Найдите свой следующий любимый книге

Станьте участником сегодня и читайте бесплатно в течение 30 дней
НедоступноDancing at the Edge of the World: Thoughts on Words, Women, Places
В настоящее время недоступен на Scribd

Dancing at the Edge of the World: Thoughts on Words, Women, Places

Автором Ursula K. Le Guin

Читать отрывок

В настоящее время недоступен на Scribd

Dancing at the Edge of the World: Thoughts on Words, Women, Places

Автором Ursula K. Le Guin

оценки:
4.5/5 (6 оценки)
Длина:
422 pages
6 hours
Издано:
Jul 18, 2017
ISBN:
9780802165664
Формат:
Книге

Описание

“Ursula Le Guin at her best . . . This is an important collection of eloquent, elegant pieces by one of our most acclaimed contemporary writers.” —Elizabeth Hand, The Washington Post Book World
 
“I have decided that the trouble with print is, it never changes its mind,” writes Ursula K. Le Guin in her introduction to Dancing at the Edge of the World. But she has, and here is the record of that change in the decade since the publication of her last nonfiction collection, The Language of the Night. And what a mind—strong, supple, disciplined, playful, ranging over the whole field of its concerns, from modern literature to menopause, from utopian thought to rodeos, with an eloquence, wit, and precision that makes for exhilarating reading.
 
“If you are tired of being able to predict what a writer will say next, if you are bored stiff with minimalism, if you want excess and risk and intelligence and pure orneriness, try Le Guin.” —Mary Mackey, San Francisco Chronicle
Издано:
Jul 18, 2017
ISBN:
9780802165664
Формат:
Книге

Об авторе

Ursula Kroeber Le Guin was born in 1929 in Berkeley, and lives in Portland, Oregon. As of 2014, she has published twenty-one novels, eleven volumes of short stories, four collections of essays, twelve books for children, six volumes of poetry, and four of translation, and has received many honors and awards, including the Hugo, Nebula, National Book Award, and PEN/Malamud. Her most recent publications are Finding My Elegy: New and Selected Poems and The Unreal and the Real: Selected Stories.


Связано с Dancing at the Edge of the World

Читать другие книги автора: Ursula K. Le Guin

Похожие Книги

Похожие статьи


В книге

Лучшие цитаты

  • Let the athletes die young and laurel-crowned. Let the soldiers earn the Pur-ple Hearts. Let women die old, white-crowned, with human hearts.

  • One of the essential functions of science fiction, I think, is precisely this kind of question-asking: reversals of a habitual way of thinking, metaphors for what our language has no words for as yet, experiments in imagination.

  • One need not smash one’s typewriter and go bomb the laundromat, after all, because one has lost faith in the continuous advance of technology as the way towards utopia. Technology remains, in itself, an endless creative source.

  • Why did I invent these peculiar people? Not just so that the book could contain, halfway through it, the sentence “The king was pregnant”—though I admit that I am fond of that sentence.

  • So if you want your writing to be taken seriously, don’t marry and have kids, and above all, don’t die. But if you have to die, commit suicide. They approve of that.


