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Eat That Frog! Action Workbook: 21 Great Ways to Stop Procrastinating and Get More Done in Less Time

Eat That Frog! Action Workbook: 21 Great Ways to Stop Procrastinating and Get More Done in Less Time

Автор Brian Tracy

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Eat That Frog! Action Workbook: 21 Great Ways to Stop Procrastinating and Get More Done in Less Time

Автор Brian Tracy

оценки:
4.5/5 (24 оценки)
Длина:
126 страниц
56 минут
Издано:
24 июл. 2017 г.
ISBN:
9781523095377
Формат:
Книга

Описание

The workbook version of this international bestseller guides you through getting more of the important things done. You'll stop procrastinating and start eating those frogs in no time!

There's an old saying that if the first thing you do each morning is eat a live frog, you'll have the satisfaction of knowing you're done with the worst thing you'll have to do all day. For Brian Tracy, eating a frog is a metaphor for tackling your most challenging task—but also the one that can have the greatest positive impact on your life.

Eat That Frog! shows you how to organize each day so you can zero in on these critical tasks and accomplish them efficiently and effectively. The core of what is vital to effective time management is: decision, discipline, and determination. This workbook puts the ideas of the original book into action. By following the same twenty-one-chapter format as the book, each chapter includes exercises for you to reflect on your own habits. You'll also learn through the experience of a narrative character who is struggling with procrastination in her work and home life and uses Eat That Frog! to improve her time management performance.
Издано:
24 июл. 2017 г.
ISBN:
9781523095377
Формат:
Книга

Об авторе

Brian Tracy is Chairman and CEO of Brian Tracy International, a company specializing in the training and development of individuals and organizations. He is the top selling author of over forty-five books that have been translated into dozens of languages. Brian is happily married and has four children. He is active in community and national affairs, and is the President of three companies headquartered in Solana Beach, California.


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Eat That Frog! Action Workbook - Brian Tracy

frog!

Introduction: Meet Shane

Like many people, Shane finds herself at a crossroads in her professional life. She’s a middle manager at a reputable firm and likes her job well enough. She has good health care, enjoys her coworkers, and makes enough money to pay her bills, take the occasional vacation, and save a little on the side. But pushing papers isn’t her real passion—chocolate is. For years, she’s been concocting confections in her home kitchen, tweaking recipes and testing them out on an all-too-willing focus group of family and friends. Recently, she decided to take her treats to the masses—or at least to the weekend farmers market in her neighborhood. She rented out a corner of a commercial kitchen in the warehouse district, where she spends some evenings preparing and packaging the treats she’ll hawk every Sunday. At the market, she gets a great response—and even has some loyal, repeat customers—but the haul she brings in isn’t nearly enough to let her quit her day job. She’s convinced that if she really wants to grow her business and be successful in the long term, it will really help to get her MBA. But how will she find the time to do it all, and also have some semblance of a personal life? In the face of so many competing priorities, she finds herself procrastinating—instead of moving surely and confidently toward her goals, she waffles, gets lost in social media streams, and is often un-focused. Papers are strewn across her desk, and the tasks just keep mounting. If she’s going to keep her head above water, she needs to make some changes.

1

Set the Table

Goals are the fuel in the furnace of achievement. The bigger your goals and the clearer they are, the more excited you become about achieving them. The more you think about your goals, the greater become your inner drive and your desire to accomplish them.

NOTES

1. With written goals, you’ll be far more productive and efficient than people who just carry goals around in their heads. Use the space below to make a list of 10 goals you want to accomplish in the next year. Write your goals as though a year has already passed and they are now a reality. If you have trouble getting them down on your own, consider talking to your boss or a trusted

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4.3
24 оценки / 22 Обзоры
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Отзывы читателей

  • (4/5)
    This was a nice refresher as it reminded me of my training I did with the Franklin Covey planners over 20 years ago. I have not been placing A's, B's and C's and then A1, A2 and so forth on my tasks. I was also doing the smaller quick tasks first to get them out of the way and then not leaving time for the big tasks. Not because I was procrastinating but I thought I could get more items checked off my list. I will now eat the nastiest frog first and know I will be more efficient. I will say, listening to this book was a little bit of a hoot as I could just picture the author sitting i a recliner with a table and lamp sitting next to him with a very old cassette tape recorder sitting on the table. The sound quality made the image happen. Even if you don't think you procrastinate, which I don't, this is a great reminder of what order things should happen to become more efficient.
  • (4/5)
    Surprisingly non-awful. The closest thing to a motivational self-help book I want to read. Lots of good practical ideas, and it's short.
  • (3/5)
    Although this book is geared for leadership/management people, I found this just as valuable me as a retired person. It had some chapters that gave me some glimpse to my own shortcomings that when implemented will add purpose and value to my day.
  • (3/5)
    The basic premise of this book is that you take the least favourite task you have to do in a given day and do it first thing. Get it over with. Quite good advice if you can follow it. There's more similar advice in this book on goal setting, achieving objectives and so on, but it does all feel a bit unoriginal.
  • (5/5)
    A great simple book that summarizes what you need to do to be productive and successful.
  • (4/5)
    This book has lots of good ideas for time management and goal setting. Though there wasn't really any new information, it was a really nice refresher. The chapters were pretty short, so I felt like I was making progress every time I picked up this book to read some. I like the idea of "eating the frog" first.

