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Honors Physics / Unit 03 / CAPM

Name:

Constant Acceleration Model

Unit I Constant Velocity Model

Unit I Constant Velocity Model Unit III Constant Acceleration Model
Unit I Constant Velocity Model Unit III Constant Acceleration Model
Unit I Constant Velocity Model Unit III Constant Acceleration Model

Unit III Constant Acceleration Model

Unit I Constant Velocity Model Unit III Constant Acceleration Model
Unit I Constant Velocity Model Unit III Constant Acceleration Model
Unit I Constant Velocity Model Unit III Constant Acceleration Model

– 1 –

from Modeling Workshop Project © 2006

Honors Physics / Unit 03 / CAPM

Ramp and Cart Investigations

Sketch and label the setup:

What could we measure? How could we measure it?

Use this space for notes, sketches, etc from the discussion.

from Modeling Workshop Project © 2006 !

– 2 –

Honors Physics / Unit 03 / CAPM

From Minds-On Physics

Walk-A-Graph

Physics / Unit 03 / CAPM From Minds-On Physics Walk-A-Graph (1) A marble is rolled at

(1) A marble is rolled at constant speed along a horizontal surface toward the origin. The marble is released at a distance of 1 meter away from the origin. (2) A block sits at rest on a table 1 meter above the floor. Take the origin to be the level of the floor. (3) A ball is dropped from a height of 2 meters above the floor. Take the origin to be the point from which the ball is released. (4) A ball is rolled along a horizontal surface. The ball strikes a wall and rebounds toward the origin. (5) A car is parked on a steep hill.

toward the origin. (5) A car is parked on a steep hill. (1) A block is

(1) A block is dropped from rest with a height of 1 meter above the floor. Take the origin to be at the level of the floor. (2) A marble is released from the top of an inclined plane. Assume that positive x is measured down the plane. (3) A ball is thrown straight up into the air. Take the origin to be at the level of the floor. (4) A ball rolls along a horizontal surface without changing speed. The ball strikes a wall and rebounds toward the origin at approximately the same speed as before. (5) A marble rolls on to a piece of felt, eventually stopping.

– 3 –

from Modeling Workshop Project © 2006

Honors Physics / Unit 03 / CAPM

Practice 1: Graphs of Motion with Changing Velocity

1. Consider the velocity-vs-time graphs and describe the motion of the objects.

Object A

16 12 8 4 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 -4 -8
16
12
8
4
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
-4
-8
-12
-16
v (m/s)

t (s)

Object B

16 12 8 4 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 -4 -8
16
12
8
4
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
-4
-8
-12
-16
v (m/s)

t (s)

Determine the displacement between 4 and 8 seconds. Show work!

Determine the average acceleration during the first 3 seconds. Show work!

Describe the motion in words.

Sketch a motion map. Be sure to include both velocity and acceleration vectors.

from Modeling Workshop Project © 2006 !

– 4 –

Honors Physics / Unit 03 / CAPM

2. Use the velocity-vs-time graph to analyze the motion of the object.

a. Give a written description of the motion.

b. Sketch a motion map. Be sure to include both velocity and acceleration vectors.

Be sure to include both velocity and acceleration vectors. c. Determine the displacement of the object

c. Determine the displacement of the object from t = 0 s to t = 4 s.

d. Determine the displacement of the object from t = 4 s to t = 8 s.

e. Determine the displacement of the object from t = 2 s to t = 6 s.

f. Determine the object’s acceleration at t = 4 s.

g. Sketch a possible position-vs-time graph for the motion of the object. Explain why your graph is only one of many possible graphs.

– 5 –

from Modeling Workshop Project © 2006

Honors Physics / Unit 03 / CAPM

Practice 2: Changing Velocities

3. The table shows some position and time data.

a. Use the double interval method to calculate the velocity at t = 0.030 s. Show your calculation below.

b. Use the double interval method to calculate the velocity at each time and fill in the rest of the table.

4. Consider the velocity-vs-time graph.

Time (s)

Position (cm)

Velocity (cm/s)

0.000

0.0

0.030

1.2

 

0.060

2.2

 

0.090

3.0

 

0.120

6.0

 

0.150

8.1

a. During which time interval(s) is the acceleration positive? During which time interval(s) is the acceleration negative? How do you know?

b. At what time or times is the acceleration zero? How do you know?

