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August October 2012
13
FRANCK MULLER GIGA TOURBILLON
MOUSSAIEFF JEWELLERS
GEZA SCHOEN PERFUME
CUSTOM SUPERBIKES
COLOURED WATCHES
BRIONI COUTURE
FLYING COLOURS JET DESIGN
BRABUS JET INTERIORS
HUMAN INTERCEPTORS
PEUGEOT CONCEPT JET
INVISION AIR INDIA
SUPERSONIC
BUSINESS JETS
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Breguet watch. A heritage proudly perpetuated in the Classique 7337BR
model with its silvered gold dial adorned with five different hand-guilloch
patterns. History is still being written
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...FOR THE JOURNEY
NOTAM
JETGALA 6
eclaring faith in an improbable idea often comes at
a hefty price. As the saying goes: Success has many
fathers. Failure is an orphan. And nowhere else
can new ideas be as costly and daring as with mans
dream to fly.
While the world was watching, our industry
has seen and no doubt will continue to see
ideas that took flight decades before their time had come. And
failed, often spectacularly. Short-lived supermachines such as
Concorde or doomed concepts like the XB-70 Valkyrie are proof
of that. But in their failure always lay the blueprint for new ideas
that in due time would succeed.
Supersonic flight is one of the better examples, and no
longer seen as the lame duck it seemed to be just a decade ago.
It is making a strong comeback on the wings of new technologies
and new demands. Current low-boom supersonic business jet
prototypes have entered the race to produce Concordes heir.
And the world is watching.
Supersonic technology is not the only focus of our industry.
Against the backdrop of a trying economy, new aircraft are
launched, general aviation technology continues to advance,
and an air of cautious confidence was felt at recent business
aviation shows and industry meetings.
The cause clbre, of course, is Asia and its vast even if
yet unproven promise. With aircraft manufacturers increasingly
looking East, the Western world may soon no longer have it all in
business aviation.
And again, the world will be watching.

Rainer Sigel
PUBLISHER
D
www.blancpain.com
BLANCPAIN BOUTIQUES ABU DHABI BEIJING CANNES DUBAI EKATERINBURG GENEVA HONG KONG MACAU MADRID MANAMA
MOSCOW MUMBAI MUNICH NEW YORK PARIS SEOUL SHANGHAI SINGAPORE TAIPEI TOKYO ZURICH
Villeret Collection
Equation du Temps Marchante
Limited edition of 188
Running equation
Perpetual calendar
Patented under-lug correctors
White grand feu
enamelled cambered dial
Ref. 6638-3631-55B
50
JETGALA 8
6 NOTAM
Vertical Horizons
12 CREW
14 LOUNGE
New & Exclusive
22 WINGS
26 STRETCH CLASS
Brabus Enters The Private Jet Arena
30 THE GREAT BARRIER BREACH
The Race For Supersonic Business Jets
34 SCARLET SETTER
Chinese-Inspired Jet Interiors
38 ON TREND
The Rise Of Bizjet Charter In India
42 WING MEN
Five Skydivers And Two Gliders
44 PERCEPTUAL MOTION
Peugeots New Concept Jet
46 JOINING THE CLUB
Honda Jet Moves Forward
50 HIGH HOMES
Unconventional Design For Elevated Interiors
56 GTTERDMMERUNG
The Supersonic Bomber That Never Went To War
60 GRAVITY DEFEATED
Taking The Show Vertical
62 EASTERN ALTITUDE
More Business Jets For Indonesia
64 CAPTAIN SPEAKING
Its All About Business
CONTENT
46
30
96
84
JETGALA 10
CONTENT CONTENT
80
66 LUXE
68 FACE TONES
Mens Coloured Watches
72 CLASSIC PRECISION
Whitehurst Clocks Renaissance
76 POINTS OF PRECISION
Franck Mullers Giga Tourbillon
80 SPIRIT ON WHEELS
Hollisters Custom Superbikes
84 ESSENTIAL MAVERICK
Simplicity In Perfumery
87 EVENT HORIZON
A Unique Royal Oak For Charity
88 SEAMLESS FIT
Masterful Tailoring By Brioni
92 CLASSIC GRANDEUR
An Almost-Secret Jeweller
94 LIFE
96 SUITE MANILA
Urban Hotel Suites
102 PSYCHO DELI
The Sights And Sounds Of Cuisine
104 CUTTING-EDGE COUTURE
When Men Dressed To Kill
106 CALIFORNIA OR BUST
From Coast To Coast On Vintage Bikes
110 PARTY CIRCUIT
Singapore Formula One Nightlife
112 FLUID CONTEXT
Wendell Teodoros Fashion Narrative
118 COLD BLUE
Jakob Wagners Exposed Landscapes
125 AIRBORNE
132 CAUTIOUS CONFIDENCE
EBACE 2012 Impressions
134 BRIEFING
Business Aviation in Brief
138 PLANE SPEAK
Aviation Glossary
142 AIR SHOW DIARY
144 TAILHOOK
Dial Overload
FRANCK MULLER BOUTIQUE SINGAPORE 01-07 ION ORCHARD (65) 6509 3380 B1-19 THE SHOPPES AT MARINA BAY SANDS (65) 6634 8825 MELBOURNE 119 COLLINS STREET (613) 9650 0288 JAKARTA PLAZA
INDONESIA (6221) 310 7608 BANGKOK SIAM PARAGON (662) 610 9423 AUTHORISED RETAILERS SINGAPORE SINCERE FINE WATCHES NGEE ANN CITY (65) 6733 0618 SCOTTS SQUARE (65) 6636 0600
THE SHOPPES AT MARINA BAY SANDS (65) 6634 9782 SUNTEC CITY (65) 6337 5150 VIVOCITY (65) 6278 1698 SINCERE HAUTE HORLOGERIE HILTON SINGAPORE (65) 6738 9971 WATCHES OF SWITZERLAND
PARAGON (65) 6732 9793 KUALA LUMPUR SINCERE FINE WATCHES STARHILL (603) 2141 8848 SURIA KLCC (603) 2166 2181 PAVILION KL (603) 2141 8418 THE GARDENS MALL (603) 2287 1133
CONTENT
EDITOR Katrina Balmaceda
ART DIRECTOR | DESIGNER Sylvia Weimer (Spacelab Design, Sydney)
EDITORIAL ASSISTANTS Sandy Tan and Fiona Low
ONLINE EDITOR Sandy Tan
AVIATION EDITOR Rainer Sigel
MANAGING EDITOR Rebecca Morris
CONTRIBUTORS
Dr Bernard Cheong, Jeff Heselwood, Kee Hua Chee,
Carol Lee, Dexter Rodrigo Matilla, Michelle Koh Morollo, Liz Moscrop,
Roger Norum, Jim Simon, Alex Unruh, Mike Vils, Alvin Wong
COMPANY
PUBLISHER Rainer Sigel
MANAGING DIRECTOR Michelle Tay
SENIOR MANAGER, BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT Jaime Lim
BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT EXECUTIVE Shirleen Low Xue Yun
CIRCULATION & PRODUCTION MANAGER Caroline Rayney
OFFICE MANAGER Winnie Lim
MARKETING ASSISTANT Anne Goh
CONTACT
120 Lower Delta Road #13-11
Cendex Centre, Singapore 169208
T: +65 6273 0620 F: +65 6273 0632
EMAILS
ADVERTISING business@oriental-publishing.com
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ADMINISTRATION ofce@oriental-publishing.com
WEBSITES
MAGAZINES www.jetgala.com | www.palacemagazine.asia
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JETGALA is published quarterly and circulated throughout
the Asia-Pacic. Opinions expressed are those of the contributors
and not necessarily endorsed by the Publisher.
COPYRIGHT NOTICE: All rights, including copyright, in the content of this publication are
owned or controlled by Oriental Publishing Pte Ltd, Singapore. You are not permitted to copy,
broadcast, download, store in any medium, transmit, show or play in public, adapt or change
in any way the content of this publication for any other purpose whatsoever without the prior
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TRADEMARKS NOTICE: The masthead logo JETGALA is a Registered Trademark of
Oriental Publishing Pte Ltd, Singapore. All rights are cumulatively reserved by Oriental
Publishing Pte Ltd, Singapore. Their protection will be pursued to the full extent of the law.
Printed by KHL Printing Co, Singapore
MICA(P) 193/06/2012 KDN PPS 1775/10/2012 (022810)

PHOTO CREDITS
COVER Photography: Wendell Levi Teodoro Model: Amy Delves
SECTION OPENER WINGS Image courtesy of NASA/Lockheed Martin
SECTION OPENER LUXE Image courtesy of Hollisters MotorCycles
SECTION OPENER LIFE Image courtesy of Scott Wright of Limelight Studio
SECTION OPENER AIRBORNE Image courtesy of Gulfstream Aerospace Corp
CREW
JETGALA 12
Liz Moscrop writes about private aviation, specialising
in interiors, for publications all over the world, including
aviation and luxury magazines in Europe and South
Africa. She lived and worked in Hong Kong for several
years and is a regular visitor to South-east Asia. She is also
co-author of a book on the 100 greatest women in aviation
together with partner Sanjay Rampal.
Mike Vils has been a part of the motorcycle industry
for the past 50 years, riding, restoring and building
motorcycles of all types. He began his career at an early
age as a designer and fabricator for custom-car builder
Ed Big Daddy Roth in the 1960s. He became a painter
in the 1970s for the likes of Yamaha, Honda, Suzuki
and Kawasaki. He has created custom paint for the
vehicles of various famous individuals in the motorcycle
industry. He currently fabricates and creates purpose-
built motorcycles.
Born in Herdecke, Germany in 1985, Jakob Wagner
successfully completed his three-year apprenticeship in
2008 as a photographer. He has since been living in
Duesseldorf, where he works as a freelance photographer,
image editor and photography assistant. His work has
taken him around the world. When not on assignment,
Wagner devotes his time and passion to personal
photography projects, which will culminate in future
books and exhibitions. His photographs are available
in signed and limited editions.
Wendell Levi Teodoro began his photography career
by assisting famed New York photographer Randy Brooke
during New York Fashion Week. He has worked for
inuential press agencies and is now the director of
photography company Zeduce. He also contributes his
time to several philanthropic projects and works with a
variety of clients, including small non-prot organisations
and large non-governmental institutions, such as entities
afliated with the United Nations.
Dr Bernard Cheong is a watch collector, horologist and
medical doctor. He was appointed the rst collector and
non-watchmaking industry ambassador for the Fondation
de la Haute Horlogerie in 2011. In 2002, Cheong helped
formulate a transparent jury system and a new, carefully
audited and numbered voting system for the Grand Prix
dHorlogerie de Genve, an annual contest between high-
end watch manufacturers, which he also helped bring
to Asia. He is a non-industry civilian chairman of the
competitions board and one of its eight jurors.
www.orientalmediagroup.com
JETGALA 14
MAVERICK
MACHINE
When unconventional Swiss watchmakers
MB&F and URWERK come together, the
result is a peculiar piece of genius like the
C3H5N3O9. Named after the molecular formula
for nitroglycerine, the limited-edition watch is
housed in an asymmetrical zirconium case with
articulated and compound lugs and is inspired
by the Wankel engine, an internal combustion
engine with an off-centre rotary design. The
large watch face measures 55 mm by 44 mm
and uses rotors shaped as Reuleaux triangles
(triangles with curves having constant width)
to indicate the hours and minutes. Twelve
pieces crafted in zirconium will be available
this year, with 12 more in red gold to be
available next year. www.c3h5n3o9.com
Private spaceight company Excalibur Almaz
has started selling tickets for a trip to the most
faraway destination available to travellers the
moon. Passengers will y in modied Russian re-
entry capsules. Each trip will take three travellers
around the moon before returning back to Earth
in a six-month, 500,000-mile (804,672-kilometre)
journey. Tickets will cost in the region of GBP100
million per person and ights are expected to
begin in 2015. www.excaliburalmaz.com
OUT OF THIS
WORLD
The Q by Aston Martin programme provides customisation
of exteriors and interiors from the upholstery of seats, steering
wheel and side door panels to embroidery of personal emblems
which can also be replicated on bespoke luggage. Q by Aston
Martin unveiled the new Rapide at the Beijing International
Automotive Exhibition, which took place from 27 April to 2 May.
Inspired by the Ming Dynasty, the Rapide features Ming Blue
paint, walnut wooden boot and door inserts, as well as Falcon
Grey and Metallic Bronze leather, embroidered with Ming-
inspired elements. www.astonmartin.com/q
Swift Finish
British artist Damien Hirst and Flea
(Michael Balzary), the bassist for the
rock band Red Hot Chili Peppers,
have produced a series of limited-
edition spin-painted guitars. Only
50 pieces of the Multi-Coloured
Deluxe Spin Bass Guitar will be
made and each will be signed by
both men. Prots from the sale will
go to the Silverlake Conservatory
of Music, a Los Angeles-based
charitable organisation that offers
scholarships and music lessons
to children. The guitars will also
come with a framed buttery gloss
painting on canvas, a hand-spun
case with an illustration by Hirst
and Flea, and 20 specially designed
plectrums. www.othercriteria.com
Image the artist & Other Criteria
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ww.othercriteria.com
Other Criteria

LOUNGE
Image courtesy of Excalibur Almaz Inc
B1-73/74 GALLERIA LEVEL
THE SHOPPES AT MARINA BAY SANDS
2 BAYFRONT AVENUE
SINGAPORE 018972
Tel: +65 6634 1253
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LOUNGE
JETGALA 16
THE ART OF
FASHION
Luxury menswear designer Stefano Riccis spring/summer 2012
collection is a quirky tribute to artist Jack Vettriano. The campaign
juxtaposes Vettrianos paintings with photographic re-enactments
of the scenes by models decked out in Riccis creations. Rich navy,
creamy taupe and chocolate-brown pieces dominate in this
collection. Ricci presented a short lm to commemorate the
collaboration. www.stefanoricci.com
f
Bespoke games and gift maker Geoffrey Parker has
created a tournament-sized backgammon board
with an alligator-leather playing eld accented with
shagreen points. The stones are 18-carat white and
yellow gold, each studded with a one-carat diamond.
All four dices are made from 18-carat white gold and
set with 27 diamonds apiece. A diamond set doubling
cube similarly comes with numbers made of diamonds
and set in 18-carat white gold. www.geoffreyparker.com
GAME
of Gilt
Image courtesy of John Collins
The vintage Ferrari driven by Cameron Diaz with Lucy Liu riding
shotgun in the 2003 lm Charlies Angels: Full Throttle is now one
of the most expensive cars for sale. Classic-car dealer Talacrest,
based in Ascot in the UK, is asking for GBP5 million for the 1963
Ferrari 250 GT SWB California Spyder, which was designed by
Italian rm Pininfarina and built by Scaglietti. This particular
piece was number 53 of only 55 models built. Its three-litre V12
engine produces 280bhp and has a zero to 60 mph time of eight
seconds and a top speed of 149 mph. www.talacrest.com
Angels Ride
Swiss luxury watchmaker
Richard Milles limited-
edition RM56 Felipe Massa
SAPPHIRE timepiece
features a watch case that
has been milled entirely
from solid blocks of sapphire
crystal. Each case required
more than 1,000 hours to
create, and cutting tools
tipped with diamond were
specially designed for the
task. Sapphires hardness
and scratch-resistance
contributes to the functionality
of the watch. Only ve
pieces will be made.
www.richardmille.com
Wrist
Candy
BBJ boeing.com/commercial/bbj
JETGALA 18
LOUNGE
Three new superyachts ranging from 40 to 60 metres are
the latest additions to Swedish designer Gray Designs
Strand Craft collection. Each yacht comes with luxurious
features such as a cinema, retractable pools and a hidden
sunbed area that appears at the push of a button. The use
of strong but lightweight materials, such as carbon, help
achieve better fuel economy. Engine packages from MTU
with KaMeWa Jets enable high-speed performances of
up to 48 knots. www.graydesign.se
Sleek Seafarer
The Joux Valley Museum of Watchmaking has reopened
as a self-proclaimed new generation museum after
eight months of intensive renovation. Learn about
the creation of some of the worlds most celebrated
timepieces through 3D lms and presentations by
students from the Joux Valley Technical College.
Spread over 500 square metres of oor space, the
museum lets visitors try their hand at assembling their
own mechanical movements. www.espacehorloger.ch
t i m e & g a i n
g
Swiss watchmaker Daniel Roth
brings back the automaton
watch with the Bulgari Daniel
Roth Il Giocatore Veneziano.
Inspired by Italian baroque
artist Caravaggios masterpiece,
The Cardsharps, the watch
features a lavish dial displaying
a 16th-century Venetian dice
player. When engaged, the
automaton gure throws the
dice and lifts the goblets in
its hand to reveal ever-changing
results. The timepiece also
contains a minute repeater.
Available in 18-carat white or
rose gold, each piece is uniquely
hand painted. www.bulgari.com
GAME OF CHANCE
The 2013 Jaguar XJ Ultimate limited-edition sedan is powered by a
supercharged 5.0-litre V8 engine that produces 510 hp. Its interior
features two individually tailored backseats with lumbar support,
massage functions and climate controls. A 20-speaker Meridian
surround-sound system, iPads and mounted screens complete the
experience. The back of each front-seat headrest carries an eight-
inch screen. Celebrations are in order with a chiller for the
bubbly and a pair of bespoke champagne utes. The vehicle
was unveiled in China earlier this year and 30 more cars will
be made available in the United States. www.jaguar.com
SEDAN
(
THINK BUSINESS
)
When it comes to gaining a competitive edge in commerce, you simply need the best.
With a Eurocopter helicopter you will y faster more safely, while enjoying greater comfort and reliability.
Invest in an EC145 T2.
Thinking without limits
WINGS
BRABUS PRIVATE AVIATION
by Liz Moscrop
S T R E T C H
C L A S S
AN ICONIC SUPERCAR TUNER TAKES
ON PRIVATE JET INTERIORS
JETGALA 26
WINGS
LIMOUSINE SOPHISTICATION ENTERED THE BIZJET ARENA RECENTLY
IN THE FORM OF A NEW DESIGN PROPOSITION BY GERMAN DESIGN
HOUSE BRABUS. Famed for its work with top-end cars, primarily by Mercedes-
Benz, Brabus announced at the recent European Business Aviation Convention and
Exhibition (EBACE) in Geneva that it is now offering design concepts for large-
cabin and narrow-body private jets.
The companys core business is to tailor-make luxury cars by modifying engines
and working with top-of-the-line bespoke components. For its new private jet
business, it has formed Brabus Private Aviation to work on heavy executive jets,
such as the Bombardier Global Express and Challenger families, as well as the
Dassault Falcon series and the Airbus A319.
Car enthusiasts are familiar with the signature Brabus design style, which comprises
carbon fibre, quality leathers and woods. Bodo Buschmann, Brabus CEO states:
We offer a portfolio of leathers. We know that there are lots of colours that suit
both the car and the aircraft. We can bring surfaces from car interiors to the >>
Brabus Private Aviation has
created a specific livery design for
each of its two themes, but clients
may ask for modifications or come
up with their own designs. This
exterior design comes in black,
grey and white versions
27 JETGALA
>> aircraft cabin. He points out that the life cycle of a car is
much shorter than that of an aircraft, therefore the aviation
industry will benefit from the knowledge and innovation
gained on the ground in high-end automotive interior design.
Brabus Private Aviation allows clients to customise their
jets interiors and livery from the ground up. It also offers
standard themes Elegance and Sportive, both of which
suit the Global Express. Elegance offers a bright cabin
featuring a combination of cream-coloured upholstery and
wood trim with high-gloss finish. Sportive, meanwhile,
contrasts black and grey leather, piped with red stitched
seams a theme borrowed from sports cars. The
upholsterers pay particular attention to the finish of the
cabin components, including the precise colour
coordination of all interior parts.
Brabus will also incorporate a high-tech inflight
entertainment system, which will allow passengers to
communicate and enjoy all forms of modern digital media
on high-end multimedia devices such as the Apple iPad
or iPhone. Custom-tailored docking and charging stations
will integrate multimedia devices into the aircraft. After
landing, these multimedia devices can ride with the
passengers in Brabus 800 iBusiness sedan, which offers
the same integration options as the aeroplane (see box).
Thanks to the popularity of the Brabus brand, as well
as the companys automotive and yachting clients who also
own private jets, Buschmann says the company has seen
strong interest from the market: We are talking with lots
of people, since we have a great deal of experience in the
luxury and engineering industries. We can serve many
different types of clients, and are offering three packages.
These package choices comprise refurbishing a cabin
with minor modifications, retrofitting an entire cabin,
or working on a green aircraft.
For the implementation of this concept, Brabus Private
Aviation is working with three partners in the aviation
industry: PrivatAir, an aircraft operations and management
company with facilities worldwide; RUAG Aviation, a
maintenance and completions house located in Munich,
Germany; and Happy Design Studio, which specialises in
the development and execution of aircraft livery.
Buschmann is particularly proud of the fact that the
interior design, completion, and aircraft management
partners are German, saying that this results in a seamless
service offering marked by German efficiency.
All Brabus design services are FAA and EASA
certifiable, which means that no time will be wasted in
bringing the concepts to reality. It also means that perhaps,
at next years EBACE, we will see the first actualisation of
these edgy, progressive concepts.
CLIENTS MAY CUSTOMISE DESIGNS FROM THE GROUND
UP. BRABUS ALSO OFFERS STANDARD THEMES
ELEGANCE AND SPORTIVE
JETGALA 28
WINGS
OPPOSITE
Brabus will work with France-based Happy Design Studio
in designing and applying avant-garde liveries, which are
meant to mimic the look of carbon fibre
THIS PAGE, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP
Octane junkies will recognise the heavy automotive
influence in the Sportive theme, which uses black leather,
carbon fibre and red detailing
The Brabus 800 iBusiness 2.0 sedan comes with integrated
multimedia devices and is touted as one of the fastest
mobile offices on the road
Brabus Elegance jet interior theme is bright and refreshing,
offering beige leather and deep, high gloss-finished wood
iCLASS
Based on the Mercedes-Benz S600, the
Brabus 800 iBusiness 2.0 sedan is a speedy
mobile office. Its 6.3-litre, twin-turbocharged,
V12 engine produces 800 hp (588.4 kW) and
1,047 lb-ft (1,420 Nm) of torque, resulting in
an acceleration time of 0 to 60 in 3.9 seconds.
It can reach 240 mph (386.24 km/h) but has
an electronically limited top speed of 219 mph
(352.45 km/h).
The interiors explain the iBusiness name.
The car comes with two iPads, an iPod Touch
and a 15.2-inch Mac screen. The devices control
the vehicles radio, navigation and telephone
systems and are also for the passengers
personal use. With USB ports for webcam
and other devices, along with power-operated
curtains and plush Alcantara upholstery, one
can conduct a video conference on the go.
29 JETGALA
SUPERSONIC BUSINESS JETS
by Jim Simon
Today, a London-based businessman could theoretically attend a
breakfast meeting in New York and be back home in time for dinner
that is, if he leaves England at dawn, manoeuvres deftly through
traffic, keeps the meeting brief and rides on a business jet. But
aircraft manufacturers and enthusiasts are challenging engineering
and physics norms to perhaps get that businessman home for lunch.
It used to be possible in the era of Concorde, the supersonic
airliner that didnt work out simply because it was a money-losing
aircraft. It required substantial fuel to fly at supersonic speeds, and
performed inefficiently when flying subsonic. It was restricted to
subsonic speeds when flying overland, though, as its sonic boom
produced a perceived noise level of 105 PLdB (PLdB is the unit of


