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The Tempest (No Fear Shakespeare)

The Tempest (No Fear Shakespeare)

Автором SparkNotes

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The Tempest (No Fear Shakespeare)

Автором SparkNotes

оценки:
3/5 (1,913 оценки)
Длина:
264 pages
2 hours
Издатель:
Издано:
May 30, 2018
ISBN:
9781411479357
Формат:
Книге

Описание

This No Fear Shakespeare ebook gives you the complete text of The Tempest and an easy-to-understand translation.

Each No Fear Shakespeare contains

  • The complete text of the original play
  • A line-by-line translation that puts Shakespeare into everyday language
  • A complete list of characters with descriptions
  • Plenty of helpful commentary
Издатель:
Издано:
May 30, 2018
ISBN:
9781411479357
Формат:
Книге

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The Tempest (No Fear Shakespeare) - SparkNotes

ACT ONE

SCENE 1

Original Text

A tempestuous noise of thunder and lightning heard Enter a MASTER and a BOATSWAIN

MASTER

Boatswain!

BOATSWAIN

Here, master. What cheer?

MASTER

Good, speak to th’ mariners. Fall to ’t yarely, or we run ourselves aground. Bestir, bestir.

Exit MASTER

Enter MARINERS

BOATSWAIN

5

Heigh, my hearts! Cheerly, cheerly, my hearts! Yare! Yare! Take in the topsail.—Tend to th’ master’s whistle.—Blow, till thou burst thy wind, if room enough!

Enter ALONSO, SEBASTIAN, ANTONIO, FERDINAND, GONZALO, and others

ALONSO

Good Boatswain, have care. Where’s the Master?

Play the men.

BOATSWAIN

10

I pray now, keep below.

ANTONIO

Where is the Master, Boatswain?

BOATSWAIN

Do you not hear him? You mar our labor. Keep your cabins.

You do assist the storm.

GONZALO

Nay, good, be patient.

BOATSWAIN

15

When the sea is. Hence! What cares these roarers for the name of king? To cabin, silence! Trouble us not.

GONZALO

Good, yet remember whom thou hast aboard.

BOATSWAIN

None that I more love than myself. You are a councilor. If you can command these elements to silence and work the

20

peace of the present, we will not hand a rope more. Use your authority. If you cannot, give thanks you have lived so long and make yourself ready in your cabin for the mischance of the hour, if it so hap.—Cheerly, good hearts!—Out of our way, I say.

Exit BOATSWAIN

GONZALO

25

I have great comfort from this fellow. Methinks he hath no drowning mark upon him. His complexion is perfect gallows. Stand fast, good Fate, to his hanging. Make the rope of his destiny our cable, for our own doth little advantage. If he be not born to be hanged, our case is

30

miserable.

Exeunt GONZALO and courtiers

Enter BOATSWAIN

BOATSWAIN

Down with the topmast! Yare, lower, lower! Bring her to try wi’ th’ main course.

A cry within

A plague upon this howling! They are louder than the weather or our office.

Enter SEBASTIAN, ANTONIO, and GONZALO

35

Yet again? What do you here? Shall we give o’er and drown?

Have you a mind to sink?

SEBASTIAN

A pox o’ your throat, you bawling, blasphemous, incharitable dog!

BOATSWAIN

Work you, then.

ANTONIO

40

Hang, cur! Hang, you whoreson insolent noisemaker! We are less afraid to be drowned than thou art.

GONZALO

I’ll warrant him for drowning though the ship were no stronger than a nutshell and as leaky as an unstanched wench.

BOATSWAIN

45

Lay her a-hold, a-hold! Set her two courses off to sea again.

Lay her off!

Enter MARINERS, wet

MARINERS

All lost! To prayers, to prayers, all lost!

Exit MARINERS

BOATSWAIN

What, must our mouths be cold?

GONZALO

The king and prince at prayers. Let’s assist them, for our

50

case is as theirs.

SEBASTIAN

I’m out of patience.

ANTONIO

We are merely cheated of our lives by drunkards. This wide-chopped rascal—would thou mightst lie drowning the washing of ten tides!

GONZALO

55

He’ll be hanged yet, though every drop of water swear against it and gape at widest to glut him.

A confused noise within

VOICES

(within) Mercy on us!—We split, we split!—Farewell, my wife and children!—Farewell, brother!—We split, we split, we split!

ANTONIO

60

Let’s all sink wi’ th’ king.

