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Capture of Jaffa

Capture of Jaffa

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Длина: 19 стр.10 мин

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The Capture of Jaffa is a battle reported to have taken place during Thutmose III's reign, although is generally considered a fictionalized account, as it was found with a copy of The Doomed Prince which is considered ancient Egyptian fiction. How much of the Capture of Jaffa is considered fiction, and how much is historical has been a matter of debate, largely because of the similarities to Homer's account of the Battle of Troy. The surviving copy of this text was discovered on a papyrus scroll dating back the Ramesside Period, hundreds of years before Homer wrote the oldest surviving account of the Trojan War. Moreover, the Capture of Jaffa is set centuries before the Trojan War, and while there is a similar story of soldiers being hidden inside a tribute taken into the city, the stories are different overall. Moreover, given Capture of Jaffa appears to have been a popular enough story that it was being copied in Egypt at the time of the Trojan War, if the story of the wooden horse actually happened, the Achaeans may have gotten the idea from the Capture of Jaffa.

The General that Thutmose III sent to Jaffa, General Thoth, did exist according to the contemporary records, and Jaffa was sacked by someone during the reign of Thutmose III. Therefore, some Egyptologists do view the Capture of Jaffa as a possibly accurate copy of a section of General Thoth's Biography. The fact that the general and his king were named, unlike the anonymous prince in the Doomed Prince, supports the idea that the story was originally part of a biography, as the Egyptians did not write stories about the dead, but they did copy stories that had been written while the dead were alive. As some Egyptologists have pointed out, the fact that the Habiru were mentioned supports the original text dating back to the time of Thutmose III, as the had Habiru disappeared from all other records after the Amarna Letters, circa 1350 BC.

Thutmose III is considered one of Egypt's great conquerors, as he expanded the empire in all directions, as described in his biography. This was most likely overcompensation for the early years of his life, when he allowed his kingdom to be ruled by a woman, something clearly humiliating in the mindset of the ancient Egyptians. The Biography of Thutmose III was prepared by the High-Priest of Amen in Karnak, and is spoken from the view of God, in this case, the god Amen, who the Amen-worshipers viewed as the supreme God. As such, the author, God, takes credit for everything that Thutmose III did and essentially usurps any respect that Thutmose III's campaigns should have earned him, implying it was written shortly after his death. The biographies of ancient Egypt were essentially their obituaries carved in stone, intended to ensure the gods would never forget them, and they would live for eternity in the afterlife. As the Egyptians did not write history books, they are the closest thing we have to 'histories' of Egypt, and occasionally, such as in The Biography of Thutmose III, also include a comprehensive description of the Egyptian world, as, according to his biographer, all the world was subject to Thutmose III.

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Capture of Jaffa

Активность, связанная с книгой

Начать чтение

Сведения о книге

Capture of Jaffa

Длина: 19 стр.10 мин

Описание

The Capture of Jaffa is a battle reported to have taken place during Thutmose III's reign, although is generally considered a fictionalized account, as it was found with a copy of The Doomed Prince which is considered ancient Egyptian fiction. How much of the Capture of Jaffa is considered fiction, and how much is historical has been a matter of debate, largely because of the similarities to Homer's account of the Battle of Troy. The surviving copy of this text was discovered on a papyrus scroll dating back the Ramesside Period, hundreds of years before Homer wrote the oldest surviving account of the Trojan War. Moreover, the Capture of Jaffa is set centuries before the Trojan War, and while there is a similar story of soldiers being hidden inside a tribute taken into the city, the stories are different overall. Moreover, given Capture of Jaffa appears to have been a popular enough story that it was being copied in Egypt at the time of the Trojan War, if the story of the wooden horse actually happened, the Achaeans may have gotten the idea from the Capture of Jaffa.

The General that Thutmose III sent to Jaffa, General Thoth, did exist according to the contemporary records, and Jaffa was sacked by someone during the reign of Thutmose III. Therefore, some Egyptologists do view the Capture of Jaffa as a possibly accurate copy of a section of General Thoth's Biography. The fact that the general and his king were named, unlike the anonymous prince in the Doomed Prince, supports the idea that the story was originally part of a biography, as the Egyptians did not write stories about the dead, but they did copy stories that had been written while the dead were alive. As some Egyptologists have pointed out, the fact that the Habiru were mentioned supports the original text dating back to the time of Thutmose III, as the had Habiru disappeared from all other records after the Amarna Letters, circa 1350 BC.

Thutmose III is considered one of Egypt's great conquerors, as he expanded the empire in all directions, as described in his biography. This was most likely overcompensation for the early years of his life, when he allowed his kingdom to be ruled by a woman, something clearly humiliating in the mindset of the ancient Egyptians. The Biography of Thutmose III was prepared by the High-Priest of Amen in Karnak, and is spoken from the view of God, in this case, the god Amen, who the Amen-worshipers viewed as the supreme God. As such, the author, God, takes credit for everything that Thutmose III did and essentially usurps any respect that Thutmose III's campaigns should have earned him, implying it was written shortly after his death. The biographies of ancient Egypt were essentially their obituaries carved in stone, intended to ensure the gods would never forget them, and they would live for eternity in the afterlife. As the Egyptians did not write history books, they are the closest thing we have to 'histories' of Egypt, and occasionally, such as in The Biography of Thutmose III, also include a comprehensive description of the Egyptian world, as, according to his biographer, all the world was subject to Thutmose III.

Подробнее