30 25 20 15 10 5 20 40 60 80 100 Velocity m s
30
25
20
15
10
5
20
40
60
80
100
Velocity m s

Time s

c. Use the tangent slope method to calculate the acceleration at time t = 10.0s.

d. Describe the motion of the object in words. In your complete sentences, you might want to use phrases like speeding up, slowing down, in the positive direction, in the negative direction, reverses direction, starting from rest.

from Modeling Workshop Project © 2006 !

– 6 –

Acceleration cm s 2

Honors Physics / Unit 03 / CAPM

5. The acceleration-vs-time graph for a cart moving along a straight-line track is shown below.

a. Calculate the change in velocity over the first 3.0 s of motion.

b. Calculate the change in velocity over the entire 8.0 s of motion.

3

2

1

0

1

2

in velocity over the entire 8.0 s of motion. 3 2 1 0 1 2 1

1

2

3 4 5 6
3
4
5
6

7

8

Time s

c. Given that the cart starts with an initial velocity of +2.0 m/s, plot the velocity-vs-time graph for this motion. (Yep, this is a bit tricky… go for it!! Break the a-t graph into useful parts.)

8 6 4 2 0 2 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Velocity
8
6
4
2
0
2
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Velocity cm s

Time s

d. Describe the motion of the object in words based on the velocity graph that you drew.

– 7 –

from Modeling Workshop Project © 2006

Honors Physics / Unit 03 / CAPM

Stacks of Kinematics Curves

Given the following position vs time graphs, sketch the corresponding velocity vs time and acceleration vs time graphs. For each problem (or part of problem), tell whether the forces on the object must be balanced or unbalanced. If they are unbalanced, say whether they are unbalanced in the positive or negative direction.

x x x x t t t t v v v v t t t
x
x
x
x
t
t
t
t
v
v
v
v
t
t
t
t
a
a
a
a
t
t
t
t
Balanced
or Unbalanced (+ / –)?
Balanced
or Unbalanced (+ / –)?
Balanced
or Unbalanced (+ / –)?
Balanced
or Unbalanced (+ / –)?
x
x
x
x
t
t
t
t
v
v
v
v
t
t
t
t
a
a
a
a
t
t
t
t
Balanced
or Unbalanced (+ / –)?
Balanced
or Unbalanced (+ / –)?
Balanced
or Unbalanced (+ / –)?
Balanced
or Unbalanced (+ / –)?

from Modeling Workshop Project © 2006 !

– 8 –

Honors Physics / Unit 03 / CAPM

For the following velocity vs time graphs, draw the corresponding position vs time and acceleration vs time graphs. For each problem (or part of problem), tell whether the forces on the object must be balanced or unbalanced. If they are unbalanced, say whether they are unbalanced in the positive or negative direction.

x x x x t t t t v v v v t t t
x
x
x
x
t
t
t
t
v
v
v
v
t
t
t
t
a
a
a
a
t
t
t
t
Balanced
or Unbalanced (+ / –)?
Balanced
or Unbalanced (+ / –)?
Balanced
or Unbalanced (+ / –)?
Balanced
or Unbalanced (+ / –)?
x
x
x
x
t
t
t
t
v
v
v
v
t
t
t
t
a
a
a
a
t
t
t
t
Balanced
or Unbalanced (+ / –)?
Balanced
or Unbalanced (+ / –)?
Balanced
or Unbalanced (+ / –)?
Balanced
or Unbalanced (+ / –)?

– 9 –

from Modeling Workshop Project © 2006

Honors Physics / Unit 03 / CAPM

Practice 3: CAPM Ranking Tasks

The following situations illustrate the position of two different balls at different times. The first ball (a through f) rolls with constant velocity across a horizontal surface, while the second ball (g through l) rolls with constant acceleration down an inclined ramp. Both objects are at position zero at time = 0, and both are at position = d at time = 6 s.

!

!

(a) t = 0s, pos = 0m

(a) t = 0s, pos = 0m

(d) t = 6s, pos = d

pos = 0m ( d ) t = 6 s , p o s = d

(b) t = 2s

( d ) t = 6 s , p o s = d (b) t =

(e) t = 8s

!

!

= 6 s , p o s = d (b) t = 2s (e) t =

(c) t = 4s

, p o s = d (b) t = 2s (e) t = 8s ! !

(f) t = 10s

s = d (b) t = 2s (e) t = 8s ! ! (c) t =

(g) t = 0, x = 0, v = 0

t = 8s ! ! (c) t = 4s (f) t = 10s (g) t =

(j) t = 6s, pos = d

!