SEBASTIAN

Let’s take leave of him.

Exeunt ANTONIO and SEBASTIAN

GONZALO

Now would I give a thousand furlongs of sea for an acre of barren ground: long heath, brown furze, anything. The wills above be done, but I would fain die a dry death.

Exeunt

ACT ONE

SCENE 1

Modern Text

Loud noises of a storm with thunder and lightning.

A ship’s MASTER and BOATSWAIN enter.

MASTER

Boatswain!

BOATSWAIN

I’m here, sir. How can I help you?

MASTER

My good boy, give the other sailors a pep talk—and do it fast, before we’re shipwrecked. Hurry, hurry!

The MASTER exits.

SAILORS enter.

BOATSWAIN

Come on, men! That’s the way to do it! Quickly! Quickly! Take in the upper sail. Listen to the master’s orders. —Blow your heart out, storm! So long as we have enough room to avoid running aground!

ALONSO, SEBASTIAN, ANTONIO, FERDINAND, GONZALO, and others enter.

ALONSO

Be careful, good Boatswain! Where’s the Master? Make these men work.

BOATSWAIN

Please stay below deck, sir.

ANTONIO

Where’s the Master, Boatswain?

BOATSWAIN

He’s busy, can’t you hear him giving orders? You’re getting in the way of our work. Stay in your cabins. You’re helping the storm, not us.

GONZALO

Don’t get wound up, my good man.

BOATSWAIN

I’m only wound up because the sea’s wound up. Now get out of here! Do you think these waves care anything about kings and officials? Go to your cabins and be quiet! Don’t bother us up here.

GONZALO

Just remember who you’ve got on board with you, good man.

BOATSWAIN

Nobody I care about more than myself. You’re a king’s advisor. If you can order the storm to calm down, we can all put down our ropes and rest. Go ahead, use your authority. If you can’t do it, be grateful you’ve lived this long and go wait to die in your cabin, if it comes to that.—Harder, men!—Now get out of our way, I’m telling you.

The BOATSWAIN exits.

GONZALO

I feel a lot better after talking to this guy. He doesn’t look like a person who would drown—he looks like he was born to be hanged. I hope he lives long enough to be hanged. The rope that hangs him will do more good than all the ropes on this ship, since it’ll guarantee he stays alive through this storm. But if he’s not destined to die by hanging, then our chances don’t look too good.

GONZALO exits with the other men of court.

The BOATSWAIN enters.

BOATSWAIN

Bring down that top sail! Fast! Lower, lower! Let the ship sail close to the wind.

A shout offstage.

Damn those men shouting down there! They’re louder than the storm or us sailors.

SEBASTIAN, ANTONIO, and GONZALO enter.

Oh, not you again. What do you want? Should we all give up and drown? Do you want to sink?

SEBASTIAN

Oh, go to hell, you loud-mouthed bastard!

BOATSWAIN

Well, get to work, then.

ANTONIO

Just die, you lowlife! Go ahead and die, you nasty, rude bastard! You’re more scared of drowning than we are.

GONZALO

Yes, I guarantee he won’t drown—even if this ship were as fragile as an eggshell and as leaky as a menstruating woman.

BOATSWAIN

Turn the ship to the wind! Set the sails and let her go out to sea again!

More SAILORS enter, wet.

SAILORS

It’s no use! Pray for your lives! We’re done for!

The SAILORS exit.

BOATSWAIN

What, we’re going to die?

GONZALO

The king and the prince are praying. Let’s go join them, since whatever happens to them happens to us too.

SEBASTIAN

I’m out of patience.

ANTONIO

Yes, we’ve been cheated out of our lives by a bunch of drunken, incompetent sailors. This bigmouth jerk here—(to BOATSWAIN) I hope you drown ten times over!

GONZALO

He’ll still die by hanging, not drowning, even if every drop of water in the sea tries to swallow him.

A confused noise offstage.

VOICES

God have mercy on us!—The ship’s breaking up!—

Goodbye, wife and kids!—Goodbye, brother!—

We’re breaking up, we’re breaking up!

ANTONIO

Let’s all sink with the king.

SEBASTIAN

Let’s say goodbye to him.

ANTONIO and SEBASTIAN exit.

GONZALO

Right now I’d give a thousand furlongs of sea for one little acre of dry ground: barren weed patch, anything at all. What’s destined to happen will happen, but I’d give anything to be dry when I die.

They exit.

