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A STUDY ON CUSTOMER SATISFACTION TOWARDS BAJAJ PULSAR WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO JAI BAJAJ, CHENNAI

PROJECT REPORT

Submitted By

DINESH.N
Register No: 088001119010

In partial fulfillment for the award of the degree of

MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION IN DEPARTMENT OF MANAGEMENT STUDIES

RVS COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND TECHNOLOGY KANNAMPALAYAM, COIMBATORE 641 402. MAY- 2010

RVS COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING &TECHNOLOGY KANNAMPALAYAM, COIMBATORE 641 402 DEPARTMENT OF MANAGEMENT STUDIES

PROJECT WORK May 2010 This is to certify that the project report entitled

A STUDY ON CUSTOMER SATISFACTION TOWARDS BAJAJ PULSAR WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO JAI BAJAJ, CHENNAI
is the bonafide record of project work done by

DINESH.N
Register No: 088001119010

of Master of Business Administration during the year 2009-2010

_____________ Faculty Guide

_______________ Head of the Department/Director

Submitted for the project Viva-Voce examination held on ________________

________________ Internal Examiner

________________ External Examiner

DECLARATION

I affirm that the project work titled A STUDY ON CUSTOMER

SATISFACTION TOWARDS BAJAJ PULSAR WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO JAI BAJAJ, CHENNAI being submitted in partial
fulfillment for the award of Master of Business Administration is the original work carried out by me. It has not formed the part of any other project work submitted for award of any degree or diploma, either in this or any other University.

(Signature of the Candidate)

DINESH.N Register No: 088001119010

I certify that the declaration made above by the candidate is true.

Signature of the Guide,

V.Loganayagi.,MBA Lecturer Department of management studies RVS College of Engineering and Technology

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT
I extend my deep sense of gratitude and sincere thanks to our principal Dr. V.GUNARAJ, ME., Ph.D., for his value support in carrying out my project work. First and foremost we would like to express our sincere gratitude to our beloved Director Dr. P.V. PRABHA,MBA.,Ph.D.,for providing us all the facilities and encouraging us throughout the course of the project. We pay our respectful thanks to our head of the department of

Prof.S.PREETHAM

SRIDHAR.,MBA.,M.Phil.,Ph.D.,Department

management studies for his efforts, thoughtful comments, grateful advice, encouragement and counsel throughout the course of our study. Without his invaluable guidance and support our project work would have been mere dream. We pay our respectful thanks to our guide, Ms. V.LOGANAYAKI, MBA., Department of management studies for his efforts, thoughtful comments, grateful advice, encouragement and counsel throughout the course of our study. Without his invaluable guidance and support our project work would have been mere dream. I am highly obliged to extend my sincere thanks to

Mr.RAMAKRISHNAN,MBA., (Assistant marketing manager of Jai Bajaj, Thiruvanmiyur, in Chennai city), for his effective guidance and valuable support to carry out this project in these premises. Above all, I thank Almighty god and My Parents for giving me the grace and content support in successfully completing this project to the best of my ability.

CONTENTS
CHAPTERS DESCRIPTIONS LIST OF TABLE LIST OF CHARTS ABSTRACT 1 INTRODUCTION 1.1 ABOUT THE INDUSTRY 1.2 ABOUT THE COMPANY 1.3 ABOUT THE STUDY 1.3.1 OBJECTIVES OF THE STUDY 1.3.2 SCOPE OF THE STUDY 1.3.3. LIMITATIONS OF THE STUDY 2 3 4 5 6 7 REVIEW OF LITERATURE RESEARCH METHODOLOGY ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATIONS FINDINGS AND INFERENCE RECOMMENDATIONS CONCLUSION APPENDIX BIBLIOGRAPHY 1 5 9 12 13 14 15 17 19 61 62 63 PAGE NO

LIST OF TABLES
S.NO DESCRIPTIONS PAGE NO
19 21 23 25 27 29 31 33 35 37 39 41 43 45 47 49 51 53 55 57

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20

Table showing the age group of the respondents Table showing the occupations of the respondents Table showing the income of the respondents Table showing the educational qualification Table showing the awareness of various series of pulsar motorcycle Table showing the awareness of product series Table showing the reason for not choosing the product Table showing the source of information Table showing the duration of using the product Table showing the satisfaction level of brand image Table showing the satisfaction level of mileage Table showing the satisfaction level of price Table showing the satisfaction level of resale value Table showing the satisfaction level of popularity Table showing the satisfaction level of comfort Table showing the satisfaction level of maintenance Table showing the satisfaction level of safety Table showing the awareness of free services Table showing the services provided Table showing the free services given by pulsar motorcycle

LIST OF CHARTS
S. NO
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20

DESCRIPTIONS
Chart showing the age of the respondents Chart showing the occupations of the respondents Chart showing the income of the respondents Chart showing the educational qualification Chart showing the awareness of various series of pulsar motorcycle Chart showing the awareness of product series Chart showing the reason for not choosing the product Chart showing the source of information Chart showing the duration of using the product Chart showing the satisfaction level of brand image Chart showing the satisfaction level of mileage Chart showing the satisfaction level of price Chart showing the satisfaction level of resale value Chart showing the satisfaction level of popularity Chart showing the satisfaction level of comfort Chart showing the satisfaction level of maintenance Chart showing the satisfaction level of safety Chart showing the awareness of free services Chart showing the services provided Chart showing the free services given by pulsar motorcycle

PAGE NO
20 22 24 26 28 30 32 34 36 38 40 42 44 46 48 50 52 54 56 58

ABSTRACT
This topic is selected in order to Study and identify the Customer Satisfaction Level of Bajaj Pulsar in Chennai city. A questionnaire was prepared consisting of 22 questions. Around 150 respondents were questioned. The questionnaire circulation covered customers of Bajaj Pulsar in Chennai City. A descriptive study was undertaken. Simple Random Sampling technique was used. Simple percentage analysis and chi square method was used. In this project the following were researched and studied in detail. The Customers attitude towards Bajaj pulsar , to determine the effects of the company image on the sales and also to find the reason for buying pulsar motorcycle.

