Наслаждайтесь миллионами электронных книг, аудиокниг, журналов и других видов контента в бесплатной пробной версии

Только $11.99 в месяц после пробной версии. Можно отменить в любое время.

Not for Everyday Use: A Memoir
Not for Everyday Use: A Memoir
Not for Everyday Use: A Memoir
Электронная книга258 страниц4 часа

Not for Everyday Use: A Memoir

Автор Elizabeth Nunez

Рейтинг: 3.5 из 5 звезд

3.5/5

()

Читать отрывок

Об этой электронной книге

The author explores her mother’s marriage—and fourteen pregnancies—in this “powerful memoir” (Ebony).
 
One of Oprah.com’s Best Memoirs of the Year
Winner of the 2015 Hurston/Wright Legacy Award in Nonfiction
 
Tracing the four days between the moment she gets the dreaded call and the burial of her mother, Elizabeth Nunez tells of her lifelong struggle to cope with her parents’ ambitions for their children—and her mother’s seemingly unbreakable conviction that displays of affection are not for everyday use. Yet Nunez sympathizes with her parents, whose happiness is constrained by the oppressive strictures of colonialism; by the Catholic Church’s prohibition of artificial birth control which her mother obeys, terrified by the threat of eternal damnation (her mother gets pregnant fourteen times: nine live births and five miscarriages which almost kill her); and by the complexities of skin color in Caribbean society.
 
Through it all, a fierce love holds this family together, and helps carry Nunez through her grief, in this “intriguing [and] courageous memoir” (Kirkus Reviews).
 
“Nunez ponders the cultural, racial, familial, social, and personal experiences that led to what she ultimately understands was a deeply loving union between her parents. A beautifully written exploration of the complexities of marriage and family life.” —Booklist
ЯзыкEnglish
ИздательAkashic Books
Дата выпуска10 мар. 2014 г.
ISBN9781617752780
Читать отрывок
Автор

Elizabeth Nunez

Elizabeth Nunez is the award-winning author of a memoir and nine novels, four of them selected as New York Times Editors’ Choice. Her two most recent books are Not for Everyday Use, a memoir, which won the 2015 prestigious Hurston Wright Legacy Award for nonfiction, and the novel Even in Paradise, a contemporary version of Shakespeare’s King Lear. Her other novels are: Boundaries (nominated for the 2012 NAACP Image Award for Outstanding Literary Fiction); Anna In-Between (PEN Oakland Award for Literary Excellence and long-listed for an IMPAC Dublin International Literary Award); Prospero’s Daughter (2010 Trinidad and Tobago One Book, One Community selection, and the 2006 Florida Center for the Literary Arts One Book, One Community); Bruised Hibiscus (American Book Award); Beyond the Limbo Silence (Independent Publishers Book Award); Grace; Discretion; and When Rocks Dance. Nunez received her PhD from New York University and is a Distinguished Professor at Hunter College, CUNY, where she teaches courses on Caribbean Women Writers and Creative Writing.

Читать больше произведений Elizabeth Nunez

Связано с Not for Everyday Use

Похожие электронные книги

Похожие статьи

Отзывы о Not for Everyday Use

Рейтинг: 3.28 из 5 звезд
3.5/5

25 оценок11 отзывов

Ваше мнение?