ACT 1, SCENE 2

Original Text

Enter PROSPERO and MIRANDA

MIRANDA

If by your art, my dearest father, you have

Put the wild waters in this roar, allay them.

The sky, it seems, would pour down stinking pitch,

But that the sea, mounting to th’ welkin’s cheek,

5

Dashes the fire out. Oh, I have suffered

With those that I saw suffer. A brave vessel

Who had, no doubt, some noble creature in her

Dashed all to pieces. Oh, the cry did knock

Against my very heart! Poor souls, they perished.

10

Had I been any god of power, I would

Have sunk the sea within the earth or ere

It should the good ship so have swallowed and

The fraughting souls within her.

PROSPERO

Be collected.

No more amazement. Tell your piteous heart

15

There’s no harm done.

MIRANDA

Oh, woe the day!

PROSPERO

No harm.

I have done nothing but in care of thee,

Of thee, my dear one—thee my daughter, who

Art ignorant of what thou art, naught knowing

Of whence I am, nor that I am more better

20

Than Prospero, master of a full poor cell

And thy no greater father.

MIRANDA

More to know

Did never meddle with my thoughts.

PROSPERO

’Tis time

I should inform thee farther. Lend thy hand

And pluck my magic garment from me.

MIRANDA helps PROSPERO remove his mantle

So,

25

Lie there, my art.—Wipe thou thine eyes. Have comfort.

The direful spectacle of the wrack, which touched

The very virtue of compassion in thee,

I have with such provision in mine art

So safely ordered that there is no soul—

30

No, not so much perdition as an hair

Betid to any creature in the vessel—

Which thou heard’st cry, which thou sawst sink. Sit down.

For thou must now know farther.

MIRANDA

You have often

Begun to tell me what I am, but stopped

35

And left me to a bootless inquisition,

Concluding, Stay. Not yet.

PROSPERO

The hour’s now come.

The very minute bids thee ope thine ear.

Obey and be attentive. Canst thou remember

A time before we came unto this cell?

40

I do not think thou canst, for then thou wast not

Out three years old.

MIRANDA

Certainly, sir, I can.

PROSPERO

By what? By any other house or person?

Of anything the image tell me that

Hath kept with thy remembrance.

MIRANDA

’Tis far off,

45

And rather like a dream than an assurance

That my remembrance warrants. Had I not

Four or five women once that tended me?

PROSPERO

Thou hadst, and more, Miranda. But how is it

That this lives in thy mind? What seest thou else

50

In the dark backward and abysm of time?

If thou rememberest aught ere thou camest here,

How thou camest here thou mayst.

MIRANDA

But that I do not.

PROSPERO

Twelve year since, Miranda, twelve year since,

Thy father was the Duke of Milan and

55

A prince of power.

MIRANDA

Sir, are not you my father?

PROSPERO

Thy mother was a piece of virtue and

She said thou wast my daughter. And thy father

Was Duke of Milan, and thou his only heir

And princess no worse issued.

MIRANDA

Oh, the heavens!

60

What foul play had we that we came from thence?

Or blessèd was ’t we did?

PROSPERO

Both, both, my girl.

By foul play, as thou sayst, were we heaved thence,

But blessedly holp hither.

MIRANDA

Oh, my heart bleeds

To think o’ th’ teen that I have turned you to,

65

Which is from my remembrance! Please you, farther.

PROSPERO

My brother and thy uncle, called Antonio—

I pray thee, mark

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Что люди думают о The Tempest (No Fear Shakespeare)

