Наслаждайтесь миллионами электронных книг, аудиокниг, журналов и других видов контента в бесплатной пробной версии

Только $11.99 в месяц после пробной версии. Можно отменить в любое время.

Mediterranean diet: Nutrition Basics, Healthier lifestyle for the entire family, Cookbook, Tasty Recipes, Change your Eating Lifestyle, Complete Guide for Success
Mediterranean diet: Nutrition Basics, Healthier lifestyle for the entire family, Cookbook, Tasty Recipes, Change your Eating Lifestyle, Complete Guide for Success
Mediterranean diet: Nutrition Basics, Healthier lifestyle for the entire family, Cookbook, Tasty Recipes, Change your Eating Lifestyle, Complete Guide for Success
Электронная книга387 страниц2 часа

Mediterranean diet: Nutrition Basics, Healthier lifestyle for the entire family, Cookbook, Tasty Recipes, Change your Eating Lifestyle, Complete Guide for Success

Автор Simona Borghini

Рейтинг: 0 из 5 звезд

()

Об этой электронной книге

The vibrant, wholesome Mediterranean diet supports heart health and combats chronic disease—and folding it into an everyday routine is the surest way to feel its benefits.

Make the Mediterranean diet work for you, with a collection of simple recipes you can always find time for.
Make the Mediterranean diet an everyday habit with these quick, nourishing recipes.

The simple, easy, and friendly way to start the Mediterranean diet and lifestyle. Starting a Mediterranean diet can feel overwhelming, but this all-in-one resource makes it surprisingly simple. Find exactly what you need to dive into the diet and stick to it, with delicious recipes, complete meal plans, detailed shopping lists, and plenty of tips. This cookbook features: The basics, Quick meals, Customizable options.
Get started on your journey to feeling healthier with a complete mediterranean cookbook and diet guide that helps you stay on track.

The Mediterranean Diet is the perfect mix of insight and recipes to start your journey to healthier living.
ЯзыкEnglish
ИздательMagic Dome Books
Дата выпуска9 июн. 2022 г.
ISBN9785459008180
Mediterranean diet: Nutrition Basics, Healthier lifestyle for the entire family, Cookbook, Tasty Recipes, Change your Eating Lifestyle, Complete Guide for Success
Читать отрывок

Связано с Mediterranean diet

Издания этой серии (1)

Показать больше

Похожие Книги

Похожие статьи

Связанные категории

Отзывы о Mediterranean diet

Рейтинг: 0 из 5 звезд
0 оценок

0 оценок0 отзывов

Ваше мнение?

Нажмите, чтобы оценить

    Предварительный просмотр книги

    Mediterranean diet - Simona Borghini

    1. Mediterranean diet.

    The Mediterranean diet varies by country and region, so it has a range of definitions. But in general, it's high in vegetables, fruits, legumes, nuts, beans, cereals, grains, fish, and unsaturated fats such as olive oil. It usually includes a low intake of meat and dairy foods.

    A Mediterranean diet incorporates the traditional healthy living habits of people from countries bordering the Mediterranean Sea, including France, Greece, Italy and Spain.

    The Mediterranean diet varies by country and region, so it has a range of definitions. But in general, it's high in vegetables, fruits, legumes, nuts, beans, cereals, grains, fish, and unsaturated fats such as olive oil. It usually includes a low intake of meat and dairy foods.

    The Mediterranean diet has been linked with good health, including a healthier heart.

    How to make your diet more Mediterranean

    You can make your diet more Mediterranean-style by:

    -  eating plenty of starchy foods, such as bread and pasta

    -  eating plenty of fruit and vegetables

    -  including fish in your diet

    -  eating less meat

    -  choosing products made from vegetable and plant oils, such as olive oil.

    The Mediterranean diet is very similar to the government's healthy eating advice, which is set out in the Diet Guide.

    The guide shows what foods are needed for a healthy, balanced diet and how much you should eat of each food group:

    - eat at least 5 portions of a variety of fruit and vegetables every day – find out more about getting your 5-DAY

    - base your meals on starchy foods such as potatoes, bread, rice and pasta – choose wholegrain versions where possible

    - eat some beans or pulses, fish, eggs, meat and other proteins (including 2 portions of fish every week, 1 of which should be oily)

    - have some dairy or dairy alternatives (such as soya drinks) – choose lower-fat and lower-sugar options

    - choose unsaturated oils and spreads, and eat them in small amounts

    - drink 6 to 8 glasses of fluid a day

    - if consuming foods and drinks that are high in fat, salt or sugar, have them less often and in small amounts – find out more about reducing sugar in your diet

    You do not need to achieve this balance with every meal, but try to get it right over the course of a day or even a week.

    1.1 The Diet Guide

    The Diet Guide shows how much of what we eat overall should come from each food group to achieve a healthy, balanced diet.

    You do not need to achieve this balance with every meal, but try to get the balance right over a day or even a week.