(h) t = 2s !
(h) t = 2s
!

(k) t = 8s

(i) t = 4s

0 (j) t = 6s, pos = d ! (h) t = 2s ! (k) t

(l) t = 10s

pos = d ! (h) t = 2s ! (k) t = 8s (i) t =
pos = d ! (h) t = 2s ! (k) t = 8s (i) t =
pos = d ! (h) t = 2s ! (k) t = 8s (i) t =

!

!

6. Rank each situation (a through l… yes, all 12 together, not two separate lists) according to the position along the surface of the ball at the indicated time. Write your answer on a single line, using the > and = signs to show the relationships. NOTE: The pictures are not drawn to scale, so you cannot rely on them to show which ball is ahead.

Explain the reason for your ranking. Try to make a single, clear statement that applies to every case rather than enumerating the work for each case.

Rank each situation (a through l) according to the instantaneous velocity of the ball at the indicated time. Write your answer on a single line, using the > and = signs to show the relationships. NOTE: The pictures are still not necessarily drawn to scale.

Explain the reason for your ranking. Try to make a single, clear statement that applies to every case rather than enumerating the work for each case.

from Modeling Workshop Project © 2006 !

– 10 –

following three Truck starts from dune buggy travels deer in three Using the constant Honors
following three Truck starts from dune buggy travels deer in three Using the constant Honors
following three Truck starts from dune buggy travels deer in three Using the constant Honors
following three Truck starts from dune buggy travels deer in three Using the constant Honors
following three Truck starts from dune buggy travels deer in three Using the constant Honors
following three Truck starts from dune buggy travels deer in three Using the constant Honors
following three Truck starts from dune buggy travels deer in three Using the constant Honors
following three Truck starts from dune buggy travels deer in three Using the constant Honors
following three Truck starts from dune buggy travels deer in three Using the constant Honors
following three Truck starts from dune buggy travels deer in three Using the constant Honors
following three Truck starts from dune buggy travels deer in three Using the constant Honors

following three

Truck starts from

dune buggy travels

deer in

three

Using the constant

dune buggy travels deer in three Using the constant Honors Physics / Unit 03 7. Read
dune buggy travels deer in three Using the constant Honors Physics / Unit 03 7. Read

Honors

Physics / Unit 03

7. Read

the

/

I.

A Mac

II.

A

III.

A driver sees

a

20 seconds.

a.

For each

of the

applies, or

b.

For one problem

c.

units.

applies, or b. For one problem c. units. if (CVPM) applies. seconds.

if

(CVPM) applies.

seconds.

Velocity Particle Model

m/s.

Constant

8.5 m/s in 20

the

of 8.5

find most useful.

Apply the Model

a speed

4:

20 seconds at

rest and reaches a speed of

problems and consider

for

Practice

acceleration particle model, solve for any unknown quantities. Show your work and use

CAPM

the road ahead and

applies

the

brakes.

The car slows to a stop

from

8.5 m/s

in

above problems, say whether CVPM

applies, whether BFPM applies, whether

CAPM

 

and explain your

reasoning.

 

where CAPM applies, draw at least three

diagrams

and/or graphs

to illustrate

the

situation.

and/or graphs to illustrate the situation. whether none of those models apply, Choose the diagrams and
and/or graphs to illustrate the situation. whether none of those models apply, Choose the diagrams and
and/or graphs to illustrate the situation. whether none of those models apply, Choose the diagrams and
and/or graphs to illustrate the situation. whether none of those models apply, Choose the diagrams and
and/or graphs to illustrate the situation. whether none of those models apply, Choose the diagrams and
and/or graphs to illustrate the situation. whether none of those models apply, Choose the diagrams and
and/or graphs to illustrate the situation. whether none of those models apply, Choose the diagrams and
and/or graphs to illustrate the situation. whether none of those models apply, Choose the diagrams and
and/or graphs to illustrate the situation. whether none of those models apply, Choose the diagrams and
and/or graphs to illustrate the situation. whether none of those models apply, Choose the diagrams and
and/or graphs to illustrate the situation. whether none of those models apply, Choose the diagrams and
and/or graphs to illustrate the situation. whether none of those models apply, Choose the diagrams and
and/or graphs to illustrate the situation. whether none of those models apply, Choose the diagrams and
and/or graphs to illustrate the situation. whether none of those models apply, Choose the diagrams and
and/or graphs to illustrate the situation. whether none of those models apply, Choose the diagrams and
and/or graphs to illustrate the situation. whether none of those models apply, Choose the diagrams and
and/or graphs to illustrate the situation. whether none of those models apply, Choose the diagrams and
and/or graphs to illustrate the situation. whether none of those models apply, Choose the diagrams and
and/or graphs to illustrate the situation. whether none of those models apply, Choose the diagrams and
and/or graphs to illustrate the situation. whether none of those models apply, Choose the diagrams and

