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From the Publisher

The must-read summary of Simon Sinek's book: "Leaders Eat Last: Why Some Teams Pull Together and Others Don’t".

This complete summary of the ideas from Simon Sinek's book "Leaders Eat Last" states that true leadership is all about putting the lower employees first. Real leaders take care of team members and focus on their well-being. According to Sinek, leaders can create a Circle of Safety around their team to make sure that they protect their team members when addressing problems and challenges at work. This Circle of Safety includes seven factors, such as powerful forces, direction and leadership. By integrating this model into their company, leaders can ensure that their employees are happy and cared for, which in turn will lead to higher levels of productivity.

Added-value of this summary:
• Save time
• Create a Circle of Safety for your team
• Enhance your leadership skills

To learn more, read “Leaders Eat Last” and find out how you can become a better leader!
Published: Primento on
ISBN: 9782511035955
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