    Eat at least 5 portions of a variety of fruit and vegetables a day.

    Most of us still are not eating enough fruit and vegetables. They should make up over a third of the food we eat each day.

    Aim to eat at least 5 portions of a variety of fruit and veg each day. Choose from fresh, frozen, tinned, dried or juiced.

    Remember that fruit juice and smoothies should be limited to no more than a combined total of 150ml a day.

    Fruit and vegetables are a good source of vitamins, minerals and fibre.

    5-DAY portion sizes:

    Everyone should have at least 5 portions of a variety of fruit and vegetables every day. An adult portion of fruit or vegetables is 80g.

    The guide below will give you an indication of typical portion sizes for adults.

    Children should also eat at least 5 portions of a variety of fruit and vegetables a day.

    The amount of food a child needs varies with age, body size and levels of physical activity.

    As a rough guide, 1 portion is the amount they can fit in the palm of their hand.

    5-DAY fruit portions:

    Small-sized fresh fruit

    A portion is 2 or more small fruit – for example, 2 plums, 2 satsumas, 2 kiwi fruit, 3 apricots, 6 lychees, 7 strawberries or 14 cherries.

    Medium-sized fresh fruit

    A portion is 1 piece of fruit, such as 1 apple, banana, pear, orange or nectarine.

    Large fresh fruit

    A portion is half a grapefruit, 1 slice of papaya, 1 slice of melon (5cm slice), 1 large slice of pineapple or 2 slices of mango (5cm slices).

    Dried fruit

    A portion of dried fruit is around 30g. This is about 1 heaped tablespoon of raisins, currants or sultanas, 1 tablespoon of mixed fruit, 2 figs, 3 prunes or 1 handful of dried banana chips.

    But dried fruit can be high in sugar and can be bad for your teeth.

    Try to swap dried fruit for fresh fruit, especially between meals.

    To reduce the risk of tooth decay, dried fruit is best enjoyed as part of a meal – as dessert, for example, not as a between meal snack.

    Tinned or canned fruit

    A portion is roughly the same quantity of fruit that you would eat for a fresh portion, such as 2 pear or peach halves, 6 apricot halves or 8 segments of tinned grapefruit.

    Choose fruit canned in natural juice, rather than syrup.

    5-DAY vegetable portions:

    Green vegetables

    A portion is 2 broccoli spears or 4 heaped tablespoons of cooked kale, spinach, spring greens or green beans.

    Cooked vegetables

    A portion is 3 heaped tablespoons of cooked vegetables, such as carrots, peas or sweetcorn, or 8 cauliflower florets.

    Salad vegetables

    A portion is 1.5 full-length celery sticks, a 5cm piece of cucumber, 1 medium tomato or 7 cherry tomatoes.

    Tinned and frozen vegetables

    Roughly the same quantity as you would eat for a fresh portion. For example, 3 heaped tablespoons of tinned or frozen carrots, peas or sweetcorn count as 1 portion each.

    For tinned, choose those canned in water with no added salt or sugar.

    Pulses and beans

    A portion is 3 heaped tablespoons of baked beans, haricot beans, kidney beans, cannellini beans, butter beans or chickpeas.

    Remember, however much you eat, beans and pulses count as a maximum of 1 portion a day.

    Potatoes

    Potatoes don't count towards your 5-DAY. This is the same for yams, cassava and plantain, too.

    They're classified nutritionally as a starchy food, because when eaten as part of a meal they're usually used in place of other sources of starch, such as bread, rice or pasta.

    Although they don't count towards your 5-DAY, potatoes do play an important role in your diet as a starchy food.

    You can learn more in 5-DAY: what counts?

    5-DAY in juices and smoothies:

    Unsweetened 100% fruit juice, vegetable juice and smoothies can only ever count as a maximum of 1 portion of your 5-DAY.

    For example, if you have 2 glasses of fruit juice and a smoothie in 1 day, that still only counts as 1 portion.

    Smoothies include any drink made up of any combination of fruit or vegetable juice, purée, or all the edible pulped fruit or vegetable.

    Your combined total of drinks from fruit juice, vegetable juice and smoothies shouldn't be more than 150ml a day, which is a small glass.

    For example, if you have 150ml of orange juice and 150ml smoothie in 1 day, you'll have exceeded the recommendation by 150ml.

    When fruit is blended or juiced, it releases the sugars. This increases the risk of tooth decay, so it's best to drink fruit juice or smoothies at mealtimes.

    Whole fruits are less likely to cause tooth decay because the sugars are contained within the structure of the fruit.

    Watch out for drinks that say juice drink on the pack as they're unlikely to count towards your 5-DAY and can be high in sugar.

    5-DAY and ready-made foods:

    Fruit and vegetables contained in shop-bought ready-made foods can also count toward your 5-DAY.

    Always read the label. Some ready-made foods contain high levels of fat, salt and sugar, so only have them occasionally or in small amounts as part of a healthy, balanced diet.

    Find out more about food labels.