JETGALA 30
WINGS
measurement for perceived noise level in decibels). This
was annoying, and a study by NASA showed the acceptable
sonic boom noise level to be no more than 70 PLdB. As a
result, Concorde was restricted to fly at its fastest and most
efficient speed only over oceans.
Aircraft manufacturers working with NASA now report
that they found a way to reconfigure an aircrafts fuselage
shape and size to reduce the sonic boom effect. Through
wind tunnel tests conducted with NASA using scale models
of small airliners, Boeings supersonic business jet (SBJ)
design has achieved 81 PLdB, while Lockheed Martins has
achieved 79 PLdB. If it all turns out to be true and possible,
both aircraft could see entry into service by 2025. Gulfstream
has its own programme the Quiet Spike project testing
the creation of a sonic whisper by mounting a 7.3-metre,
lance-like spike on the nose of a supersonic F-15B testbed
aircraft. NASA believes that with advanced materials expected
to become available by 2035, even a 70-PLdB sonic boom
may be achievable.
At the time of publication, Boeing, Lockheed Martin and
Gulfstream, working with NASA, are reported to be >>
OPPOSITE
The Aerion SBJs distinct feature is its thin, low-swept wings,
which will help it operate efficiently at both supersonic and
subsonic speeds
Image courtesy of Aerion Corporation
THIS PAGE
Gulfstream used an F-15B testbed aircraft to find out its Quiet
Spike technologys effectiveness in reducing sonic boom
Image courtesy of NASA/Jim Ross
31 JETGALA
>> planning to reveal a low-boom SBJ prototype at the
Farnborough International Airshow in July. Code-named
X-54, it is designed to fly at Mach 3.26, which would
shorten a London-to-Sydney trip to four hours from the
current 23 hours on commercial airlines.
Another player is Aerion Corporation, whose game
plan is not to eliminate sonic boom, but to offer an SBJ
that flies efficiently at both supersonic and subsonic
speeds. The premise is that the jet should be feasible
even if the rules on overland supersonic flight dont
change. The design uses a very thin wing with a very low
sweep, which Aerion spokesman Adam Konowe says will
work extremely well in the high subsonic regime and
in the supersonic area of Mach 1.4 or 1.5. He adds that
outside the USA, many countries with the right atmospheric
conditions allow aircraft to operate at boomless cruise
speeds of up to Mach 1.15.
FROM TOP
Like many of todays business jets,
Aerions SBJ will have room for eight to
12 passengers. The interior will lend itself
easily to customisation and interior design
Image courtesy of Aerion Corporation
A design by Boeing, funded by a NASA
Research Announcement, reconfigures the
shape of the typical business jet for better
aerodynamics and less sonic boom
Image courtesy of NASA/The Boeing Company
JETGALA 32
WINGS
ABOVE
Lockheed Martins design for
a possible future aircraft that
can fly at supersonic speed
overland is funded by a NASA
Research Announcement
Image courtesy of NASA/Lockheed Martin
Aerions SBJ will cost roughly USD80 million. Konowe
says the company has kept all the refundable deposits
about 50 of them, each at USD250,000 that it has collected
since announcing its project in 2007. Funding comes from
private investors, especially Aerions chairman, billionaire
Robert Bass. This summer, Aerion continues its research by
mounting a test article, representative of its SBJs wing, on a
supersonic F-15B military jet supplied by NASA. The test
will help identify manufacturing tolerances for the wing,
among others.
Aerion has yet to sign up a willing manufacturer, but
expects a demand for 400 to 600 SBJs in the first 15 years
after production begins. Konowe says: We, the industry,
have extended the range of aircraft, weve put showers in
airplanes, weve taken the comfort level about as far as we
can, but were not travelling really any faster now than we
were 50 years ago. When Concorde went out of service, there
was nothing to replace it. And thats simply not progress.
The competition to create an SBJ may feel more like an
endurance run than a neck-breaking race, but even sceptics
must secretly hope to finally conquer the issue of speed
the last remaining barrier to mans oldest dream.
CONCORDE
1
GULFSTREAM G650 AERION SBJ
CRUISE SPEED MACH 2.02 MACH 0.85
(LONG-RANGE CRUISE
SPEED)
MACH 0.90
(HIGH-SPEED CRUISE)
MACH 0.95
(OVER LAND)
MACH 1.6
(OVER WATER)
TIME BETWEEN
LONDON-NEW YORK
3 HOURS, 20 MINUTES <6 HOURS 4 HOURS
TIME BETWEEN
NEW YORK-LOS ANGELES
NOT APPLICABLE 5 HOURS 4 HOURS
PASSENGERS 92-120 PASSENGERS UP TO 18 8-12
SALE PRICE NOT APPLICABLE USD64.5 MILLION USD80 MILLION
AT 2007 LEVELS
FUEL CONSUMPTION 47 LBS/MILE 5.8 LBS/MILE TO BE DETERMINED
1
COURTESY OF BRITISH AIRWAYS
33 JETGALA
FLYING COLOURS CORPORATION
by Katrina Balmaceda
PAINTING THE SKY RED
WITH ASIAN JET INTERIORS
OPPOSITE, FROM TOP
Many clients take a more personal approach
in choosing materials for their aircraft than for
their home or office, as it is tedious to change
materials once they are installed
Kate Ahrens is the director of interior design
and business development. Her design career,
originally inspired by fashion, has always
involved aviation
SCARLET
SETTER
JETGALA 34
WINGS
eutral tones and earthy shades have often
dominated Flying Colours Corporation's
jet interior design portfolio. The reason
is practical: many of its clients are Western
charter operators, and a neutral palette
is adaptable no one objects to a beige
aeroplane seat. Recently, though, the design
for a client's Bombardier Challenger 850
called for a dominance of red, from the upholstery to the
tables and even the carpet. What made the difference was
that the client was Chinese.
Customers from Hong Kong and mainland China are
filling Flying Colours' order book for private jet completions,
with many requesting red-inspired interiors, says Kate Ahrens,
the company's director of interior design and business
development. Flying Colours has delivered seven Challenger
850s to China and 60 per cent of its overall projects are also
heading to Asia. Its past and current clients in the region
include Sino Private Aviation, Hongkong Jet, Metrojet,
Business Aviation Asia, TAG Asia and Lily Jet.
With so much activity in the region, Ahrens flies to China
and Hong Kong at least twice a year. This gives her a chance to
learn more about their traditions and culture. Travelling is a
true inspiration for me. It allows me to tap into other cultures
to be creatively inspired and educated, says Ahrens. >>
35 JETGALA
>> She also takes cues from other design disciplines.
Cabinetry may come with precise lines, geometric shapes
and extensive detailing, inspired by architecture. Colour
blocking may be borrowed from the fashion runway. One of
her designs included an Herms-inspired carpet; another
used Calvin Klein fabrics. As to the influence of art history,
Ahrens says: I try to inquire in [my initial contact with
clients] if they have a liking towards a certain period in time
for instance, classic versus modern.
While many designers start out in other fields before
crossing over into aviation, Ahrens grew up steeped in the
industry. Her father founded Flying Colours in 1989, which
means her career has always involved aircraft interiors. The
company also does completions, refurbishment and livery
painting, as well as maintenance, avionics installation and
engineering functions such as ground- and flight-testing.
Flying Colours gained a reputation for its CRJ Execliner
programme, which converts the interiors of Bombardier
Canadair Regional Jets into a VIP configuration (see box).
Ahrens especially likes working on the Bombardier Global
RIGHT
Ahrens says her Asian clients
typically prefer bold interiors
with a warm, organic feel
BELOW, FROM TOP
With a growing demand
from Asian, especially
Chinese, clients, Flying
Colours sees more requests
for red-inspired interiors
When designing, Ahrens
prefers innovative materials
that will pass burn certification,
and perfectly coordinated
colour palettes
JETGALA 36
WINGS
Express and Challenger series and has had most of her
experience with these types of jets, adding that she likes
their large cabin size and user-friendly layout.
Exotic materials spark her interest, too for example,
shrunken buffalo leather and Pommele Sapele wood veneer.
And red is not just red it can come in pebbled leather the
shade of merlot, or Bubinga veneer stained a vibrant cherry
brandy. She also explores more modern materials: We recently
installed a stone floor manufactured by LIST Components &
Furniture GmbH that totally reinvented the aircraft. A current
CRJ200 project for a South-east Asian client uses a midnight-
black palette, complemented by LED lighting that reflects
different time-zone changes.
It's no wonder the company is on the hunt for a business
partner in Asia. It signed an MoU with Hong Kong-based
business aviation service provider Metrojet in October last
year. The deal included plans to open a base in the region for
refurbishing mid- to large-sized business aircraft, including
Dassault Falcon, Embraer, Hawker and Gulfstream models,
in addition to the Global Express and Challenger types.
MOBILE HOME



Flying Colours Corporation
converts Canadair Regional Jets
(CRJ), a family of Bombardier
regional airliners, into VIP business
jets. Its most challenging CRJ
project yet is a collaboration
among the company's engineers,
its lead designer Kate Ahrens
and Harry Schnaper, a renowned
interior designer hired privately
by the client. The design involves
placing a shower in the aft lavatory
and a pivoting bed in the aft cabin.
Flying Colours has designed a
smoke extraction system to remove
cigar smoke and galley smells from
the cabin while in flight. Bespoke
details include telephone lines,
video-teleconferencing equipment,
electric seats with massage and
lumbar support features, and a
custom-designed communications
system with a 20-terabyte server
for multimedia. The client wanted
to sleep, shower and effectively
have the option to live on his
plane when travelling on business,
says Eric Gillespie, Flying Colours
executive vice-president for
sales and marketing, and project
manager for the conversion.
Flying Colours is known for its
conversion of CRJ airliners into VIP
aircraft. Shown here is one such
converted jet for an Asian client
37 JETGALA
INVISION AIR
Q: After telecommunications, why did
you decide to set up Invision Air?
Ive been fascinated by airplanes since
I was 10, when a family friend took me
up in a Cessna 172. I graduated from
the University of Pennsylvania and
worked for a real estate finance
company in Los Angeles. Upon
returning to India, I tied up with an aviation equipment
manufacturing firm in LA to sell their products in India.
Unfortunately, within a few years the Indian airline industry
collapsed. I moved on to telecommunications.
In 2005, a friend and ex-pilot colleague (now Invision Air
co-founder) in the telecom business pointed out that there was
a new kind of jet being developed with space for only four
passengers, low capital and low operating costs. It could land
on very small rural runways. We knew that significant growth
was happening in rural India, but physical connectivity to these
locations was extremely poor. So why not do with light jets
what we had done with antennas? Using antennas, we helped
parts of India get connected via voice; using light jets, we could
help parts of India get connected via travel.
MORE INDIAN BUSINESS PEOPLE ARE OPTING
FOR BUSINESS JETS. JETGALA SPEAKS TO
INVISION AIRS CO-FOUNDER, VINIT PHATAK
JETGALA 38
WINGS
Q: Six- to 10-seater aircraft dominate general aviation in
India. Now there is a shift towards light and very light jets
that seat at most five. What is the main reason for this trend?
Light jets enjoy low-level capital and operating costs. They
require shorter landing and take-off distances compared to
bigger six- to 10-passenger aircraft and can therefore access
more airports than those bigger jets. Most of the time for
businesses, there are one to four key passengers, therefore a
four-passenger jet like the Phenom 100 is more fuel-efficient
and more environmentally friendly than a six- or more
passenger capacity aircraft.
Q: What is your main reason for focussing on a single aircraft
type (light jets)? Will you expand your fleet to include other
aircraft types in the future?
Our operation uses Phenom 100 aircraft (we will have six in
total). These will be joined by six Phenom 300 aircraft. Most
other competitors have either one or two aircraft. If they
have more, they have multiple types. The single aircraft type
fleet provides increased dispatch reliability, safety, and
economies of scale.
In the next phases, we will introduce larger aircraft with
longer ranges to cover international private travel. We are also
looking at adding turboprops to our fleet to cover an additional
150 or so airports where the jets cannot currently land.
Q: What are the three main advantages of using Embraer
Phenom 300 and Phenom 100 aircraft?
A mix of Phenom 100 and 300 aircraft allows us to fit into a
variety of passenger loads and missions while practically
having a single aircraft type in our operations. The many
similarities between the two aircraft facilitate using common
pilots and engineers for both.
We chose Embraer also because they built aircraft for
airline operations and high utilisations and had used the same
philosophy in designing their Phenom jets. For Invision Air,
aircraft longevity and high utilisation are critical.
Q: What are the top three regulatory hurdles to the
growth of business aviation in India?
The process of aircraft registration is tedious and costly due to
the several weeks that the aircraft has to remain grounded
before it can begin commercial operations.
Also from a taxation perspective, it is unfairly burdensome.
Commercial operators pay 2.5 per cent custom duty on aircraft.
The duties for private operators are close to 25 per cent of the
aircraft value. This cripples the progress of general aviation in
India. Nowhere else in the world are there custom duties on
aircraft and there are no business jet manufacturers in India to
protect. In introducing this tax, the Indian government seems
to presume a business jet is a luxury good and not a practical
tool that can add to the countrys economic growth.
There is a long approval process from the Reserve Bank
of India and other authorities in order to make payments
OPPOSITE, FROM TOP
Invision Air will use primarily Phenom 300 and Phenom 100 light
jets, which can access various airports in both urban and rural
parts of India, including those with short runways
Vinit Phatak has been interested in aviation since his childhood.
He co-founded Invision Air with Jayant Nadkarni, an ex-colleague
in the telecommunications industry who is also a former pilot
towards aircraft purchases. There is a restriction on the
amounts that can be paid in advance, which creates a
problem for booking aircraft orders.
Q: How can Indian charter operators help shift the
perception of private jets from being luxury items only
to being business tools?
Light jets allow business people to travel to up to 200
destinations in India, while traditional airlines cover only 80
destinations, of which only 38 are serviced by multiple flights
a day. A significant part of Indias six per cent annual growth
is in rural areas. But getting there by car or train can take from
seven hours to a few days. A light jet can reach these areas
within minutes or an hour and a half. This allows executives
to reach their locations very easily. One can go to multiple
cities in one day, which is impossible by commercial airlines.
In February this year, our aircraft travelled to six cities in one
day for some clients. Examples like these and a concerted
effort at educating the regulator and the target audience will
be necessary for this shift in perception to take place.
Q: What is your vision for Indian business aviation
10 years from now?
Worldwide, the low-cost-carrier model with commercial airlines
is gaining momentum, meaning more business-class seats will
be taken out of the inventory. Air India and Jet Airways plans,
as reported by the press recently, indicate this is already
happening in India. This will push the high end of the business
class segment to consider options like Invision Air. >>
39 JETGALA
>> You have to consider that in the troubled times of today,
there is still a segment that is not affected and whose value
of time is increasing and will continue to rise.
Our current estimate of the Indian business aviation
market size is approximately USD250 million per annum.
We expect the market to grow at a rate of 12 to 15 per cent
each year for the next five years. There are about 136 business
jets in private and commercial use in India today. This is
expected to rise to 400 by 2020 an average growth rate
of 20 per cent per annum.
Ten years from now, we expect considerable growth in
the quality and quantity of infrastructure available for
business aviation in India. Flying privately for our target
audience will be more commonplace. These factors, among
others, including a more conducive environment for the
import, ownership and operation of business aircraft, should
transform the general aviation sector in India and put it
among the top few in the world.
Q: How does Invision Air hope to eventually position
itself in the international business jet market?
We fly to up to 200 airports within India and can also fly to
any international routes within the range of our aircraft, such
as the Maldives, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Middle East, and
Singapore (with the Phenom 300). We expect our initial
primary flying will be between the major metros and the tier
II cities in India, and between the tier II cities themselves.
In the long term, we aim to become India and the
surrounding regions largest private and business aircraft
operator; and to be an industry leader with a loyal member
base. Strategic partnerships with selected operators overseas
will allow us to provide a seamless private air travel service to
clients from all over the world.
UP CLOSE
What is your pet peeve about flying/travel?
Wasting time waiting in lines.
Name someone you admire as a hero.
My grandfather, who was a talented actor,
musician and journalist, but sacrificed his
careers to raise five children on his own.
What surprises people most about you?
That I used to be a mischievous boy in school.
How did you earn your first rupee/dollar?
By bussing tables and cleaning bathrooms
at a fast food restaurant in Los Angeles.
What was/is still your first love?
Music.
What do you love most about flying?
The freedom.
What dream are you shooting for now?
To find the right balance in my life.
Words to live by what are yours?
After I am gone, when they talk of me,
let them say: He did many different things,
but most of all, he was a good man.
Light jets typically seat four passengers in a VIP
configuration, which is ideal for business travellers in
India, who typically travel in groups of at most four
JETGALA 40
WINGS
AKTE BLANIX III
by Jeff Heselwood