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  • (3/5)
    A quick reread ahead of seeing Julie Taymor's big-screen adaptation. The first/last time I read this play was aeons ago in school, and since it's not one of my favorite ones --the ones I read/see again and again-- I found I needed some help from time to time. I enjoyed the re-encounter with the play as I only remembered vaguely that there was a sorcerer and his daughter, and the most popular quotations: strange bedfellows, brave new world and such stuff as dreams are made of.. Now, I'm ready but it's still not one of my favorite plays.
  • (5/5)
    This is one of my favorite of Shakespeare's plays, in terms of the richness of the story and the language.
  • (4/5)
    I enjoyed this, though it was a little hard to keep track of everyone and the spirits too.
  • (5/5)
    I read this before I saw it staged at the Pittsburgh Public Theater. This is Shakespeare's masterpiece.
  • (4/5)
    This wasn't quite a comedy and isn't a tragedy. Prospero is an interesting character -- a scholar, a duke, a stranded man, a plotter, and a dad.
  • (5/5)
    Absolutely my favorite of Shakespeare's plays. His vision and poetic skill have come to full maturity in this fantasy of loss and redemption.
  • (3/5)
    A very visual play -- it is difficult to read because I think it really needs to be seen for impact. Other than Miranda and Prospero, the characters seemed to blend together; they weren't that well-defined in their differences ... except for the monstrous Caliban, of course. Some nice passages -- "We are such stuff as dreams are made on."
  • (4/5)
    I was prompted to read this by my re-reading of the entire Sandman series by Neil Gaiman - and now I can go back and read the last chapter. I only read the play, and very little of the additional material in this edition - I probably will go back and read the rest and re-read the play. I kept expecting something horrible to happen at the end. I did like it rather more than Midsummer Night's Dream.
  • (4/5)
    It's Shakespeare. Really, what else can I say?
  • (4/5)
    Since I was in Ann Arbor when the Royal Shakespeare Company came through in 2006, with Patrick Stewart in tow, how could I give up and opportunity to attend at least one of the performances? It required camping out the night before the student tickets went on sale, and getting very wet and cold, but I became a happy owner of a ticket to see The Tempest. The RSC interpretation was a little unorthodox (it took place on an arctic island, among other things) I absolutely loved it and decided that I should probably actually read it at some point.The Tempest is the last finished play to be attributed completely to Shakespeare and is the favorite of many of The Bard's aficionados. While I have a preference to see his plays performed, reading them is very enjoyable as well. The Tempest occurs in one location over the course of one day; the plot, while inspired, is entirely Shakespeare's own. Prospero, the usurped Duke of Milan and a great sorcerer, has lived in exile with his daughter Miranda on a nearly deserted island for twelve years. When a ship sails close by carrying those who put him in such an unfortunate state, he quickly devises a plan to achieve his revenge and even more quickly puts it into motion.I read the Signet Classics edition which provides a general introduction to Shakespeare, an introduction to the play, excerpts from the sources it was derived from, and various commentaries in addition to the play itself, all of which were very nice to have.Experiments in Reading
  • (5/5)
    This is a genuinely good work of drama, which I had to read for my Intro. to Drama class. This is one of those works of Shakespeare that has been done in a multitude of forms and variations, so it is quite likely that everyone has a rough idea of the story. Still, you really cannot replace the original. It's a bit odd, but quite good fun as well. As to the edition itself, I found it to be greatly helpful in understanding the action in the play. It has a layout which places each page of the play opposite a page of notes, definitions, explanations, and other things needed to understand that page more thoroughly. While I didn't always need it, I was certainly glad to have it whenever I ran into a turn of language that was unfamiliar, and I definitely appreciated the scene-by-scene summaries. Really, if you want to or need to read Shakespeare, an edition such as this is really the way to go, especially until you get more accustomed to it.
  • (5/5)
    A strange but moving work, performed here by a wonderful set of players.
  • (5/5)
    O que dizer?

    "O, wonder!

    How many godly creatures are there here!

    How beauteous mankind is! O brave new world,

    That has such people in 't!".
  • (4/5)
    Published 1998.


    On this re-reading I noticed that the word "brave" was used a few times in the movies that I watched (Taymor, 2010 & Jarman 1979).

    I like this word. It generates a very good feeling in my heart. This word often makes me think of someone who has a quality to face something difficult with the strength of heart / mind / body... Does not take me much to feel a respect and admiration for this person...

    I also come to know that the word "brave" describes something wonderful, admirable in appearance...

    And I just got curious to see how often the word "brave" was used in "The Tempest". And I started reading the play to look for the word "brave" and "bravely", and every time I found one of these words, I put a post-it note to the page to keep track of it... No, I did not use any fancy software to sort out the words or count the words... The work was done manually... Though I tried to be as faithful and accurate as possible, there might be a few occasions that I missed finding these words...

    It looks like there are 11 occasions that the words "Brave" or "Bravely" were mentioned...

    The rest of this review can be found elsewhere.
  • (3/5)
    Even a genius is allowed to be average once in a while. Reportedly the last play Shakespeare wrote on his own, I can't help but wonder if he mailed it in on this. Maybe he needed the money? Maybe he was fulfilling a contract for one more play, much like Hitchcock did with the abhorrent movie Jamacia Inn, his last British production before moving to Hollywood. Whatever the case, The Tempest was neither romantic enough to make me fall in love, tragic enough to make me sad or funny enough to make me laugh. But, it is Shakespheare so even his meh efforts are better than most, but still. Not up to his standards.