whether none of those models apply,

the situation. whether none of those models apply, Choose the diagrams and graphs that you –
the situation. whether none of those models apply, Choose the diagrams and graphs that you –
the situation. whether none of those models apply, Choose the diagrams and graphs that you –
the situation. whether none of those models apply, Choose the diagrams and graphs that you –
the situation. whether none of those models apply, Choose the diagrams and graphs that you –
the situation. whether none of those models apply, Choose the diagrams and graphs that you –
the situation. whether none of those models apply, Choose the diagrams and graphs that you –
the situation. whether none of those models apply, Choose the diagrams and graphs that you –
the situation. whether none of those models apply, Choose the diagrams and graphs that you –
the situation. whether none of those models apply, Choose the diagrams and graphs that you –
the situation. whether none of those models apply, Choose the diagrams and graphs that you –
the situation. whether none of those models apply, Choose the diagrams and graphs that you –
the situation. whether none of those models apply, Choose the diagrams and graphs that you –
the situation. whether none of those models apply, Choose the diagrams and graphs that you –
the situation. whether none of those models apply, Choose the diagrams and graphs that you –

Choose the diagrams and graphs that you

Choose the diagrams and graphs that you
Choose the diagrams and graphs that you – 11 – from Modeling Workshop Project © 2006
Choose the diagrams and graphs that you – 11 – from Modeling Workshop Project © 2006
Choose the diagrams and graphs that you – 11 – from Modeling Workshop Project © 2006
Choose the diagrams and graphs that you – 11 – from Modeling Workshop Project © 2006
Choose the diagrams and graphs that you – 11 – from Modeling Workshop Project © 2006
Choose the diagrams and graphs that you – 11 – from Modeling Workshop Project © 2006
Choose the diagrams and graphs that you – 11 – from Modeling Workshop Project © 2006
Choose the diagrams and graphs that you – 11 – from Modeling Workshop Project © 2006
Choose the diagrams and graphs that you – 11 – from Modeling Workshop Project © 2006
Choose the diagrams and graphs that you – 11 – from Modeling Workshop Project © 2006
Choose the diagrams and graphs that you – 11 – from Modeling Workshop Project © 2006
Choose the diagrams and graphs that you – 11 – from Modeling Workshop Project © 2006
Choose the diagrams and graphs that you – 11 – from Modeling Workshop Project © 2006
Choose the diagrams and graphs that you – 11 – from Modeling Workshop Project © 2006
Choose the diagrams and graphs that you – 11 – from Modeling Workshop Project © 2006
Choose the diagrams and graphs that you – 11 – from Modeling Workshop Project © 2006
Choose the diagrams and graphs that you – 11 – from Modeling Workshop Project © 2006
Choose the diagrams and graphs that you – 11 – from Modeling Workshop Project © 2006
Choose the diagrams and graphs that you – 11 – from Modeling Workshop Project © 2006
Choose the diagrams and graphs that you – 11 – from Modeling Workshop Project © 2006
Choose the diagrams and graphs that you – 11 – from Modeling Workshop Project © 2006
Choose the diagrams and graphs that you – 11 – from Modeling Workshop Project © 2006
Choose the diagrams and graphs that you – 11 – from Modeling Workshop Project © 2006
Choose the diagrams and graphs that you – 11 – from Modeling Workshop Project © 2006
Choose the diagrams and graphs that you – 11 – from Modeling Workshop Project © 2006
Choose the diagrams and graphs that you – 11 – from Modeling Workshop Project © 2006
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– 11 –

from

Modeling Workshop Project

©

2006

Choose the diagrams and graphs that you – 11 – from Modeling Workshop Project © 2006
Choose the diagrams and graphs that you – 11 – from Modeling Workshop Project © 2006
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For the following problems, a complete solution will consist of Honors Physics / Unit 03
For the following problems, a complete solution will consist of Honors Physics / Unit 03
For the following problems, a complete solution will consist of Honors Physics / Unit 03

For the following problems,

a complete

solution will consist of

Honors Physics

/ Unit 03 / CAPM

(a)

at least three diagrams and/or graphs to represent the situation.