WHERE SKYDIVERS GET
FAST AND FURIOUS WITH GLIDERS
4,000 metres above
the Austrian Alps,
the five-man Red
Bull skydiving team
caught up with two
gliders and flew
alongside the planes
at breakneck speeds
JETGALA 42
WINGS
SKYDIVERS WOULD BE MAD TO
GET CLOSE TO A MOVING AIRCRAFT.
Five wingsuit divers recently defied this
madness as they pursued two gliders
flying 4,000 metres above the Austrian
Alps. The skydivers then inched their
way towards the aircraft before flying
along side-by-side at speeds in excess
of 180 km/h.
Normally, the idea is to stay as far
away as possible from other flying objects.
Instead, we headed straight for them. We
were even able to look the pilots straight
in the eye, says Paul Steiner, who led the
Red Bull Skydive Team that executed the
stunt. Ive still got goose bumps. Red
Bull has been involved in extreme sports
as part of its marketing campaign, and
apart from its participation in Formula
One, is best known for its aerial stunts
performed around the world.
Steiner played a major role in
planning and coordinating the stunt,
performed with the Austrian Blanix Glider
Team this May in the Austrian state of
Styria. It required 11 people and seven
aircraft, and was dubbed Akte BlaniX III
as part of the conclusion of the Akte
BlaniX series. In Akte BlaniX II, Steiner
swapped planes mid-flight at 2,100 metres
above the ground, performing a forward
roll on the wing as he did so. Standing on
the wing of the second aircraft, he
touched the rudder of the first aircraft,
which was hovering above him upside-
down thus connecting the two planes.
Steiner then jumped off the wing and
parachuted back to earth.
While the risks of Akte BlaniX III
were plain for all to see, pilot Ewald
Roithner emphasises the amount of
preparation the stunt required. None of
us are adrenalin junkies. Were all just
guys who are looking for challenges to
make our lives more intense. The secret is
to prepare everything very carefully so
that you can push the limits without
going too far. Its all about professional
planning, conscientious training and
absolute trust, he says. Skydiver Georg
Lettner admits that the gliders, which
were constantly moving around during
the stunt, were intimidating at times.
The aircraft pursued were L-13
Blank sailplanes the most widely
produced glider in the world, often used
for flight training and aerobatics. In
June 2010, a fatal accident involving an
L-13 led to the grounding of the type.
Engineering service provider Aircraft
Design & Certification Ltd developed a
supplemental type certificate for
modifying the gliders, convincing the
European Aviation Safety Agency to
allow the modified sailplanes to fly
under certain limitations. The Blanix
Glider Teams OE-0758 aircraft, one of
the two pursued in Akte BlaniX III,
became the worlds first L-13 to be
modified according to these guidelines.
Glider OE-5733, also used in the stunt,
followed suit.
With the Akte BlaniX trilogy now
completed, the teams enthusiasm leaves
no doubt that the next daredevil project is
just around the corner. Never before have
human beings and aircraft flown this
close in formation. It is the first stunt of
its kind in the world, says Steiner.
Somewhere deep down the next idea is
already brewing..
NORMALLY, THE IDEA IS TO STAY AS FAR AWAY
AS POSSIBLE FROM OTHER FLYING OBJECTS.
INSTEAD, WE HEADED STRAIGHT FOR THEM
Watch Akte BlaniX III here
43 JETGALA
JETGALA 44
WINGS
COMBINE THE AESTHETICS AND FUNCTIONALITY
OF A SUPERCAR WITH THE SPEED AND MOBILITY
OF A JET, and the result might look something like the
Peugeot HX1 concept jet. An experimental design exercise
by Peugeot Design Lab, the sleek concept business jet
features a modular design, ergonomic efficiency and a
lightweight interior.
The goal was to create an aircraft exterior with a unique
design that could easily be identified as a Peugeot, says
Cathal Loughnane, head of Peugeot Design Lab. In the
interior, we wanted to apply what we have learned about
designing cars that are extremely modular and adaptable
to the aircraft industry.
The aircraft features an elegant, clean fuselage similar
to that of fighter planes. Inspired by latest-generation fly-
by-wire jets, the tail plane is divided into V-tail stabilisers,
mounted at 45-degrees an unusual design. Adding to its
streamlined exterior, the edges of the wings are accented
with powerful LED lights.
The cabin would be approximately two metres wide and
26 metres long. A versatile interior feature is its seating
arrangement, which transforms easily from an eight-seater
luxury configuration to a functional 14-seater that caters
for business journeys. This is done by sliding a second seat
out from underneath the rear of the first with the touch
of a button. When not in use, the second seat folds neatly
to slip back into place. The jet is only a design research
project for now, which means the rest of the interior
details are still rough, but the plane is intended to include
an integrated galley and a wireless entertainment system.
The plane was inspired by the Peugeot car of the
same name, the HX1 concept car, which was designed to
push aerodynamic boundaries with a tapered, low body
structure that integrates diesel hybrid technology. The
car also features two additional integrated seats that can
be deployed if needed. Peugeots concept cars are aimed
at exploring design and technological advances, and
are sometimes forerunners to actual production pieces.
More often, though, the cars in the range are created as
indulgent technological showcases.

ALL THE PERKS OF
A FRENCH CAR,
ELEVATED
PEUGEOT HX1 CONCEPT JET
by Fiona Low
JETGALA 45
OPPOSITE
The designers automotive influence shows
clearly in the jet designs exterior details
THIS PAGE, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP
Peugeots concept jet includes a smart and discreet
seating system that can change configuration
to hold up to eight or 14 passengers
With a touch of a button, a second seat
ejects from underneath the rear of the first
The design features an elegant, clean fuselage
similar to that of fighter planes
Conceived by the newly formed Peugeot Design Lab,
the HX1 concept jet is part of a quirky portfolio that
includes a powerboat, bicycle and watch. Some of its
creations are already available for purchase, including the
DL121 and DL122 bicycles. The former is a limited-edition
bike that incorporates two contrasting design concepts
in one vehicle. Up front, the bicycle is crafted in deep,
sensual copper tones, while the rear is finished in a snowy
white colour. A leather compartment large enough to hold
a digital tablet is incorporated into the bike frame. The
DL122 is a nimble, lightweight urban bike designed for
mobility and functionality. A storage area in the centre of
the bike is large enough for a laptop bag and an integrated
anti-theft lock keeps sticky fingers at bay.
Launched this year, Peugeot Design Lab will specialise
in non-automotive objects and will also be undertaking
non-profit projects. Loughnane is tight-lipped about the
firms other projects but says these involve aeronautics,
sports, and even the music sector.
HONDA AIRCRAFT COMPANY
J O I N I N G T H E C L U B
WITH FIRST DELIVERIES SCHEDULED FOR THE END OF 2013 IN THE
US, HONDA JETS FOURTH CONFORMING TEST AIRCRAFT TOOK TO
THE SKIES ON 4 MAY 2012. JETGALA TALKS TO MICHIMASA FUJINO,
PRESIDENT AND CEO OF HONDA AIRCRAFT COMPANY, WHO HAS
WORKED CLOSELY ON THE JETS DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT.
JETGALA 46
WINGS
Q: When Narita International Airport opened its first bizjet
terminal in March this year, the move was seen as being long
overdue. Why do you think it has taken a while for the
business jet industry in Japan to make the step?
In the Japanese economic system, everything is concentrated
in Tokyo and other cities are not so critical for doing
business just like in other Asian countries. Also, major
cities in Japan are connected by high-speed train, so
aeroplanes are not necessarily convenient for us to use,
especially if we consider the time needed to go to the
airport, transfer into an aeroplane and arrive at another
city. So we didnt have a very good air transportation
system at the time.
Now, the government and the industry have started to
be aware that if we dont incorporate a global standard in
business speed and style, we may fall behind in the future.
In the last one or two years, there have been big changes,
and I hope more will come in the next five years, including
Narita International Airport becoming a major international
hub for business jets.
Q: How does your automotive background influence your
approach to jet design?
The automobile industry is very competitive. Its product
development cycle is very short, and there are many
competing manufacturers. The size of the market is huge.
So the development cycle how to incorporate lifestyle
trends, or how to incorporate the most recent IT developments
is very quick. The measure for capturing customer demand
is very sensitive. That kind of development culture is very
important in designing a private jet, and I try to incorporate
it into aviation design as much as possible.
Q: You studied aeronautical engineering. What led you to
work in a car company?
In Japan, there are very few aerospace companies, and even in
these companies, most of the work is sub-contractual. There is
no opportunity to design an entire aircraft. When I graduated
from school, I wanted to design something starting with the
concept. In Japan, that kind of job can be done in the
automobile industry.
Q: Why did Honda decide to design a jet? Were you involved
in the conception of the plan?
I worked on automobiles for about two years. After two
years, Honda decided to go into aeroplane research it
was a fundamental research project. I was one of those
members and was assigned to do aerospace. That was 1986
and Honda management thought they needed a future
product for the continuous growth of the company. One of
the managers had a strong desire to start an aviation
business, which is why one of the identified future projects
was the aeroplane project.
Q: Asians tend to manufacture, rather than design,
aeroplanes. What do you think hampers business jet
design in Asia?
In order to design a business jet, you have to understand the
product and the lifestyle revolving around the use of these
planes. Currently, the major [business jet] markets are North
America and Europe. Without understanding how business jets
are used and what is critical for business jet users, it is very
difficult to design such a product. One advantage for automobile
companies is that all engineers can drive, so they can design
what the customer wants. >>
Like a sports car, the Honda
Jet is offered in a variety
of lively colour themes. A
customer may also configure
the livery and interior details
using a software developed
by Honda Aircraft Company
47 JETGALA
>> Also, aeroplane certification is very complex. In order to
certify an aeroplane, there should be very technical people in
government agencies. In Japan, unfortunately, they dont have
experience in certifying aircraft, so they have to rely on
organisations such as the Federal Aviation Administration to
do so. Without sufficient certification infrastructure, its very
difficult for us to design aircraft.
Q: Do you see more Asian companies designing business jets
in the future?
In order to design a good aeroplane, you have to live in the United
States or Europe and learn this lifestyle. For example, the Japanese
cannot understand the pick-up truck. When I was in Japan, I
would sometimes watch American movies, and there would be
scenes where Americans had pick-up trucks that were seen as
very cool and something that people wanted to own. I could not
understand why. But when I moved to the US and spent at least
five years there, sometimes pick-up trucks looked good to me. So,
it is very important for a designer to understand a certain lifestyle
in order to design a product. If you just live in Asia or in Japan, it
is very difficult to design a good [private jet] product.
Q: Is that why you are building the Honda Jet in the US?
Thats one reason out of many. The major market is the US,
and Hondas corporate philosophy is that we design and build
products where the market exists. Thats why we moved the
factory to the US instead of heavily relying on exports from Japan.
Q: Can you tell us more about the decision to focus on
the US as the major market for the Honda Jet? Also, how
would you describe the typical buyer you have in mind for
the aircraft?
Currently, more than 70 per cent of the business jet fleet
is located in the US, so the US has the strongest demand.
A business jet is a much more common business tool for
Americans. Also, in order to gain good credibility or trust
in the reliability of the product, it is very important to
establish the Honda Jet product, brand, and service support
network in the US first. After North America, is Europe.
We are primarily focused on individual owners and small
business owners who will use the jet for business purposes,
and maybe also for personal use.
Q: Nevertheless, has there been interest from Asia? Do you
see the Honda Jet being heavily marketed in Asia in the
next decade?
We have well over 100 orders for the Honda Jet. There used to be
one Asian buyer, a very famous architect in Japan. I told him that
we dont deliver to Japan, but he replied that he would buy it in
the US and fly it back to Japan. Unfortunately, he passed away a
few years ago, so his order was cancelled.
[A potential Asian market is] China, where growth has been
much faster than I thought it would be. The Chinese lifestyle
is more American than Japanese because of the landscape and
automobile usage.
UP CLOSE
What is your pet peeve about flying/travel?
Waiting in a long line for security checks and
check-in.
Name someone you admire as a hero.
Kelly Johnson, designer of the SR-71
Blackbird.
What surprises people most about you?
I dont give up.
How did you earn your first yen?
As a mathematics tutor to high school
students when I was in college.
What was/is still your first love?
I like table tennis.
What is your favourite place in theworld?
I like The Bahamas very much.
What dream are you shooting for now?
I want to see many Honda Jets in the world.
Words to live by what are yours?
Soul fight.
JETGALA 48
WINGS
OPPOSITE
Michimasa Fujino, Honda
Aircraft Company president
and CEO, has worked on
the Honda Jet project from
its inception in the late
1980s up till its design and
development stage today
RIGHT
Honda Aircraft plans to
use a new 40/60 display
configuration on the
Garmin G3000 Primary
Flight Displays, giving the
pilot and co-pilot a more
user-friendly visual scan of
flight data
Q: Please cite examples of ideal Asian city pairs for
the Honda Jet.
The Honda Jet is for regional usage between cities, like Beijing
and Shanghai, Shanghai and Hong Kong, or Beijing and Hong
Kong. The Honda Jet is designed for local commute and high
fuel efficiency. America is the same. Where a large aircraft is
ideal for trips between New York and Los Angeles, the Honda
Jet is for trips between New York and Florida.
Q: What are the three main advantages of mounting
the engine on the wings of the aircraft, instead of on
the fuselage?
My objective was to avoid increasing the size of the aircraft,
but at the same time, maximise cabin space. So we moved
the engine from the fuselage. Thats why the Honda Jet is
the same size, or even smaller, than other light jets, but its
cabin size is 20 per cent larger. Also, if you mount the
engine on the fuselage, the noise and vibration would be
much stronger than an over-the-wing configuration. It is
just like a speaker. If you mount the engine on the wing,
there is no noise or vibration transmitted directly to the
fuselage, so its very quiet. The third advantage is reducing
drag. This is why the Honda Jet has high fuel efficiency.
Q: What options can passengers add for greater comfort
and more entertainment?
My concept is to design an interior cabin system that is well
equipped, even in its standard configuration. At the same
time, it will be customisable if customers want to do so. We
have prepared several options, such as a side-facing seat that
can accommodate one more passenger, cabin management
using mobile devices, and several avionics options.
Q: The Honda Jet is described as a sports car in the sky.
Does this imply a desire to reach customers who do own
sports cars, but do not yet own private jets?
When I joined Honda after college, my dream was to design
my own sports car. I couldnt, but I switched to aviation
I designed a sports car in the sky. I wanted to design a jet
that was very quick, high-performance and fuel-efficient, like
a grand, hybrid sports car.
Q: Can you fly a plane?
My first objective when I came to the US from Japan was to
be a pilot, but Im still learning. In order to earn a licence,
I have to fly 40 to 45 hours and its very difficult to find time.
But a lot of pilots work at Honda aircraft. We have
a Honda Flying Club very active there within our team
associates. So aviation is a passion, not just a vocation,
for many in our team.
49 JETGALA
Visionnaires eclectic mix
of Baroque, Gothic and
Art Deco styles evokes the
elegance of grand palaces
JETGALA 50
WINGS
WHEN ITALIAN FURNITURE BRAND VISIONNAIRE FIRST
ENTERED THE SCENE IN 2005, IT TOOK AIM AT MILANS
THEN LARGELY MINIMALIST SCENE. In the beginning,
people could not define the collection. That was very good, says
Leopold Cavalli, CEO of IPE Cavalli Group, the family-run
company behind the brand. The pieces were nostalgic but modern;
refined, yet inspired by fashion and fantasy.
Now Visionnaire aims to stir up another market. Incollaboration
with UK-based aviation design company CTM Design Ltd and
German aircraft design and completions specialist 328 Support
Services, Visionnaire will deliver bespoke interiors for private
jets. After two years of planning, a sample of the custom
refurbishment was unveiled at Milans iSalone design fair in
April, and again last May at the European Business Aviation
Convention and Exhibition in Geneva.
CTM Design is the project director, led by its design director,
Robin Dunlop. Dunlop has long worked with 328 Support
Services to overhaul the interiors of the latters fleet of Dornier
328 aircraft for the business jet market. He saw that design was
an effective but under-appreciated tool in selling the aircraft.
CTM Design has since worked on six Dornier 328 interiors for
328 Support Services, and both companies agreed to explore
more luxurious finishes with each new project. For their latest
work, Dunlop studied Visionnaires home philosophy and
reinterpreted this according to the 12-seater VIP Dornier 328s
platform and layout.
The result is a design concept called Air Philosophy, which
offers a fusion of styles from Baroque, Gothic and Art Deco >>
AIR PHILOSOPHY
by Sandy Tan
51 JETGALA
>> to cleaner lines. The percentages of mix depend
on how the overall balance is to feel. If we went 90
per cent Baroque in such a relatively small aircraft,
youd lose any perspective of space, explains
Dunlop. Capable of four- to five-hour flights, the
Dornier 328 was originally conceived for regional
European travellers. With unique interior schemes
such as Air Philosophy, the partners believe the
aircraft will also reach out favourably to Middle
Eastern and Asian markets.
Air Philosophys theme changes along with
Visionnaires seasonal collections. Currently, it
features soft and resilient materials, such as
leather hides and stingray- or snake-skin textures,
studded with cut crystal glass and complemented
by gold silk and Italian marble. High-gloss metal
plating comes in white gold, almond gold and
black chrome in order to work effectively with the
collections cream and beige palette. Quirky
emblems, such as King Arthurs sword in a stone
as a door handle or an AK-47 machine gun as wall
art, are part of the overall look and may also be
placed in the jet.
JETGALA 52
WINGS
Whats the twist? Its not the quietly luxurious interior or the state-of-the-art
avionics suite, those are expected. Its not even the undeniable ramp appeal
and airstair door entrance, though certainly a bonus. Its the value. With a
fuel burn of just 37 gph the Piper Meridian is the most fuel efcient six-place
turboprop available today 30% more efcient to be exact. The cost of this
value? About one million dollars less than its closest competitor.
Ill take the turbine with the value twist, please.
Turbine power with a twist.
p|per.com [ +1.31.518.77 [ +1.772.299.2403
2012 P|per A|rcral|, lrc.
The secret is personalisation, says Cavalli.
Our clients love collecting unique, individual,
handmade objects, crafted by the finest artisans
across the world. Clients can customise every
design aspect, such as the seats, doors, bathroom
fixtures, hardware and soft furnishings. Carpentry,
upholstery, and livery painting are carried out by
328 Support Services, and an order can take nine
to 12 months to complete. Dunlop says: As with
wine, quality is enhanced with maturity. If we take
some time and consider the clients needs very
early on, it will pay off later.
328 Support Services has previously worked on
larger aircraft, such as Gulfstream G-IV, Airbus 319
and A340, and Boeing 737 and 767. This partnership
is the best of both worlds Italian flair for the
extraordinary, backed up by the engineering
reassurance of German manufacturing, says 328
Support Services CEO Dave Jackson.
The partners look forward to refurbishing larger
aircraft in 2013. We are also looking at helicopters
and yachts, adds Dunlop. And if one should find it
difficult to define Air Philosophy, Cavalli is not likely
to fret. He agrees that this look is not for everyone.
Visionnaire, he says, is for those looking for
something astonishing Al Pacino, at the same
time delicate Michelle Pfeiffer. A pairing thats
perhaps not universally embraced, but nonetheless
individually understood.
OPPOSITE, FROM TOP
Clients can customise every aspect of their aircraft
from interior upholstery to livery design
Air Philosophy changes along with furniture designer
Visionnaires collections. This theme features a soft,
cream and beige palette
Exquisite Italian marble and high-gloss metal plating
further complement furnishings in this Dornier 328
interior design by Visionnaire and CTM Design
ABOVE
The team recognises that design is a key element in
reintroducing the Dornier 328, especially to Middle
Eastern and Asian markets
CUTTING THE MUSTARD
When he was a student at Londons Brunel School of
Engineering and Design, Robin Dunlop won a design
competition that landed him a job at British Airways.
Peers later encouraged him to set up his own business,
and in 2002, he founded CTM Design Ltd. The firm is
named after the English saying, cutting the mustard,
which means to meet and exceed expectations. Business
jet interior projects began in 2007 with a green outfitting
of a Bombardier CRJ700. Dunlop says that the company
is always hands-on with projects, so that everyone in the
team from engineers to clients will see their original
illustrations come to life.
JETGALA 54
WINGS
JETGALA
IN VIKING MYTHOLOGY, VALKYRIES ARE FEMALE,
GOD-LIKE FIGURES who hover over a battlefield and decide
who lives or dies in combat. A befitting name, therefore, for an
aircraft designed to deliver all-out Armageddon to an enemy
the XB-70 Valkyrie supersonic bomber.
The Cold War had barely started when, in 1954, the US
Air Forces Strategic Air Command started searching for a
replacement for its ageing B-52 Stratofortress bomber fleet.
The result is a stunning tale of the power of disruptive
technologies and in the case of the B-52, which still flies
today a lesson in the endurance of proven systems. But
more of that later.
The task sheet given to the aircrafts designers at the time
was immensely complex and challenging. This new super
bomber had to have a cruise speed of Mach 3 (~3,675 km/h),
be able to fly at an altitude of 70,000 feet (~21 km above
ground), carry a payload of 50,000 pounds (almost 23 tons)
and provide for a range of 7,500 miles (~12,000 kilometres).
In addition, this ultimate flying war machine had to provide
a shirtsleeve environment for its crew, meaning its interior
had to be designed in such a way that no special clothing,
pressure suits or respirators were needed. It also had to
be able to use, without modifications, the entire support
infrastructure the B-52s were using.
XB-70 VALKYRIE
by Rainer Sigel
GTTERDMMERUNG
JETGALA 56
WINGS
The result, the XB-70, was in some ways decades ahead
of its time. North American Aviation, now part of Boeing,
came up with the design, which provided for an aircraft
constructed largely from honeycombed stainless steel, and
with delta wings on a slab-sided fuselage containing its six
jet engines. To achieve Mach 3 performance, the overall
design allowed the aircraft to ride its own shock wave, an
effect known in aerodynamics as compression lift. Its outer
wing panels were hinged and only during take-off, landing,
and subsonic flight did they remain in horizontal position.
Once the aircraft was supersonic, the wing panels were hinged
downward to reduce drag caused by the wingtips interacting
with the inlet shock wave. The down-turned outer panels also
provided more vertical surface to improve directional stability
at high Mach numbers. Behind the cockpit were two movable
canards as additional control surfaces.
The first XB-70 was nearly complete in late 1962 when
corrosion between various grades of steel used was discovered.
Extensive rebuilding took almost two years and the maiden
flight for the first prototype was pushed to late 1963. Assembly
of the first XB-70A was completed in mid-1963, but a fuel leak
problem caused another long delay. Finally, on 11 May 1964,
the XB-70A emerged for the first time from its hangar at
Palmdale, California. Its sheer size, menacing stance and >>
OPPOSITE
The outer wing panels of the XB-70A Valkyrie
were slightly raised after landing and drag
chutes had to be deployed to slow down
THIS PAGE
The XB-70A Valkyrie is seen here in cruise
configuration, with wingtips drooped for
improved controllability
The XB-70 Valkyries cockpit has an airspeed/
Mach indicator, altitude/vertical velocity
indicator and six throttles for its jet engines
Images courtesy of NASA
57 JETGALA
FROM TOP
The long-awaited XB-70A Valkyrie was finally rolled out in 1964, but the
technologically advanced aircraft project was doomed to fail. In the end,
only two models were produced
The B1-B Lancer was produced with a focus on low-level penetration bombing.
It entered service with the US Air Force in 1986 as a nuclear bomber
Images courtesy of US Air Force
MAKING HISTORY
The XB-70s manufacturer, North American Aviation, was
a major US aerospace player credited with designing and
building a wide range of historic aircraft. These include
the T-6 Texan trainer (not related to Hawker Beechcrafts
T-6 trainer), the legendary P-51 Mustang fighter, the B-25
Mitchell bomber, the iconic F-86 Sabre jet fighter, the X-15
rocket plane and the variable-sweep-wing strategic bomber
B-1 Lancer. As a major NASA contractor, the company also
built the Apollo Command and Service Module, the second
stage of the Saturn V rocket and the Space Shuttle orbiter.
Through a series of mergers and sales, North American
Aviation became part of Rockwell International and is now
part of Boeing.
>> strategic capabilities made headlines around the world.
Inside the cockpit, crew members sat in cocooned seats with
clamshell doors, which provided them with individual
sealed escape capsules in case of aircraft loss. A single bay
between the engine ducts and engines could carry groups
of nuclear bombs.
The XB-70 finally made its first flight on 21 September
1964, but failed to reach Mach 1 owing to several technical
issues. A second prototype was built, and both prototypes first
reached Mach 3 only on their respective 17th flights. But while
the XB-70s aviation technology was way ahead of anything ever
produced before, military technology was advancing even faster.
Pentagon planners had come to realise that the delivery of
nuclear warheads would be much cheaper and more accurate
if done by intercontinental ballistic missiles rather than
by manned super bombers.
This growing opinion of obsolescence was further
reinforced by a mid-air collision and fatal crash of the XB-70s
second prototype on 8 June 1966, while on a photo shoot
commissioned by engine maker General Electric. The aircrafts
co-pilot was killed, and its commander was seriously injured
with one of his arms crushed by the closing clamshell escape
capsule. The first XB-70 was undergoing maintenance at the
time of the accident and did not fly again until November 1966,
mostly for supersonic flight research purposes.
All in all, the first XB-70 made only 83 flights, totalling
160 hours and 16 minutes, while the doomed second
prototype logged only 46 flights, totalling 92 hours and 22
minutes. The Valkyries final flight came on 4 February 1969,
when the aircraft was ferried to Wright-Patterson Air Force
Base in Ohio, where it is now on display at the National
Museum of the US Air Force.
JETGALA 58
WINGS
Know More.
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Stay Up-To-Speed with Aviation Business Index
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VERTICAL WINGS
by Jim Simon
AEROBATIC PILOTS ARE PUSHING THE ENVELOPE OF FLIGHT. IT IS WHAT
THEY DO, AND CHAMPION PILOT MATT TANNER HAS AN UNCONVENTIONAL
idea for doing so by adding vertical wings to his aircraft. Tanner believes that vertical
wings will enable him to entertain audiences with safe, controlled, aerobatic manoeuvres
that are rarely, if ever, seen at aerobatics shows. What makes his project even more ambitious
is that he is leveraging the Internet to appeal for sponsors to help make his vision a reality.
Tanner currently uses a Laser Z300, a specialised aerobatics aircraft. His team has
designed a set of vertical wings that will fit onto it and allow it to turn, loop and manoeuvre
like nothing seen before. Each wing will have two parts top and bottom which will be
fitted right through the existing horizontal wings.
Many big ideas are conceived at random moments at pubs, in the shower or, in Tanners
case, on an unplanned drive with a friend after a flight was cancelled due to bad weather.
Swapping airshow ideas with fellow pilot Tom Edwards, both realised that they were
focussing on stunts that were not easily repeatable. They began discussing the possibility of
adding vertical wings to their aircraft, and the idea developed into a detailed plan over the
next two years. They are now close to completing a one-third scale model that they hope
to test this summer.
If it sounds too fantastic, Tanner assures that they are proceeding with care. Although
we have thoroughly calculated the aerodynamics and flight parameters, and will test them
extensively on the scale model, there are sure to be characteristics of the vertical wings that
we are not fully aware of until we fly the real thing, he says. For example, how will it handle
A MISSION TO MANOEUVRE THROUGH
THE SKY LIKE NEVER BEFORE
JETGALA 60
WINGS
an extremely high-angle-of-attack flight? What will the stall
or spin characteristics be? Exactly how difficult will crosswind
landings be? We anticipate that they wont be a walk in the park.
Tanner believes that the spectacle of the new manoeuvres
that his Laser Z300 will be able to make will draw more people
to aviation. He says: We are hoping to inspire non-pilots to
become pilots, to show people what can be done on our
three-dimensional canvas the sky and to inspire creativity
and motivate people to do great things in their lives.
He still recalls the two people who first sparked his interest
in aviation and in aerobatic flying. A friend who obtained a
private pilot certificate when they were about 17 years old
motivated him to begin taking flying lessons too. He worked at
the local airport to finance these classes. Another friend took
Tanner on his first aerobatic ride in a Boeing PT-17 Stearman,
a World War II biplane primary trainer. But the loops and rolls
in the open-cockpit Stearman could not compare to the thrill
he felt the first time he rode in an Extra 300.
We had just done a spin and were pointing straight at the
ground. It was the coolest view I had ever had in an airplane,
recalls Tanner. But then we went full throttle and accelerated
straight down! I could feel myself getting pushed back into my
seat like I was in a drag race. That was when I knew I was
going to be an aerobatic pilot.
Tanner became a flight instructor and earned a degree in
aviation management. Currently, he teaches US Air Force pilot
candidates to fly through Doss Aviation. He has trained with
aerobatic legends Wayne Handley and Sean Tucker, and has
been recognised and awarded in airshows across the United
States. During the prime North American summer season,
Tanner performs at airshows every few weeks.
Throughout aviation history, innovators and adventurers
have relied on the patronage of like-minded individuals to help
them see their vision through from concept to reality. Tanner is
no different. He hopes to raise USD75,000 with the help of
sponsors and has a team ready to start building the wings. He
adds, though, that the project will still materialise even if he and
his team have to finance it themselves. It will take more time,
but the show will surely go vertical at some point.
OPPOSITE
Tanner is an award-winning aerobatic pilot and
a frequent performer at airshows around the
United States
THIS PAGE, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT
Tanners team has almost completed a one-
third scale model of the plane with vertical
wings and they hope to test it this summer
Tanner believes installing vertical wings on his
plane will enable him to perform aerobatic
stunts that were previously almost impossible
to execute
Tanner currently flies a Laser Z300, a
specialised aerobatics aircraft. This is the plane
that he plans to use for the installation of his
unconventional vertical wings
61 JETGALA
JETGALA 62
WINGS
A
sian culture is an intriguing mix that emphasises the
often conflicting values of modesty and face, often
defined as a mixture of prestige, dignity, honour,
respect and status. With Asias strong growth over the
past years, ultra-high-net-worth (UHNW) Asians
now seem more ready to acknowledge wealth more
openly. And in Indonesia, South-east Asias largest economy,
this new wave of success is buoying the growth of business
jet ownership.
According to Wealth-X, a global wealth intelligence
firm headquartered in Singapore, Indonesia has approximately
775 individuals worth more than USD30 million. Their
combined wealth grew by 47 per cent since the release
of the World Ultra Wealth Report 2011 to reach USD125
billion. This increase is reflected in a growing appetite for
luxury items in the country, with private aircraft being the
ultimate purchase.
Demand for air travel in Indonesia has boomed
together with its economy. This fact was reinforced at the
Singapore Airshow in February 2012 where Indonesian
carriers orders accounted for more than two-thirds of all
deals sealed, amounting to an estimated SGD31 billion.
Not surprisingly, private jet rental activity has also surged
in Indonesias corporate and leisure sectors, beyond the
widespread hiring of turboprops by oil, coal and mining
companies. In response, more commercial airlines are
expanding their services to include business jet charter.
Business aircraft manufacturers report enviable order
book activity that points towards Indonesia evolving as
the strongest market for private aircraft in South-east Asia.
Industry estimates show that in the next 10 years, Asia will
account for 16 per cent of worldwide bizjet orders, with
Indonesia leading the race in South-east Asia.
Wealth Xs data suggests that Indonesias elite have
a tradition of owning private aircraft. A high official
of a major shipbuilding and investment firm owns a
Gulfstream IV, while one of the potential presidential
candidates in the 2014 elections owns a 2002 Boeing
Business Jet and a 2008 Bombardier Global Express XRS.
Indonesian businessmen with a penchant for flight
include an airline company owner who has in his stable a
2008 Cessna Citation XLS and a 1996 Bell 407 Helicopter.
Another prominent billionaire owns a 2008 Gulfstream
G200 through his diversified holding company.
Indonesia has replicated the spirit of its national
emblem, the mythical Garuda bird, which represents
strength and power. In its rise from the Asian financial crisis
and through its pursuit of steady economic expansion in the
last decade, Indonesian wealth is proving to be as resilient
as its national symbol one private jet at a time.
WEALTH INTELLIGENCE: INDONESIA
ALL EYES ON INDONESIAN SKIES IN SOUTH-EAST ASIA
E A ST E R N
A LT I T U D E
63 JETGALA
JETGALA 64 JJETGALA ETGALA LA 64 64
CAPTAIN SPEAKING...
by Alex Unruh
ITS ALL ABOUT BUSINESS
WINGS
JETGALA 65 JJETGALA ETGAL ALAA 65 655
NOW THAT I HAVE GOT USED TO
HAVING INTERNET ON BOARD,
I WONDER HOW, AS A PILOT,
I EVER GOT BY WITHOUT IT
W
hen asked what I do for a living, and on replying that Im a pilot, the typical response is: Oh,
what airline do you fly for? Answering that I fly business jets is often a new idea for people
who are not familiar with aviation; thus, it requires some clarification. The aircraft I fly,
generally referred to as private jets, are often and unfortunately stereotyped as the preferred
transportation for fat cats going on golf junkets. While this may apply to a few private fliers,
for the majority, it couldnt be further from the truth.
The company I work for manufactures business jets and the primary theme when marketing these fantastic
machines is that they increase productivity. The majority of private jet buyers worldwide are businesses, both
large and small. A client once told me there was no way he could maintain enough privacy on an airliner,
where you are within earshot and eyeshot of outsiders. Competition in todays global business environment
is so tight that one needs to create every advantage he can.
In 2009, with the business aviation industrys image in a tailspin, the National Business Aviation Association
and General Aviation Manufacturers Association conceived a website called, No Plane No Gain. It promotes
business aviation (including jets and single-propeller aeroplanes) as an asset for productivity. It hopes to
educate the public and policy makers on the benefits of general aviation, as well as equip current participants
with the facts to justify their use of it.
The website quotes an editor of the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association blog, who says: Study after
study shows that companies that own business aircraft handily outperform competitors in the same field that
dont use business airplanes. I couldnt agree more. Worldwide Internet is being installed on the aircraft I fly
so that anyone on board can be more productive while en route to their next destination. And now that I have
got used to it, I wonder how, as a pilot, I ever got by without it.
And business aviation benefits more than just its users. As Arne Sorenson, president and CEO of Marriott
International, Inc says: Weve got to get away from the symbolism of corporate fat cats smoking a big cigar
on a golf course and instead think about the symbolism of people meeting and thinking together and creating
ideas, and building their cultures.

