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GUIDE QUESTIONS Part 1. 1. In part 1, should the work done be increasing every trial?

Explain No, because based from the data that weve gathered the work is directly proportional to the force applied by the fan. Another thing is the work is directly proportional to the displacement of the fan cart. Since our group decreases the displacement by 10 cm or .10 m for every trial while the cart is at constant velocity, the time intervened also decreases. So therefore, the work done should be decreasing in every trial. 2. In part 1, should the power expended be increasing every trial? No, I guess the power expended must be constant in every trial since the battery supplies the energy to the fan cart. Since the results that our group had calculated have a very small difference in each trial, it is safe to say that the power consumed is constant.

Part 2. 1. In figure 6, why is it incorrect to calculate the work done by multiplying the spring balance reading F and the horizontal displacement x? It is incorrect to calculate the work done by multiplying the spring balance reading F and the horizontal displacement because the height of the string is increasing. It will give you wrong results if you multiply F with the horizontal displacement because that formula (W=Fx) is only used when the force and the displacement have the same direction.

ANALYSIS 1. In table 1, is the work done by the fan cart constant? Why or why not? No, the work done by the fan cart not constant because the force of the fan cart is constant and when the force of the fan cart is constant and the displacement increases, the work done also increases. 2. In table 1, is the power expended by the fan cart constant? Why or why not? Yes, the power consumed by the fan cart is constant because the battery is the one supplying the energy to the fan cart. 3. In table 2, how does the work done compare with the increase in gravitational potential energy? Does your result agree with theory? Why or why not? Every time an object is lifted up, its gravitational potential energy or GPE is increased. The mass is gently pulled so that the kinetic energy can be taken as constant which we have exactly did during the experiment. Hence, the results that we've got agree with a theory that states that the work done on the curved path is equal to the change in the GPE because, the calculated results of the experimental work done and GPE are almost the same.

CONCLUSION 1. What is the correct relationship between the applied force and the work done? The work done is directly proportional to the applied force because as the applied force increases, the work done also increases if and only if the given displacement is constant. 2. What is the correct relationship between the displacement and the work done? The work done is directly proportional to the direction of displacement. Since work is equal to the force multiplied by the displacement, we can conclude that as the displacement is increased given the force is constant, the work done also increases. 3. What is the correct relationship between the work done and the power expended? The power expended is directly proportional to the work done because the power is equal to work over time.

RELATED RESEARCH Work can be defined as transfer of energy. In physics we say that work is done on an object when you transfer energy to that object. If one object transfers (gives) energy to a second object, then the first object does work on the second object. Work is the application of a force over a distance. Lifting a weight from the ground and putting it on a shelf is a good example of work. The force is equal to the weight of the object, and the distance is equal to the height of the shelf (W= Fxd). Work-Energy Principle --The change in the kinetic energy of an object is equal to the net work done on the object. Energy can be defined as the capacity for doing work. The simplest case of mechanical work is when an object is standing still and we force it to move. The energy of a moving object is called kinetic energy. For an object of mass m, moving with velocity of magnitude v, this energy can be calculated from the formula E= 1/2 mv^2. Types of Energy There are two types of energy in many forms: Kinetic Energy = Energy of Motion Potential Energy = Stored Energy

Forms of Energy Solar Radiation -- Infrared Heat, Radio Waves, Gamma Rays, Microwaves, Ultraviolet Light Atomic/Nuclear Energy -energy released in nuclear reactions. When a neutron splits an atom's nucleus into smaller pieces it is called fission. When two nuclei are joined together under millions of degrees of heat it is called fusion Electrical Energy --The generation or use of electric power over a period of time expressed in kilowatt-hours (kWh), megawatt-hours (NM) or gigawatthours (GWh). Chemical Energy --Chemical energy is a form of potential energy related to the breaking and forming of chemical bonds. It is stored in food, fuels and batteries, and is released as other forms of energy during chemical reactions. Mechanical Energy -- Energy of the moving parts of a machine. Also refers to movements in humans Heat Energy -- a form of energy that is transferred by a difference in temperature What is Power Power is the work done in a unit of time. In other words, power is a measure of how quickly work can be done. The unit of power is the Watt = 1 Joule/ 1 second. One common unit of energy is the kilowatt-hour (kWh). If we are using one kW of power, a kWh of energy will last one hour.

Calculating Work, Energy and Power WORK = W=Fd Because energy is the capacity to do work , we measure energy and work in the same units (N*m or joules). POWER (P) is the rate of energy generation (or absorption) over time:P = E/t Power's SI unit of measurement is the Watt, representing the generation or absorption of energy at the rate of 1 Joule/sec. Power's unit of measurement in the English system is the horsepower, which is equivalent to 735.7 Watts.

(Source: http://www.edinformatics.com, 2012)