Обзоры

Что люди думают о Dancing at the Edge of the World

4.3
6 оценки / 4 Обзоры
Ваше мнение?
Рейтинг: 0 из 5 звезд

Отзывы читателей

  • (4/5)
    This is such intelligent, engrossing writing. I made my husband listen to me read several of the essays outloud so that I could discuss them with him. If you are a woman, or know one, do yourself a favor and read this. You might not agree with what she says, but she makes coherent, passionate arguments that are worth your time.
  • (4/5)
    Readers often make the mistake that, because they have read an author’s works, they know that author. Never true. Yet, as you read, you can build a familiarity with that author if you are willing to recognize the wall that will always exist between the author and the reader. (The fallacy is probably stronger when these perceptions are built on fiction rather than essays or autobiographies.) Of all authors, I feel I “know” Harlan Ellison best. But, that is only because I’ve read his works extensively, read large volumes of his essays, listened (on tape and in person) to his lectures, and frequent his web site (where he actually posts.) All that being said – I don’t know him. I feel I would like to know him. But, until there is one-on-one conversation, none of us can begin to really know a person.And now, after reading Dancing at the Edge of the World, I think I would like to know Ursula K. Le Guin. This is a fine collection of her essays and speaking engagements. As any full collection will be, it is uneven. However, there is a feel to them, a sense that this is an individual who cares, a sense that this is person is “human” (I have no better word.) In these essays, Le Guin comes off as someone you want to sit down with and talk about things, for a long time – personal things, important things, whatever things come up. The essays focus on feminism, social responsibility, literature, and travel, but (as with any good essay) they bring up ideas that will resonate within your personal issues and concerns. (And the things I learned – I never knew her mother wrote Ishi – a book all anthropology majors know). It’s been a while since I dog-eared a copy of a book to remember ideas – and I did so a number of times with this one – and, just imagine, part of the reason was because I saw an application in my business life as an internal auditor. A collection that is well worth the reading, and a nice introduction to, what appears to be, a wonderful human being.
  • (5/5)
    I have been greatly enjoying reading this book as my bathtub book for the first 2/3 of July. Long on my shelves, I pulled it out in response to the July Nonfiction Challenge: Creators and Creativity. And it fit the billing perfectly. This is a collection of Le Guin's talks, essays and reviews from 1976 to 1988. I only have half a dozen tags sticking out of the pages, but I could have had 4 times that number. The leisurely pace of reading an article a day left space for taking the time to let the ideas emerge and submerge themselves in my consciousness as she talks about writing, women and women's experience of writing and how it may differ from men's, and some perfectly lovely travelogue diary excerpts where one wants to roll oneself in the luxuriousness of the written language. She is sharp, acerbic, wise, deep, tolerant, critical, and creative. I immediately went to Amazon to buy her latest nonfiction collection, [Words Are My Matter: Writings About Life and Books, 2000-2016, with a Journal of a Writer’s Week], skipping over the two collections in between (for the time being, at least) as I want to see what she is thinking about NOW after reading her thoughts of 30 years ago.
  • (4/5)
    I think Ursula Le Guin's collections of essays were the first non-fictional works that I really learned to appreciate. I was very much not a non-fiction person at the time, but Le Guin's writing is always so full of clarity, so well considered, that it draws me in when it's non-fiction as surely as when it's prose.

    Obviously some of these essays are somewhat dated now, written and edited in the 70s and 80s, but there's still a lot of interest there. Le Guin's thoughts on the gender issues in The Left Hand of Darkness, for example, years after it was published, years after she originally wrote about it, for example. Or her reflections on her mother's life, or on Jo March as one of the few female writers in fiction to be a writer and have a family at the same time... A personal gem for me was coming across, in the section containing book reviews, a review of C.S. Lewis that almost inevitably also reflected on J.R.R. Tolkien:

    J.R.R. Tolkien, Lewis's close friend and colleague, certainly shared many of Lewis's views and was also a devout Christian. But it all comes out very differently in his fiction. Take his handling of evil: his villains are orcs and Black Riders (goblins and zombies: mythic figures) and Sauron, the Dark Lord, who is never seen and has no suggestion of humanity about him. These are not evil men but embodiments of the evil in men, universal symbols of the hateful. The men who do wrong are not complete figures but complements: Saruman is Gandalf's dark-self, Boromir Aragorn's; Wormtongue is, almost literally, the weakness of King Theoden. There remains the wonderfully repulsive and degraded Gollum. But nobody who reads the trilogy hates, or is asked to hate, Gollum. Gollum is Frodo's shadow; and it is the shadow, not the hero, who achieves the quest. Though Tolkien seems to project evil into "the others", they are not truly others but ourselves; he is utterly clear about this. His ethic, like that of dream, is compensatory. The final "answer" remains unknown. But because responsibility has been accepted, charity survives. And with it, triumphantly, the Golden Rule. The fact is, if you like the book, you love Gollum.
    In Lewis, responsibility appears only in the form of the Christian hero fighting and defeating the enemy: a triumph, not of love, but of hatred. The enemy is not oneself but the Wholly Other, demoniac.

    I'm not sure I agree with all of that -- the Southrons are most definitely Othered, and I'm not sure they're meant to be universal symbols of the hateful. Or rather, if they are, and perhaps they are, we need to examine why Tolkien made that decision. But I do think that this is an informative way of looking at the two authors, which reflects a lot on Le Guin herself as well.