Image by Mitch Russo www.lenstraveler18.com
LUXE
AUDEMARS PIGUET Royal Oak Offshore Chronograph
Audemars Piguet has made commemorative Royal Oak models
for the collections 40th anniversary this year, with models
ranging from open-worked to ultra-slim variants. One sportier
and slightly more whimsical take on the classic timepiece is the
Royal Oak Offshore Chronograph. Measuring 44 mm across, the
watchs platinum case with black ceramic bezel frames a blue
dial with the brands signature Mega Tapisserie guilloch motif.
The watch comes with a matching blue bezel ring and crocodile
strap. It uses the Calibre 3216/3840, an in-house automatic
chronograph movement known for its stability.
COLOURED TIMEPIECES
by Alvin Wong
FROM FULL-ON
HUES TO A SLIGHT
TINT, COLOUR
IS KEY TO SOME
OF THE LATEST
LUXURY WATCHES
iven watch enthusiasts increasing fondness
for sombre-looking and classic timepieces
in recent years, it is easy to forget that these
pieces are also meant to enliven ones attire.
Contrary to conventional notions, colourful
dials do not necessarily diminish a watchs
worth. Rather, with the right shade, applied
to the right degree, colour can infuse a watch
with an exclusive, irreplaceable personality.
We look at recent colour-inspired designs at
the finest end of the horological spectrum.
JETGALA 68
LUXE
BLANCPAIN Villeret Calibre 7663Q
Revealed at Baselworld 2012, Blancpains
latest Villeret model is a classic gentlemans
dress watch. Its blue guilloch dial is made
using the traditional flinqu lacquer technique,
which requires the application of several
layers of translucent lacquer to achieve a
rich lustre. It has a retrograde small-seconds
counter at six oclock, as well as a wavy date
pointer. Driven by a 4.57 mm-thin automatic
movement and housed in a 40 mm-diameter
white-gold case, the watch avoids being
overtly showy. The lining of its navy alligator
leather strap matches the colour of the dial.
BREGUET Classique Complication 3358BB/2P/986 DD0D
This Renaissance-style, hand-wound timepiece from Breguets
Classique collection reveals a tourbillon mechanism at six oclock,
with a small-seconds counter on the tourbillon shaft. Its dials
decorative finery includes a red guilloch plate that frames an
off-centred hour-and-minute sub-dial, blued steel hands, and
a 35-mm white-gold case festooned with 74 diamonds totalling
1.33 carats. All this is complemented by an understated black
strap. The watch was introduced at Baselworld this year.
BULGARI Octo Maserati Special Edition
At Baselworld this year, Bulgari presented its collaboration
with Maserati the Bulgari Octo Maserati Special Edition, which
alludes to race cars with its radiator-grille-style motif, a leather
strap in Maserati-style blue upholstery, and a tachymeter. The
watchs technical aspects include jumping hour and retrograde
chronograph counters that are signature to the Bulgari Grald
Genta Octo collection. The watch comes in a brushed steel case,
while its proprietary chronograph movement flaunts an aged
gold treatment. The Maserati Trident symbol is displayed on
the transparent case back. >>
69 JETGALA
A. LANGE & SHNE DATOGRAPH UP/DOWN


A. Lange & Shnes DNA has always been of classic elegance and utilitarian style.
Hence, apart from the chronographs blued steel hands, the only dash of colour one
can find on its Datograph Up/Down is on the red-accented, fuel-gauge-style, power-
reserve indicator at six oclock. The watch was revealed at the 2012 SIHH watch fair
and is an update of the brands Datograph, which when launched in 1999 held
the title of the worlds first classic column-wheel chronograph with a flyback feature.
This update includes a 60-hour power reserve, up from its predecessors 36 hours.
The case size has also been increased from 39 mm to 41 mm. The thickness remains
the same, though, at 13.1 mm.
PATEK PHILIPPE Ref. 6102P-001 Celestial with Date
This Patek Philippe grand complication features a dial
streaked with gold stars and a moon, depicting a moving
sky chart that tracks stars movement and moon phases.
It is powered by an automatic movement with a 48-hour
power reserve. The dials midnight-blue hue is achieved
with three metalised sapphire-crystal discs, and includes
a small ellipse that frames the portion of the sky visible
from Geneva. This timepiece tells mean solar time and
includes a date indicator. Its predecessor was launched
in 2010 with a diamond-set case, while this 2012 version
comes with a platinum case and mirror-polished bezel.
VACHERON CONSTANTIN Mtiers dArt Les Univers Infinis
Centuries-old, hand crafted, decorative techniques are the
highlight of Vacheron Constantins new Mtiers dArt collection,
christened Les Univers Infinis. The series is inspired by the
works of Dutch artist Maurits Cornelis Escher, who was known
in the early and mid-20th century for his tessellation art
graphics featuring repetitive geometric patterns. In reviving
Eschers art, Vacheron Constantins craftsmen used traditional
engraving, enamelling, gem-setting and guilloch techniques
on three timepieces that individually feature dove, fish and
shell patterns on their dials. Driven by the brands proprietary
Calibre 2460 automatic movement with Geneva Hallmark, the
watches are limited to 20 pieces for each design.
FRANCK MULLER Mariner 9080 CC AT MAR
Modern machismo is best expressed in black, if one judges by
Franck Mullers dark and sporty Mariner watches. The lacquered
black dial shows off numerals outlined in either blue or red, an
hours, minutes and date display, and a chronograph. Nautical
design elements include a compass and a wind-rose symbol.
The hand-finished automatic movement, which is accurate to
one-eighth of a second, is housed in an 18-carat rose-gold,
Cintre Curvex case. The collection was launched in 2008; the
watch featured here is a 2011 version.
t
T
Th
th
shell
Calib
watch
JETGALA 70
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THIS PAGE
Recreating Whitehurst clocks entails not only
faithfulness in design and technicality, but
also in quality. All cogs that go into a new
timepiece are carefully filed by hand before
going through a rigorous eight-stage polishing
process also entirely done by hand
OPPOSITE
Created for Benjamin Franklin, the Whitehurst
three-wheeled clock ticked stoically behind the
man commonly known as Americas founding
father as he shaped that countrys history
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WHITEHURST CLOCKS
by Dr Bernard Cheong
CLOCKS ARE OBJECTS OF THE MIND THAT EXIST IN THE
REAL WORLD OF MATHEMATICS, PHYSICS AND MATERIAL
science. In the mid-18th century, a scientist named John
Whitehurst II, the son of a clockmaker, began making clocks of
exemplary beauty and precision. Today, his timepieces still elicit
curiosity, attention and even envy. They are fascinating objects
that take more than just wealth to possess and appreciate.
A Whitehurst clock does not come with sex appeal and
materialistic magnetism. What it has is presence, and the unique
added flavour of old money and superb taste. These surviving
clocks date back more than 200 years and are highly coveted
in the secondary market. A testament to the makers acceptance
is the fact that several museums and old-world industrial and
banking empires still have the clocks today in their original
buildings, working in robust health.
Whitehurst lived in Derby, England, from 1736 to 1780 and
was a respected inventor in his day. As a clockmaker and engineer,
his innovations included the round-dial long-case clock,
standardisation of parts, and the manufacture of components to
very narrow tolerances. He also made compasses, pyrometers and
barometers, and was respected for his work in geology. In 1778, >>
THE RENAISSANCE
OF WHITEHURST
CLOCKS, AN
18TH-CENTURY
MECHANICAL FEAT
73 JETGALA
THIS PAGE
A limited number of modern Whitehurst clocks
are being built on a commission-only basis and
can be customised for each collector
OPPOSITE, FROM TOP
One of Whitehursts most famous designs,
the original Y-frame clock, was made some
200 years ago. Today, it continues to tick with
precision
Each individual cog, as well as the framework
of the clock, is finished in a protective layer of
24-carat gold to ensure flawless workmanship
JETGALA 74
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>> he published a theory entitled, An Inquiry into the Original
State and Formation of the Earth. He surrounded himself with
great thinkers; among his friends were Benjamin Franklin
and Erasmus Darwin.
Although the Whitehurst name has slept for more than
a century, many of its clocks are still working, having been
maintained by knowledgeable collectors. The Whitehursts
trade has been under the Smith family since 1856, when
apprentice John Smith took the reins after the death of the
third John Whitehurst, the geologists son.
Today the Smith of Derby company creates the clocks on a
commission-only basis, using the techniques of yesteryear but
with modern equipment. Not totally controversial, the modern-
day Whitehurst is old-world fusion, avoiding the pits of the
markets unpredictable whims. The team has little tolerance for
fashion, focussing instead on classic design values and historic
perspectives. This very subtle difference is what separates
objects that stand the test of time from those that will rust
and eventually fade away.
True to the originals, the modern-day Whitehurst clocks
demonstrate an extreme attention to detail and obsessively
intricate work. There is ample use of shapes circles or
rectangles made complex by pulling them together with
a certain tension in design. The clocks seem excruciating
to produce, let alone replicate according to 18th-century
aesthetics and mechanics. The clocks appear hand assembled
from 70 to over 100 finely finished parts.
AGE-OLD
WISDOM