CHAPTER 1
1. INTRODUCTION 1.1 ABOUT THE INDUSTRY
India is the second largest producer and manufacturer of two-wheelers in the world. It stands next only to Japan and China in terms of the number of two-wheelers produced and domestic sales respectively. Indian two-wheeler industry has got spectacular growth in the last few years. Indian two-wheeler industry had a small beginning in the early 50's. The Automobile Products of India (API) started manufacturing scooters in the country. Bikes are a major segment of Indian two wheeler industry, the other two being scooters and mopeds. Indian companies are among the largest two-wheeler manufacturers in the world. In the initial stages, the scooter segment was dominated by API; it was later overtaken by Bajaj Auto. Although various government and private enterprises entered the fray for scooters, the only new player that has lasted till today is LML. The motorcycle segment was initially dominated by Enfield 350cc bikes and Escorts 175cc bike. The two-wheeler market was opened to foreign competition in the mid-80s. And the then market leaders - Escorts and Enfield - were caught unaware by the onslaught of the 100cc bikes of the four Indo-Japanese joint ventures. With the availability of fuel efficient low power bikes, demand swelled, resulting in Hero Honda - then the only producer of four stroke bikes (100cc category), gaining a top slot.The first Japanese motorcycles were introduced in the early eighties. TVS Suzuki and Hero Honda brought in the first two-stroke and four-stroke engine motorcycles respectively. These two players initially started with assembly of CKD kits, and later on progressed to indigenous manufacturing. In the 90s the major growth for motorcycle segment was brought in by Japanese motorcycles, which grew at a rate of nearly 25% CAGR in the last five years. The industry had a smooth ride in the 50s, 60s and 70s when the Government prohibited new entries and strictly controlled capacity expansion. The industry saw a sudden growth in the 80s. The industry witnessed a steady growth of 14% leading to a peak volume of 1.9mn vehicles in 1990. In 1990, the entire automobile industry saw

a drastic fall in demand. This resulted in a decline of 15% in 1991 and 8% in 1992, resulting in a production loss of 0.4mn vehicles. Barring Hero Honda, all the major producers suffered from recession in FY93 and FY94. Hero Honda showed a marginal decline in 1992.The reasons for recession in the sector were the incessant rise in fuel prices, high input costs and reduced purchasing power due to significant rise in general price level and credit crunch in consumer financing. Factors like increased production in 1992, due to new entrants coupled with the recession in the industry resulted in company either reporting losses or a fall in profits. Key players in the Two-wheeler Industry: There are many two-wheeler manufacturers in India. Major players in the 2wheeler industry are Hero Honda Motors Ltd (HHML), Bajaj Auto Ltd (Bajaj Auto) and TVS Motor Company Ltd (TVS). The other key players in the two-wheeler industry are Kinetic Motor Company Ltd (KMCL), Kinetic Engineering Ltd (KEL), LML Ltd (LML), Yamaha Motors India Ltd (Yamaha), Majestic Auto Ltd (Majestic Auto), Royal Enfield Ltd (REL) and Honda Motorcycle & Scooter India (P) Ltd (HMSI). Evolution of two wheeler in India Two-wheeler segment is one of the most important components of the automobile sector that has undergone significant changes due to shift in policy environment. The two-wheeler industry has been in existence in the country since 1955. It consists of three segments viz. scooters, motorcycles and mopeds. According to the figures published by SIAM, the share of two-wheelers in automobile sector in terms of units sold was about 80 per cent during 2003-04. This high figure itself is suggestive of the importance of the sector. In the initial years, entry of firms, capacity expansion, choice of products including capacity mix and technology, all critical areas of functioning of an industry, were effectively controlled by the State machinery. The lapses in the system had invited fresh policy options that came into being in late sixties. Amongst these policies, Monopolies and Restrictive Trade Practices (MRTP) and Foreign Exchange Regulation Act (FERA) were aimed at regulating monopoly and foreign investment respectively. This controlling mechanism over the industry resulted in: (a) several firms operating below minimum scale of efficiency; (b) underutilisation of capacity; and (c) usage of outdated technology. Recognition of the damaging effects of licensing and fettering policies led to initiation of reforms, which ultimately took a more prominent shape with the introduction of the New Economic

Policy(NEP)in1985.

However, the major set of reforms was launched in the year 1991 in response to the major macroeconomic crisis faced by the economy. The industrial policies shifted from a regime of regulation and tight control to a more liberalised and competitive era. Two major results of policy changes during these years in two-wheeler industry were that the, weaker players died out giving way to the new entrants and superior products and a sizeable increase in number of brands entered the market that compelled the firms to compete on the basis of product attributes. Finally, the twowheeler industry in the country has been able to witness a proliferation of brands with introduction of new technology as well as increase in number of players. However, with various policy measures undertaken in order to increase the competition, though the degree of concentration has been lessened over time, deregulation of the industry has not really resulted in higher level of competition. There is a large untapped market in semi-urban and rural areas of the country. Any strategic planning for the two-wheeler industry needs to identify these markets with the help of available statistical techniques. Potential markets can be identified as well as prioritised using these techniques with the help of secondary data on socioeconomic parameters. For the two-wheeler industry, it is also important to identify the target groups for various categories of motorcycles and scooters. With the formal introduction of secondhand car market by the reputed car manufacturers and easy loan availability for new as well as used cars, the two-wheeler industry needs to upgrade its market information system to capture the new market and to maintain its already existing markets. Availability of easy credit for two-wheelers in rural and smaller urban areas also requires more focussed attention. It is also imperative to initiate measures to make the presence of Indian two-wheeler industry felt in the global market. Adequate incentives for promoting exports and setting up of institutional mechanism such as Automobile Export Promotion Council would be of great help for further surge in demand for the Indian two-wheeler industry.

National Council of Applied Economic Research (NCAER) had forecast two-wheeler demand during the period 2002-03 through 2011-12. The forecasts had been made using econometric technique along with inputs obtained from a primary survey conducted at 14 prime cities in the country. Estimations were based on Panel

Regression, which takes into account both time series and cross section variation in data. A panel data of 16 major states over a period of 5 years ending 1999 was used for the estimation of parameters. The models considered a large number of macroeconomic, demographic and socio-economic variables to arrive at the best estimations for different two-wheeler segments. The projections have been made at all India and regional levels. Different scenarios have been presented based on different assumptions regarding the demand drivers of the two-wheeler industry. The most likely scenario assumed annual growth rate of Gross Domestic Product (GDP) to be 5.5 per cent during 2002-03 and was anticipated to increase gradually to 6.5 per cent during 2011-12. The all-India and region-wise projected growth trends for the motorcycles and scooters are presented in Table 1. The demand for mopeds is not presented in this analysis due to its already shrinking status compared to' motorcycles.

It is important to remember that the above-mentioned forecast presents a long-term growth for a period of 10 years. The high growth rate in motorcycle segment at present will stabilize after a certain point beyond which a condition of equilibrium will set the growth path. Another important thing to keep in mind while interpreting these growth rates is that the forecast could consider the trend till 1999 and the model could not capture the recent developments that have taken place in last few years. However, this will not alter the regional distribution to a significant extent.

