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RTA96C-B Operation 4003–1/A1

Engine Control

Overview
1. General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1/11
2. Function of the control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2/11
3. Engine local control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2/11
3.1 Local control with governor intact . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2/11
3.2 Emergency control (with fuel lever) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3/11
4. Checking the engine control system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4/11
4.1 General preparatory works . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4/11
4.2 Checking the safety system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7/11
4.3 Checking the auxiliary blowers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8/11
4.4 Checking the reversing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8/11
4.5 Checking the speed setting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9/11
4.6 Checking the injection pump regulating linkage . . . . . . . . . 9/11
4.7 Checking the starting system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9/11
4.8 Cylinder lubrication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10/11
4.9 Load-dependent VIT (Variable Injection Timing) . . . . . . . . . . 10/11
4.10 Checking the slow-turning system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11/11
4.11 Local control on engine (manual fuel regulation) . . . . . . . . . 11/11
4.12 Engine start . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11/11

1. General

The DENIS–6 control system (Diesel Engine CoNtrol and OptImizing Specifica-
tion) has been designed in such a manner, that various remote controls can be
used. To this end all nodes are exactly defined. Terminal boxes are mounted on the
engine, to which the cable ends from the control room or from the bridge can be
connected (depending on the type of remote control).
The engine control comprises all the elements which are necessary for operation,
monitoring and safety of the engine.
Synopsis of engine control (4003–2):
The Engine Control Diagram is a schematic synopsis of all control components
and of their functional connections. The variable design executions of the speed
control are designated by the alternative names (on the sheet corner to the right
below the number of the group).
All code numbers and valve designations used in the following description are
found in Description and in the Engine Control Diagram 4003–2.
Detailed control diagram with interfaces in the plant (4003–3):
On these sheets individual diagram sections of the engine control connected by
function are shown in detail.
They provide a general view of:
– Standard and optional systems.
– Connection of the individual systems.
– Interfaces from engine to plant or to remote control respectively.
– Monitoring and safeguard instrumentation.
– Code designations for the identification of external connectors.

Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd 1/ 11 2001


4003–1/A1 Operation RTA96C-B

Engine Control

2. Function of the control

The engine control permits carrying out the following functions:


– Starting, operation, manoeuvring and shutting down.
– Regulating the engine speed.
– Partly safeguarding and monitoring the engine.
All the functions can be checked (see paragraph ”Checking the Engine Control be-
fore Commissioning the Engine”). Interlocks protect against and prevent manoeu-
vring errors.

Media of the control Pressures


Control air from the board system max. 9 bar
Control air from starting air bottles max. 25/30 bar
Starting air from starting air bottles max. 25/30 bar
Main bearing and piston cooling oil 4.8–6.0 bar
Crosshead bearing oil and actuator pump oil 10–12 bar

3. Engine local control

The engine can be operated normally from the local manoeuvring stand. Should
the speed governor fail, it is possible to operate the engine for a limited time on a
manual ’Emergency Operation’.

3.1 Local control with governor intact


D As soon as lever 5.03 on the local manoeuvring stand is moved out of position
REMOTE CONTROL, the engine local control is activated.

Starting:
⇒ Preselect all auxiliary blowers.
⇒ Move local manoeuvring lever 5.03 to RUN AHEAD or RUN ASTERN.
⇒ Set stop lever 5.07 to position RUN.
⇒ Set local control speed setting to position START, i.e. about 40% of the nomi-
nal speed.
⇒ Move local manoeuvring lever 5.03 to position START (AHEAD or ASTERN)
until engine runs.
⇒ Slowly increase the speed setting until the engine runs at the required speed.

Reversing:
⇒ Set local speed setting to position START.
⇒ Move manoeuvring lever 5.03 to the corresponding position.
⇒ Further move manoeuvring lever 5.03 to position START until the engine runs
in the correct direction.
Remark: On ships underway this procedure may under certain circumstances
take rather a long time (several minutes), as the propeller is ’dragged’ in the
’wrong’ sense of rotation.

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RTA96C-B Operation 4003–1/A1

Engine Control

Stopping:
⇒ Reduce local control speed setting.
⇒ Move stop lever 5.07 to position STOP.
D For switching off the auxiliary blower move manoeuvring lever 5.03 to position
REMOTE CONTROL.

Take over from remote control to local control:


⇒ Adjust the local control speed setting to the same level as remote speed set-
ting.
⇒ Move local manoeuvring lever 5.03 to RUN AHEAD or RUN ASTERN (the
same rotational direction in which the engine is running).

Take over from local control to remote control:


⇒ Move local manoeuvring lever 5.03 to position REMOTE CONTROL.
⇒ Push button REMOTE CONTROL.
⇒ In the control room the definitive take-over must be called for by pressing the
corresponding button. (e.g. TAKE-OVER IN THE CONTROL ROOM).

3.2 Emergency control (with fuel lever)


This form of operation should only be managed in an emergency i.e. in case of
governor or remote control failures. The function of the overspeed monitoring sys-
tem must be verified and assured to function without fail. The operator may not
leave the manoeuvring desk. He must regularly observe the engine speed enab-
ling him to immediately adjust the fuel supply when the speed varies to some ex-
tent.

Additional preparations:
Fuel lever 3.12 must be disengaged from position REMOTE CONTROL and en-
gaged into the injection pump regulating linkage.

Starting:
⇒ Preselect all auxiliary blowers.
⇒ Move local manoeuvring lever 5.03 to the corresponding position RUN
AHEAD or RUN ASTERN.
⇒ Move fuel lever 3.12 to position ’3’–’4’.
⇒ Move local manoeuvring lever 5.03 to position START (AHEAD or ASTERN)
until the engine turns.
⇒ Slowly move fuel lever until the engine runs at the required speed.

Reversing:
⇒ Move fuel lever 3.12 to position ’3’–’4’.
⇒ Move local manoeuvring lever 5.03 to the corresponding position.
⇒ Further move local manoeuvring lever 5.03 to position START until the engine
runs in the correct direction.
Remark: On ships underway this procedure may under certain circumstances
take rather a long time (several minutes), as the propeller is ”dragged” in the
”wrong” sense of rotation.

Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd 3/ 11 2001


4003–1/A1 Operation RTA96C-B

Engine Control

Stopping:
⇒ Move fuel lever 3.12 to zero.
⇒ Move stop lever 5.07 to position STOP.
D For switching off the auxiliary blower move local manoeuvring lever 5.03 to
position REMOTE CONTROL.

Take over from remote control to local control:


⇒ Quickly bring the fuel lever 3.12 into the same position as the injection pump
linkage and link them together.
⇒ Move local manoeuvring lever 5.03 to the corresponding position (RUN
AHEAD or RUN ASTERN).
⇒ Check the engine speed.
At most engines equipped with electronic speed control systems there is also the
possibility to operate the engine with the speed-setting knobs. (In place of regula-
tion with the fuel lever). In this case the actuator is manually actuated (only pos-
sible, if there is a fault in the remote control or in the electronic governor. Actuator,
connecting link to the regulating linkage and the regulating linkage itself must be
functioning).

4. Checking the engine control system

Should elements of the pneumatic control system have been dismantled, re-
moved or replaced during an overhaul, then a general operational check must be
made before re-commissioning. The following passages describe how to proceed.
The item numbers and descriptions of the following mentioned valves correspond
to those in the schematic engine control diagram 4003–2 and detailed control dia-
grams 4003–3.
The load indicator 3.04 (LI for short) must, for specific checks, be brought to the
corresponding positions. For this the fuel lever 3.12 on the local manoeuvring
stand must be notched out from its catch an notched-in in the lever of the injection
pump regulating linkage. With the aid of a hand wheel it can be brought to the de-
sired LI position (scale division ’0’–’10’).
Attention! Any detected leakages must be eliminated during checking the control
system!

4.1 General preparatory works

Checking the load indicator transmitter 7.07:


As all load-dependent functions receive their signals from the load indicator trans-
mitter, the transmitter has to be carefully checked (conformity of the mechanical
load indicators with the indications in the control room and/or bridge) and if applica-
ble, be exactly set. For safety reason the engine is equipped with two independent
load indicator transmitters (see Load Indications 9240–1).
Remark: For cost down reasons in some cases one transmitter may be built into
the electrical actuator. In this case the second transmitter must be correctly ad-
justed by the supplier of the speed control system.

2001 4/ 11 Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd


RTA96C-B Operation 4003–1/A1

Engine Control

Coarse setting:
⇒ Bring load indicator to position ’5’ and line up the lever on the intermediate
shaft parallel with the lever on the transmitter. The adjustable rod has then to
stand at right angles to the levers.
⇒ Bring load indicator to position zero. The red markings on shaft and hub of the
transmitter must be approximately in line.

APPROXIMATELY IN LINE

97.7126

Fine setting with potentiometers ZERO and SPAN:


⇒ The front end covers of the transmitters must be removed for this fine setting.
⇒ In terminal box E10 loosen the wire from terminals 103 and 106 and connect
an ammeter between the terminals and the wires.

WATCHMAKER’S
SCREWDRIVER Ø 2.3 mm

POTMETER ZERO

POTMETER SPAN

97.7123

⇒ Bring regulating linkage to position ’1’ and adjust the potentiometers ZERO till
the ammeters indicate 5.6 mA.
⇒ Bring regulating linkage to position ’9’ and adjust the potentiometers SPAN till
the ammeters indicate 18.4 mA.
⇒ Repeat the two previous points till 5.6 mA and 18.4 mA are exactly indicated.
⇒ A check measure in position ’5’ must indicate 12 mA.
⇒ Loosen and remove ammeters and re-connect the wires to terminal 103 and
106.

Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd 5/ 11 2001


4003–1/A1 Operation RTA96C-B

Engine Control

Preparatory work for checking the engine control system:


⇒ Open indicator cocks.
⇒ Close shut-off valves on the starting air bottles. Close shut-off valve 2.03 with
handwheel 2.10. Vent starting air supply pipe with venting valve 2.21.
⇒ Vent air bottles 287HA and 287HB.
⇒ Move local manoeuvring lever 5.03 to position REMOTE CONTROL. Bring
stop lever 5.07 to position STOP. Bring fuel lever 3.12 to position REMOTE
CONTROL.
⇒ Start main bearing oil pump and crosshead bearing oil pump.
⇒ Start cylinder cooling water pump.
⇒ Engage turning gear.
D Starting air distribution piping must now be vented through valve 38HB, in
case starting air is already present in the distribution piping.

Checking control air supply unit A :


⇒ Loosen piping in connection A3 and blind off connection A3.
⇒ Open 30 bar and 25 bar feed to control air supply unit at connection A2.
⇒ Open 8 bar control air feed at connection A1.
⇒ Adjust safety control air and stand-by air for air spring to 6.5 bar with reducing
valve 23HA. For this valve 36HA must be open. The pressure can be checked
on the pressure gauge PI4331L of reducing valve 23HA as well as on pres-
sure gauges PI4341M and PI4412M.
⇒ Set the air spring air pressure with reducing valve 19HA to 7–7.5 bar. The
pressure can be checked on pressure gauge PI4321L of reducing valve 19HA
as well as on pressure gauges PI4341M and PI4412M.
⇒ Set stand-by control air pressure to 7 bar with reducing valve 19HB. The pres-
sure can be checked on the pressure gauge PI4411L of reducing valve 19HB.
⇒ Shut cock at A1 and A2. Re-connect piping at connection A3 then open cock
A1 and A2 again. The pressure gauge PI4412M must now indicate 8 bar. Any
pressure deviations have to be corrected with the 8 bar board supply system.
D As long as the control air supply is switched on the pressure indicator G4 in
valve group G must indicate pressure.
⇒ Check whether the two orifices ∅ 2 mm are fitted at non-return valve 112HE
and 112HF (only at a possible exchange necessary).
D As long as stop lever 5.07 stands in position STOP the pressure indicators
G2, G8 and 216HA must indicate pressure.