The first Whitehurst clock recreated
this century was modelled after
John Whitehursts original Y-frame
clock, which has been telling time at
the Duke of Devonshires Chatsworth
House in Derbyshire, England, for
200 years. The modern version
comes with a hand-engraved glass
feature that allows one to track the
earths rotation and tell the time across
the world. It follows Whitehursts
principle of creating components
from the same piece of material,
resulting in a uniform reaction to
temperature and humidity and
thus enhancing precision. The clock
alone weighs 40 pounds without
the stand. It loses only one second
every two months.
Today, Whitehurst clocks stand at one end of a dichotomy
that horology needs to survive the relentless jaws of fashion
trends and into the next century. Ultra wristwatches now
beginning at USD100,000 per piece form the other extreme
end of this dichotomy. Both share that hand-made Kiton
Napoli feel and custom Maybach atmosphere.
The clocks warm wealth seeps into the walls of a home or
office, their heritage and history exerting their presence in the
glow of the metal. There are no diamonds. And although they
come in brass plated with 24-carat gold, one could say these
clocks are made of unobtainium a metal of the mind.
75 JETGALA
The first edition of
the Giga Tourbillon
comes in a case
shaped as a Cintre
Curvex, which is
unique to the brand
and follows the
curve of the wrist
JETGALA 76
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GIGA TOURBILLON
by Dr Bernard Cheong
A DELICATE BALANCING ACT
BETWEEN PHYSICS, ART AND TIME
IN THE TRADITIONAL WORLD OF HOROLOGY, ONCE IN A WHILE, A
WATCHMAKER COMES ALONG WHO STRETCHES THE VERY LIMITS OF
convention. In this generation, one such innovator is Franck Muller, whom I have
met many times but never had a real opportunity to know better. But I once became
fascinated by tourbillons of all kinds and, as a watch collector, took a much closer
look at the Giga Tourbillon by Franck Muller.
A tourbillon is more than a redundant tool to enhance accuracy it is a display
of watchmaking's most daring complication. A tourbillon has to demonstrate a
certain 'dance' and be laid open, as if split into three parts, showing the wheel, cage
and escapement. Attempts to achieve this harmony have included rotating the
tourbillon, and even tilting it. These techniques enhanced the finish of the polished
parts, but failed to create a unique way of displaying the balance wheel, cage and
revolving escapement.
Franck Muller has opted to sharpen the focus on this intricate mechanism with
his Giga Tourbillon, which has a comparatively giant 20-mm diameter tourbillon that
fills half of the watch. It dances with danger, in a way that makes a collector's heart
beat faster with fear that the tourbillon might explode. This, however, is imaginary.
The tourbillon is stable, and it works. >>
77 JETGALA
TOP (L-R)
One of the bejewelled versions of the
Giga Tourbillon boasts diamonds on
both sides of the dial, as well as on the
case and the movement itself
The 2012 edition of the Giga Tourbillon
uses a round case, available in white gold
and red gold
The first edition of the Giga Tourbillon
was launched in 2011 and comes with a
skeletonised version
BOTTOM
The 20-mm tourbillon on the Giga
Tourbillon occupies half of the watch
JETGALA 78
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BUILT ON TIME



The historic village of Genthod
in Geneva, Switzerland, is the site
of Franck Muller Watchland. It is
located in the Les Amandoliers
estate, within a Neo-Gothic-inspired
property built in 1905. The view
from the estate encompasses Lake
Geneva, the Swiss Alps and Mont
Blanc. Renovations on the property
began in 1995, and in 2001, Watchland
was opened to the public.
Watchland aims to provide the
research and design involved in
watchmaking. This includes the design
and development of technical studies
and the creation of prototypes. It also
focusses on the development of the
case, movement and dial, as well as
the working of precious metals,
watch assembly and casing.
The parts of Franck Muller watches
are crafted in the company's various
workshops and are then assembled
at Watchland
>> In this timepiece, Franck Muller
has reversed the movement, placing the
bridges on the dial side. The hour setting
and winding section are also reversed
all in all, a strange arrangement to novice
eyes. In order to distribute the immense
torque required to drive the movement's
nine-day operating reserve, with manual
winding by crown, the Giga Tourbillon
utilises four barrels instead of the usual
one or two. These are assembled in series
to double the operating reserve, but
connected in parallel to double the power
of the movement. The barrels have a
diameter of 16 mm 4 mm larger than
traditional ones which provides them
the almost constant force needed for the
watch to operate.
The high-yield escapement drives
a balance wheel whose inertia moment
is four times higher than that of a
traditional tourbillon. This creates a
sound similar to the triple-click sound
of a marine chronometer, which indicates
that a constant force limiter is employed,
and that the movement is of a higher
breed than conventional tourbillons.
The balance wheel, which oscillates at
a frequency of 2.5 Hz, requires a very
large spiral. Both the escapement and
the spiral were developed exclusively
by the Franck Muller group.
Launched in 2011, the first-edition
Giga Tourbillon is housed in a Cintre
Curvex-shaped case. Its versions include
skeletonised and bejewelled watches.
In one bejewelled version, diamonds are
set on the case, dial and even on the
reverse movement. Setting diamonds on
the bridges and plate is rarely done, and
is a skill that requires great precision and
most likely caused an immense amount
of time and loss in terms of small
adjustments. Set with 693 diamonds
351 on the plate and 342 on the reverse
side of the plate the Giga Tourbillon
paved with diamonds is available in white
gold, pink gold, or PVD set with black
diamonds. The second Giga Tourbillon
edition, released at the 2012 World
Presentation of Haute Horlogerie, comes
in a 49 mm-diameter round case with
a skeletonised movement.
All versions have nine-day power
reserves. The Giga Tourbillon has the
spirit of Franck Muller's early days,
moving past traditional high-end watch
making conventions and pushing existing
limits to technical complexity. Art at times
has to contain a quantum of controversy,
as otherwise it can lack creative credibility.
And Franck Muller's creations often come
with controversy built in.
79 JETGALA
HOLLISTERS MOTORCYCLES
by Jeff Heselwood
The striking Phantom lives up to the award it won at the 2002 Daytona Beach Bike Week the Worlds Most Beautiful Motorcycle
JETGALA 80
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AS A CHILD, VOLKER SICHLER LOVED RIDING
AROUND ON HIS PLASTIC BIG WHEEL TRIKE. ONCE
he reached double digits, he challenged the neighbours kids
in his hometown of Rottweil, Germany, to show who had the
fastest bicycle. Tinkering with the engines of scooters and
motorbikes as a young adult, his interest soon turned to
something bigger. Sichler reached an impasse, though
finding a Harley in 1980s Germany was no easy feat and he
continued to search for the one bike to capture his imagination.
Finding none, he built one himself.
He turned his hobby into a business in 1986 and founded
Hollisters MotorCycles as an importer and customiser of
Harley-Davidsons. Today, the company focusses exclusively on
developing its own models and exporting its bikes all over the
world to a growing client base in the United States, Europe
and Russia though Sichler is especially pleased when his
bikes turn up in Asia and Australia.
Exactly what makes these bikes so special? I think it is
the curved styling, Sichler posits. Everything fits perfectly
together, [resulting in] a very clean and very expensive look.
Im sure that if you were to look at the bikes in 50 years, they
would still be just as fascinating. >>
Winner of at least seven awards, the Excite N1 sports a distinguished silhouette
81 JETGALA
>> Demand far exceeds supply the company offers
only six styles of cycle and produces between 10 and 15 models
a year. Each is unique, as the motorcycles are produced
according to a customers specific wishes. Once the sketch
is approved, the bike is carefully pieced together by hand. It
is painted, chromed and polished, then ridden on a 1,000-km
test drive to make sure it is absolutely solid and rides to
perfection. The finished motorcycle is then presented to the
customer in the companys factory or delivered to anywhere
in the world.
One early challenge was designing the bikes electric
systems, which Sichler built from the ground up to
accommodate seamless interaction with a range of diverse
parts. He also redesigned the bikes power systems, installing
a self-patented MBC (Multi-Bike Control) that manages
remote starting, advanced motor functioning, individual
shock absorption and round-the-clock cycle diagnosis.
Hollisters bikes have won some 45 awards around the
world. The Phantom was named Worlds Most Beautiful
Motorcycle at the Daytona Beach Bike Week in 2002, and
was the most awarded show-bike the following year. Excite N1
won seven prizes in 2003, including the vaunted Red Dot
International Design award. Under orders from Prince Albert,
Hollisters MotorCycles is allowed to exhibit at Monte Carlo
a privilege that bike manufacturers rarely enjoy in Monaco.
Sichler notes that 85 per cent of Hollisters clients are
businessmen at the top of their game. These people work
very hard and in the little free time they have, they want to
refresh their lives with an outstanding bike. And his clients
never change a thing about their motorcycle. Because we
build the bikes as they want them, everything is done. There
is no reason to change anything, adds Sichler. He believes
that the best way to predict the future is to create it
just as he has done.
JETGALA 82
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CLASSIC
REBELLION



One of the companys most popular
bikes is the Classic. It moulds retro
styling with modern technology:
banana-style fishtail exhaust pipes
that recall 1930s gangster films;
massive mudguards; and a two-
tone detailing job that calls to mind
a vintage Maybach or Bentley.
The bikes hit the ground on three
different types of wheels, all made
of aluminium and featuring moulded
rims. Their engines churn out
between 1460 and 1800cc, offering
serious acceleration even at low revs.
Little surprise that its clients become
lifelong fans of Sichlers motorcycles
and of the man himself.
Hollisters produces a range of twin-engined motorcycles.
Seen here is an example of a Custom Twin Special edition
A 2012 version of the Hollisters Classic
features an RT 88 poliert engine
OPPOSITE, FROM TOP
Hollisters motorcycle designs, each with its own
characteristics, feature a signature curved styling
Hollisters MotorCycles have been showcased at
automotive exhibitions and competitions around
the world, including Monte Carlo
Each component of the bikes is pieced together by
hand and electric systems are carefully integrated
83 JETGALA
GEZA SCHOEN
by Roger Norum
IN AN INDUSTRY SATURATED WITH CELEBRITY, LABELS
and branding gimmicks, Geza Schoens simplistic yet soulful
perfumes exude a refreshing note. Based in Berlin, trained
by renowned perfumer Haarmann & Reimer, and holding a
transnational resum with stints in Argentina, Singapore, London
and Paris, Schoen stands out as a singular artist.
Schoen grew up in Kassel, Germany, where his father was
an art teacher and his mother, a kindergarten teacher. He
recalls: Around 14 or 15, I started collecting samples and had a
large collection of mens scents. I just started smelling them and
after half a year, I could smell them blind and name them. It was
good fun. It must have been around that time when I wanted to
work with perfume.
What separates Schoen from most of his contemporaries
is an inquisitive mind for the essence of perfume, and what it
does. Like a true scientist, he isolates individual components
and works with natural, raw materials essential oils, resins
and absolutes in order to create what he calls single scent
products. Schoen finds few fragrances in the industry with soul
to speak of, as he believes many are rife with marketing, branding
and dilution. To base a perfume on only one chemical and
one simple scent was a purist idea that turned him on. As
a parfumier, I [was] fed up with having to combine molecules
with 18 ingredients... What goes into the bottle can come as
an after-thought, he says. >>
JETGALA 84
LUXE
OPPOSITE
The controversial Molecule 01
fragrance features just one
ingredient, the sensual Iso E Super
molecule, diluted in alcohol
ABOVE
A tribute to German screen legend
Klaus Kinski, the perfume is a
decadent, textured scent of heady
notes including cassis, juniper and
castoreum
RIGHT
The aroma-chemical vetiveryle
acetate is celebrated in the heady,
earthy Molecule 03
85 JETGALA
Tanner is an award-winning aerobatic
pilot and a frequent performer at
airshows around the United States
TTTTTTTaaaaann nnnnnn aaann n aa eeeeeeeeer eeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee is a TTTTTT
pil pil pilllll il pil pil pi pi pil pillllllll p oott ot ot oo aaaaaaaand aaaaaaaaaaaa a
ai aai ai irrrrrrr ir aa rr ir ai airrrrrrr a rr a r air air aai airr ir ir airrrr air irrrr irrrrr ir airr air airrrrrrrrr aaaaaaaaairrrrrrr air aaair aair aaai iirrrrr aaaaaair aai irrrrrrssh h sh hhhhhho shoo shoooo hoo hho shhhhho hoo shhhh sh sh hh sho hoo sho ssh sh sh sh hhoooo ho shoo hooo shooo hoooo sh shoooooooo sssh h sho hooooo hoo sshhho sho ho ho sssh hhh ssssssshho sssssshhhho ssssssho hoo sssssho ho hhoo shhows a
>> In 1990, while working on a scent
for a fashion label, Schoen isolated
the Iso E Super molecule, which exists
in many commercial perfumes and is
supposedly an aphrodisiac. Discovering
the ingredients appeal on its own, he
created Molecule 01, which contained
only Iso E Super diluted with perfumers
alcohol. Critics and fans called it the
anti-fragrance or the non-perfume;
nevertheless, it gained a cult following
and remains widely discussed today.
After working for brands such as
Diesel, FCUK and Wode, Schoen
decided to work independently. Within a
few years, he struck gold, selling 120,000
units of a scent based on gin and tonic to
Bombay Sapphire. It was fabulous, he
recalls. I couldnt believe Bacardi would
let us produce this but they did and it
smelled great.
Schoen has since composed aromas
for clients as diverse as British designer
label Boudicca and Thorsten Biehl. But
his focus and favourite is his brainchild,
the Escentric Molecules line, which
launched in April 2006 at Harvey Nichols.
Our perfumes are easier to wear than
most other perfumes. We are not as
exuberant or cloying, he says. They
smell fresh and woody, sophisticated
and sexy. His Escentric 01 blends Iso E
Super with notes of pink pepper, lime
peel and orris incense.
A fan of subtle artists such as Jeff
Wall, Gerhard Richter and Joseph Beuys,
Schoen says he is inspired by anything:
It can be anywhere that smells or
odours take place. He adds: The
combination of people, surroundings
and materials creates unique mixtures
on their own. The ultimate inspiration
though, for me, is travelling.
Schoen is currently working with
renowned ballerina Polina Semionova
on the second installation of The
Beautiful Mind series sensual scents
inspired by talented and unconventional
women. The first scent in the series was a
collaboration with memory prodigy
Christiane Stegner. Schoen is also
preparing Escentric 04, which releases in
autumn 2013. And, he adds casually,
millions of other things in between. It
seems theres much to do for the rebel
with a perfumed cause.
PRIDE &
PASSION



Perfumer Geza Schoen has created
some extremely distinct scents over
the years. He co-designed Paper
Passion, a fragrance said to smell
like books, with publisher Gerhard
Steidl. Another unconventional
perfume he made was for the 20th
death anniversary of German actor
Klaus Kinski, which fuses cassis,
juniper, castoreum and vetiver.
The result is intense and smoky
much like Kinski himself. Of all his
aromas, Schoen is most proud of
Escentric 01, his first creation for
his Escentric Molecules line. He
says: Worn on the skin is how I like
the magic of ingredients working
together.
A rebel in the world of perfumery,
Geza Schoen eschews modern branding
gimmicks and celebrity associations
with fragrances
Inspired by memory prodigy Christiane
Stegner, Beautiful Mind Volume 1 is a rich,
woody fragrance of cedar, sandalwood and
cashmeran with luscious base notes of tiare
absolute, an extract from a rare Tahitian flower
JETGALA 86
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AS SWISS WATCHMAKER AUDEMARS PIGUET CELEBRATES
40 YEARS OF ITS ICONIC ROYAL OAK SERIES, it is only fitting
that the watch should be central to one of Singapores most
prominent non-profit auctions this year. The brand has created a
unique version of the timepiece, which will be auctioned at the Kidz
Horizon Appeal charity ball on 21 September.
The unique piece is a contemporary take on the Royal Oak series,
which was originally designed by Grald Genta in 1971. The watch
features a lightweight titanium casing and a scratch-resistant bezel made
of cermet, an alloy composed of ceramic and metallic materials. The
skeletonised dial contrasts with anthracite-treated pink-gold indexes and
hands. The 41 mm-diameter case rests on a hand-stitched grey crocodile
strap with a titanium folding buckle. The case back is engraved with the
words: Singapore 2012 Piece Unique.
Such a choice of materials is a tribute to Duncan Wang, a prominent
Singapore-based watch collector who was known to appreciate the use of
unconventional materials in timepieces. Wang, who died in 2009, was known
for his charitable works. Each year since his death, a watch has been especially
made and auctioned for Kidz Horizon Appeal, a charity that he supported. The
organisation benefits children in Singapore who suffer from chronic or terminal
illnesses, such as HIV and cancer. Established in 2004, Kidz Horizon Appeal
sponsors the medical costs of about 100 children yearly.
In 2010, the first Duncan Watch was created by Swiss manufacturer Vacheron
Constantin and raised USD60,000 for Kidz Horizon Appeal. The following year,
German watchmaker A. Lange & Shne designed a unique rendition of its Lange
ZEITWERK watch, raising USD138,000 for the same cause.
It is no surprise that the baton has passed to Audemars Piguet this year
Wang, after all, was a Royal Oak fan. It seems the admiration is mutual. As
Oliviero Bottinelli, Audemars Piguets managing director for Asia, puts it: How
can we not do something so special for Duncan? He was so special to Audemars
Piguet, its staff and the watch community.