Table 1 suggests two important dimensions for the two-wheeler industry. The region-wise numbers of motorcycle and scooter suggest the future market for these segments. At the all India level, the demand for motorcycles will be almost 10 times of that of the scooters. The same in the western region will be almost 20 times. It is also evident from the table that motorcycle will find its major market in the western region of the country, which will account for more than 40 per cent of its total demand. The south and the north-central region will follow this. The demand for scooters will be the maximum in the northern region, which will account for more than 50 per cent of the demand for scooters in 2011-12.

1.2 ABOUT THE COMPANY


COMPANYS PROFILE:

Bajaj Auto came into existence on November 29, 1945 as M/s Bachraj Trading Corporation Private Limited. It started off by selling imported two- and three wheelers in India. In 1959, it obtained license from the Government of India to manufacture two- and three-wheelers and it went public in 1960. In 1970, it rolled out its 100,000th vehicle. In 1977, it managed to produce and sell 100,000 vehicles in a single financial year. In 1985, it started producing at Waluj in Aurangabad. In 1986, it managed to produce and sell 500,000 vehicles in a single financial year. In 1995, it rolled out its ten millionth vehicles and produced and sold 1 million vehicles in a year. Bajaj Auto Limited. The Groups' principal activity is to manufacture two and three wheeler vehicles. Other activities of the group include insurance and investment business. The Group operates in three segments, which are Automotive, Insurance and Investment and Others. It has a network of 498 dealers and over 1,500 service dealers and 162 exclusive three-wheeler dealers spread across the country. About Bajaj The Bajaj Group is amongst the top 10 business houses in India. Its footprint stretches over a wide range of industries, spanning automobiles (two-wheelers and three-wheelers), home appliances, lighting, iron and steel, insurance, travel and finance. The groups flagship company, Bajaj Auto, is ranked as the worlds fourth largest two- and three- wheeler manufacturer and the Bajaj brand is well-known in over a dozen countries in Europe, Latin America, the US and Asia. Founded in 1926, at the height of India's movement for independence from the British, the group has an illustrious history. The integrity, dedication, resourcefulness and determination to succeed which are characteristic of the group today, are often traced back to its birth during those days of relentless devotion to a common cause. Jamnalal Bajaj, founder of the group, was a close confidant and disciple of Mahatma Gandhi. In fact, Gandhiji had adopted him as his son. This close relationship and his deep involvement in the independence movement did not leave Jamnalal Bajaj with much time to spend on his newly launched business venture. His son, Kamalnayan Bajaj, then 27, took over the

reins of business in 1942. He too was close to Gandhiji and it was only after Independence in 1947, that he was able to give his full attention to the business. Kamalnayan Bajaj not only consolidated the group, but also diversified into various manufacturing activities. The present Chairman and Managing Director of the group, Rahul Bajaj, took charge of the business in 1965. Under his leadership, the turnover of the Bajaj Auto the flagship company has gone up from Rs.72 million to Rs.46.16 billion (USD5 936 million), its product portfolio has expanded from one to and the brand has found a global market. He is one of Indias most distinguished business leaders and internationally respected for his business acumen and entrepreneurial spirit. Bajaj Pulsar is a motorcycle brand owned by Bajaj Auto in India. The two wheeler was developed by the product engineering division of Bajaj Auto in association with motorcycle designer Glynn Kerr Tokyo R&D.Currently there are four variants available -with engine capacities of 135 cc, 150cc, 180cc and 220 cc. More than a million units of Pulsar were sold by November 2005. With monthly sales of more than 48,000 units in June 2009, Pulsar is the leader in the 150 cc segment in India with a market share of 43% Before the introduction of the Pulsar, the Indian motorcycle market trend was towards fuel efficient, small capacity motorcycles (that formed the 80-125 cc class). Bigger motorcycles with higher capacity virtually did not exist (except for Enfield Bullet). The launch and success of Hero Honda CBZ in 1999 showed that there was demand for performance bikes. Bajaj took the cue from there on and launched the Pulsar twins in India on November 24, 2001. Since the introduction and success of Bajaj Pulsar, Indian youth began expecting high power and other features from affordable motorcycles. The project was faced with internal resistance, reservations by Mckinsey and doubts on its effects on Bajaj's relation with Kawasaki. The project required approximately 36 months for completion and cost Bajaj Rs 1 billion.

DTSi DTSi stands for Digital Twin Spark Ignition, a Bajaj Auto trademark. Bajaj Auto holds an Indian patent for the DTSi technology. The Alfa Romeo Twin-Spark engines, the BMW F650 Funduro which was sold in India from 1995 to 1997 also had a twin-spark plug technology, and the Rotax motorcycle engines,more recently Honda's iDSI Vehicle engines use a similar arrangement of two spark-plugs. However very few small capacity engines did eventually implement such a scheme in their production prototype. Patent infringement allegations In September 2007, Bajaj Auto filed a claim accusing that the development of TVS Flame was in violation of their patent for DTS-I. TVS Motors countered by threatening to sue Bajaj Auto for libel.On February 2008, the Madras High Court in Chennai restrained TVS from launching it with the twin spark plug technology. TVS appealed against this decision, claiming that crucial evidence was not taken into account and in March 2008, launched the Flame with a modified engine containing one spark plug.The DTSi idea is a simple one to understand - it involved usage of two spark plugs (instead of one) per engine cylinder. ExhausTEC ExhausTEC stands for Exhaust Torque Expansion Chamber, a technology patented by Bajaj.The technology involves use of a small chamber connected to the exhaust pipe of the engine to modify the back-pressure and the swirl characteristics, with an aim to improve the low-end performance of the bikes. The ExhausTEC technology is claimed to be highly effective in improving the low- and mid-range torque. Since 1986, there is a technical tie-up of Bajaj Auto Ltd. with Kawasaki Heavy Industries of Japan to manufacture state-of-art range of latest two-wheelers in India. The JV has already given the Indian market the KB series, 4S and 4S Champion, Boxer, the Caliber series, and Wind125.

Kawasaki Heavy Industries is a Fortune 500 company with a turnover of USD 10 billion (Rs. 45,840 crore). It has crafted new technologies for more than hundred years. The technologies of KHI have redefined space systems, aircrafts, jet engines, ships, locomotive, energy plants, automation system, construction machinery, and of KHI has given the world its legendary series of 600-1200cc Ninja and 1600 Vulcan bikes. Straight from its design boards, the Kawasaki Bajaj Eliminator, India's first real cruiser bike, redefines the pleasure of "biking" in looks as well as performance.