2001 6/ 11 Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd


RTA96C-B Operation 4003–1/A1

Engine Control

4.2 Checking the safety system (Pressure switches and pressure transmitters I )
⇒ Actuate the EMERGENCY STOP on the control room desk as well as on the
local manoeuvring station and test each time whether the safety cut-out de-
vices 6.04 on the injection pumps have been actuated.
⇒ Set the overspeed safeguard monitoring to about 30 engine rpm.
D With the above setting the proper function of the overspeed safeguard moni-
toring must be later checked during the commissioning of the engine with an
air start (with cut-out injection pumps).
⇒ When this check is successful, the overspeed safeguard monitoring can be
set to nominal engine speed + 10%.
D For the safety system the setting of the pressure switches must be carried out
with falling pressures, in accordance with the following table:

Medium Code No. Pressure Action Time delay


Main bearing oil PS2001S 4.6 bar Slow-down/Stop 60/90 sec
PS2002S 4.1 bar Stop 10 sec
Crosshead bearing oil PS2021S 9 bar Slow-down *) 60 sec
Air spring PS4341S 6 bar Slow-down 60 sec
PS4342S 4.5 bar Stop 0 sec
Cylinder cooling water PS1101S 2.5 bar Slow-down/Stop 60/90 sec
Cylinder lube oil FS3101–12S no flow Slow-down 90 sec

*) Slow-down is only effective above an engine load of 40%, e.g. above a load
indicator position of about ’4.5’

D All slow-downs and shut-downs can be overridden in an emergency case by


pressing the buttons SLOW-DOWN OVERRIDING and SHUT-DOWN
OVERRIDING.
Excluded from these are:
– Stop in case of overspeed
– Stop in case of bearing oil failure (PS2002S)
D For the passive failure monitoring a resistor must be inserted in the plug be-
tween the connections 2 and 3 of the following 8 pressure switches:
– PS1101S, PS1301S, PS2001S
– PS2002S, PS2021S, PS4341S and PS4342S.
– The pressure switch PS1301S is only necessary if the engine is
equipped with multistage scavenge air coolers.
Remark: The value of the resistors depends on the remote control supplier.

Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd 7/ 11 12.03


4003–1/A1 Operation RTA96C-B

Engine Control

4.3 Checking the auxiliary blowers


⇒ Switch on the electric power supply for both auxiliary blowers.
⇒ Bring local manoeuvring lever 5.03 to position RUN AHEAD.
D Auxiliary blower 1 must start immediately.
D Auxiliary blower 2 must start with a delay of 5 sec.
⇒ These delay periods can be set on the time relays in the individual auxiliary
blower control boxes.
⇒ For pressure switches PS4051L and PS4052L connect compressed air pump
(tool) and simulate scavenge air pressure. With rising air pressure the individ-
ual auxiliary blowers must be switched off by their differential pressure
switches at a pressure of 0.45 bar. With sinking pressure the auxiliary blowers
must be switched on at an air pressure of 0.35 bar. This pressure of 0.35 bar
has to be set on each differential pressure switch. The individual auxiliary
blowers are again switched on with time delay.
⇒ Check rotation direction of both auxiliary blowers.
⇒ Move local manoeuvring lever 5.03 to position RUN ASTERN and check
whether the auxiliary blowers also start time delayed.
⇒ Remove compressed air pump and re-connect piping to the differential pres-
sure switches. Move lever 5.03 again to position REMOTE CONTROL.

4.4 Checking the reversing


⇒ Move stop lever 5.07 to position RUN.
Pressure indicator G2 must not indicate any pressure.
⇒ Turn engine with turning gear AHEAD by about 45 degrees. Then disengage
turning gear.
⇒ Bring local manoeuvring lever 5.03 to position RUN AHEAD.
D The indicator on the reversing valve 5.02 must be in position “put out”.
D Pressure indicators 216HI, 216HK, etc. (valve group D ) below the injection
pumps and 216HB in valve group B must indicate pressure.
D Pressure indicators G5, G6, G11 and G8 must not indicate pressure.
D The safety cut-out devices 6.04 must be in running position.
⇒ Engage turning gear and turn ASTERN by about 45 degrees.
Then disengage the turning gear.
D Pressure indicator 216HB must not indicate any pressure, as the rotation di-
rection safeguard 6.01 now stands at ASTERN.
D Pressure indicators G6, G11 and G8 must now indicate pressure.
D Pressure must be present in the piping between G8 and the governor. Pres-
sure switches PS5011C and PS5015L must be closed. The safety cut-out de-
vices 6.04 must be in stop position.
⇒ Bring local manoeuvring lever 5.03 to position RUN ASTERN.
D The indicator on the reversing valve 5.02 must now be in position “put in”.
D Pressure indicators 216HI, 216HK etc. below the injection pumps and 216HB
must indicate pressure.
D Pressure indicators G5, G6, G11 and G8 must not indicate any pressure.
D The safety cut-out devices 6.04 must be in running position.

2001 8/ 11 Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd


RTA96C-B Operation 4003–1/A1

Engine Control

⇒ Engage turning gear and turn AHEAD by about 45 degrees. Then disengage
the turning gear.
D Pressure indicator 216HB must not indicate any pressure, as the rotation di-
rection safeguard 6.01 now stands at AHEAD.
D Pressure indicators G6, G11 and G8 must now indicate pressure.
D Pressure switches PS5011C and PS5015L must be closed.
D The safety cut-out devices 6.04 must be in stop position.

4.5 Checking the speed setting


⇒ Output G10 in valve group G has to be blanked-off.
D The speed setting occurs electrically from all manoeuvring stations including
the local manoeuvring station. It is therefore the responsibility of the governor
supplier or of the remote control system supplier to ensure that the necessary
electrical operating elements for the speed setting are included in the local
manoeuvring station.
D Adjustments and testing of the speed setting circuits must therefore be car-
ried out to the specifications and instructions of the electronic governor suppli-
ers.

4.6 Checking the injection pump regulating linkage


D When the actuator output shaft is in position zero then the load indicator 3.04
must also be at position zero.
D When the pneumatic VIT/FQS unit is in position zero, then the pointer of the
spill valve shaft at the setting plate must also be in position zero.
D Release fuel lever 3.12 from position REMOTE CONTROL and engage it in
the injection pump regulating linkage.
D When fuel lever 3.12 is in position zero then load indicator 3.04 must also be in
position zero.
⇒ Move fuel lever 3.12 to position ’8’.
⇒ Load indicator 3.04 must now also be in position ’8’.
⇒ Move fuel lever 3.12 to position zero.
⇒ Disengage fuel lever 3.12 from the injection pump regulating linkage and
bring it back to position REMOTE CONTROL.