DUNCAN WATCH
by Fiona Low
A UNIQUE ROYAL OAK WATCH
GOES UNDER THE HAMMER
TO HELP SICK CHILDREN
RIGHT
Duncan Wang died on 11 August
2009 from heart failure. In his
honour, the annual Kidz Horizon
Appeal watch auction was born. It
combines Wangs two great passions
horology and philanthropy
ABOVE
Audemar Piguets unique Duncan
Watch is based on the Royal Oak series
87 JETGALA
SEAMLESS
FIT
MASTERING THE SARTORIAL
ART OF LOOKING GRAND
JETGALA 88
LUXE
BRIONI
by Fiona Low
talian suit maker Brioni is not satisfied with just
training its tailors. We for lack of a better word
breed our own tailors all the time. Its the heart
of our business, says Farouk P Shivji, director of
the companys neckwear and made-to-measure department.
He is referring to the parentage of Donato Liguori, one of the
companys master tailors. Both Liguoris parents were tailors
at Brioni and he enrolled in its tailoring school at the age of 14
before climbing up the ranks.
But while Shivji may have said it in jest, it is clear the
67-year-old fashion house takes pride in its beginnings as
a family establishment and hopes to continue the business
model as such. This follows the companys recent acquisition
by mega French luxury group PPR, which led to many
questioning if the brand will hold on to its heritage as
an Italian family business.
Shivji and Liguori, who came to Singapore to meet
clients and the media, say Brioni retains a familial atmosphere.
Liguori explains: As soon as [Farouk and I] get back toItaly, we
are going to fight over whether to play golf or tennis. It then
follows that the relationship between the company and its
clients is as that of friends. We visit them, like the old Italian
tailors did in the past. We go to their house, have a nice plate
of pasta, and talk about everything horses, cars, golf... At one
stage, we will talk about measurements, says Liguori.
This intimate service sets the bespoke suit makers apart
at a time when quick turnover and high-tech machinery are
the cornerstones of success for most. A typical Brioni suit
takes from 20 to 22 hours to make and goes through some >>
THE RELATIONSHIP
BETWEEN BRIONI
TAILORS AND THEIR
CLIENTS IS AS THAT
OF FRIENDS
I
ABOVE
Suits are made according to a clients requested style, detailing
and fit, as long as they are in line with the companys standard
of elegance. Brioni refrains from creating suits that may be
considered over-the-top or quirky
OPPOSITE
Fabrics are very important in making the suit, and Brioni
orders them tailor-made for different types of climate
89 JETGALA
>> 220 different hands each one a specialist of a single
craft, such as making buttonholes or stitching lapels. As
many as 7,000 hand-sewn stitches go into each suit. After
sewing, the suit is left to relax for several days. The cloth is
then tested stretched, pulled and placed under stress
to ensure that every stitch and pleat remains exactly in place.
All tailors in the company undergo rigorous training at
the Scuola Superiore di Sartoria Nazareno Fonticoli, the
brands own tailoring school. Aside from learning to sew and
draw, they also learn the properties of different fabrics,
practise English, and study Italian history so they understand
sartorial tradition and the companys heritage.
The brand has dressed the likes of Prince Andrew,
Donald Trump and the actors playing fictional secret agent
James Bond in several films. Says Shivji: We serve most
kings, many presidents and a very big part of Hollywood.
[Our tailors] enter houses where there is normally a very
long pro forma to meet the people inside.
As Brionis clients hail from all over the world, the
company is careful that each piece of clothing is made not
just for the man who wears it, but for the place he wears it
in. Wool is bought in bulk and specially woven to suit the
climate of different countries. For instance, in a tropical
climate such as Singapore, the tailors will not offer fabric
that can warp in high humidity. We serve any race, colour
and weather, assures Liguori.
And more than clothe, Brioni endeavours to make its
clients look better with expertly placed nips and tucks. Shivji
recalls making a suit for a sumo fighter who was so large, it
needed two people to hold the cloth to measure him. But
when the suit was done and he was dressed up, he looked
very good. He was very thrilled and happy, says Shivji.
While a lower trouser waistband will go a long way in
improving a fat mans appearance, it is harder work to make
a slim person look good. With small and slim figures,
Asians often require made-to-measure suits, as ready-to-
wear suits on the market are typically designed for tall,
full-figured Western men. Liguori says this makes Asian
clients meticulous and curious.
With its penchant for making men look good, it is no
wonder the brand has acquired somewhat of a cult following
among the worlds most influential personalities. Clothes make
the man, said Mark Twain. Had he been born a century later,
he may have hinted that Brioni would make the clothes.
JETGALA 90
LUXE
RETAILORING BRIONI



Brioni, formerly a family business, was fully acquired by
French luxury group PPR earlier this year for an undisclosed
amount. Analysts speculate the cost to be in the region of
EUR300 million. Headed by billionaire Franois-Henri Pinault,
PPR also owns more than 10 luxury labels and several sports
and lifestyle brands. The Brioni brand complements PPRs
existing portfolio, which does not have any other luxury
menswear label.
PPR aims to expand Brionis reach in fast-growing luxury
goods markets such as China, Japan and India, and bolster
the brands offering with new lines for accessories and
leisurewear. In Singapore, the tailoring house is represented
by Uomo Collezioni, a chain of luxury menswear boutiques
that was founded in Moscow in 1983.
OPPOSITE
Brioni likes to complete a mans outfit and
produces accessories such as briefcases,
ties and shoes
THIS PAGE, CLOCKWISE FROM RIGHT
A Brioni suit is tailored to fit both the client
and the occasion on which its worn
Established in 1945, Brioni teaches its tailors
not only the most minute processes of suit
making, but also Italian history, which is
intertwined with the sartorial tradition
Brioni master tailor Donato Liguori says
Asians are typically curious clients who
require perfectly fitted suits on account
of their smaller frames
91 JETGALA
T
here are high jewellery brands, and there are
high jewellers. The former are coveted for
their public profile and the easy prestige their
products convey. The latter prefer to stay
under the marketing radar, thriving instead
on their reputation, discretion, personal touch
and most of all bespoke services.
Moussaieff Jewellers is one of them. Not a household name
with frequent celebrity endorsements, the London-based
jeweller prefers to be seen as a guarded secret among royalty,
established celebrities and jewellery connoisseurs throughout
the world. At the helm of the company is co-owner Alisa
Moussaieff, who oversees sales, design and acquisitions.
Moussaieffs passion for coloured stones is no secret.
She owns some of the rarest coloured diamonds in the world,
including the famous 5.1-carat, brilliant-cut Moussaieff Red
Diamond, which was discovered in 1990 and is the worlds
largest natural fancy red diamond. Moussaieff and her
husband, Shlomo, reportedly acquired it around 2002, and
in 2010, they acquired a 5.16-carat fancy vivid, internally
flawless blue diamond at a staggering price she reportedly
called a bargain.
MOUSSAIEFF JEWELLERS
by Carol Lee
JETGALA 92
LUXE
If you cant get them cheaper, then you pay the record
price. And the provenance behind certain historic gems is
fascinating, she says. This patient but pro-active acquisition of
rare jewels is the backbone for the jewellery, designed by
Moussaieff herself. Whether it is a 4.34-carat, natural fancy,
vivid-blue, marquise-cut diamond ring or a 119-carat Sri
Lankan sapphire pendant on a white-gold and diamond chain,
each piece is hand designed, handmade and hand finished.
As a designer, Moussaieff prefers to keep things simple and
classic. Today, it is fashionable to mix many colours with
diamonds. However, as a designer, I prefer to stay as much as
possible with clean lines. Coloured diamonds are enhanced by
white diamonds, so for example, if I create a piece of jewellery
with pink diamonds, I would not mix it with other coloured
diamonds but would use white diamonds to accentuate the
natural beauty of the pinks. When asked about her favourite
diamond colour, she easily declares: I like them all.
Fine stones cannot simply be ordered and bought.
Moussaieff explains: You buy them when theyre available,
keep them in your safe, and let them accumulate. It may take
a few years to find the same quality again but when you have
enough and you are ready, you put them on the table and a
nice piece of jewellery comes out of it. She cant name a
favourite piece, as she says all the pieces she has designed
are her babies.
Those babies are being bought by clients from all over
the world, including a significant number of Asian clientele.
Moussaieff notes that Asian, Middle Eastern and European
buyers have different preferences and diverse reasons for
buying jewellery: Asians buy mostly for investment. They
prefer top quality and its not so much about size. Theyre
willing to sacrifice size for quality. The Middle East business
is strongest in wedding sets, while European buyers purchase
single pieces for occasions and also for investment.
Established by Shlomos grandfather in 1850, Moussaieff
Jewellers took off when Shlomo opened a Park Lane
showroom in 1963. It has built a loyal following since then,
but has deliberately limited its shops to only three locations:
Londons Bond Street, the Hilton Hotel on Park Lane,
London, and the Grand Hotel Kempinski in Geneva.
The satisfaction of being able to create something is what
drives Moussaieff after so many years. She says: The most
important thing is to know your clients and be able to find
the perfect stones for them.
Instead of combining differently coloured
stones in one piece, Alisa Moussaieff believes
in accentuating the beauty of coloured gems
by setting them against white diamonds
If you cant
Instead of comb
stones in one pie
in accentuating t
by setting them
93 JETGALA
LIFE
New business, residential and hospitality
developments continue to rise in Makati,
Metro Manilas central business district
JETGALA 96
LIFE
URBAN COMFORTS IN A FRENETIC CITY
SUITE
MANILA
PRESIDENTIAL SUITES
by Dexter Rodrigo Matilla
97 JETGALA
The Philippines saw close to 1.5 million foreign visitors from
January to April 2012, a 14.61 per cent increase from the same
period in 2011. And while most come to enjoy the countrys
sandy beaches, others prefer the capital regions modern
luxuries and faster albeit still laissez-faire pace.
FROM THE LION CITY
Already making a buzz is the highly anticipated Raffles
Makati, scheduled for completion in December 2012.
The 30-floor structure will have 30 hotel suites and 236
residential units. The Oriental-themed suites are designed
by the renowned Bent Severin & Associates firm, and
each will come with a personal butler. Occupying the
ninth and 10th floors of the tower, the suites offer views
of the central business districts skyline. Raffles Makati
will offer a gym, spa, designer boutiques, 24-hour
concierge service and multiple dining choices plus its
own version of the Raffles Long Bar, of course.
BELOW
The hotel suites at Raffles Makati
feature a neutral colour palette
in their interiors and also draw
influences from Filipino art
OPPOSITE, FROM TOP
Guests of the Peninsula Suite at
The Peninsula Manila have private
access to the hotels helipad
A dark wood colour palette and
exquisite furnishings offer comfort
and privacy at the Mandarin Suite
at Mandarin Oriental, Manila
JETGALA 98
LIFE
Arguably one of the most sought-
after hotel rooms in the city is The
Peninsula Suite at The Peninsula
Manila. It features hallways covered
with pre-Raphaelite-style wall
frescoes, a sun-soaked solarium, and
an intimate, wood-panelled dining
room. Crystal chandeliers, as well as
antique and contemporary Asian and
European art pieces, complement a
muted colour scheme.
The suite has two bedrooms with
individual baths. An audio-visual
centre connects the bedrooms and the
bathrooms, which are panelled with
black, gold-veined Italian marble. The
shower section converts into a steam
bath and has a jacuzzi. For entertaining
guests, there is a full kitchen, dining
room for 12, living room and mood
lighting. Other nooks include a study,
library and guest powder room. Suite
guests enjoy bedside electronic
controls, personal butler service, and
private access to the hotels helipad.
A block away is the Mandarin Oriental, Manila
and its crowning glory, the 84 sq m Mandarin
Suite. Natural light seeps through the floor-to-
ceiling glass windows. With a dark wood-colour
palette and dark wooden floors accented by area
rugs, the mood is as enigmatic as its environment.
The living room is decorated with paintings of
Oriental vases, while gold-hued silk upholstery
adorns the armchairs in the sitting room. Wooden
louvre doors shut off the two bedrooms from the
main area. Each bedroom has a king-sized bed, a
wood-framed oval mirror above the headboard,
and a grey- or beige-marbled bathroom one of
which boasts a flat-screen TV at the foot of a
bathtub. A niche in the bathrooms displays
modern sculpture and artwork. >>
99 JETGALA
>> The Sofitel Philippine Plaza is
fast-tracking its recovery after typhoon
Pedring (international name: Nesat)
flooded most of its lower floor area,
including the acclaimed Spiral
restaurant. The Imperial Residence,
meanwhile, remains open. Guests can
book one of the five distinct rooms
(four Luxury Club Millsime rooms and
the Imperial Suite), or book the entire
576 sq m residence. Designed by Spin
Design Studio of Japan, the rooms may
be customised according to the guests
preference for instance, placing
emphasis on an en-suite office or
in-room gym. An expansive view of
Manila Bay, as well as a 180-degree
vista, is best appreciated from the
residences 30 sq m outdoor area.
Guests at The Imperial Residence
enjoy privileges such as butler service,
personal shopper service, a private chef
on request, and complimentary use of
the hotels helipad with direct access
to the residence. The Sofitel
Philippine Plaza is close to convention
centres and to SM Mall of Asia, one of
the worlds largest shopping malls.
Also in the central business district is the Makati Shangri-La,
Manila, preferred by many travellers for its close proximity
to the citys shopping district and numerous choices of
dining establishments. It has an extensive business centre,
a tennis court, and one of the most renowned hospitality
services in a country known for having hospitable citizens.
The 312 sq m Presidential Suite at the top floor has two
bedrooms, a sitting room, dining area, and kitchenette.
Personal butler service is available upon request.
JETGALA 100
LIFE
Just a few minutes from the Ninoy Aquino International Airport, newcomer
Maxims Hotel is quickly becoming a choice among discerning travellers. Its
location within the Resorts World Manila lifestyle complex means entertainment is
always on hand, including fine restaurants featuring celebrity chefs, a grand theatre,
upscale shopping complex, childrens arcade, casino, and prestigious night clubs.
Its 600 sq m Presidential Suite has two pavilions, a private garden, and
swimming pool. Each of its two bedrooms has an individual bathroom, while
the master bedroom boasts a jacuzzi. Amenities include a massage room, visual
room, and bar.
DIRECTORY
Raffles Makati
Raffles, Ayala Center
1224 Makati City, Metro Manila
Republic of the Philippines
T: +63 2 555 9777
F: +63 2 555 9799
E: raffles.makati@raffles.com
The Peninsula Manila
Corner of Ayala and Makati Avenues
1226 Makati City, Metro Manila
Republic of the Philippines
T: +63 2 887 2888
F: +63 2 815 4825
E: pmn@peninsula.com
Mandarin Oriental, Manila
Makati Avenue,
1226 Makati City, Metro Manila
Republic of the Philippines
T: +63 2 857 4782
F: +63 2 817 4524
E: momnl-reservations@mohg.com
Makati Shangri-La, Manila
Corner of Ayala and Makati Avenues
1200 Makati City, Metro Manila
Republic of the Philippines
T: +63 2 813 8888
F: +63 2 813 5499
Sofitel Philippine Plaza
CCP Complex, Roxas Boulevard,
1300 Pasay City, Metro Manila
Republic of the Philippines
T: +63 2 551 5555
F: +63 2 551 5610
E: room.reservations@sofitelmanila.com
Maxims Hotel
Resorts World Manila
Newport Boulevard, Newport City
1309 Pasay City, Metro Manila
Republic of the Philippines
T: +63 2 908 8000 loc 7796
E: reservation@rwmanila.com
OPPOSITE, FROM TOP
Guests at Makati Shangri-La, Manila have
easy access to the citys shopping and
commercial districts
Guests may convert rooms at the Sofitel
Philippine Plazas The Imperial Residence
into a gym, spa or office
THIS PAGE
The Presidential Suite at Maxims Hotel, located
across the Ninoy Aquino International Airport,
features a wide range of amenities, ranging
from a lush garden to a spacious media room
101 JETGALA
IMAGINE MAKING RESERVATIONS FOR
DINNER AND NOT KNOWING WHERE YOU
WILL EAT? This kind of mystery is one of the
hallmarks of Ultraviolet, Shanghais newest
avant-garde restaurant. Just 10 diners are accepted
nightly, and those who score a reservation are
instructed to meet at Mr & Mrs Bund another
restaurant of the group then bundled into two
black vans and driven into the boondocks.
The secret location is just the first of many
surprises for diners at Ultraviolet. The establishment,
a brainchild of French chef Paul Pairet, features a
unique concept where dining becomes a full-on,
multi-sensory experience, complete with lights,
visuals and infused aromas.
Each dish in the fixed 20-course menu is
served in unison to all 10 diners, who are seated
at the same table. Despite a price tag that others
might consider hefty, the restaurant is not as one
might expect lavished with precious antiques,
imperial artefacts or perchance a Van Gogh. In
fact, it is as bare as Mother Hubbards cupboard.
But as each dish is delivered, the room fills with
a cascade of lights, a cacophony of sounds and a
collection of smells. Projected images bounce off
stark white walls that serve as an artists blank
ULTRAVIOLET
by Kee Hua Chee