(Use the ones

you find most useful.)

(b)

a determination

of the quantities for which it is

possible to solve.

(c)

a clear

presentation of

the

procedure used to produce

a

numerical answer for

each unknown

quantity, with units.

8.

A

car whose initial speed is

30 m/s

slows

uniformly to

10 m/s in

5

seconds.

30 m/s slows uniformly to 10 m/s in 5 seconds. 9. A bear spies some honey
30 m/s slows uniformly to 10 m/s in 5 seconds. 9. A bear spies some honey
30 m/s slows uniformly to 10 m/s in 5 seconds. 9. A bear spies some honey
30 m/s slows uniformly to 10 m/s in 5 seconds. 9. A bear spies some honey
30 m/s slows uniformly to 10 m/s in 5 seconds. 9. A bear spies some honey
30 m/s slows uniformly to 10 m/s in 5 seconds. 9. A bear spies some honey
30 m/s slows uniformly to 10 m/s in 5 seconds. 9. A bear spies some honey
30 m/s slows uniformly to 10 m/s in 5 seconds. 9. A bear spies some honey
30 m/s slows uniformly to 10 m/s in 5 seconds. 9. A bear spies some honey
30 m/s slows uniformly to 10 m/s in 5 seconds. 9. A bear spies some honey
30 m/s slows uniformly to 10 m/s in 5 seconds. 9. A bear spies some honey
30 m/s slows uniformly to 10 m/s in 5 seconds. 9. A bear spies some honey
30 m/s slows uniformly to 10 m/s in 5 seconds. 9. A bear spies some honey
30 m/s slows uniformly to 10 m/s in 5 seconds. 9. A bear spies some honey
30 m/s slows uniformly to 10 m/s in 5 seconds. 9. A bear spies some honey
30 m/s slows uniformly to 10 m/s in 5 seconds. 9. A bear spies some honey
30 m/s slows uniformly to 10 m/s in 5 seconds. 9. A bear spies some honey
30 m/s slows uniformly to 10 m/s in 5 seconds. 9. A bear spies some honey
30 m/s slows uniformly to 10 m/s in 5 seconds. 9. A bear spies some honey
30 m/s slows uniformly to 10 m/s in 5 seconds. 9. A bear spies some honey
30 m/s slows uniformly to 10 m/s in 5 seconds. 9. A bear spies some honey
30 m/s slows uniformly to 10 m/s in 5 seconds. 9. A bear spies some honey
30 m/s slows uniformly to 10 m/s in 5 seconds. 9. A bear spies some honey
30 m/s slows uniformly to 10 m/s in 5 seconds. 9. A bear spies some honey
30 m/s slows uniformly to 10 m/s in 5 seconds. 9. A bear spies some honey
30 m/s slows uniformly to 10 m/s in 5 seconds. 9. A bear spies some honey
30 m/s slows uniformly to 10 m/s in 5 seconds. 9. A bear spies some honey
30 m/s slows uniformly to 10 m/s in 5 seconds. 9. A bear spies some honey
30 m/s slows uniformly to 10 m/s in 5 seconds. 9. A bear spies some honey
30 m/s slows uniformly to 10 m/s in 5 seconds. 9. A bear spies some honey
30 m/s slows uniformly to 10 m/s in 5 seconds. 9. A bear spies some honey
30 m/s slows uniformly to 10 m/s in 5 seconds. 9. A bear spies some honey
30 m/s slows uniformly to 10 m/s in 5 seconds. 9. A bear spies some honey
30 m/s slows uniformly to 10 m/s in 5 seconds. 9. A bear spies some honey
30 m/s slows uniformly to 10 m/s in 5 seconds. 9. A bear spies some honey
30 m/s slows uniformly to 10 m/s in 5 seconds. 9. A bear spies some honey
30 m/s slows uniformly to 10 m/s in 5 seconds. 9. A bear spies some honey
30 m/s slows uniformly to 10 m/s in 5 seconds. 9. A bear spies some honey
30 m/s slows uniformly to 10 m/s in 5 seconds. 9. A bear spies some honey
30 m/s slows uniformly to 10 m/s in 5 seconds. 9. A bear spies some honey
30 m/s slows uniformly to 10 m/s in 5 seconds. 9. A bear spies some honey
30 m/s slows uniformly to 10 m/s in 5 seconds. 9. A bear spies some honey
30 m/s slows uniformly to 10 m/s in 5 seconds. 9. A bear spies some honey
30 m/s slows uniformly to 10 m/s in 5 seconds. 9. A bear spies some honey
30 m/s slows uniformly to 10 m/s in 5 seconds. 9. A bear spies some honey
30 m/s slows uniformly to 10 m/s in 5 seconds. 9. A bear spies some honey
30 m/s slows uniformly to 10 m/s in 5 seconds. 9. A bear spies some honey