4.7 Checking the starting system


⇒ Bring local manoeuvring lever 5.03 to position REMOTE CONTROL.
D Starting air supply piping is still vented.
D Leave venting valve 2.21 in open position.
⇒ Engage turning gear.
D Loosen the piping to the pneumatic logic unit at connection E6.
D No air must come out.

Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd 9/ 11 2001


4003–1/A1 Operation RTA96C-B

Engine Control

⇒ Slowly disengage turning gear.


D As long as the pinion of the turning gear is engaged and as long as the clear-
ance between the tooth of the flywheel and the pinion of the turning gear does
not exceed 10 mm no air must issue from the piping.
D This check has to be made when engaging and disengaging the turning gear.
⇒ Connect the piping to connection E6.
⇒ Disengage the turning gear.
⇒ Loosen control piping at valve 2.05, as well as valve 129HA with connected
piping (pay attention not to lose the O-ring).
⇒ Bring local manoeuvring lever 5.03 to position START ASTERN.
⇒ Check whether air flows from the loose piping end and from outlet No. 2 of
valve 129HA.
⇒ Bring local manoeuvring lever 5.03 to position START AHEAD
⇒ Carry out the same checks as for point 7.
⇒ Bring local manoeuvring lever 5.03 to position REMOTE CONTROL.
⇒ Re-connect piping and valve.

4.8 Cylinder lubrication


⇒ Check whether the electric motor, the flow monitoring FS3101–08S, and the
level switch LS3125A have been electrically connected.
⇒ Ensure that oil supply functions properly and vent all pump modules.
⇒ Shortly press the push button for manual lubrication on the terminal box, and
check whether the electrically-driven lubricating pump turns, and that all steel
balls in the sight glasses have moved to the upper position.
⇒ With the aid of cylinder lubricating diagram ’A’ (7218–2), select the relative
lubricating flow in g/kWh for full load and the division in upper and lower lubri-
cating levels. The division of the flow quantity in upper and lower levels, e.g.
64% / 36% must be set by the six different adjusting positions on the pump
elements.
⇒ Subsequently, the speed of the horizontal drive shaft must be chosen in such
a manner that the required relative lubricating flow in g/kWh at full load is at-
tained. The speed of the electric motor and the corresponding power supply
frequency can also be seen in the diagram ’A’ (7218–2).

4.9 Load-dependent VIT (Variable Injection Timing)


⇒ Check whether the air connections have been arranged according to the con-
trol diagram.
⇒ Check whether the electrical connections have been wired.
⇒ The function test has to be carried out by the remote control supplier.

2001 10/ 11 Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd


RTA96C-B Operation 4003–1/A1

Engine Control

4.10 Checking the slow-turning system


⇒ Close indicator cocks. The turning gear must not be engaged.
⇒ Close venting valve 2.21. Put handwheel 2.10 of shut-off valve 2.03 in posi-
tion AUTOMAT and open shut-off valves at the starting air bottles.
⇒ Press SLOW-TURNING button in the control room and check whether the
crankshaft makes one turn in about 5–10 sec.
⇒ If the time for one turn differs widely from the above mentioned value, the
pulse modulation for the valve ZV7014C has to be readjusted by the remote
control supplier.

4.11 Local control on engine (manual fuel regulation)


⇒ Bring local manoeuvring lever 5.03 to position RUN AHEAD.
⇒ Engage turning gear and rotate AHEAD by about 45 degrees. Then disen-
gage turning gear.
⇒ Disengage fuel lever 3.12 from position REMOTE CONTROL and engage it
into the lever for injection pump regulating linkage.
D Pressure indications G7 and 216HC in valve group B must indicate pressure.
D Air cylinder 3.10 must be vented as long as manual fuel charge is in operation,
i.e. the air cylinder can be rotated by hand without great effort.
D Safety cut-out devices 6.04 must be in operating position, provided no SAFE-
TY SHUT-DOWN is actuated.
⇒ Engage turning gear and rotate ASTERN by about 45 degrees. Then disen-
gage turning gear again.
D Pressure indicator G6 and G11 must now indicate pressure.
D Safety cut-out devices 6.04 must now be in position STOP , as rotation direc-
tion safeguard 6.01 shows the wrong direction of rotation.
⇒ Bring local manoeuvring lever 5.03 to position RUN ASTERN.
D Safety cut-out devices 6.04 must move again to operating position.
⇒ Engage turning gear and rotate about 45 degrees AHEAD. Then disengage
turning gear.
D Safety cut-out devices 6.04 must move to position STOP , as the rotation di-
rection safeguard 6.01 shows the wrong direction of rotation.
⇒ Move fuel lever 3.12 to position zero.
⇒ Disengage fuel lever 3.12 and move it to position REMOTE CONTROL.
D Air cylinder 3.10 must now be pressurized again.

4.12 Engine start


⇒ Bring stop lever 5.07 to position STOP.
⇒ Adjust speed setting signal to minimum.
⇒ Actuate local manoeuvring lever 5.03 and start engine on air (without fuel), in
order to test the function of the overspeed monitoring (see paragraph 4.2).
D Safety cut-out devices 6.04 on the injection pumps must lift the suction val-
ves.
⇒ Then the overspeed monitoring has to be correctly adjusted (see paragraph
4.2).
⇒ Now the engine can be started with fuel.

Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd 11/ 11 2001


RTA96C-B Operation 4003–2/A0
Control Diagram
Designations (Description to 4003–1, 4003–2 and 4003–3)

1. Summary of part code numbers

A Control air supply unit


B Valve group for air cylinder
D Valve groups for reversing interlock
E Valve group in pneumatic logic unit
G Valve group in pneumatic logic unit
H Instrument panel
I Pressure switches and pressure transmitters
P Valve group at starting air distributor

1. Speed setting system 4. Exhaust valve drive


03 Actuator 01 Exhaust valve
04 Speed pick-ups 02 Hydraulic actuator pump
2. Starting system 03 Actuator pump cam
01 Starting air distributor 04 Exhaust valve actuator
02 Cam for starting control valves 05 Air spring
03 Shut off valve for starting air 06 Throttle
04 Non-return valve 07 Relief valve
05 Control valve 08 Air spring venting
06 Drain and test valve 5. Reversing system
07 Starting valve 01 Reversing servomotor
08 Flame arrester 02 Reversing valve
09 Relief valve 03 Local manoeuvring lever
10 Handwheel for shut-off valve 07 Stop lever
13 Blocking valve on turning gear
15 Starting cut-off valve 6. Safety devices
21 Venting valve 01 Rotation direction safeguard
22 Reversing servomotor for starting system 02 Sliding coupling
04 Safety cut-out device
3. Fuel regulating system 7. Monitoring
01 Fuel injection valve 03 Remote tachometer
02 Fuel injection pump 07 Transmitter for lad indicator
03 Fuel cam 18 Collector for leakage oil from air spring
04 Load indicator 23 Revoulution counter
05 Load-dependent variable injection timing 8. Cylinder lubricating system
07 Eccentric shaft for suction valve 03 Terminal box with sensor amplifier
08 Eccentric shaft for spill valve 04 Progressive block distributor
09 Intermediate regulating shaft 06 Cylinder lubricating pump
10 Air cylinder for actuator/fuel linkage connection 07 Sight glass indicator
11 Fuel linkage maximum limiting screw 08 Accumulator
12 Fuel lever 09 Lubricating quill with non-return valve
13 Relief valve 16 Angular gear box with electric motor
17 Piping filter

Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd 1/ 2 2001


4003–2/A0 Operation RTA96C-B

Designations (Description to 4003–1, 4003–2 and 4003–3)

9. Engine room
01 Starting air bottles
02 Lubricating oil pump
03 Crosshead lubricating oil pump
04 Oil filter
05 Oil cooler
06 Non-return valve (on engine)

Remark: Systems are drawn for engines in position STOP, reversed AHEAD with unpressurized circuits.

Circuits: Starting air Lubricating oil and fuel oil


Control air and cooling water Electric

2001 2/ 2 Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd


RTA96C-B Operation 4003–2/A1
Control Diagram

001.601/03

Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd 1/ 1 5.03


RTA96C-B Operation 4003–3/A1
Control and Auxiliary Systems
Detailed Control Diagrams with Interfaces to the Plant

On the following pages 3 to 22 the complete engine control with the auxiliary sys-
tems, split up into their various functions, has been precisely represented. It in-
cludes all interfaces to the plant and remote control with clear designations for the
identification of internal and external connectors.

Overview of the systems Path No. Page


range
Air supply 30 3
Bearing and cooling oil supply 40 4
Starting system 110 5
Stop – Electronic speed control (with engine-driven generator)* 120 6
– Electronic speed control (without engine-driven generator)* 120 7
Reversing system 130 8
Speed control: – ABB DEGO-III + ASAC 200 / 400* 150 9
– NORCONTROL DGS-8800e* 150 10
– NABCO MG-800* 150 11
– STN ESG 40M and LYNGSOE EGS 2000* 150 12
Transfer control, emergency control, wrong way alarm 160 13
Cylinder lubrication 170 14
Load-dependent VIT (variable injection timing) & fuel quality setting FQS 190 15
Exhaust gas / turbocharger types TPL and MET / charge air / auxiliary blower 300 16
(1-stage charge air cooler)*
Exhaust gas / turbocharger types TPL and MET / charge air / auxiliary blower 300 17
(2-stage charge air cooler)*
Exhaust valve drive, air spring 310 18
Fuel oil system 330 19
Cooling water (cylinder) 340 20
Main bearing & crosshead bearing lubrication, piston cooling, balancer, oil mist 350 21
detector (VISATRON VN215)*
Main bearing & crosshead bearing lubrication, piston cooling, balancer, oil mist 350 22
detector (GRAVINER MK6)*

* Design execution alternative

(continuation on page 2)

Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd 1/ 22 11.04


4003–3/A1 Operation RTA96C-B

Detailed Control Diagrams with Interfaces to the Plant

Remarks for easier understanding of the individual diagrams:


Each diagram has a path No. range allotted to the system part, which is subdivided
at the page edge (on the right) into 10 sections. These path numbers designate
the junctions from one diagram to the other.
One piping leading away in the direction of the arrow is marked with the path No.
(framed) which lies above this No. in the section part. The number below the rect-
angle is the target path number.

Example: Page 3 Page 5

CONTROL AIR 8 BAR


CONTROL AIR
37 37
30 BAR
110

37 38 Path-No. 110 111

In this example the control air tube carrying number 37 (page 3) leads to target
path No. 110 (page 5). Where two equal path numbers appear additional letter
indications are used for identification, e.g. on page 3 No. 39 and 39A.
The interfaces to the remote control as well as local alarm and monitoring instru-
ments have been designated by expressive symbols (box with rounded corners).

Letter code
for functional identification
CS
Signal from / to engine Letter code for systems
5014 C
Manner of circuit Numeral

