Editor’s Note

“Timeless insights...”

The favorite business book of both Warren Buffett & Bill Gates, this collection of John Brooks’s 1960s New Yorker articles about leadership & decision-making has emerged as a book for the ages.
Scribd Editor

From the Publisher

Business Adventures remains the best business book I’ve ever read.” —Bill Gates, The Wall Street Journal

What do the $350 million Ford Motor Company disaster known as the Edsel, the fast and incredible rise of Xerox, and the unbelievable scandals at General Electric and Texas Gulf Sulphur have in common? Each is an example of how an iconic company was defined by a particular moment of fame or notoriety; these notable and fascinating accounts are as relevant today to understanding the intricacies of corporate life as they were when the events happened.

Stories about Wall Street are infused with drama and adventure and reveal the machinations and volatile nature of the world of finance. Longtime New Yorker contributor John Brooks’s insightful reportage is so full of personality and critical detail that whether he is looking at the astounding market crash of 1962, the collapse of a well-known brokerage firm, or the bold attempt by American bankers to save the British pound, one gets the sense that history repeats itself.

Five additional stories on equally fascinating subjects round out this wonderful collection that will both entertain and inform readers . . . Business Adventures is truly financial journalism at its liveliest and best.

Topics: Stock Market, Success, Wealth, Scandal, Informative, Investigative Journalism, and Essays

Published: Open Road Media an imprint of Open Road Integrated Media on
ISBN: 9781497638853
List price: $14.99
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