Company Flashback

'Inspiring Confidence,' the tagline, has build up confidence, through excitement engineering, not only to domestic consumers but also internationally. Established just eight decades back in 1926 by Jamnalal Bajaj, the company has been vested with India's largest exporter of two and three wheelers, 196,710 units in 2004-05, a great Bajaj Auto Ltd. sales have increased by approximately 21 per cent in the year 200405, which exceeds Rs 65.4 billion, a record in the history of the company. The gross operating profit stands at Rs. 9.3 billion, again a record. The profits after tax of the BAL are close to Rs. 7.7 billion, and the pre-tax return on operating. Capital The strength of the company is its quality products, excellence in engineering and design, and its ability to delight the customers. The Pulsar, introduced in November 2004, is continually dominating the premium segment of the motorcycle market, helping to maintain the market superiority. Discover DTSi, one more successful bike on Indian roads, is in the 'value' segment of the motorcycle market. It incorporates a high degree of power with fuel efficiency of a 100 cc motorcycle.

BAL is committed to prevention of pollution, continual improvement of environment performance and compliance with all environmental legislation and regulations. They always believe in providing the customer 'value for money' and keeps an special eye upon quality, safety, productivity, cost and delivery.

1.3 ABOUT THE STUDY


Customer satisfaction Customer satisfaction, a business term, is a measure of how products and services supplied by a company meet or surpass customer expectation. It is seen as a key performance indicator within business and is part of the four of a Scorecard. In a competitive marketplace where businesses compete for customers, customer satisfaction is seen as a key differentiator and increasingly has become a key element of business strategy. There is a substantial body of empirical literature that establishes the benefits of customer satisfaction for firms. Measuring customer satisfaction Organizations need to retain existing customers while targeting non-customers;[2]. Measuring customer satisfaction provides an indication of how successful the organization is at providing products and/or services to the marketplace.Customer satisfaction is an abstract concept and the actual manifestation of the state of satisfaction will vary from person to person and product/service to product/service. The state of satisfaction depends on a number of both psychological and physical variables which correlate with satisfaction behaviors such as return and recommend rate. The level of satisfaction can also vary depending on other factors the customer, such as other products against which the customer can compare the organization's products. Improving Customer Satisfaction Published standards exist to help organizations develop their current levels of customer satisfaction. The International Customer Service Institute (TICSI) has released The International Customer Service Standard (TICSS). TICSS enables organizations to focus their attention on delivering excellence in the management of customer service, whilst at the same time providing recognition of success through a 3rd Party registration scheme. TICSS focuses an organizations attention on delivering increased customer satisfaction by helping the organization through a Service Quality Model.

TICSS Service Quality Model uses the 5 P's - Policy, Processes, People, Premises, Product/Services, as well as performance measurement. The implementation of a customer service standard should lead to higher levels of customer satisfaction, which in turn influences customer retention and customer loyalty. Customer Satisfaction a Critical Component of Profitability Exceptional customer service results in greater customer retention, which in turn results in higher profitability. Customer loyalty is a major contributor to sustainable profit growth. To achieve success, you must make superior service second nature of your organization. A seamless integration of all components in the service-profit chain employee satisfaction, value creation, customer satisfaction, customer loyalty, and profit and growth links all the critical dynamics of top customer service. Customer Expectations Customer is defined as anyone who receives that which is produced by the individual or organization that has value. Customer expectations are continuously increasing. Brand loyalty is a thing of the past. Customers seek out products and producers that are best able to satisfy their requirements. A product does not need to be rated highest by customers on all dimensions, only on those they think are important. Measuring Customer Satisfaction To execute a successful client satisfaction survey, build one that your customers have the time and inclination to respond to, and that delves into the types of information that will truly help enhance your performance. By carefully constructing a brief, yet strong, survey, you can discover what your customers believe your strengths and weaknesses are and what makes your customers loyal to your company. Customers for Life By: Brian Tracy The purpose of a business is to create and keep a customer. If a business successfully creates and keeps customers in a cost-effective way, it will make a profit while continuing to survive and thrive. If, for any reason, a business fails to attract or sustain a sufficient number of customers, it will experience losses. Too many losses will lead to the demise of the enterprise.

According to Dun and Bradstreet, the single, most important reason for the failure of businesses in America is lack of sales. And, of course, this refers to resales as well as initial sales. So your companys job is to create and keep a customer, and your job is exactly the same. Remember, no matter what your official title is, you are a salesperson for yourself and your company.

Satisfaction is a persons feelings of pleasure or disappointment resulting from comparing a products perceived performance (or outcome) in relation to his or her expectations. Whether the buyer is satisfied after purchase depends on the offers performance in relation to the buyers expectations. If the performance falls short of the expectations, the customer is dissatisfied. If the performance matches the expectations, the customer is satisfied. If the performance exceeds expectations the customer is highly satisfied or delighted. A company would be wise to measure customer satisfaction regularly because one key to customer retention is customer satisfaction. A highly satisfied customer generally stays loyal longer, buys more as the company introduces new products and upgrades existing products, talks favourably about the company and its products, pays less attention to competing brands and is less sensitive to price, offers product or service ideas to the company, and costs less to serve than new customers because transactions are routine. It could mean early delivery, on-time delivery, order completeness, and so on. The company must also realize that two customers can report being highly satisfied for different reasons. One may be easily satisfied most of the time and the other might be hard to please but was pleased on this occasion. A number of methods exist to measure customer satisfaction. Periodic surveys can track customer satisfaction directly. Respondents can also be asked additional questions to measure repurchase intention and the likelihood or willingness to recommend the company and brand to others. Companies that do achieve high customer satisfaction ratings make sure their target market knows it. Although the customer-centered firm seeks to create high customer satisfaction, that is not its ultimate goal. The company might be able to increase its profitability by means other than increased satisfaction (for example, by improving manufacturing processes or investing more on R&D). Also, the company has many stakeholders, including employees, dealers, suppliers and stock holders.

1.3.1 OBJECTIVES OF THE STUDY


Primary objective: To measure the customer satisfaction towards Bajaj Pulsar with special reference to Jai Bajaj, Chennai.

Secondary objectives: To find out the factors influencing customer to purchase Bajaj pulsar. To find out the customer satisfaction towards free service given by the company. To determine the company image on sales.

1.3.2 SCOPE OF THE STUDY


This study is useful for me as well as for the company for identifying the Customer satisfaction level towards Bajaj Pulsar in Chennai city. For company, to identify the customer attitude towards Bajaj Pulsar. And also this study helps me to create and maintain a good relationship between the customer and the management. Because of this study, the company may know what the customer is looking for and also how to satisfy him regarding pulsar bike.

1.3.3 LIMITATIONS OF THE STUDY


1. Since the project duration was limited to Two months an elaborate study was not possible. 2. Study was limited in Chennai City. 3. The sample size was limited to 150 customers of Bajaj pulsar in Chennai City. 4. During the survey most of the respondents contacted had newly purchased the motorcycle thus they could not respond accurately i.e. their satisfaction level and defects in the motorcycles. 5. The research is directly concerned with the study of human preference and behavior and achieving absolute mathematical accuracy towards this was not possible.

