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Younger Next Year: Live Strong, Fit, Sexy, and Smart—Until You're 80 and Beyond

Younger Next Year: Live Strong, Fit, Sexy, and Smart—Until You're 80 and Beyond

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Younger Next Year: Live Strong, Fit, Sexy, and Smart—Until You're 80 and Beyond

оценки:
4/5 (11 оценки)
Длина:
503 pages
7 hours
Издатель:
Издано:
Dec 24, 2019
ISBN:
9781523508662
Формат:
Книге

Описание

Congratulations, you are about to get younger!
 

Dr. Henry Lodge provides the science. Chris Crowley provides the motivation. And through their New York Times bestselling program, you’ll discover how to put off 70 percent of the normal problems of aging—weakness, sore joints, bad balance—and eliminate 50 percent of serious illness and injury. Plus, prominent neurologist Allan Hamilton now explains how following “Harry’s Rules” for diet, exercise, and staying emotionally connected directly affects your brain—all the way down to the cellular level. The message is simple: Learn to train for the next third of your life, and you’ll have a ball.

 
 
Издатель:
Издано:
Dec 24, 2019
ISBN:
9781523508662
Формат:
Книге

Об авторе

Chris Crowley, a former litigator (Davis Polk & Wardwell), is the coauthor, with Henry S. Lodge, of the Younger Next Year books, and the coauthor, with Jen Sacheck, PhD, of Thinner This Year. Though in his eighties, he fully lives the life, skiing black diamonds and routinely doing thirty-mile bike rides. He and his wife live in Connecticut and New York City.  

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Younger Next Year - Chris Crowley

One

Take Charge of Your Body

Chapter One

The End of the World

So look, you’re fifty-three, fifty-eight, somewhere in there. Great guy, pretty successful. Good energy. You’re a serious man in a serious life. And besides that, you’re in decent shape, thank God. A solid, weekend athlete. Well, fairly solid. Maybe a little overweight and the bike’s been in the garage awhile, but you could get back there in a heartbeat. You’re Type A at work sometimes, but hey, you get stuff done. You are one of those people who not only had the gifts to do all right, you had the temperament to use them. Good for you.

And a couple of months ago, you open your eyes in the dark and say to yourself, I am going to be sixty years old! I am almost sixty! You’re awake the rest of the night.

Or you’re sitting in the office and some twerp is looking at you strangely. Looking through you, sort of. As if you weren’t there. When he leaves, it hits you, That guy thinks I’m a short-termer. He thinks this is the Departure Lounge, the little punk. You go around your desk and sit in the chair where the kid just was. An involuntary sigh. Retire! What the hell will become of me?

Last one: You’re at a party. A pretty woman goes by. Not that young . . . maybe thirty-eight. And she looks through you, too. Just does not see you. As if you were dead. As if you were sixty. Same thing. That night, in the dark again. Sixty! I am going to be sixty years old!

In the morning, you suck it up, go to work. Do your job. Just like the last thirty years. But it’s there, man. It’s there all the time: I am going to turn sixty. What is to become of me? As if I didn’t know.

But guess what? You don’t know. The point of this book is that you do not know. And you have the wrong picture in your head. You know what it meant for your old man and his father . . . for your mentor and a few billion other guys. But the rules are changing. Right now. And your prospects are different. Quite different.

Harry—that’s Henry S. Lodge, MD, my doctor, my co­author, my close friend—is going to give you enough of the new evolutionary biology in his chapters so that you can understand for the first time how your body actually works. It is going to be a revolutionary insight for virtually everybody, believe me. Once you understand it, and once you do some of the things that will seem obvious to you after that—why, you can choose to live like fifty until you’re in your eighties. In your eighties, my man! We mean it. You may ski into a tree; that’s a different story. Or you may grow a tangerine in your brainpan and be dead in the morning. Fine. But most of us really do not have to age significantly. For decades.

It is better than that. Most of us can be functionally younger every year for the next five or even ten years. That sounds like cruel nonsense or hype, but it’s true. Limited aspects of biological aging are immutable. Like the fact that your maximum heart rate goes down a bit every year, and your skin and hair get weird. But 70 percent of what you feel as aging is optional. You do not have to go there. No joke. No exaggeration, even. There’s a new, tough game out there. And, congratulations, you are eligible to play. You just have to learn