    Got a question about 5-DAY?

    If you have a query about 5-DAY check our 5-DAY FAQs.

    Base meals on potatoes, bread, rice, pasta or other starchy carbohydrates.

    Starchy food should make up just over a third of the food we eat. Choose higher fibre wholegrain varieties, such as wholewheat pasta and brown rice, or simply leave skins on potatoes.

    There are also higher fibre versions of white bread and pasta.

    Starchy foods are a good source of energy and the main source of a range of nutrients in our diet.

    Have some dairy or dairy alternatives (such as soya drinks and yoghurts).

    Milk, cheese, yoghurt and fromage frais are good sources of protein and some vitamins, and they're also an important source of calcium, which helps keep our bones healthy.

    Try to go for lower-fat and lower-sugar products where possible, like 1% fat milk, reduced-fat cheese or plain low-fat yoghurt.

    Eat some beans, pulses, fish, eggs, meat and other protein.

    These foods are good sources of protein, vitamins and minerals. Pulses, such as beans, peas and lentils, are good alternatives to meat because they're lower in fat and higher in fibre and protein, too.

    Choose lean cuts of meat and mince, and eat less red and processed meat like bacon, ham and sausages.

    Aim for at least 2 portions of fish every week, 1 of which should be oily, such as salmon or mackerel.

    Choose unsaturated oils and spreads, and eat in small amounts.

    Unsaturated fats are healthier fats and include vegetable, rapeseed, olive and sunflower oils.

    Remember all types of fat are high in energy and should be eaten sparingly.

    Eat foods high in fat, salt and sugar less often and in small amounts.

    These foods include chocolate, cakes, biscuits, sugary soft drinks, butter, ghee and ice cream.

    They're not needed in our diet, so should be eaten less often and in smaller amounts.

    Drink plenty of fluids – the government recommends 6 to 8 cups or glasses a day.

    Water, lower-fat milks and lower-sugar or sugar-free drinks, including tea and coffee, all count.

    Fruit juice and smoothies also count towards your fluid consumption, but they contain free sugars that can damage teeth, so limit these drinks to a combined total of 150ml a day.

    How does the Diet Guide work?

    The Diet Guide divides the foods we eat and drink into 5 main food groups.

    Try to choose a variety of different foods from each of the groups to help you get the wide range of nutrients your body needs to stay healthy.

    It's important to get some fat in your diet, but foods that are high in fat, salt and sugar have been placed outside of the circular image as they're not necessary as part of a healthy, balanced diet and most of us need to cut down on these.

    Unsaturated fats from plant sources (for example, vegetable oil or olive oil) are healthier types of fat.

    But all types of fat are high in energy (calories), so they should only be eaten in small amounts.

    On average, women should have around 2,000 calories a day (8,400 kilojoules) and men should have around 2,500 calories a day (10,500 kilojoules). Most adults consume more calories than they need.

    Find out how food labels can help you choose between foods and pick those lower in calories, fat, saturated fat, sugar and salt.

    Combination foods

    Many foods, such as pizzas, casseroles, pasta dishes and sandwiches, are combinations of the food groups.

    With these meals, check the ingredients and think about how these fit with on to help you achieve a balanced diet.

    1.2.  5-DAY: what counts?

    Almost all fruit and vegetables count towards your 5-DAY, so it may be easier than you think to get your recommended daily amount.

    At a glance: what counts?

      - 80g of fresh, canned or frozen fruit and vegetables counts as 1 portion of your 5-DAY. Opt for tinned or canned fruit and vegetables in natural juice or water, with no added sugar or salt.

    - 30g of dried fruit (this is equivalent to around 80g of fresh fruit) counts as 1 portion of your 5-DAY. Dried fruit should be eaten at mealtimes, not as a between-meal snack, to reduce the risk of tooth decay.

    Some portions only count once in a day:

      - 150ml of fruit juice, vegetable juice or smoothie. Limit the amount you drink to a combined total of 150ml a day. Crushing fruit and vegetables into juice and smoothies releases the sugars they contain, which can damage teeth. Juices and smoothies should be consumed at mealtimes, not as a between-meal snack, to reduce the risk of tooth decay.

      - 80g of beans and pulses. These only count once as part of your 5-DAY, no matter how many you eat. This is because although they're a good source of fibre, they contain fewer nutrients than other fruits and vegetables.

    Different types of fruit and veg

    Fruit and vegetables don't have to be fresh to count as a portion. Nor do they have to be eaten on their own: they also count if they're part of a meal or dish.

    These all also count towards your 5-DAY:

      -  Frozen fruit and vegetables.

      -  Tinned or canned fruit and vegetables. Buy ones tinned in natural juice or water, with no added sugar or salt.

      -  Fruit and vegetables cooked in dishes such as soups, stews or pasta.

      -  A 30g portion of dried fruit, such as currants, dates, sultanas and figs, counts as 1

    Нравится краткая версия?
    Страница 1 из 1