CHAPTER 2
REVIEW OF LITERATURE
Bardia Alimohamadi; Nasrin Khorshidi(1980)1In beginning of 1980s, a majority of business sectors were suffering from high operating costs and inefficiencies which were a big loss to these sectors. These inefficiencies and lack of effectiveness were consequently producing high levels of customer dissatisfactions as well. Mohammed Alam; AtiqurRahman Khokhar(2006)2 The banking services have been dynamic during the last decade due to the advent of the Internet in banking sector. One of the most vital challenges of the Internet as a service delivery channel is providing and maintaining service quality. Service quality is an input of customer trust which becomes satisfaction and lead to loyalty as an output. Elinor Johnson(1984) 3 This study is based upon the premise that creating value is the basis for all businesses. The research problem and ultimate purpose of the study is to determine how customer perceived value can be improved at the Liberty Program, Naples Italy. Maria Hansson; Gunilla Hansson(2003)4 How shall effective and satisfactory replenishment planning and information sharing be designed to improve the security of consumer satisfaction? In which areas is it most essential to do changes in order to come closer to a more desirable replenishment planning and information sharing situation in the food supply chain? Purpose: The purpose of this master thesis is to provide propositions for improving replenishment planning and information sharing in the food supply chain in order to improve the consumer satisfaction. Method: The background to this master thesis led us to be nominalists and functionalists with a systems approach Laleh Nosrati(1993)5 The daily growth of the internet and e-commerce has changed the way of marketing and selling products and services. As a result of development in electronic information resources and the evolution of the "digital age" product sellers and information service providers face many new challenges.

Ina Landua(1986)6 Research Question/Purpose: Due to environmental legislation, economic influences and increasing concern about the environment among the general public, todays businesses are becoming more committed to environmental issues. Some enterprises yet have implemented a green strategy. Parmita Saha; Yanni Zhao(2005)7 In the last few years we have witnessed a substantial growth of internet-based services, both from pure Internet businesses and from traditional companies that are developing online services. One of the key challenges of the Internet as a service delivery channel is how they manage service quality, which holds a significant importance to customer satisfaction. Saadullah Khan(1994) 8 In the world of banking, the development in information technology has an enormous effect on development of more flexible payment methods and more-user friendly banking services. Electronic banking services are new, and the development and diffusion of these technologies by financial institutions is expected to result in a more efficient banking system. Mojdeh Ghezelayagh(1995)9 Banking, one of the most information intensive sectors, is an ideal domain for the successful development of e-commerce. The present study focuses on e-commerce opportunities for improving customer services in the Iran banking sector. Ali Dehghan(1999)10 The purpose of this research was to gain a better understanding of the service quality dimensions that affect customer satisfaction from customer perspective. Based on a detailed literature review, a frame of reference was developed. Some service quality dimensions were selected to be tested in CCG CO operations .

CHAPTER 3
RESEARCH METHODOLOGY
Research is an original contribution to the existing stock of knowledge making for its advancement. It is the pursuit of truth with the help of study, observation, comparison and experiment. In short, the search for knowledge through objective and systematic method of finding solution to a problem is research. A research method refers to the methods the researchers use in performing research operations. Research Methodology is a way to systematically solve the research problem. By research methodology not only the research methods are considered but also the logic behind the methods used in the context of the research study and explanations are given on why a particular technique is used RESEARCH DESIGN The research design that is adopted in this study is Descriptive Research. DESCRIPTIVE RESEARCH: To describe the characteristics of the variables in a situation. METHODS OF DATA COLLECTION Sources of Data: Data were collected through both primary and secondary data sources. Primary Data A primary data is a data, which is collected afresh and for the first time, and thus happen to be original in character. The primary data with the help of questionnaire were collected from various investors Secondary Data Secondary data consist of information that already exists somewhere, have been collected. Secondary data is collected from company websites, other websites. SAMPLING DESIGN Sampling Method: The sampling technique used is Simple Random sampling.

Sample Size: The sample size for this study is 150 customers of Bajaj pulsar in Chennai city.

Tools used for analysis : Simple percentage method and chi square method was used. 1. Simple percentage analysis: The percentage analysis is mainly used to standardize the response of the respondents. This analysis is carried out for all the questions given in the

questionnaire, mainly to asses, how the respondents are distributed in each category. Percentage analysis uses percentage to process the data this method is used as a percentage simply number, reducing them into 0-100 range through percentage. Percentage = n/N X 100

n = number of respondents assured. N= Total number of respondents. 2. Chi Square Test It is useful to determine the sign cant relationship between the two variables The formula is used for chi-square test.

Chi-square = (oij-eij)2 eij Where oij Observed frequency eij Expected frequency Expected frequency is calculated as follows

Expected value = Row total X column total Grand total

Degree of freedom = (r-1) X(c-1) Where, R - Number of rows C - Number of columns.

CHAPTER 4
ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION TABLE NO: 4.1

TABLE SHOWING THE AGE GROUP OF THE RESPONDENTS

Age group Below 20 years 20-40 years 40-60 years Above 60 years Total

No: of respondents 30 70 30 20 150

Percentage 20 46.7 20 13.3 100

INTERPRETATION: The above table shows that 20% of the respondents are age group of below 20, 46.7% of the respondents age is between 20-40, 20% of the respondents age is between 40-60 and 13.3% of the respondents age is above 60.

CHART NO: 4.1 CHART SHOWING THE AGE GROUP OF THE RESPONDENTS

AGE GROUP OF THE RESPONDENTS


50 PERCENTAGE 40 30 20 10 0 Below 20 20-40 40-60 Above 60 AGE GROUP 20 46.7 20 13.3

TABLE NO: 4.2 TABLE SHOWING THE OCCUPATION OF THE RESPONDENTS

Occupation students businessmen Working professional others Total

No: of the respondents 30 20 80 20 150

Percentage 20 13.4 53.2 13.4 100

INTERPRETATION: The above table shows that 20% of respondents are students, 13.4% of the respondents are businessmen, 53.2% of the respondents are working professionals and 13.4% of the respondents belong to others.

CHART NO: 4.2 CHART SHOWING THE OCCUPATION OF THE RESPONDENTS

OCCUPATION OF THE RESPONDENTS


60 PERCENTAGE 50 40 30 20 10 0
en t st ud

53.2 20 13.4
en al

13.4
ot he rs

ne ss

si

bu

W or

ki ng

OCCUPATION

pr

of es s

io n

TABLE NO: 4.3 TABLE SHOWING THE INCOME OF THE RESPONDENTS Income level Less than 5000 5001-10000 10001-15000 Above 15001 Total No: of respondents 12 33 78 27 150 Percentage 8 22 52 18 100

INTERPRETATION: The above table shows that 8% of the respondents income is less than 5000, 22% of the respondents is between 5001-10000, 52% of the respondents is between 1000115000 and 18% of the respondents income is between above 15001.