11.04 2/ 22 Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd


RTA96C-B Operation 4003–3/A1
Air Supply
008.514/01
Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd 3/ 22 11.04
4003–3/A1 Operation RTA96C-B
Bearing and Cooling Oil Supply
012.416/04
11.04 4/ 22 Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd
RTA96C-B Operation 4003–3/A1
Starting System
001.395/97
Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd 5/ 22 11.04
4003–3/A1 Operation RTA96C-B
Stop
with Electronic Speed Control
009.248/03
11.04 6/ 22 Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd
RTA96C-B Operation 4003–3/A1
Stop
with Electronic Speed Control
009.249/03
Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd 7/ 22 11.04
4003–3/A1 Operation RTA96C-B
Reversing System
001.459/97
11.04 8/ 22 Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd
RTA96C-B Operation 4003–3/A1
Speed Control
for DEGO-III + ASAC 200 / 400
009.257/01
Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd 9/ 22 11.04
4003–3/A1 Operation RTA96C-B
Speed Control
for NORCONTROL DGS-8800e
008.517/01
11.04 10/ 22 Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd
RTA96C-B Operation 4003–3/A1
Speed Control
for NABCO MG-800
008.519/01
Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd 11/ 22 11.04
4003–3/A1 Operation RTA96C-B
Speed Control
for STN ESG 40M and LYNGSOE EGS 2000
008.520/01
11.04 12/ 22 Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd
RTA96C-B Operation 4003–3/A1
Transfer Control, Emergency Control, Wrong Way Alarm
009.061/01
Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd 13/ 22 11.04
4003–3/A1 Operation RTA96C-B
Cylinder Lubrication
008.521/01
11.04 14/ 22 Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd
RTA96C-B Operation 4003–3/A1
Load-Dependent VIT (Variable Injection Timing) & Fuel Quality Setting FQS
001.452/97
Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd 15/ 22 11.04
4003–3/A1 Operation RTA96C-B
Exhaust Gas / Turbocharger Type TPL and MET / Charge Air / Auxiliary Blower
for 1-Stage Charge Air Cooler
012.417/04
11.04 16/ 22 Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd
RTA96C-B Operation 4003–3/A1
Exhaust Gas / Turbocharger Type TPL and MET / Charge Air / Auxiliary Blower
for 2-Stage Charge Air Cooler
012.418/04
Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd 17/ 22 11.04
4003–3/A1 Operation RTA96C-B
Exhaust Valve Drive / Air Spring
001.421/97
11.04 18/ 22 Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd
RTA96C-B Operation 4003–3/A1
Fuel Oil System
008.528/01
Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd 19/ 22 11.04
4003–3/A1 Operation RTA96C-B
Cooling Water (Cylinder)
008.524/01
11.04 20/ 22 Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd
RTA96C-B Operation 4003–3/A1
Main bearing & crosshead bearing lubrication, piston cooling, balancer, OMD
(VISATRON VN215)
008.525/01
Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd 21/ 22 11.04
4003–3/A1 Operation RTA96C-B
Main bearing & crosshead bearing lubrication, piston cooling, balancer, OMD
(GRAVINER MK6)
012.419/04
11.04 22/ 22 Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd
RTA96C-B Operation 4044–1/A1
Control Units

1. General

The majority of the units required for the engine control are arranged in the im-
mediate vicinity of the local manoeuvring stand.
All connected apparatus and design groups are shown on Fig. ’A’ and ’B’. For eas-
ier identification of the corresponding description the respective groups have been
listed below.
The arrangement has been represented by the electronic NABCO actuator.

4506–1 I
A 4303–1

9240–1

9215–1
4618–1

4809–1

III II

4605–1
4503–1

4613–1

4628–1

4605–1

001.480/97

DRAWN FOR 8–12 CYLINDER

Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd 1/ 2 2001


4044–1/A1 Operation RTA96C-B

Control Units

B II III

4614–1
5103–1 4240–1
4303–1 4506–1
5803–1
5803–1
I I

4809–1

4618–1 5803–1

4605–1
4630–1
4628–1
4503–1
4605–1

001.479/97

DRAWN FOR 8–12 CYLINDER

Key:
4240–1 Gear auxiliary drives 4628–1 Pick-up for speed measurement
4303–1 Starting air distributor with valve unit P 4630–1 Pneumatic logic unit E and G
4503–1 Reversing valve 4809–1 Local manoeuvring stand
4506–1 Rotation direction safeguard 5103–1 Actuator
4605–1 Control air supply 5803–1 Injection pump regulating linkage
4613–1 Valve group D for reversing interlock with electronic VIT and FQS
4614–1 Valve group B for air cylinder 9215–1 Instrument panel H
4618–1 Box on local manoeuvring stand 9240–1 Transmitter for remote load indication

2001 2/ 2 Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd


RTA96C-B Operation 4103–1/A1
Camshaft Drive

1. General

The camshaft 7 is driven by the gear wheel 1 on the crankshaft via intermediate
wheel 2. Camshaft driving wheel 3 turns in the same running direction as the
crankshaft. On 6 and 7 cylinder engines the drive is placed at the driving end (see
Fig. ’B’). On 8–12 cylinder engines the drive is arranged at mid-engine (see Fig.
’C’).
The following conditions must be fulfilled to ensure correct assembly of the gear
train:
– The piston of cylinder 1 is in its TDC position.
– The marks ’MA’ on gear wheel 3 are lined up with the machined side surface of
the bearing housing 10.
The condition of the tooth profile must be checked periodically. In particular new
gear wheels must be checked frequently after a short running-in period (see Main-
tenance Manual 4103–1).
Should abnormal noises be heard from the area of the gear train, their cause must
be established immediately.

2. Lubrication

The bearings 4 of the intermediate wheel and the camshaft bearings 11 are lubri-
cated with bearing oil. The gear teeth are supplied with bearing lubricant through
spray nozzles 6 and 6a.

I-I
III II
A III - III
8

MA 6a
10

11
7 3

MA

6a 6
III
2
11 3
6

001.477/97

II

Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd 1/ 2 2001


4103–1/A1 Operation RTA96C-B

Camshaft Drive

B II - II C II - II

I I

3 3

8 8

2 2
4 4

1 1

5 5

9 9

012.434/04 012.435/04

I I

Key to Illustrations: ’A’ Cross section (8–12 cylinders)


’B’ Drive at driving end (longitudinal section, 6 and 7 cylinders)
’C’ Drive at mid-engine (longitudinal section, 8–12 cylinders)

1 Gear wheel on crankshaft 8 Column


2 Intermediate wheel 9 Crankcase
3 Camshaft driving wheel 10 Bearing housing
4 Bearing pair for intermediate wheel 11 Camshaft bearing
5 Crankshaft
6, 6a Oil spray nozzle
7 Camshaft MA Marks