JETGALA 102
LIFE
canvas. An Indonesian dish, for instance, is served
with wall-to-wall images of Balinese masks, amid the
beat of tribal drums and the tinkle of gamelan. The
scent of holly fills the room when an apple-wasabi
sorbet arrives. Micro Fish No Chips is served to The
Beatles Ob-La-Di, Ob-La-Da along with Union Jack
visuals and courtesy of the English gloom
projections of rain. It is paired with Scottish craft beer.
All this is achieved with wind generators,
four scent diffusers, seven high-resolution
projectors, 10 computer screens, 12 close-circuit
television cameras, 56 speakers and 146 light
bulbs. More than 4,000 pieces of tableware and
45 doors are also part of the line-up. It is a carefully
choreographed sensory play, but Pairet would be
piqued if you likened his concept to that of a
dinner theatre. He says: Ultraviolet is a restaurant,
not Moulin Rouge, so dont expect live performances
or sexy girls. We are the worlds first experimental
restaurant. It is food enhanced by ambiance, not a
show supported by food. The food takes precedence.
The menu at Ultraviolet is wildly imaginative.
Fresh cuttlefish is presented as one long, continuous
strand, laid in a concentric circle; a lemon tart is
made to look like a real lemon. A dish is ready
when there is nothing to add or remove. It can be
interesting, new, daring, beautiful. Shocking, even.
Maybe comforting, or perhaps funny but it
should always be divine, says Pairet.
He confesses that the 20 dishes on the menu
are his personal favourites. It took one year to
develop them, so the menu does not change very
often. Special requests or food allergies from
diners can be accommodated but only for two or
three courses. Not more, Pairet explains, because
the dishes must relate to the pre-set ambiance.
Pairet first set foot in Shanghai in 2005 to open
Jade 36 restaurant at Pudong Shangri-La hotel. He
left in 2008 to set up modern French eatery Mr & Mrs
Bund, before eventually launching Ultraviolet. He
reveals that despite the restaurants prices, it actually
charges well below the real cost per guest. To manage
this, he works closely with sponsors, partners and
suppliers who absorb some of the costs in support of
his vision, and presumably in exchange for publicity.
The restaurant has been well received since
its opening in mid-May, with all seats fully-booked
almost every night. It serves dinner from Tuesdays to
Saturdays on a reservations-only basis. Considering
that Pairet brought Ultraviolet from concept to life
over a span of 15 years, its current wait-list of at least
three weeks should well be worth it.
OPPOSITE PAGE
Born and trained in France, Chef Paul Pairet has
travelled the world seeking inspiration for his
distinctive style of cuisine
THIS PAGE (L-R)
Guests remain in the same spot throughout the
meal, but the room changes around them as
different visuals are projected on stark white walls
At Ultraviolet, dining is a multi-sensory
experience. Images, sounds and smells are
timed to complement the food
All images by Scott Wright of Limelight Studio
103 JETGALA
EXPLORING
AN ERA
WHEN MEN
DRESSED
TO KILL
WALLACE COLLECTION
by Fiona Low
JETGALA 104
LIFE
O
ne might say the Elizabethan
man had a sharply tailored
wardrobe. The ubiquitous
mens accessory of the time
was a deadly and often
lavishly adorned rapier,
which he knew exactly how to use. Aside
from being part of bloody brawls and
testosterone-laden challenges, though,
rapiers and the underlying art of fencing
were, and still are, an art of precise,
elegant movement that has survived
the test of time.
Fencing being one of the few original
Olympic events that continues today,
Londons Wallace Collection has curated
The Noble Art of Sword: Fashion and
Fencing in Renaissance Europe in time
for the upcoming summer Olympics.
This extraordinary exhibition of deadly
weapons includes rapiers, swords and
daggers from the 16th and early 17th
centuries. In addition to the Wallace
Collections own holdings, works from
the Victoria and Albert Museum, the
Royal Armouries and British private
collectors will also be on display.
The rapier had a firm place in the
Renaissance mans attire. The higher the
carriers social status, the more elaborate
and expensive were his weapons designs
and materials. Make no mistake, though
the rapier was a brutal accessory.
Designed with a narrow, tapered blade,
it had no place in a serious battleground,
but was meant solely for duelling and
street fighting. Without a cutting edge for
slicing, opponents had to be killed with
a thrust to the heart.
One of the pieces in the show is a
rapier made for the Holy Roman Emperor
Maximilian II. Precious stones are set in
a solid gold hilt, trimmed with brightly
coloured enamel and fastened onto a
lethal Milanese blade said to be of the
best quality. Another rapier, made in
Dresden in the early 1600s, is crafted
from solid white silver and features an
abstract design of rippling water flowing
from a pommel carved into the shape
of a cockleshell.
Beautifully illustrated fencing manuals
on loan from the Howard de Walden
Library, as well as portraits and design
books, will also be on display at the
exhibition. Demonstrations in historic
fencing techniques and swashbuckling
films will also be shown on selected
days. The exhibition is open daily until
16 September.
OPPOSITE
An Italian fencing armour shows
intricate decorative details
FROM LEFT
Owned by electors of Saxony,
this rapiers hilt was made in
Dresden, Saxony. The blade
was made in Solingen, a
German town famous for its
finely crafted knives, scissors,
razors and swords
This rapier belonged to Elector
Christian II of Saxony. The hilt is
believed to have been made by
Marx Bischhausen of Dresden,
and the blade in Solingen, from
1605 to 1607
A design by the goldsmith-
jeweller Giulio Cesare
Marciliano and the swordsmith
Federigo Piccinino, both of
Milan, 1600-1609
105 JETGALA
MOTORCYCLE CANNONBALL
by Mike Vils
COAST-TO-COAST ADVENTURE
WITH TIME MACHINES ON WHEELS
JETGALA 106
LIFE
The 2010 Motorcycle Cannonball journey began, for me, with
a phone call from promoter Lonnie Isam, Jr asking if I would
like to ride my 1913 Excelsior across the United States with
like-minded motorcycle enthusiasts. The 45-member group
turned out to include some of the giants in the vintage
motorcycling world. The route would take us from Americas
northern shore along the Atlantic Ocean, across 11 states, ending
up 3,231 miles (5,200 km) away on the western shore of the
Pacific Ocean. This would be completed only on pre-1916
motorcycles along the back roads of America, all in 14 days. My
immediate answer was a resounding: Absolutely!
I have owned and ridden my Excelsior for about 18 years. In
its day the Excelsior was kind of an outlaw and the guys who
raced them were known as the X men. It has lots of potential,
though, when incorporated with modern-day technology. A
years worth of preparation for the 2010 Motorcycle Cannonball
included rebuilding my motorcycle from scratch. Because the
Excelsior store is closed these days (the Excelsior Motor
Manufacturing & Supply Company of Chicago went out of
business in 1931), I had to fabricate many of the parts myself.
We gathered in Kitty Hawk, North Carolina for the start of
this grand adventure. The area is well known as the birthplace of
air travel the Wright brothers first flight was recorded there.
The excitement was palpable as we set out for the open road.
This grassroots adventure took on a life of its own as riders
worked to keep themselves and their ancient machines in top
working order. Our mantra became: ride, wrench, repeat. At
the conclusion of each days route, after covering 200 to >>
IN 1903, GEORGE WYMAN RODE FROM SAN FRANCISCO TO NEW YORK IN 50 DAYS ON A BICYCLE WITH A MOTOR
CLAMPED ONTO THE FRAME. IN 1915, A YOUNG WOMAN NAMED EFFIE HOTCHKISS TRAVELLED FROM COAST TO
coast in the USA on a Harley-Davidson, her mom in a sidecar. In 1922, Erwin Cannonball Baker rode the tiny Neracar from New
York to California, eliciting jokes and disbelief until he completed the 3,364-mile (5,413-km) journey on a mere 45 gallons of gas.
It is in the spirit of such adventures that the Motorcycle Cannonball coast-to-coast endurance run was organised in 2010, and
will take place again in September this year. One could call it Americas answer to Italys Mille Miglia, where riders on antique
machines take a scenic but potentially arduous journey. Biker Mike Vils tells the story.
OPPOSITE PAGE
Only pre-1916 motorcycles, including
legendary models like the Flying Merkel,
Excelsiors and vintage Harley-Davidsons,
were used in the 2010 Cannonball
endurance run
Image by Aaron Tuell, courtesy of Outer Banks
Visitors Bureau
THIS PAGE
Mike Vils rode his Excelsior in the 2010
Cannonball endurance run and will
ride a 1929 Harley-Davidson JD in this
Septembers race
107 JETGALA
>> 300 miles (322 to 483 km), we would all be found in the
motel parking lots encouraging each other, helping twist
wrenches, and laughing often until the sun came up. The
camaraderie and shenanigans could be likened to that of a
travelling gypsy family as we all became dependent on one
another.
The main challenge that I experienced was on the third
day out. Something blocked the main oil supply line to the
crankshaft and seized up the lower end. I had to pull the
motor and make a new set of main bearings. Sixteen hours
later, we finished at 2am and got up at 6am to take off again.
Incredible receptions were arranged in small towns
along the way, with hundreds of people greeting us as we
rode through their area. Several Harley-Davidson
dealerships welcomed us with live music, fans and a party
atmosphere. Being greeted with such genuine warmth as we
rolled in on rickety time machines is a feeling that is difficult
to explain.
We were welcomed at the Wheels Through Time
Museum in Maggie Valley, North Carolina, owned by fellow
rider Dale Walksler, who opened his workshop to us. The
place took on the atmosphere of an emergency room triage
with riders experiencing a wide array of devastating
mechanical failures. Dale, his crew, riders, and volunteers
worked on repairs through the night and into the wee hours
FROM TOP
Forty-five riders revved
up their engines at the
starting point in Kitty
Hawk, North Carolina,
against the backdrop
of the Wright Brothers
monument
Many of the riders
are vintage bike
aficionados with years
of long-distance riding
experience and their
own dealerships
Image by Aaron Tuell, courtesy
of Outer Banks Visitors Bureau
OPPOSITE PAGE,
FROM TOP
Riders took in views of
the Cowee Mountains,
the Rio Grande river and
the Continental Divide
during the 14-day race
in 2010
The iconic Route 66
highway took riders
and their vintage bikes
through to the end of the
trail at Santa Monica pier
JETGALA 108
LIFE
of the morning. By daybreak, everyone was back on another
12-hour ride to the next stop. Corky and Cameron Coker, owners
of Coker Tire Museum in Chattanooga, Tennessee provided an
excellent reception and opened up their shop for repairs.
In Mississippi, a home-cooked lunch in the park was
provided by a local businessman. The city of Stuttgart, Arkansas,
closed its main road to display the motorcycles in the centre of
town while riders enjoyed a picnic lunch on the steps of City
Hall. The quaint resort town of Hot Springs, Arkansas, threw
open the doors to its convention centre. Oklahoma also proved
to have a hospitable community.
At New Mexico, the weather took a drastic turn and everyone
had an opportunity to test their rain gear as the skies turned
grey. The roads were washed out by the heavy downpour, leading
to a change of course. In Arizona we entered the last leg of the
historic Route 66 as we crossed Nevada and entered California,
travelling along the road that time forgot.
When we finally rolled onto the Santa Monica pier in
California, having travelled from sea to shining sea, we were
collectively ecstatic. I was overjoyed with the accomplishment of
experiencing the heart and soul of America especially with a
group of strangers that became family, all riding on 100-year-old,
surprisingly tough machines.
COASTAL
CHALLENGE
This years Motorcycle Cannonball coast-to-coast
race takes riders on pre-1930 machines through
a 3,800-mile (6,116-km) route that passes through
a dozen national parks and forests; along the
coasts of Lakes Erie and Michigan; and past plains,
hills and the Rocky Mountains. It will begin on 7
September in Newburgh, New York, home of the
Motorcyclepedia Museum. The grand finale on
23 September takes the riders along Californias
Pacific Coast Highway and across the Golden Gate
Bridge to finish in San Francisco.
109 JETGALA
If the noise and action at the 2012 Formula One Singapore
night race leave you reeling for more, festivities continue
track-side. For the fourth time running, the life of the
F1 race celebration will be at The Podium Lounge from
21 to 23 September from 10pm onwards. The Ritz-Carlton,
Millenia Singapores pool-side flanked by views of Marina
Bay and the racetrack will host a guest list which includes
racing drivers, musicians, ambassadors, celebrities and
royalty. Celebrity DJs Nicole Chen from Singapore, Seb
Fontaine from London, Giuseppe from Italy and Angie Vu
Ha from Vietnam will spin addictive Balearic house and
dance tracks.
Organised by B-Yond, The Podium Lounge is hosting
the Childrens Cancer Foundation live auction, which will
feature a Red Bull F1 race suit signed by Sebastian Vettel,
as well as other F1 merchandise signed by Michael Schumacher,
Lewis Hamilton and Juan Manuel Fangio. Italian brand Canali
will highlight the runway on 22 September, followed by another
fashion show by Willow & Huxley with LIFEwithBIRD,
Equipment and Clover Canyon on 23 September. Another
highlight is the Dom Prignon VIP Lounge event in collaboration
with Parisian jeweller House of Chaumet, which will be exclusive
to 80 guests. A display of the iconic Nissan GT-R supercar will
rev up the night to an inexhaustible Grand Prix season.
THE PODIUM LOUNGE 2012
FULL-SPEED CELEBRATIONS AT AN EXCLUSIVE GRAND PRIX EVENT
JETGALA 110
LIFE
CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT
Rubens Barrichello (centre) also
joined The Podium Lounge to
celebrate the Grand Prix season
in Singapore
Fernando Alonso at The Podium
Lounge 2011
Celebrity chef Bobby Chin
(second from left) was one of
the prominent guests at The
Podium Lounge last year
The Ritz-Carlton, Millenia
Singapore is a two-minute walk
from The Pit Building
Vertu presented its limited-
edition carbon-fibre luxury
handset last year
The star-studded party will also
host musicians, ambassadors
and royalty
111 JETGALA
JETGALA 112
JETGALA 113
Photography by Wendell Levi Teodoro
Text by Sandy Tan
SYDNEY-BASED PHOTOGRAPHER WENDELL LEVI TEODORO KNOWS good
timing and the art of manipulation well. For one of his photo shoots, he chose
a drained Olympic swimming pool in Sydney, set against a blue sky, to give the
images a surreal context. In the stark setting, his camera captured the movements
of model and dancer Amy Delves, with her long, voluminous black dress flowing
in sync. The concept was to evoke freedom and confidence in a strong pose, says
Teodoro. Like a graceful black swan with its head held high.
Teodoro tells a comic book-inspired narrative through fashion photography.
High Fashion Standoff shot on a rooftop flanked by New York Citys Empire State
Building captures the tension between two polar-opposite characters in a duel
for superiority. Omega Time, shot in Botany Bay, depicts a sinister super-heroine
juxtaposed with a dystopian backdrop. Teodoro is inspired by the late Guy Bourdin,
whose provocative photographs tended to leave much to the viewers interpretation.
Teodoros approach fuses strong, graphic lines and fluidity. I see fashion as
an extension of the human form, he says. Founder and director of Zeduce, a
photography studio and creative think tank, Teodoros portfolio includes high-
fashion shows, advertising campaigns and editorial features. He collaborates with
various talents in fashion, film and music. www.zeduce.org
JETGALA 114
JETGALA 115
Omega Time
Fashion designer: Robby Tjia
Model: Charly Brown @Chadwick
Hair and makeup: Ayshe and Luana
@Brad Ngata Hair Direction
JETGALA 116
JETGALA 117
High Fashion Standoff
Stylist: Ope
Models: Amela and Julie
Hair: Linh Nguyen @Kate Ryan NYC
Makeup: Lauren Kuzas
JETGALA 118
Nightscapes: Cape Town, South Africa
The coast of Madeira, a Portuguese archipelago, forms a
spectacular backdrop to Wagners Madeiran Weather series
JETGALA 119
Photography by Jakob Wagner
Text by Sandy Tan
THE WORLD CAPTURED AT A STANDSTILL TELLS A STORY OF ITS OWN. Jakob
Wagner, a 25-year-old photographer from Germany, was fascinated by how a camera with
long exposure revealed details the naked eye could not see. Wagner then created a series of
photographs captured on long exposure, resulting in heavy contrasts and cold colour. Nightscapes
includes Wagners favourite aerial shot of Cape Town, taken from Table Mountain, showing
bright city lights that frame the surrounding sombre slopes. It was my first time there and
I was instantly blown away by the view, he says. In Madeiran Weather, Wagner suspends the
movement of shadow and light across the Atlantic Ocean.
Several things can diminish the quality of an aerial photograph, so the most important thing
is to be in the right place at the right time, says Wagner. He learned to draw at the age of 12
and later dabbled in graffiti art, stealthily done at night. He had bought a camera to document
his work. I quickly realised what great potential photography had and I started to use it as an
independent artistic medium, he says. Wagner, whose clients include Emirates Airlines and
Audi, continues to pursue aerial photography, visual art and moving images. He is now working
on a series of aerial shots showing scenes from all over the world. www.jakobwagner.eu
Madeiran Weather: Madeira, Portugal
JETGALA 120
Sea of Clouds: Mediterranean Sea
Nightscapes: Shanghai, China
JETGALA 121
Madeiran Weather captures a rapid
change in weather over the Atlantic Ocean
Nightscapes: Lindau, Germany
JETGALA 122
Nightscapes: Funcal, Madeira, Portugal
Nightscapes: Shanghai, China
JETGALA 123
Nightscapes: Carnical, Madeira, Portugal
Winterscapes: Illinois, USA
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WE SPEAK YOUR LANGUAGE
EBACE 2012
EUROPEAN BUSINESS AVIATION REGAINS OPTIMISM
NUMBERS ARE TELLING. Almost one in five business
jets (19 per cent) in Europe is up for sale, compared to
the worldwide average of 14 per cent. The news is filled
with aircraft manufacturers increasingly shifting their focus
to Asia, and charter operators determined to expand to the
EMEA region. Even so, one press conference after another
at the 2012 European Business Aviation Convention and
Exhibition (EBACE), held in Geneva from 14 to 16 May,
echoed assurances of Europe remaining an important market
in the coming years. The event had its own numbers to battle
the industrys glum statistics: about 12,638 attendees showed
up. This years EBACE had a record number of booths (2,280)
and aircraft on static display (60).
JETS ON THE WAY
Manufacturers also presented strong numbers. Cessna
unveiled the Citation Longitude, its longest-range jet to
date. With a speed of Mach 0.86 and a 4,000-nm range,
it will be able to fly non-stop from New York to Paris,
London to Dubai, or Beijing to Moscow. It is expected
to enter into service in 2017.
Bombardier announced the six-passenger Learjet 70
and eight-passenger Learjet 75, based respectively on the
fuselage of the Learjet 40 and 45. The new models will
feature winglets for extended range and will carry Lufthansa
Techniks nice high-definition cabin management system
(CMS). The Learjet 70 will cruise at 2,000 nm at Mach 0.75,
while the Learjet 75 will have similar specifications. First
deliveries are expected in 2013.
Meanwhile, Honda Aircraft Company and Aerion reassured
the industry of their determination to realise products that they
had announced at earlier EBACE events. The fourth conforming
test Honda Jet flew for the first time in May, while Aerion is
continuing talks with potential manufacturers for its supersonic
business jet design.
In the midst of the National Transportation Safety Boards
investigation into a test-flight crash that happened in April,
the Gulfstream G650 achieved its first trans-Atlantic crossing
to attend EBACE. It flew non-stop for 3,780 nm from
Washington DC to Geneva in six hours and 55 minutes.
HEADS ABOVE WATER?
Even as it filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy in May, Hawker
Beechcraft Corporation announced two Hawker 4000 sales
one each to operators InterAviation and Orion Malta. It
exhibited eight aircraft at EBACE, including the 800XPR
and King Air 350ER. Nextant Aerospace, which many thought
would fold, announced significant demand for its 400XT
aircraft (a modified Hawker Beechjet 400A/XP). Ten have
been delivered so far; 32 are expected to be delivered by the
end of 2012.
OPERATORS
Charter operators and service providers are getting aggressive:
NetJets moved into aircraft management and announced plans
to launch and expand its fleet which it has since done, on
a large scale. Rizon Jet announced a contract for the operation
and management of a Bombardier Challenger 605 executive jet
for an undisclosed customer.
Image courtesy of EBACE Show Management
JETGALA 132
AIRBORNE
NEW PRODUCTS
After four years of preparation, Jonathan Nicol launched the
StrataJet pricing application, which promises to help clients
quickly find charter flights and obtain accurate pricing data
with no need for a middleman. The software currently covers
just European fleet.
OUTLOOK
Corporate buyers remain cautious, said Charles Edelstenne,
Dassault Aviation chairman and CEO. In the first quarter of 2012,
Dassault Falcon announced 11 new orders worth EUR450 million.
It displayed its first Falcon 50 aircraft with blended winglets by
Aviation Partners Inc. Meanwhile, Boeing forecasts a total of
12 deliveries in 2012, including BBJs and 747-8 VIPs.
Gulfstream said it sees opportunities in corporate clients in
the US, with sales in the first quarter of 2012 being 60 per cent
North American and 40 per cent international a reversal of
the previous years pattern. Northern Europe, Russia and Turkey
are also pockets of growth for the manufacturer. A presentation
by David Marsh, manager of statistics and forecasts at
intergovernmental organisation Eurocontrol, noted that Europe
is experiencing a second dip but business aviation is performing
well in Turkey and Ukraine.
Embraer, which displayed the Phenom 100, Phenom 300,
Legacy 650 and Lineage 1000, forecasts 11,275 units (worth
USD260 billion) of new bizjet deliveries from 2012 to 2021
should the economy strengthen. A downturn would see only
8,600 (worth USD205 billion) new bizjet deliveries in the
same period. Ernie Edwards, Embraer Executive Jets president,
said in a press conference: There is an air of cautious
optimism. Ive not used that word for a long time. The
market is showing signs of recovery.
Gama Group has established a Hong Kong base, with Neil
Gibson appointed managing director of Gama Aviation Asia.
Gibson is the former CEO of TAG Aviation Asia and was
at the helm of PremiAirs Charter & Management Division.
Gama Groups Asian operation will offer complete turn-key
facilities to the companys existing and potential clients.
CABIN CHOICE
Aircraft interior entrants include furniture designer Visionnaire
in partnership with CTM Design Ltd and 328 Support Services.
Singapore-based ST Aerospace announced its Aeria VIP
completions service following its launch earlier this year.
Aeria is headquartered at the companys MRO facility in
San Antonio, Texas.
Eurocopter displayed its EC135 with corporate interiors
created by Europavia. Daher-Socata exhibited the 2012 Elite
version of its TBM 850, which includes redesigned seats that
can add two more to the four-seat arrangement. The company
expects to deliver about 36 Elite versions of the aircraft this year.
Comlux-designed aircraft at the static display included
a Bombardier Challenger 850 and Airbus ACJ319. Comlux
announced a cabin completion contract for a new Boeing
Business Jet (BBJ) for a Russia-based customer, as well as a VIP
completion deal for Hyundai Motor Companys BBJ. Boeing
displayed a BBJ with interiors by Greenpoint Technologies.
FROM TOP
The office space inside an Airbus ACJ319 cabin
designed by Comlux
A mock-up of the Citation Longitude, Cessnas
longest-range business jet to date
An image rendering of the Bombardier Learjet 75,
which is based on the fuselage of the Learjet 45
Eurocopter emphasised the importance of
helicopters in business aviation and displayed
an EC135 with a corporate cabin configuration
Eurocopter Charles ABARR
133 JETGALA
Dassault Falcon has signed anagreement
with Indian charter operator Taj Air to
establish a service stationat Chhatrapati
Shivaji International Airport in Mumbai.
The Dassault Falcon Authorized Line
Service Station, already in operation,
will provide scheduled and unscheduled
maintenance, as well as inspection, for
all Falcon 2000 models. Dassault Falcon
expects to receive aviation safety approval
from the European Aviation Safety
Agency in early 2013.
Piper Aircraft has named KoreaBusiness
Air Service Co, Ltd as the company
dealer for new aircraft sales in the
Republic of Korea. The company has
bases at Gimpo International Airport
and Incheon International Airport near
Seoul. It also offers aircraft maintenance
and FBO services.
Aviation brokerage firm
Jetcraft Corporation has
appointed David Dixon
as president of Jetcraft
Asia. The former
Bombardier Business
Aircraft regional vice
president for Asia Pacific has been based
in Asia for more than 30 years. In his
new role, Dixon will manage the overall
operations and lead sales initiatives for
the region spanning China to Australia.
ExecuJet Haite Aviation Services
China has been approved as a Part
145 maintenance facility by the Civil
Aviation Administration of China(CAAC).
This brings the facility closer to offering
full MRO (maintenance, repair and
overhaul) services for business jets. The
Part 145 CAAC enables ExecuJet Haite,
based at Binhai International Airport in
Tianjin, China, to work on maintenance
on most Bombardier business jets. The
facility also expects to receive European
Aviation Safety Agency approval thisyear.
Struggling aircraft manufacturer Hawker
Beechcraft Corporation (HBC) has
announced an exclusivity agreement
with Superior Aviation Beijing Co, a
Chinese aerospace manufacturer. The
deal, should it be completed, will allow
Superior to buy HBC for USD1.79
billion. Superior intends to maintain
HBCs existing operations while
investing substantial capital in the
company and its business and general
aviation product line. The sale will not
include Hawker Beechcraft Defense Co,
which will remain a separate entity.
Gulfstream Aerospace Corporation
has appointed Joseph Rivera as
its new director of international
operations. Formerly general manager
for Bombardiers Tucson, Arizona service
centre, Rivera will oversee Gulfstreams
three international service centres in
Beijing, China; Luton, England; and
Sorocaba, Brazil. Riveras 32-year aviation
career includes working as a jet engine
technician in the US Navy. He first
joined Gulfstream in 1997 and moved
to Bombardier in 2006.
SpaceShip Two (SS2), a passenger
carrying suborbital space vehicle owned
by Virgin Galactic, completed a glide
test and rocket motor firing on 26 June.
This follows approval from the Federal
Aviation Administration to begin rocket-
powered suborbital test flights.
Manufactured by vehicle developer Scaled
Composites, SS2 received a one-year
experimental launch permit for test
flights beyond the atmosphere.
The Chinese government has approved
Embraers bid to manufacture itsLegacy
600 and 650 jets in the country. A joint
initiative with the Aviation Industry
Corporation of China, the project will
use the infrastructure, financial resources
and workforce of the Harbin Embraer
Aircraft Industry Co. Chinas ICBC
Financial Leasing has already signed
a deal to take up to 10 Legacy 650 large
executive jets, with deliveries expected
to begin at the end of 2013. This includes
firm orders for five aircraft and theoption
for five more later.
Embraer has received a type certificate
from Transport Canada Civil Aviation
for its Phenom 300 light jet. The jet
is already certificated in more than
40 countries, including the USandBrazil.
Also, the Federal Aviation Administration
recently granted Embraer a production
certification to assemble the light
jet Phenom 100 at its Melbourne,
Florida facility.
Daher-Socata has delivered the first
TBM 850 Elite turboprop in Thailand
to the countrys former Deputy Minister
for Public Health and Commerce, Anutin
Charnvirakul. The aircraft is fitted with
new middle seats that can be oriented in
a forward-facing position, allowing the
cabin to be reconfigured into a four-
seater, thus increasing luggage capacity.
Charnvirakul, currently chairman of
Sino-Thai Engineering and Construction
PLC and also a private pilot, included
a Garmin GSR56 Iridium satellite
transceiver with his purchase.
Greenpoint Technologies, a completions
centre for Boeing Business Jets, has
signed a memorandum of understanding
with Ameco Beijing to cooperate on
commercial- and business-jet completion
work in China and the Asia-Pacific. The
two aim to finalise a relationship for
collaborative engineering, certification
and installation of narrow- and widebody
aircraft modifications. >>
AIRBORNEBRIEFING
JETGALA 134
DISCOVER THE DIFFERENCE
LIGHT UP THE SKY.
Next gen avionics from your Citation Service Center makes situational awareness shine
with the brightest, most dynamic and advanced technology you can put in a ight deck.
Add it to yours, and see the light.
SCAN WITH YOUR SMART PHONE
FOR AN ONLINE QUOTE
>> Jay Beever, formerly design
manager for new product development
at Gulfstream Aerospace, has joined
Embraer Executive Jets as vice president
of interior design. The appointment
came as the manufacturer unveiled its
expanded design suite at its customer
service centre in Melbourne, Florida.
The centre facilitates sales, design and
delivery for Embraer business aircraft.
The Phenom, Legacy and Lineage have
more than 3,000 options for materials,
carpets and systems.
Azul Brazilian Airlines has successfully
completed a demonstration flight using
renewable jet fuel produced from
Brazilian sugarcane. An Embraer E195
jet loaded with the new fuel departed
from the Campinas Viracopos Airport
and landed in Santos Dumont Airport
in Rio de Janeiro on 19 June. Dubbed
the Azul+Verde project, which means
a greener blue in Portuguese, the
initiative began in 2009 and is a joint
venture between the airline, manufacturer
Embraer, renewable fuels company
Amyris Inc, and American conglomerate
GE. The fuel is made using modified
microorganisms that convert sugar into
pure renewable hydrocarbon and has
been designed to be compliant with
Jet A/A-1 fuel specifications. The
Institute for International Trade
Negotiations, a Brazilian think tank,
reckons that greenhouse gas emissions
will be reduced by 82 per cent with
the use of the new fuel compared to
conventional fossil-derived jet fuel.
ExecuJet Aviation Group has signed
a Memorandum of Cooperation to
design, construct and manage general
aviation terminals in as many as 13
of the Indonesian airports managed by
the state-owned Angkasa Pura 1. Bali
International Airport is part of Angkasa
Pura 1s management portfolio. ExecuJet
Asia managing director Graeme
Duckworth says that Indonesia, which
is experiencing significant and exciting
growth, is a strategic location for
ExecuJets Southeast Asian expansion.
Eclipse Aerospace has startedproduction
of its Eclipse 550 twin-engine jet, an
upgraded version of the legacy Eclipse
500 very light jet. The first of the
USD2.7 million five-seater craft is
expected to be delivered in 2013, although
the company is keeping tight-lippedabout
the number of orders. Full production
for between 50 and 100 aircraft yearly is
expected by 2014, but will be paced by
market demand, says the company.
Eclipse Aviation was founded in 1998
and entered Chapter 11 bankruptcy in
2008. It entered into Chapter 7 liquidation
in 2009 and was bought by Eclipse
Aerospace Inc.
NetJets is expanding its North American
and European fleet with a deal topurchase
as many as 275 Bombardier Challenger
business jets, including a firm order for
100 Challenger business jets with
deliveries beginning in 2014 and
options for up to 175 more. The deal,
worth up to USD7.3 billion, is touted
to be the largest business aircraft sale
to date. NetJets also placed an order
for 150 Cessna Citation Latitude
business aircraft, including 25 firm
orders and options for 125 more,
with deliveries starting in 2016. The
purchases, which could total as much
as USD9.6 billion, are part of a 10-year
business plan that will see a renewal
of its existing 725-strong fleet.
Execujet Europe has launched a
complimentary pet-handling service
at Cambridge Airport that will enable
domestic cats and dogs to travel
internationally without quarantine
or overseas vet inspection. This follows
new regulations implemented this year
to relax procedures for pets entering
the United Kingdom from the European
Union and selected non-EU countries.
The relaxed rules scrap post-vaccination
blood tests and reduce the pre-entry
period from six months to 21 days.
Indian MRO service provider, Air
Works India Engineering, has invested
INR1.2 billion in Dubai-based business
aviation services company, Empire
Aviation Group. The move aims to
help both companies expand their
reach in each others home markets.
Vivek Gour, managing director of Air
Works, said that within a year, Air
Works expects to acquire a company
that provides MRO services for aircraft
engines. A definitive target has yet to
be set, but potential areas for the
acquisition are Australia, South Africa,
the US and UK.
JETGALA 136
AIRBORNEBRIEFING
The expanded design suite at Embraer Executive Jets customer service centre in Melbourne, Florida
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Home influences
7-11 SEPT. 2012
PARIS NORD VILLEPINTE
www.maison-objet.com
The show for home-fashion
Trade only. Tel. + 33 (0)1 44 29 02 00
info@safisalons.fr