CHART NO 4.3 CHART SHOWING THE INCOME OF THE RESPONDENTS

INCOME OF THE RESPONDENTS


60 PERCENTAGE 50 40 30 20 10 0 8 Less than 5000 5001-10000 1000115000 22 18 Above 15001 52

INCOME

TABLE NO 4.4 TABLE SHOWING EDUCATIONAL QUALIFICATION Educational qualification Schooling graduate Post graduate Total No: of respondents 21 79 50 150 Percentage 14 52.6 33.4 100

INTERPRETATION: The above table shows that 14% of the respondents are school students, 52.6% of the respondents are graduates and 33.3% of the respondents are post graduates.

CHART NO 4.4 CHART SHOWING EDUCATIONAL QUALIFICATION

EDUCATIONAL QUALIFICATION
60 50 PERCENTAGE 40 30 20 10 0 Schooling graduate Post graduate 14 52.6 33.4

TABLE NO: 4.5 TABLE SHOWING THE AWARENESS OF VARIOUS SERIES OF PULSAR MOTORCYCLE

Awareness of respondents Yes No Total

No: of respondents

Percentage

132 18 150

88 12 100

INTERPRETATION: The above table shows that 88% of the respondents are aware of various series of pulsar motorcycle and 12% of the respondents are not aware of various series of pulsar motorcycle.

CHART NO: 4.5 CHART SHOWING THE AWARENESS OF VARIOUS SERIES OF PULSAR MOTORCYCLE

AWARENESS ABOUT VARIOUS SERIES OF PULSAR MOTORCYCLE


100 PERCENTAGE 80 60 40 20 0 Yes 12 No 88

TABLE NO 4.6 TABLE SHOWING THE AWARENESS OF THE PRODUCT SERIES Product series 150 cc 180 cc 200 cc 220 cc Total No: of respondents 25 70 25 30 150 Percentage 16.6 46.8 16.6 20 100

INTERPRETATION: The above table shows that 16.6% of the respondents are aware of 150cc, 46.8% of the respondents are aware of 180cc, 16.6% of the respondents are aware of 200cc and 20% of the respondents are aware of 220cc.

CHART NO: 4.6 CHART SHOWING THE AWARENESS OF THE PRODUCT SERIES

AWARENESS ABOUT THE PRODUT SERIES


50 PERCENTAGE 40 30 20 10 0 150 cc 180 cc 200 cc 220 cc PRODUT SERIES 16.6 46.8 16.6 20 percentage

TABLE NO: 4.7 TABLE SHOWING THE REASON FOR NOT CHOOSING THE PRODUCT

Reasons Unawareness Not interested Total

No: of respondents 75 75 150

Percentage 50 50 100

INTERPRETATION: The above table shows that 50% of the respondents are not aware for choosing the product and 50% of the respondents are not interested in choosing the product.

CHART NO: 4.7 CHART SHOWING THE REASON FOR NOT CHOOSING THE PRODUCT

REASON FOR NOT CHOOSING THE PRODUCT


60 50 PERCENTAGE 40 30 50 20 10 0 Unawareness Not interested 50

TABLE NO: 4.8 TABLE SHOWING THE SOURCE OF INFORMATION Source of information Family Friends Media Dealers Total No: of respondents 33 46 42 29 150 Percentage 22 30.6 28 19.4 100

INTERPRETATION: The above table shows that 22% of the respondents got information from their family,30.6% from their friends, 28% of them from the media and 19.4 % from dealers.

CHART NO: 4.8 CHART SHOWING THE SOURCE OF INFORMATION

SOURCE OF INFORMATION
35 30 PERCENTAGE 25 20 15 10 5 0 Family Friends Media Dealers SOURCE 22 30.6 28 19.4

TABLE NO: 4.9 TABLE SHOWING THE DURATION OF USING THE PRODUCT Duration Below 1 year 1-3 year 3-6 year Above 6 year Total No: of respondents 44 31 65 10 150 Percentage 29.4 20.6 43.4 6.6 100

INTERPRETATION: The above table shows that 29.4% of the respondents are using the product less than a year, 20.6% of the respondents are using between 1-3 year, 43.4% of the respondents are using between 3-6 year and 6.6% of the respondents are respondents are using for more than 6 years.

CHART NO 4.9 CHART SHOWING THE DURATION OF THE PRODUCT

DURATION OF USING THE PRODUCT


50 PERCENTAGE 40 30 20 29.4 10 0 Below 1 year 1-3 year 3-6 year 20.6 6.6 Above 6 year 43.4

DURATION

TABLE NO 4.10 TABLE SHOWING SATISFACTION LEVEL OFTHE BRAND IMAGE Brand image Highly satisfied Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Highly dissatisfied Total No: of respondents 111 22 0 12 5 150 Percentage 74 14.6 0 8 3.4 100

INTERPRETATION: The above table shows that 74% of the respondents are highly satisfied with the brand image, 14.6% of the respondents are satisfied with the brand image, 8% of the respondents are dissatisfied and 3.4% of the respondents are highly dissatisfied with the brand image.

CHART NO 4.10 CHART SHOWING SATISFACTION LEVEL OF THE BRAND IMAGE


SATISFACTION LEVEL OF THE BRAND IMAGE
80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0

PERCENTAGE

74 14.6 8

3.4

BRAND IMAGE

is sa t is f ie H ig d hl y di ss at is fie d

sa tis fie d

Sa t is f ie d

ig hl y

eu t ra l

TABLE NO 4.11 TABLE SHOWING THE SATISFACTION LEVEL TOWARDS MILEAGE Mileage Highly satisfied Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Highly dissatisfied Total No: of respondents 94 5 6 13 12 150 Percentage 62.6 16.7 4 8.7 8 100

INTERPRETATION: The above table shows that 62.6% of the respondents are highly satisfied with the mileage, 16.7% of the respondents are satisfied with the mileage, 4% of respondents have no idea about mileage, 8.7 % of the respondents are dissatisfied and 8% of the respondents are highly dissatisfied.

CHART NO 4.11 CHART SHOWING THE SATISFACTION LEVEL TOWARDS MILEAGE

SATISFACTION LEVEL TOWARDS MILEAGE


PERCENTAGE 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0
tis

62.6 16.7
d ie d fie tra

4
l eu is f

8.7
at is fie d di ss ly ie d

Sa t

is f

sa

H ig h

D is s

ly

M ILEAGE

H ig h

at

TABLE NO 4.12 TABLE SHOWING THE SATISFACTION LEVEL TOWARDS PRICE

Price Highly satisfied Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Highly dissatisfied Total

No: of respondents 31 26 10 50 33 150

Percentage 20.6 17.4 6.6 33.4 22 100

INTERPRETATION: The above table shows that 20.6% of the respondents are highly satisfied with the price, 17.4% of the respondents are satisfied with the price, 6.6% of respondents have no idea about price, 33.4 % of the respondents are dissatisfied and 22% of the respondents are highly dissatisfied.