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3.9
11 оценки / 10 Обзоры
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  • (4/5)
    An easy to read guide to some basic methods for limiting and deferring some of the physical problems of aging. The prose is simple and the rules are effective. Included in the book is some observations on basic scientific discoveries about our bodies and how they work. I look forward to living the way the authors recommend and enjoying the benefits.
  • (4/5)
    There's nothing earthshattering in this book, but it presents a fairly simple and practical method for pursuing good health, concentrating on men over 50 years of age.
  • (5/5)
    Another installment in the Old Races universe, this one a single long "short story". Sarah's story. Which is as awesome as you would expect. Love the detail work on this one. Definitely a good read!
  • (4/5)
    Even if we can't live forever, we can extend our life and certainly the quality of it to be active and vital for the last third. These two authors seem to have the science and the experience to tell us how. Holding back the tide of forces that erode us in our later years is possible, with some knowledge and daily discipline. The underlying premise involves replicating the biological signals that tell our primitive brain: it's spring, we're being product, and it's time to grow. Otherwise, when you sit around, inactive and alone, it triggers the body's decay mode. Winter is here and more winter is coming. The authors' include a very practical plan that anyone can follow, if they make the time. They describe their own execution of it in ways to make exercise social and fun.
  • (4/5)
    This book is highly motivating to get you to exercise.
  • (4/5)
    This is a great fun and inspiring read. It is directed to men near the beginning of the last third of life, i.e. around 60. So I am certainly in the target audience!The book is structured around Harry's Seven Rules: 1) Exercise six days a week for the rest of your life; 2) Do serious aerobic exercise four days a week for the rest of your life; 3) Do serious strength training, with weights, two days a week for the rest of your life; 4) Spend less than you make; 5) Quit eating crap; 6) Care; 7) Connect and commit.The chapters more or less alternate between Chris and his physician Harry. Chris tells lots of stories from his own life and Harry gives more a scientific justification of the program they outline. The basic idea is that we are living beings, animals, mammals - that is the biological foundation on which our humanity rests. Our humanity is a rather thin layer on top of all that biology. Denying our animality just doesn't work. The smart strategy is to recognize and work with it. At one point they use the analogy of a horse and rider. That reminds me of the classic analogy from the Katha Upanisad, which I think was more a chariot drawn by several horses, but the intent was basically the same. The program they outline is not so far from how I have been living already, but it has motivated me to make some changes. I try to exercise regularly but with only moderate success. This book has given me good motivational tools to be a lot more regular! Primarily by explaining how important it is. I am also cutting back to two cups of coffee/tea a day which should help me sleep better.They do talk a bit about how this program is suitable for a wide range of budgets but I must say it does come across directed at... well, money is funny... Chris was a high powered lawyer... there is a lot of talk here about travel and gym memberships and shiny new equipment. Just regular medical checkups. I can afford rent and food and heat & figure that's pretty good. I think the program presented here can work just fine on a limited budget. But the presentation could put folks off a bit who aren't set up quite as nicely as a retired high power lawyer.
  • (5/5)
    Great tips on exercise and health in the last third of life. It wasn't til I was almost done with the book it became obvious that it was for men. But it was very readable with alternating chapters by the two authors. Recommend this for anyone retiring and/or over 60.
  • (3/5)
    I read this book when I was 55 and followed it religiously for three years. I exercised vigorously six days per week.

    However, I later decided that six days per week were simply too many, and didn't give my body enough rest time in between. There were some nights when I was extremely tired, and I suspect that was due to the lack of recover time.

    Also, although the authors understood the problems of high-carbohydrate meals, I don't think they took this far enough.

    So now I exercise four days a week, typically with one five-hour bike ride (60 miles), on strength-training day (Boxflex), and another day of a long walk or some high-intensity intervals. That seems to work better.

    In general, the concepts in this book are well-explained and important. The most important being that the only way to communicate with your body, and tell it that it shouldn't break itself down and store fat, is to exercise.

    One other note: I gave this to my older sister, and she felt that it "changed her life." She became much more active. However, I think she's reverted to her old ways a bit.
  • (2/5)
    Not memorable enough that I remembered anything in it four years later. 
  • (5/5)
    A good read and a useful book. I don't know whether these guys are right or not, but it dosen't matter. I am 75 and have recently begun to fall, starting with the stairs in my sister in law's house in Cambridge MA. That cost me a week in Mt Aubutn Hospital in Cambridge and then four weeks at a rehab facility on the east side where the young ladies did a wonderful job in physical and occupational therapy. Despite o whole lot of exercises and a loss of 30 pounds,( food at these places is the pits and the hospital has completely given up) I continue to fall. My doc is Henry Lodge, who co-wrote this book with Chris Crowley, and I think that his advice is pretty good. Crowley talked about how much the doc contributed to the effort yet i see he is the sole author according to this website. He is as full of crap as those revolting Irish nurses at the Cambridge hospital.