    A few years ago, I mentioned this book (based only on what I read about it on Amazon or Barnes & Noble's website) during a short talk I gave at t Junior League board meeting about time management. I remember that the "eat the frog" part made several people chuckle. Now I wish I'd read the book beforehand, especially since I know now that it was a pretty quick read.
  • (5/5)
    This is a short but valuable book. The concepts covered are important and well stated. I will try to apply them to my life. Most concepts are simple and perhaps are logical but often not followed. I strongly recommend this book.
  • (4/5)
    Concise roundup of tips.
  • (3/5)
    How to stop procrastinating so you can accomplish more and advance at twork.
  • (3/5)
    Flipped through this one. It contains solid advice, but nothing particularly original. Good to review when you need a kick in the pants.
  • (4/5)
    I read this book a long time ago, but the lessons stick with me. The lessons have helped me to procrastinate less than I'm normally inclined to. I'm still not as disciplined as I'd like to be, but I often tackle the most difficult or the biggest and ugliest frog on the list. I always get more done and in a more efficient way.
  • (4/5)
    Read for a workshop. Didn't particularly find any new ideas, but they were certainly presented in a memorable way.
  • (3/5)
    Well written but heard it all before. Short so a good refresher.
  • (4/5)
    This is a concise and enjoyable set of personal success aphorisms oriented around the themes of time management and taking initiative. Tracy's overall point is that successful people get there bit by bit, by acting daily on the most important steps, and by getting rid of the mental and schedule clutter that aren't as important.
  • (4/5)
    I got to say when i looked as this very small book i was worried that was useless. But actually i read it in one hour and really liked the concise information. It is really a very good little book on ideas to help with procrastination
  • (4/5)
    As a productivity and motivation manager, Eat That Frog! wins all around. The tips given in it are clear, actionable items, not bogged down by the psychology or theory behind them (though I will admit, that is sometimes nice to know), and the author has a thoroughly peppy, motivational-speaking tone.

    Truthfully, these were often the book's greatest weaknesses as well. I could have used a little more evidence (he often cites statistics, such as how starting and stopping a project can "increase the time necessary to complete the task by as much as 500 percent", curiously without any references to where he pulled that number) (110). Additionally, I am immediately suspicious of anyone who claims that he can "guarantee" that a reader who follows his advice will double their income within a month - which he does twice, once at the beginning and another later while relating a story of one of his clients who managed this. This approach may be motivational, but also had a distinctly slick salesman approach to it; testimonials and guarantees are pitfalls to the prudent-minded.

    In short, my impression of Eat That Frog is very similar to that I had to Dave Ramsay's Money Makeover - the salesman, "Try my product and see your life change, guaranteed!" approach was a turn-off, but there is good advice inside. Just take it with a grain of salt.
  • (3/5)
    Good summary of timeless principles.
  • (4/5)
    Must read book for who want to done more work in same time. Very well expatiation by Brain Tracy.
  • (3/5)
    This is a good, solid, well-written book on time management. Whether you are seeking to improve the management of your own time or empathize with others as they attempt to become better stewards of their own time, this book will say it all - in only 21 short chapters!

    Its central premise, that time is best managed by taking the hardest project on first, is a reliable and well-tested one. From this premise (put into a metaphor by eating a frog first), the entire book flows.

    As with any 100-to-150-page book, what it captures in its brevity, it leaves out in its depth. It does not dwell on these subjects for an extended outlay of pages. If that is what you want - a series of short "devotionals" on time management - this book is for you. If you want to dive into a topic in depth, this book is not for you; perhaps you should pick up something by Peter Drucker.

    The third edition (which I read) contains two helpful chapters on the time management of email - of pertinence to our society today. I like Mr. Tracy's contributions to discussion on these topics and welcome his insights into my practice.
  • (2/5)
    A very generic self-help book that draws strongly on other self-help books. On the plus side, it lines up with a lot of my own personal views and was very short. On the negative side, my wife and daughter are already tired of me talking about eating frogs.
  • (3/5)
    The book has much good advice, but only when looked at from a high level: don’t procrastinate; don’t perform meaningless tasks, take a long-term view of your life. Tracy get to applying this very common wisdom he reveals his flawed biases. He claims, for example, his system is equally applicable to both professional and private life, when it’s really only helpful to people who work in white collar corporate settings. Here’s his problem: He believes that everyone has the ability to choose what they want to do next, and the problem with most people’s lives is that they routinely choose to perform low-value tasks like responding to emails instead of eating that frog and getting the biggest, ugliest, most high-value task out of the way first thing. Makes sense.This is, however, only helpful to people, like me, whose jobs are filled with so many meaningless tasks that I have the freedom to choose what I want to do next. I can routinely put off eating frogs and although I won’t get ahead in my profession, I won’t necessarily lose my job, either. If I had a real job (e.g., doctor, teacher, car mechanic, homemaker) I wouldn’t have the luxury of choosing what task I do next. Their client dictates it (e.g., I promised to fix their car, the sick person needs comfort, the baby’s diaper needs to be changed). People who have real jobs must routinely submit themselves to the actual needs of others, and have objective standards of performance they must live up to. People with real jobs don’t have the luxury to choose to eat that frog, because their clients constantly give them frogs throughout their workdays. (btw, preparing a spreadsheet or presentation for your boss is not submitting to someone’s needs nor does it have objective quality standards.)Debilitating procrastination only exists when your life is filled with a bunch of meaningless stuff to do. Since most of our white collar jobs are meaningless, this book is great for most people. But even there, encouraging people to master their sinking ships well isn’t really wise advice. In general, people don’t need to eat that frog every day, they need to find jobs where there’s nothing but frogs to eat.The details of his advice shouldn’t be helpful for your family life either since putting your own aspirations and desires first is not the way to live fully in personal relationships. Rather our lives should be directed through submission to the needs of others who come to us in need. (Greater love has no one than this, that he lay down his life for his friends.)
  • (5/5)
    Very easy read, and really helpful tips! I would recommend this to anyone who needs help with organization of their life.