CHART NO 4.12 CHART SHOWING THE SATISFACTION LEVEL TOWARDS PRICE

SATISFACTION LEVEL TOWARDS PRICE


40 35 30 25 20 15 10 5 0 PERCENTAGE

33.4 20.6 17.4 6.6

22

Satisfied

Highly satisfied

Neutral

PRICE

Dissatisfied

Highly dissatisfied

TABLE NO 4.13 TABLE SHOWING THE SATISFACTION LEVEL TOWARDS RESALE VALUE Price Highly satisfied Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Highly dissatisfied Total No: of respondents 42 31 10 33 34 150 Percentage 28 20.6 6.7 22 22.7 100

INTERPRETATION: The above table shows that 28% of the respondents are highly satisfied with the resale value, 20.6% of the respondents are satisfied with the resale value, 6.7% of respondents have no idea about resale value, 22% of the respondents are dissatisfied and 22.7% of the respondents are highly dissatisfied.

CHART NO 4.13 CHART SHOWING THE SATISFACTION LEVEL TOWARDS RESALE VALUE
SATISFACTION LEVEL TOWARDS RESALE VALUE
PERCENTAGE 30 25 20 15 10 5 0 28 20.6 6.7 Highly satisfied Satisfied Dissatisfied Highly dissatisfied 22 22.7

RESALE VALUE

Neutral

TABLE NO 4.14 TABLE SHOWING THE SATISFACTION LEVEL TOWARDS POPULARITY Popularity Highly satisfied Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Highly dissatisfied Total No: of respondents 115 14 0 9 12 150 Percentage 76.6 9.4 0 6 8 100

INTERPRETATION: The above table shows that 76.6% of the respondents are highly satisfied with the popularity, 9.4% of the respondents are satisfied with the popularity, 6% of the respondents are dissatisfied and 8% of the respondents are highly dissatisfied.

CHART NO 4.14 CHART SHOWING THE SATISFACTION LEVEL TOWARDS POPULARITY


SATISFACTION LEVEL TOWARDS POPULARITY 90 80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 PERCENTAGE

76.6 9.4 0 6 8

sa tis fi Sa ed tis fie d N eu D iss tra H l ig at hl is y fi di ss ed at isf ie d


POPULARITY

ig h

ly

TABLE NO 4.15 TABLE SHOWING THE SATISFACTION LEVEL TOWARDS COMFORT

Comfort Highly satisfied Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Highly dissatisfied Total

No: of respondents 98 32 0 10 10 150

Percentage 65.4 21.4 0 6.6 6.6 100

INTERPRETATION: The above table shows that 65.4% of the respondents are highly satisfied with the comfortness, 21.4% of the respondents are satisfied with the comfortness, 6.6 % of the respondents are dissatisfied and 6.6% of the respondents are highly dissatisfied.

CHART NO 4.15 CHART SHOWING THE SATISFACTION LEVEL TOWARDS COMFORT

SATISFACTION LEVEL TOWARDS COMFORT


PERCENTAGE 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0

65.4 21.4 0
Highly satisfied Satisfied Neutral

6.6
Dissatisfied

6.6
Highly dissatisfied

COMFORT

TABLE NO 4.16 TABLE SHOWING THE SATISFACTION LEVEL TOWARDS MAINTENANCE Maintenance Highly satisfied Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Highly dissatisfied Total No: of respondents 54 46 5 39 6 150 Percentage 36 30.6 3.4 26 4 100

INTERPRETATION: The above table shows that 36% of the respondents are highly satisfied with the maintenance, 30.6% of the respondents are satisfied with the maintenance, 3.4% of respondents have no idea about maintenance, 26 % of the respondents are dissatisfied and 4% of the respondents are highly dissatisfied.

CHART NO 4.16 CHART SHOWING THE SATISFACTION LEVEL TOWARDS MAINTENANCE

TABLE NO 4.17 TABLE SHOWING THE SATISFACTION LEVEL TOWARDS SAFETY Safety Highly satisfied Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Highly dissatisfied Total No: of respondents 74 46 8 12 10 150 Percentage 49.4 30.6 5.4 8 6.6 100

INTERPRETATION: The above table shows that 49.4% of the respondents are highly satisfied with the safety, 30.6% of the respondents are satisfied with the safety, 5.4% of respondents have no idea about safety, 8% of the respondents are dissatisfied and 6.6% of the respondents are highly dissatisfied.

CHART 4.17 CHART SHOWING THE SATISFACTION LEVEL TOWARDS SAFETY


SATISFACTION LEVEL TOWARDS SAFETY
60 50 40 30 20 10 0
tis

PERCENTAGE

49.4 30.6 8 6.6

5.4

ie d

is f

N eu

is f

Sa t

sa

at

H ig

hl

D is s

SAFETY

H ig h

ly

di ss

at is

fie d

fie

tra

ie d

TABLE NO 4.18 TABLE SHOWING THE AWARENESS OF FREE SERVICES Awareness of free services yes no Total 125 25 150 83.4 16.6 100 No: of respondents Percentage

INTERPRETATION The above table shows that 83.4% of the respondents are aware of free services and 16.6% of the respondents are not aware of free services.

CHART NO 4.18 CHART SHOWING THE AWARENESS OF FREE SERVICES

AWARENESS OF FREE SERVICES


100 80 60 40 20 0 yes FREE SERVICE no 16.6

83.4

TABLE NO 4.19 TABLE SHOWING THE SERVICES PROVIDED Services provided Below2 3 4 5 Above 5 Total No: of respondents 42 38 32 26 12 150 Percentage 28 25.3 21.3 17.4 8 100

INTERPRETATION: The above table shows that 28% of the respondents are provided services below 2 times, 25.3% are provided services for three times, 21.3% for 4 times, 17.4% of the respondents for 5 times and 8% of the respondents are provided services above 5 times.

CHART NO 4.19 CHART SHOWING THE SERVICES PROVIDED


SERVICES PROVIDED
30 25 PERCENTAGE 20 15 10 5 0 Below2 3 4 5 Above 5

TABLE NO 4.20 TABLE SHOWING THE FREE SERVICES GIVEN BY THEM Free services Highly satisfied Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Highly dissatisfied Total No: of respondents 94 41 0 10 5 150 Percentage 62.6 27.4 0 6.6 3.4 100

INTERPRETATION: The above table shows that 62.6% of the respondents are highly satisfied with the free services given by them, 27.4% of the respondents are satisfied with the free services, 6.6 % of the respondents are dissatisfied and 3.4% of the respondents are highly dissatisfied.