    I read along with the text while I listened to the audio version, a practice I highly recommend. I wish I could have done that in high school. I'll definitely suggest immersion reading to my children as they enter high school and discover Shakespeare.

  • (3/5)
     Dramatized audio recordings of are difficult for to listen to because there are so many minor characters. This one was a bit more manageable.
  • (5/5)
    A great play. Never forget Sir Patrick Stewart in the title role. This version includes: Forward, Intro, essay on The Tempest in performance (through 1984), description of the Globe, essay on Shakespeare's sources (with excerpts), annotated bibliography, memorable lines.
  • (5/5)
    Saw a magnificent production of this at Nottingham Playhouse. The shipwreck took place before the beginning proper. While we the audience were prevented from entering, the duke of milan and his fellows got swept from the foyer into the auditorium which was roaring orange light. Everything went quiet. Then we were allowed in to see Prospero on stage in a totally serene blue stage.
  • (3/5)
    Wizards, man, who knows.
  • (3/5)
    This book a bit different was
    From oth'rs of The Bard I've read.
    More with of the fantastic
    F'r sooth, and f'r the head.
    'Twas an amalgam of stylings.
    Or mashup, if thou wouldst.
    With manipulations, calculations
    machinations, Prospero couldst.
    All through, as always all
    The language play is dear,
    And Merrily doth I findeth it
    When bent towards William's ear.
    7 books of the smith have I read, what, ho!
    And now if thou wilt excuseth me, I have 30 more to go.
  • (3/5)
    This was just OK for me. I am pretty fussy about my Shakespeare I guess (I know, what nerve). I liked the audio production and it was entertaining, but pretty standard fare. Deposed ruler living on deserted island with daughter learns magic. Uses magical skills to cause a shipwreck, bringing a suitor for his daughter and the chance to right wrongs. Happy ending. Some familiar bits of language - "stuff as dreams are made on", "brave new world" and "strange bedfellows" - to note.
  • (2/5)
    I enjoyed this more than other mandatory Shakespeare reads in college because this was required for the best English class ever: "Making Monsters". Ms. Cook's guidance was not annoying like Corum's.
  • (4/5)
    This was the first Shakespeare play I ever read - from an old white-covered paperback I had when I was 9 years old. I probably didn't understand it very well back then. I REALLY liked the title, though.

    Now, it's still good stuff.

    For me, supplementing my reading with a viewing of Helen Mirren as Prospera... magnified my enjoyment of this book tremendously.