9.

A bear spies some

honey 10

m away and takes off from

rest, accelerating

at a

from Modeling Workshop Project

from Modeling Workshop Project

© 2006 !

– 12 –

rate of 2.0 m/s 2 .

© 2006 ! – 12 – rate of 2.0 m/s 2 .
© 2006 ! – 12 – rate of 2.0 m/s 2 .
© 2006 ! – 12 – rate of 2.0 m/s 2 .
© 2006 ! – 12 – rate of 2.0 m/s 2 .
© 2006 ! – 12 – rate of 2.0 m/s 2 .
© 2006 ! – 12 – rate of 2.0 m/s 2 .
© 2006 ! – 12 – rate of 2.0 m/s 2 .
© 2006 ! – 12 – rate of 2.0 m/s 2 .
© 2006 ! – 12 – rate of 2.0 m/s 2 .
© 2006 ! – 12 – rate of 2.0 m/s 2 .
© 2006 ! – 12 – rate of 2.0 m/s 2 .
© 2006 ! – 12 – rate of 2.0 m/s 2 .
© 2006 ! – 12 – rate of 2.0 m/s 2 .
© 2006 ! – 12 – rate of 2.0 m/s 2 .
© 2006 ! – 12 – rate of 2.0 m/s 2 .
© 2006 ! – 12 – rate of 2.0 m/s 2 .
© 2006 ! – 12 – rate of 2.0 m/s 2 .
© 2006 ! – 12 – rate of 2.0 m/s 2 .
© 2006 ! – 12 – rate of 2.0 m/s 2 .
© 2006 ! – 12 – rate of 2.0 m/s 2 .
© 2006 ! – 12 – rate of 2.0 m/s 2 .
© 2006 ! – 12 – rate of 2.0 m/s 2 .
© 2006 ! – 12 – rate of 2.0 m/s 2 .
© 2006 ! – 12 – rate of 2.0 m/s 2 .
© 2006 ! – 12 – rate of 2.0 m/s 2 .
© 2006 ! – 12 – rate of 2.0 m/s 2 .
© 2006 ! – 12 – rate of 2.0 m/s 2 .
© 2006 ! – 12 – rate of 2.0 m/s 2 .
© 2006 ! – 12 – rate of 2.0 m/s 2 .
© 2006 ! – 12 – rate of 2.0 m/s 2 .
© 2006 ! – 12 – rate of 2.0 m/s 2 .
© 2006 ! – 12 – rate of 2.0 m/s 2 .
© 2006 ! – 12 – rate of 2.0 m/s 2 .
© 2006 ! – 12 – rate of 2.0 m/s 2 .
© 2006 ! – 12 – rate of 2.0 m/s 2 .
© 2006 ! – 12 – rate of 2.0 m/s 2 .
© 2006 ! – 12 – rate of 2.0 m/s 2 .
© 2006 ! – 12 – rate of 2.0 m/s 2 .
© 2006 ! – 12 – rate of 2.0 m/s 2 .
© 2006 ! – 12 – rate of 2.0 m/s 2 .
© 2006 ! – 12 – rate of 2.0 m/s 2 .
© 2006 ! – 12 – rate of 2.0 m/s 2 .
© 2006 ! – 12 – rate of 2.0 m/s 2 .
© 2006 ! – 12 – rate of 2.0 m/s 2 .
© 2006 ! – 12 – rate of 2.0 m/s 2 .
© 2006 ! – 12 – rate of 2.0 m/s 2 .
© 2006 ! – 12 – rate of 2.0 m/s 2 .
© 2006 ! – 12 – rate of 2.0 m/s 2 .
© 2006 ! – 12 – rate of 2.0 m/s 2 .
© 2006 ! – 12 – rate of 2.0 m/s 2 .