CHART NO.4.20 TABLE SHOWING THE FREE SERVICES GIVEN BY THEM

CHI-SQUARE
TABLE NO- 4.22 CHI-SQUARE TEST INCOME PRICE HIGHLY SATISFIED SATISFIED NEUTRAL DISSATISFIED HIGHLY DISSATISFIED TOTAL LESS THAN 5000 3 2 1 4 2 12 500110000 5 3 3 12 10 33 1000115000 17 6 5 30 20 78 ABOVE 15000 6 15 1 4 1 27 TOTAL

31 26 10 50 33 150

CALCULATIONS: H0: There is no significant relationship between present Income and price Ha: There is significant relationship between present income and price. Chi-square = (Oi-Ei)^2 Ei Oi 3 5 17 6 2 3 6 15 1 3 5 1 4 12 30 4 2 10 20 1 Ei 2.48 6.82 16.12 5.58 2.08 5.72 13.52 4.68 0.8 2.2 5.2 1.8 4 11 26 9 2.64 7.26 17.16 5.94 TOTAL Chi-square 0.10903226 0.48568915 0.0480397 0.0316129 0.00307692 1.29342657 4.18272189 22.7569231 0.05 0.29090909 0.00769231 0.3555555 0 0.09090909 0.61538402 2.77777778 0.15515152 1.03410468 0.47002331 4.10835017 38.8663806

CALCULATION V= (n-1) (m-1) =12 Table value = 21.026 Calculation value = 38.8663806

Table value is less than calculated value So, we reject H0 and Ha accepted.

INTERPRETATION: There is significant relationship between satisfied with present salary and working hour facility.

CHAPTER 5
FINDINGS AND INFERENCES Majority 46.7% of the respondents are under the age group between 20-40. Majority 53.2% of the respondents who use the bike are working professionals. Majority 52% of the respondents income is between 10001-15000. Majority 52.6% of the respondents completed their graduation. Majority 88% of the respondents are aware of various series of pulsar motorcycle. Majority 46.8% of the respondents are aware of 180cc. Majority 50% of the respondents are not aware for choosing the product and 50% of the respondents are not interested in choosing the product. Majority 30.6%of source of information is from their friends. Majority 43.4% of the respondents are using the bike for 3-6 year. Majority 74% of the respondents are highly satisfied with the brand image. Majority 62.6% of the respondents are highly satisfied with the mileage. Majority 33.4 % of the respondents are dissatisfied with the price. Majority 28% of the respondents are highly satisfied with the resale value. Majority 76.6% of the respondents are highly satisfied with the popularity. Majority 65.4% of the respondents are highly satisfied with the comfortness.

Majority 36% of the respondents are highly satisfied with the maintenance. Majority 49.4% of the respondents are highly satisfied with the safety. Majority 83.4% of the respondents are aware of free services. Majority 28% of the respondents are provided services below 2 times. Majority 62.6% of the respondents are highly satisfied with the free services given by them.

CHAPTER 6
RECOMMENDATIONS
The following are the suggestions given by the respondents

Respondents feel that the price is high and suggested that it should be brought down, so that more people can purchase it. Respondents suggest that the company should take initiative in selling up more number of authorized services centers in different locality of the city. Few respondents are not satisfied with the resale value, so the company should take necessary steps regarding the resale value. Majority of the respondents are highly satisfied in driving the bike, so the company shall maintain the same strategy. Few respondents are much worried about the maintenance, because the cost of giving it to service is very high when compared with the other bikes Most of the respondents are very much aware of giving free services, so the company should increase free services as much as possible. Few respondents feel that the free services should be done properly and it should not be for namesake.

CHAPTER 7
CONCLUSION From this research work done in Bajaj pulsar in, Chennai city. The respondents are highly satisfied with the present Bajaj pulsar bike. The reason is because of their brand image and style of the bike and the comfort and also the free services provided by them. But there are few respondents who are not satisfied with the price. So the company should look on the price also. When compared to all Bajaj bikes, Bajaj Pulsar is sold many. Because, the main thing is, it is very familiar to all the people when compared with all other Bajaj bikes.

BIBLIOGRAPHY

REFERENCES:

1. David A. Aker, V Kumar and George S.Day (2002), Marketing research, Seventh Edition, John Wiley & sons.
2. C.R. Kothari (2004), Research Methodology: Methods and Techniques,

Revised Second edition, New Age International. Pvt. Ltd. 3. Philip Kotler, Kevin Lane Keller, Abraham Koshy, Mithileshwar Jha (2007), Marketing Management, Twelfth Edition, Pearson Education, Inc. WEBSITES:

1. http://www.Bajaj pulsar.com/ 2. http://www.google.co.in/ 4. http://www.wikipedia.com/ 5. http://www.jaibajaj.com/

QUESTIONNAIRE
1. Name: 2. Age: Below 20 20-40 40-60 above 60 3. Occupation: Student businessmen working professional others 4. Income: Less than 5000 5001-1000 10001-15000 above 15000 5. Educational qualification: schooling under graduate post graduate 6. Are you aware of various series of pulsar motorcycle do you own? Yes no 7. If yes mention the series which you are aware? 150cc 180cc 200cc 220cc 8. If no mention a reason? unawareness not interested 9. What was the source of information for the purchase of Bajaj Pulsar? Family Friends Media Dealers 10. How long are you using Bajaj Pulsar? below I year 1-3year 3-6year above 6year 11. Are you satisfied with the brand image? highly satisfied satisfied neutral dissatisfied highly dissatisfied 12. Are you satisfied with the mileage? highly satisfied satisfied neutral dissatisfied highly dissatisfied 13. Are you satisfied with the price? highly satisfied satisfied neutral dissatisfied highly dissatisfied 14. Are you satisfied with the resale value? highly satisfied satisfied neutral dissatisfied . highly dissatisfied 15. Are you satisfied with the popularity? highly satisfied satisfied neutral dissatisfied highly dissatisfied

16. Are you satisfied with the comfort? highly satisfied satisfied neutral dissatisfied highly dissatisfied 17. Are you satisfied with the maintenance? highly satisfied satisfied neutral dissatisfied highly dissatisfied 18. Are you satisfied with the safety? highly satisfied satisfied neutral dissatisfied highly dissatisfied 19. Are you aware of giving free service of your motorcycle to the showroom? yes no 20. If yes how many services you can get? below 2 3 4 5 above 5 21. Are you satisfied with free services given by them? highly satisfied satisfied neutral dissatisfied highly dissatisfied 22. Suggestions if any __________________________________

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