JETGALA 138
ABSOLUTE ALTITUDE Measurable height
of an aircraft above the actual terrain.
ABSOLUTE CEILING The maximum
altitude above sea level at which an
aircraft can maintain level flight under
Standard Air conditions.
AGL (Above Ground Level) Altitude
expressed as feet above terrain or airport
elevation (see MSL).
AILERONS An aircraft control surface
hinged to the rear, outer section of each
wing for banking (tilting) the aircraft.
AIRCRAFT MANAGEMENT Comprehensive
services provided by a management
company for an aircraft owner. Details vary.
AIRFOIL The shape of any flying surface,
but principally a wing, as seen in side-view
(cross section).
AIRWORTHINESS DIRECTIVE Official
notification to aircraft owners/operators
of a known safety issue with a particular
model of aircraft.
ALTIMETER A highly sensitive barometer
that shows an aircrafts altitude above
mean sea level by measuring atmospheric
pressure.
ANGLE OF ATTACK The angle between
the airfoils chord line and the direction in
which the aircraft is currently moving.
AOG (Aircraft on Ground) Aircraft
unfit to fly, in need of repair. Owners
worst nightmare.
APPROACH (DEPARTURE) CONTROL
Radar-based air traffic control, usually
at an airport tower, providing traffic
separation up to 40 miles.
APRON Hard-surfaced or paved area
around a hangar. Also, ramp.
ATC (Air Traffic Control) Service providing
separation services to participating
airborne traffic and clearances to land,
take off or taxi at airports.
AVIONICS The electronic control
systems airplanes use for flight such as
communications, autopilots, and navigation.
BLOCK RATES Pre-paid hours for air
charter at a contracted price.
CARBON OFFSET Monetary contributions
to renewable energy research and
production projects to offset carbon
emissions of an airplane.
CHARTER The renting of an aircraft with
crew for a personal, business, or cargo
flight from one point to another.
CHARTER CARD Pre-paid air charter
plan, either for a block of charter hours
at a pre-defined fee, or a set debit
balance in dollars.
CLASS I NAVIGATION Operation of
aircraft under visual meteorological
conditions (VFR) primarily based on see
and avoid procedures.
CLASS II NAVIGATION Any en route flight
operation that is not Class I, i.e. instrument-
based navigation (IFR).
CLEARANCE Formal instructions from
air traffic control authorising a specific
action (climb or descend, entry into
controlled airspace).
CONTRAILS Streaks of condensed water
vapour created in the air by aircraft flying
at high altitudes; a.k.a. vapour trails.
CONTROLLED AIRSPACE An airspace of
defined dimensions within which air traffic
control service is provided.
CRUISE SPEED The normal speed attained
at altitude once the aircraft is no longer
climbing and is en route.
CRUISING ALTITUDE A level altitude
maintained by an aircraft while in flight.
DEADHEAD To fly the return leg of a trip
without cargo or passengers.
DRAG Resisting force exerted on an
aircraft in its line of flight opposite in
direction to its motion. Opposite of thrust.
DUTY TIME That portion of the day when
a crewmember is on duty in any capacity
(not just in the air), limited by regulations.
EFIS (Electronic Flight Information
Systems) Glass cockpit avionics that
integrate all flight parameters into one
optimised instrument.
ELEVATOR An aircraft control surface
hinged to both rear horizontal stabilisers,
changing the aircraft pitch attitude
nose-up or nose-down.
EMPTY LEG Also known as one-way
availability. Usually posted as available
for travel between two airports during
a certain time period.
FAA (Federal Aviation Administration)
The Department of Transportations
agency for aviation.
FBO (Fixed Base Operator) A business
operating an airport terminal for
non-airline, general aviation aircraft.
FERRY FLIGHT A flight for the purpose of
returning an aircraft to base or delivering
an aircraft from one location to another.
FLAPS Hinged surfaces on the inboard
rear of wings, deployed to increase wing
curvature (and thus, lift).
FLIGHT PLAN Filed by radio, telephone,
computer, or in person with Flight
Service Stations.
FLIGHT TIME Portion of the trip actually
spent in the air.
FRACTIONAL OWNERSHIP The purchase
of a share of an aircraft.
FUSELAGE An aircrafts main body
structure housing the flight crew,
passengers, and cargo.
GENERAL AVIATION Part of civil aviation
comprising all facets of aviation except
scheduled air carriers.
GLASS COCKPIT See FIS.
GPS (Global Positioning System) Satellite-
based navigation system operated by
Department of Defence.
GPWS (Ground Proximity Warning
System) System designed to alert pilots
if their aircraft is in immediate danger of
flying into the ground.
GROUND SPEED Actual speed that an
aircraft travels over the ground also called
shadow speed.
HANGAR An enclosed structure for
housing aircraft. Originated with lake-
based floating homes of the original
German Zeppelin airships.
HEAVY JETS See Large-Cabin Jets.
HORSEPOWER The motive energy
required to raise 550 lbs. one foot in one
second, friction disregarded.
HUD (Head-Up Display) A transparent
display that presents data without
requiring the user to look away from
his or her usual viewpoint.
IATA CODE International aviation code for
international airports.
ICAO CODE Civil aviation codes for airports.
AIRBORNEGLOSSARY
JETGALA 140
AIRBORNEGLOSSARY
IFR (Instrument Flight Rules) Rules
for flights into clouds and low visibility,
by reference to cockpit instruments and
radio navigation.
ILS (Instrument Landing System) A
precision instrument approach system
permitting aircraft to land with low ceilings
or poor visibility.
JOINT OWNERSHIP Purchase or lease of
an aircraft by a number of owners, often
through a partnership or limited company.
KNOT (Nautical Mile per Hour) Common
measure of aircraft speed equalling 6,080
feet or about 1.15 miles. (For mph, multiply
knots by 1.15.)
KTAS True airspeed, in knots.
LARGE-CABIN JETS The largest size
aircraft that doesnt require a major airport
runway. Typical capacity 9-15 passengers.
LAYOVER A night spent in the middle of
the trip in a city other than home base for
the aircraft and crew.
LEG Describes one direction of travel
between two points. Commonly used in
referring to a planned itinerary.
LIGHT JETS See Small-Cabin Jets.
MACH SPEED A number representing the
ratio of the speed of an airplane to the
speed of sound in the surrounding air.
MAYDAY An international distress signal
to indicate an imminent and grave danger
that requires assistance.
MID-CABIN JETS Typical capacity
7-9 passengers.
MRO (Maintenance, Repair & Overhaul)
Company licensed to provide services for
the upkeep and airworthiness of airplanes.
NAUTICAL MILE Defined internationally
as equivalent to 1,852 metres or 1.15
statute miles.
NDB (Non-Directional Beacon) A radio
transmitter at a known location, used as an
aviation or marine navigational aid.
PAN PAN International call signal for
urgency, indicating uncertainty and usually
followed by the nature of the alert.
PART 91 The parts of Federal Aviation
Regulations on non-commercial operations
covering corporate flight departments.
PART 121 The parts of Federal Aviation
Regulations on scheduled airline operations,
including the publication of a schedule.
PART 135 The parts of Federal Aviation
Regulations on non-commercial operations
covering charter carriers.
PART 145 Certificate allowing an
organisation to perform maintenance and
alterations on US-registered aircraft.
PATTERN The path of aircraft traffic
around an airfield, at an established height
and direction.
PAYLOAD Anything that an aircraft carries
beyond what is required for its operation
during flight.
POSITIONING Ferrying aircraft for departure
from other than originating airport.
RADAR System that uses electromagnetic
waves to identify the range, altitude,
direction, or speed of moving and fixed
objects.
RAMP The apron or open tarmac in front
of an FBO or terminal facility. This space
is busy, used for deplaning, parking of
aircraft, etc.
ROLL One of three axes in flight, specifying
the action around a central point.
ROTATE In flight, any aircraft will rotate
about its centre of gravity, a point which is the
average location of the mass of the aircraft.
RUDDER Aircraft control surface attached
to the rear of the vertical stabiliser (fin) of
the aircraft tail. Forces the plane to veer
left or right.
RUNWAY HEADING Magnetic direction
corresponding to the centre line of the
runway.
SLATS Small, aerodynamic surfaces on the
leading edge of the wings of fixed aircraft
which allow the wing to operate at a
higher angle of attack.
SLIPSTREAM The flow of air driven backward
by a propeller or downward by a rotor.
SMALL-CABIN JETS Typical capacity
5-8 passengers.
SQUAWK A four-digit number that a pilot
dials into his transponder to identify his
aircraft to air traffic controllers.
STATUTE MILE A unit of length equal
to 5,280 feet.
SVS (Synthetic Vision System)
A technology that uses 3D to provide
pilots with intuitive means of under-
standing their flying environment.
TAIL NUMBER An airplanes
registration number.
TARMAC A paved airport surface,
especially a runway or an apron at a hangar.
TAXI TIME Portion of the trip spent
rolling between the gate, terminal,
or ramp and runway.
THRUST The forward force produced in
reaction to the gases expelled rearward
from a jet engine. Opposite of drag.
TRAILING EDGE The rearmost edge
of an airfoil.
TRANSPONDER An airborne transmitter
that responds to automated air traffic
control interrogation with accurate
position information.
TURBINE Engine that uses compressed
air to generate thrust to spin a metal shaft
inside the motor, used in jet engines and
turboprop aircraft.
TURBOPROP An aircraft in which the
propeller is driven by a jet-style turbine
rather than a piston.
VERY LIGHT JETS (VLJ) Small jet aircraft
approved for single-pilot operation,
maximum take-off weight of less than
10,000 lb (4,540 kg).
VFR (Visual Flight Rules) A defined set
of FAA regulations covering operation
of aircraft flying by visual reference to
the horizon.
VOR (VHF Omnidirectional Range)
Ground-based radio navigation aid.
VORTICES Regions of high velocity that
develop at the tip of a wing as it flies
through the air.
WIND SHEAR Large changes in either
wind speed or direction at different
altitudes that can cause sudden gain or
loss of airspeed.
WINGLET A small, stabilising, rudder-like
addition to the tips of a wing to control or
employ air movement, thereby increasing
fuel economy.
YAW One of the three axes in flight,
specifying the side-to-side movement of
an aircraft on its vertical axis.
YOKE The control wheel of an aircraft, akin
to an automobile steering wheel.

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JETGALA 142
AUGUST 2012
15 17 AUG LABACE (LATIN AMERICAN BUSINESS
AVIATION CONFERENCE & EXHIBITION)
2012
Congonhas Airport, So Paulo, Brazil www.abag.org.br/labace2012
SEPTEMBER 2012
11 16 SEP ILA BERLIN AIR SHOW 2012 Berlin ExpoCenter Airport, Germany www.ila-berlin.de
OCTOBER 2012
09 14 OCT JA 2012 (JAPAN INTERNATIONAL
AEROSPACE EXHIBITION)
Central Japan International Airport
(Centrair) and Port Messe Nagoya, Japan
www.japanaerospace.jp/english
30 OCT - 01 NOV NBAA 2012 (NATIONAL BUSINESS
AVIATION ASSOCIATION 65TH
ANNUAL MEETING & CONVENTION)
Orange County Convention Center and
Orlando Executive Airport, Florida, USA
www.nbaa.org/events/amc/2012
NOVEMEBER 2012
07 10 NOV INDO AEROSPACE 2012 EXPO & FORUM JIExpo Kemayoran, Jakarta, Indonesia www.indoaerospace.com
DECEMBER 2012
11 13 DEC MEBA 2012 (MIDDLE EAST BUSINESS
AVIATION)
Al Maktoum International Airport,
Dubai, United Arab Emirates
www.meba.aero
JANUARY 2013
19 - 21 JAN BAHRAIN INTERNATIONAL
AIRSHOW 2013
Sakhir Air Base, Bahrain
International Airport, Bahrain
www.bahraininternationalairshow.com
FEBRUARY 2013
26 FEB 03 MAR AVALON 2013 (AUSTRALIAN
INTERNATIONAL AIRSHOW AND
AEROSPACE & DEFENCE EXPOSITION)
Avalon Airport, Geelong, Victoria,
Australia
www.airshow.net.au
MARCH 2013
19 20 MAR ASIAN BUSINESS AVIATION 2013 Hong Kong Business Aviation Centre,
China
www.asianbusinessav.com
APRIL 2013
16 18 APR ABACE 2013
(ASIAN BUSINESS AVIATION
CONFERENCE & EXHIBITION)
Shanghai Hawker Pacific Business
Aviation Service Centre, China
www.abace.aero
MAY 2013
14 16 MAY EBACE 2013
(EUROPEAN BUSINESS AVIATION
CONVENTION & EXHIBITION)
Palexpo and Geneva International
Airport, Geneva, Switzerland
www.ebace.aero
31 MAY 02 JUN AEROEXPO UK 2013 Sywell Aerodrome, UK www.expo.aero/uk
JUNE 2013
17 23 JUN PARIS AIR SHOW 2013 Le Bourget Exhibition Centre,
Paris, France
www.paris-air-show.com
EBACE Geneva
AIRBORNESHOWDIARY
MAKE PLANS FOR YOUR COMPANY TO
BE PART OF THE LARGEST BUSINESS
AVIATION EVENT IN THE WORLD
Attend or Exhibit at NBAA2012
Orange County Convention Center
and Orlando Executive Airport
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Over 26,000 Attendees

Over 1,000 Exhibitors

More than 100 Aircraft on Static Display

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Learn more
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NBAA also hosts
MAY 21, 22, 23, 2013
GENEVA, SWI TZERLAND
JETGALA 144
AIRBORNETAILHOOK
by Rainer Sigel
THIS IS THE BUSY COCKPIT OF THE LEGENDARY BOEING B-52 STRATOFORTRESS,
A LONG-RANGE, SUBSONIC, JET-POWERED STRATEGIC BOMBER. Operated by the
US Air Force since the 1950s, the aircraft carries up to 70,000 pounds (32 tons) of weaponry.
The B-52 is powered by eight turbojet engines and, although a veteran of a number of
wars, has dropped only conventional munitions. Excellent performance at subsonic speeds
and relatively low operating costs have kept the B-52 in service, despite the advent of later
aircraft such as the XB-70 Valkyrie (see page 56).
The aircraft marked its 50th anniversary of continuous service in 2005, and after further
upgrades between 2013 and 2015, is expected to serve well into the 2040s.
Image by
Tony Landis,
courtesy of the
NASA Dryden
Flight Research
Center Photo
Collection