Нажмите, чтобы оценить

Отзыв должен содержать не менее 10 слов

  • Рейтинг: 3 из 5 звезд
    3/5
    Elizabeth Nunez does have a gift for lyrical writing, which makes this memoir pleasant to read. The love for her parents is evident, and I found the historical references interesting. However, there was something I couldn't quite place that made this book an okay read rather than a great one, perhaps because I felt "disconnected" from the author at times.
  • Рейтинг: 5 из 5 звезд
    5/5
    I was fascinated by this book from the very first paragraph. Elizabeth Nunez has written more than just a memoir. While telling the reader about her Trinidadian upbringing, she also examines the class structures, religious influences, and historical backgrounds that she believes played a role in shaping her family, her parents, and therefore her own life. Ultimately, the book is about the sometimes complicated love between a daughter who immigrated to the U.S. at a young age and the mother who stayed behind in Trinidad, but there is so much more within these pages.
  • Рейтинг: 4 из 5 звезд
    4/5
    Although I would have rated this book with 3 stars through the first 3/4 of it, I changed my rating to 4 stars in the last quarter because the author finally discovers some important insights regarding her family, mostly her parents and their relationship. Most of her life, the author feels an emotional detachment to her mother but finally sees the truth of the matter, even though she must be in her 60s by the time she realizes the truth. A very good book that I'd recommend.
  • Рейтинг: 4 из 5 звезд
    4/5
    Caribbean American author Elizabeth Munez was living and teaching in New York when she got that dreaded telephone call that her mother in Trinidad had had a stroke and was seriously ill.She arrived home to find that her mother had passed and her father was slipping away into dementia. This brought forth this beautiful episodic memoir of growing up in Trinidad.Along with everyday events she deftly reveals the evils of colonialism (her father was the first non-white government minister), racism, classism, and a wonderful splash of Caribbean history as well as glimpses into her life in the United States.Two bits especially will stay with me:In one very memorable scene, she relates this striking story. There were almost no Caribbean authors as she was growing up, especially not Caribbean children's authors. Since the infrastructure was British with British officials, British church leaders, and British teachers, the books she read were mostly British and her favorites were by Enid Blyton. So her family went to the beach one day to have a picnic and Elizabeth was disappointed to the point of tears. She had learned from Ms. Blyton that it 'was not a real picnic' without taking a wooly jumper and eating apples or pears. None of these items were available on Trinidad and Elizabeth was heartbroken that her family's picnic was not real – not good enough. I also was very intrigued to learn that the Trinidadians who enlisted to fight in WWII, did not go to avenge the white Europeans, but the slaughter of 1.5 million Ethiopians by Mussolini. I do not remember learning about this slaughter in school - and after a bit of internet searching, now I am dumbfounded by it.I love memoirs by women and this is one of the best I have read this year. Highly recommended.
  • Рейтинг: 3 из 5 звезд
    3/5
    This is the first book I have read from Nunez even though she has a eight novels on the market. After reading her memoir I can't say I'm anxious to read her previous works but that is not because this memoir is bad or poorly-written. Some of the themes Nunez writes about don't really speak to me but this was still a fast read. I remained interested until the end.Nunez, a professor of English, explores several aspects of her life and her relationships (along with the lives of her parents) after she returns to her childhood home of Trinidad for her mother's funeral. Nunez writes with a wistful and curious tone. She manages to weave in snippets of history, literature, and religion in what is already a jam-packed story without cluttering it one bit.
  • Рейтинг: 2 из 5 звезд
    2/5
    This book started out very promising. However, it really bothered me that the author continuously kept "hawking" her previous books. It seemed more like she wrote this book so she could mention her other publications. Even when talking about the fact that her mother read most of the books the author wrote, she constantly mentioned the titles of those books. Enough of that!!! If I am interested in reading the other books I will look them up, not much of a problem nowadays!
  • Рейтинг: 4 из 5 звезд
    4/5
    This is the third book I have read by Nunez. This memoir was very touching and engaging which made it a quick read. I actually closed the book wanting to learn more about Nunez' parents' story (how they met, what were their perspectives on the ups and downs in their marriage, how they were able to have a 60th anniversary, etc). As this was an Advance Copy, the book needs a bit more editing as some details were very repetitive throughout, which made it somewhat distracting for me; just some finetuning.
  • Рейтинг: 5 из 5 звезд
    5/5
    I utterly devoured this book. I absolutely loved it. But as I sit to write I'm having trouble deciding if its because the book is beautifully written (which it is) or because of the uncanny number of parallels between the family she so lovingly and carefully describes and my own. I'm a white 12th generation American, and Elizabeth Nunez is new immigrant and a Woman of Color, but we were both raised in large Catholic families. Both our mother's were undemonstrative (my mother tensed up when she was hugged). We were expected to succeed, and to become independent. And both of us left those families at a young age, and both ended up in the outer boroughs of NYC. That's where the parallels end. But while Elizabeth's journey to dealing with the realities and complexities of such a background are very different than mine, they are told with such clarity and love that I felt like I was connecting with someone I've always known.This is the first book by Elizabeth Nunez that I've read, so my task over the next few weeks is to go find and read her others.Bravo, Elizabeth Nunez.
  • Рейтинг: 2 из 5 звезд
    2/5
    Elizabeth Nunez's recollection opens with a phone ringing, but it's the middle of the next page before she even looks at the caller ID. She spends that time telling us about the novel she's proofreading. It draws on her mother's life, and especially the breast cancer that was killing her. But she assures us "my mother lives. Her cancer may have reached the terminal stage, but it was not terminal." I'm not sure what that's supposed to mean, but it does set the tone for the book, which puts Nunez and her writing, and her insecurities and resentments, at the forefront, and her mother as mostly a secondary character in her own life.At first I assumed this opening chapter must be a prologue, even though it is numbered simply "1," and that eight pages later, under "2," we would be transported back to Nunez's childhood in Trinidad, or perhaps her mother's early life. But no, by the fifth page of the chapter, we are given a simple list of the children, two from Wald