11.04 2/ 2 Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd


RT-flex96C Engine Selection and Project Manual

Abbreviations

ABB ASEA Brown Boveri M2V External moment 2nd order vertical
ALM Alarm MCR Maximum continuous rating (R1)
AMS Attended machinery space MDO Marine diesel oil
BFO Bunker fuel oil mep Mean effective pressure
BN Base Number MET Turbocharger (Mitsubishi manufacture)
BSEF Brake specific exhaust gas flow MHI Mitsubishi Heavy Industries
BSFC Brake specific fuel consumption MIM Marine installation manual
CCR Conradson carbon MMI Man–machine interface
CCW Cylinder cooling water N, n Speed of rotation
CMCR Contract maximum continuous rating (Rx) NCR Nominal continuous rating
CPP Controllable pitch propeller NOR Nominal operation rating
CSR Continuous service rating (also OM Operational margin
designated NOR and NCR) OPI Operator interface
cSt centi-Stoke (kinematic viscosity) PAL Pressure alarm, low
DAH Differential pressure alarm, high P Power
DENIS Diesel engine control and optimizing PI Pressure indicator
specification ppm Parts per million
EM Engine margin PRU Power related unbalance
EnSel R Engine selection program PTO Power take off
ESPM Engine selection and project manual RCS Remote control system
FCM Flex control module RW1 Redwood seconds No. 1 (kinematic
FPP Fixed pitch propeller viscosity)
FQS Fuel quality setting SAC Scavenge air cooler
FW Fresh water SAE Society of Automotive Engineers
GEA Scavenge air cooler (GEA manufacture) S/G Shaft generator
HFO Heavy fuel oil SHD Shut down
HT High temperature SIB Shipyard interface box
IMO International Maritime Organisation SIPWA-TP Sulzer integrated piston ring wear detec-
IND Indication ting arrangement with trend processing
IPDLC Integrated power-dependent liner cooling SLD Slow down
ISO International Standard Organisation SM Sea margin
kW Kilowatt SSU Saybolt second universal
kWe Kilowatt electrical SW Sea-water
kWh Kilowatt hour TBO Time between overhauls
LAH Level alarm, high TC Turbocharger
LAL Level alarm, low TI Temperature indicator
LCV Lower calorific value TPL Turbocharger (ABB manufacture)
LI Level indicator tEaT Temperature of exhaust gas after turbine
LR Light running margin UMS Unattended machinery space
LSL Level switch, low VI Viscosity index
LT Low temperature WCH Wärtsilä Switzerland
M Torque WECS Wärtsilä Engine Control System
MAPEX Monitoring and maintenance performance winGTD General Technical Data program
enhancement with expert knowledge nM Torque variation
M1H External moment 1st order horizontal
M1V External moment 1st order vertical

Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd m 25.74.07.40 – Issue X.04 – Rev. 0


Engine Selection and Project Manual RT-flex96C

Abbreviations

25.74.07.40 – Issue X.04 – Rev. 0 n Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd


RT-flex96C Engine Selection and Project Manual

A. Introduction

The Sulzer RT-flex system represents a major step forward in the technology of large diesel engines:
Common rail injection – fully suitable for heavy fuel oil operation.

The Sulzer RT-flex96C low-speed diesel engine is designed for today’s large container ships and is avail-
able with any or all of the following options:

1. Delta Tuning for reduced brake specific fuel Engine power Engine power
[kW] [bhp]
consumption (BSFC) in the part load range 100 000
below 90% load. 80 000
120 000
100 000
2. Fresh water cooling system with single-stage RT-flex96C
60 000 80 000
or two-stage scavenge air cooler. 50 000
all other RTA 60 000
3. ABB TPL or Mitsubishi MET turbochargers. 40 000 and RT-flex engines

30 000 40 000

20 000

20 000
With this manual we provide our clients with in-
formation, enabling them to select the engine and 10 000

options to meet the needs of their vessels. 8 000


10 000
6 000 8 000

6 000
4 000

4 000

2 000
50 60 70 80 90 100 120 140 160 180 200
Engine speed
F10.5301 [rpm]

Fig. A1 Power/speed range of all IMO-2000 regulation


compatible RTA and RT-flex engines

This book provides the information required for the layout of marine propulsion plants. Its con-
tent is subject to the understanding that any data and information herein have been prepared
with care and to the best of our knowledge. We do not, however, assume any liability with re-
gard to unforeseen variations in accuracy thereof or for any consequences arising therefrom.

Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd


PO Box 414
CH-8401 Winterthur, Switzerland
Telephone: +41 52 2624922
Telefax: +41 52 2124917
Direct Fax: +41 52 2620707
http://www.wartsila.com

Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd A–1 25.74.07.40 – Issue X.04 – Rev. 0


Engine Selection and Project Manual RT-flex96C

A. Introduction

A1 Primary engine data

Engine Sulzer RT-flex96C


Bore x stroke [mm] 960 x 2500
Speed [rpm] 102 102 92 92

Engine power (MCR)

Cylinder Power R1 R2 R3 R4
[kW] 34 320 24 000 30 960 24 000
6
[bhp] 46 680 32 640 42 120 32 640
[kW] 40 040 28 000 36 120 28 000
7
[bhp] 54 460 38 080 49 140 38 080
[kW] 45 760 32 000 41 280 32 000
8
[bhp] 62 240 43 520 56 160 43 520
[kW] 51 480 36 000 46 440 36 000
9
[bhp] 70 020 48 960 63 180 48 960
[kW] 57 200 40 000 51 600 40 000
10
[bhp] 77 800 54 400 70 200 54 400
[kW] 62 920 44 000 56 760 44 000
11
[bhp] 85 580 59 840 77 220 59 840
[kW] 68 640 48 000 61 920 48 000
12
[bhp] 93 360 65 280 84 240 65 280
[kW] 80 080 56 000 72 240 56 000
14
[bhp] 108 920 76 160 98 280 76 160

Brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC)


Load
[g/kWh] 171 163 171 164
100 %
[g/bhph] 126 120 126 121
mep [bar] 18.6 13.0 18.6 14.4

Lubricating oil consumption (for fully run-in engines under normal operating conditions)
System oil approximately 10 kg/cyl per day
Cylinder oil *1) 0.9 – 1.3 g/kWh

Remark: *1) This data is for guidance only, it may have to be increased as the actual
cylinder lubricating oil consumption in service is dependent on operational factors.

Table A1 Primary engine data of Sulzer RT-flex96C

All brake specific fuel consumptions (BSFC) are To determine the power and BSFC figures accu-
quoted for fuel of lower calorific value 42.7 MJ/kg rately in bhp and g/bhph respectively, the standard
(10 200 kcal/kg). All other reference conditions kW-based figures have to be converted by
refer to ISO standard (ISO 3046-1). The figures for factor 1.36.
BSFC are given with a tolerance of +5 %.