  • (5/5)
    The story of a prince who is shipwrecked in a strange land on his journey home is a frequent theme of Classical literature. These strange lands are almost certainly snares, attempts to prevent the hero from fulfilling his destiny and arriving at his homeland, and the usual method of entrapment is seduction.Odysseus on Calypso's island, Aeneas in Carthage, and Jason and Medea as told in the Metamorphoses. In The Tempest, Ferdinand finds himself in just such a situation. Washed up on a strange shore, Ferdinand meets the strange and entrancing woman who bewitches him and inspires him to remain in captivity instead of heading home to rule his city. He believes that he is the king (1.2.435 "Myself am Naples"), but will remain on the island for Miranda's sake. What makes The Tempest different from the other stories is the presence of Prospero, the one who is actually orchestrating the lovers' encounter.Prospero was a philosopher-king defeated by a MachiavelProspero was a stranger ot his state, "being transported / and rapt in secret studies." Antonio is described as having set "All hearts i' the' state / to what tune pleased his ear, . . " (1.2.79-116), who realized that he had to learn Machiavellianism if he was to maintain his throne. He speaks in Machiavellian terms of Fortune bringing him the opportunity which he must not neglect (1.2.178-184). He manipulates the situation to his best possible advantage; intersetingly, he does this through Baconian methods. His whole life has been about studying ways to manipulate nature, achieving power over nature. This is what enables him in the end to achieve power over the shipwrecked men -- for the power of man over Nature really means the power of some men over other men with Nature as the instrument.Prospero takes a fundamentally adversarial stance to Nature as portrayed by both of the original inhabitants of the island, Caliban and Ariel. He originally tried being nice to Caliban (1.2.344-348), but learned to his chagrin that this part of nature is tricksy and unyielding. He also freed Ariel from the pine tree, but only because Ariel is useful to him; he dominates Ariel, praising and scorning him by turns even as a large part of his power depends on the sprite. He cannot afford to alienate Ariel as he has alienated Caliban, but he still dominates. Prospero believes that he is manipulating everything for the greater good, but he is still manipulating it all, and this will eventually lead to what we know as the Brave New World (5.1.182-185).It is possible to argue that Prospero's endeavor is not Baconian, since he rarely directly manipulates nature but instead relies on a cooperative spirit. Lewis described the eschatology of our power over Nature in Miracles, this way: "In the walking on the Water we see the relations of spirit and Nature so altered that Nature can be made to do whatever spirit pleases. This new obedience of Nature is, of course, not to be separated even in thought from spirit's own obedience to the Father of Spirits. Apart from that proviso such obedience by Nature, if it were possible, would result in chaos: the evil dream of Magic arises from finite spirit's longing to get that power without paying that price. The evil reality of lawless applied science (which is Magic's son and heir) is actually reducing large tracts of Nature to disorder and sterility at this very moment." But when Prospero hears of Gonzalo's tears, his reason defeats his baser desires for vengeance and he realizes that all his manipulation is of the same school as Medea's.(5.1.15-20) It's not noble, it's selfish witchcraft, and he renounces it by quoting Medea's own description of her powers.
  • (2/5)
    The tragic story of Prospero, a wizard that is actually the duke of Milan. He is send to and island after his jelous brother. Propero is send with his only daughter, Miranda. Tweleve years had pass now and the beautiful Miranda is now fifteen.In the island, Prospero now has under control Arial, a spirt, and Caliban a men that is now his slave. With the help of Ariel and his own magic, Prospero sank the fleet in were his bother and some other friends were trabeling. His plans of revenge for the moment seem to work out perfectly, it is needed time to see what happens.This is a story full of magic, tangles and mysteries. The characters made this play full of life, letting the reader involves in the events. Although the language used get complicated some times the plot is very interesting.
  • (5/5)
    Thunder, lightning, magical creatures and islands. A lovely fantasy.
  • (3/5)
    For the past year, the fates have been telling me I needed to read William Shakespeare's final work The Tempest. Alright fates, I did it! Now you can shove it!!!

    Honestly, I was disappointed. There was so much potential in this one, but it was as though Shakespeare, “The Man,” was giving up. Great premise, great setting, great characters with witty dialogue, but why, Prospero? Why do you relent so easily? Ferdinand, what do you see in Miranda? What was the point of it all, Shakespeare? It wasn't clear. These characters just could not convince me of this world.

    The ending was classic. C-L-A-S-S-I-C. It seems “The Man” knew he was retiring. Having the magician, Prospero—possibly a reflection of Shakespeare himself—address the audience was brilliant. He explains his mission was to entertain, begs pardon for all his wrongs, and asks to be set free. Loved it.

    If only the rest of the play could have been so affecting and clever. Nonetheless, I thank The Man for his entertainment, forgive him his wrongs, and set him free. Run, Shakespeare run.
  • (3/5)
    This is my second read through of the play. I'm still not necessarily a fan; the way that Prospero gives blanket forgiveness to Alonso and Antonio seems forced, even if I have a better understanding of why he did it. In addition, the subplot with Sebastian and Antonio's attempt on the king's life goes nowhere. Prospero is still incredibly unlikeable as a main character.

    As far as this specific version goes, it has to be one of my favorite editions in terms of how it handles footnotes. Most versions have ALL notes either lumped into the bottom, or on the facing page to the play. It makes it difficult sometimes to find what you're looking for without disturbing the flow of your reading. This book relegates short notes (one or two word translations of the Renaissance word into modern English) to the left of the line it occurs in, and longer footnotes and explanations to the facing page. Aside from an uncomfortable amount of white space on each page, it is an excellent edition.
  • (3/5)
    3½ stars - I found I had some trouble in parts with following the action just reading this rather than seeing a performance. I also found Prospero's sudden reconciliation with his brother rather unconvincing.
  • (4/5)
    I will start this review by saying I liked this play a lot more after I had time to sit and digest it. I knew from the start that I was going to hate Prospero, which does not leave much hope for a favorable opinion because he's behind everything that happens in the play. Prospero plays a good victim, but he's an amazing manipulator. If you can get past that, you will love this story. Characteristic if Shakespeare, The Tempest's pages are full of tragedy, humor, Romance, murder plots, revenge, and a smattering of mysticism. Short, dense, and enjoyable.4 stars.