The values of power in kilowatt (kW) and fuel con-


sumption in g/kWh are the standard figures, and
discrepancies occur between these and the corre-
sponding brake horsepower (bhp) values owing to
the rounding of numbers.

25.74.07.40
25.74.07.40 – Issue
– Issue X.04X.04 – Rev.
– Rev. 0 1 A–2 Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd
RT-flex96C Engine Selection and Project Manual

A. Introduction

A2 Delta Tuning of RT-flex engines

A2.1 Introduction Due to the trade-off between BSFC and NOx


emissions, the associated increase in NOx
With the introduction of the Sulzer RT-flex engines, emissions at part load must then be compensated
a major step in the development of marine 2-stroke by a corresponding decrease in the full load NOx
engine was taken. Now Wärtsilä is taking this de- emissions. Hence, there is also a slight increase in
velopment even further by introducing Delta Tun- full load BSFC, in order to maintain compliance of
ing for RT-flex engines. the engine with the IMO NOx regulations.

Delta Tuning makes it possible to further reduce The concept is based on tailoring the firing pres-
the specific fuel oil consumption while still comply- sure and firing ratio for maximum efficiency in the
ing with all existing emission legislation. Moreover, range up to 90% load and then reducing them
this is achieved only by changing software para- again towards full load. In this process, the same
meters and without having to modify a single en- design-related limitations with respect to these two
gine part. quantities are applied as in the specification of the
standard tuning.
A2.2 Delta Tuning outline
The reliability of the engine is by no means im-
In realising Delta Tuning, the flexibility of the RT- paired by the application of Delta Tuning since
flex system in terms of free selection of injection all existing limitations to mechanical stresses
and exhaust valve control parameters, specifically and thermal load are observed.
variable injection timing (VIT) and variable exhaust
closing (VEC) is utilised for reducing the brake spe-
cific fuel consumption (BSFC) in the part load
range below 90% load.

3 RTA, Standard Tuning

2 RT-flex, Standard Tuning


RT-flex, Delta Tuning
1
Reduction of BSFC [g/kWh]

0 BSFC at R1 [g/kWh]

–1

–2

–3

–4

–5

–6

–7

–8
ISO conditions, tolerance +5%
–9
50% 75% Load 100%
Fig. A2 Comparison of Delta Tuning and Standard Tuning

Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd A–3 25.74.07.40 – Issue X.04 – Rev. 0


Engine Selection and Project Manual RT-flex96C

A. Introduction

A2.3 Further aspects of Delta Tuning

Delta Tuning for de-rated engines: Project specification for RT-flex engines:
For various reasons, the margin against the IMO Although Delta tuning is realised in such a way that
NOx limit decreases for de-rated engines. Delta it could almost be considered a pushbutton option,
Tuning thus holds the highest benefits for engines its selection has an effect on other aspects of en-
rated close to R1. With the de-rating, the effect gine and system design as well.
diminishes and, in fact, Delta Tuning is not appli- This is why the tuning option to be applied to RT-
cable in the entire field (see figure A3). flex engines needs to be specified at a very early
stage in the project:
Engine power
[% R1] R1
– The calculations of the torsional and axial
100 vibrations of the installation have to be per-
RT-flex96C engines
formed using the correct data.
95

R3 – The layout of the ancillary systems has to be


90 based on the correct specifications.
85 Delta Tuning area – In order to prepare the software for the RT-flex
system control, the parameters also have to be
80 known in due time before commissioning of
the engine.
75

70
R4 R2

Engine speed
65 [% R1]
70 75 80 85 90 95 100
Fig. A3 Delta Tuning area

Effect on engine dynamics:


The application of Delta Tuning has an influence
on the harmonic gas excitations and, as a conse-
quence, the torsional and axial vibrations of the in-
stallation. Hence, the corresponding calculations
have to be carried out with the correct data in order
to be able to apply appropriate countermeasures,
if necessary.

25.74.07.40 – Issue X.04 – Rev. 0 A–4 Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd


RT-flex96C Engine Selection and Project Manual

F. Auxiliary power generation

F1 General information

F1.1 Introduction

This chapter covers a number of auxiliary power The waste heat option is a practical proposition for
arrangements for consideration. However, if your high powered engines employed on long voyages.
requirements are not fulfilled, please contact our The electrical power required when loading and
representative or consult Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd, discharging cannot be met with a main-engine
Winterthur, directly. Our aim is to provide flexibility driven generator or with the waste heat recovery
in power management, reduce overall fuel con- system, and for vessels employed on compara-
sumption and maintain uni-fuel operation. tively short voyages the waste heat system is not
viable. Stand-by diesel generator sets (Wärtsilä
The sea load demand for refrigeration com- GenSets), burning heavy fuel oil or marine diesel
pressors, engine and deck ancillaries, machinery oil, available for use in port, when manoeuvring or
space auxiliaries and hotel load can be met by at anchor, provide the flexibility required when the
using a main-engine driven generator, by a steam- main engine power cannot be utilised.
turbine driven generator utilising waste heat from
the engine exhaust gas, or simply by auxiliary gen-
erator sets.

Ship service steam


Exhaust gas
econimiser

Steam turbine

Ship service power

Power turbine
G Aux. engine

G Aux. engine

M/G Main engine G Aux. engine

G Aux. engine

F10.5321

Fig. F1 Heat recovery, typical system layout

Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd F–1 25.74.07.40 – Issue X.04 – Rev. 0


Engine Selection and Project Manual RT-flex96C

F. Auxiliary power generation

F1.2 System description and layout F3.2 PTO power and speed

Although initial installation costs for a heat recov- PTO tunnel gear with generator
ery plant are relatively high, these are recovered
Generator speed
by fuel savings if maximum use is made of the 1000, 1200, 1500, 1800
[rpm]
steam output, i.e., electrical power and domestics, 700
space heating, heating of tank, fuel and water. 1200
Power [kWe]
1800
F2 Waste heat recovery *1)
Remark: *1) Higher powers on request
Before any decision can be made about installing
Table F1 PTO power and speed
a waste heat recovery system (see figure F1) the
steam and electrical power available from the ex-
haust gas is to be established. Another alternative is a shaft generator.

For more information see chapter J ‘winGTD – the


General Technical Data’.

F3 Power take off (PTO)

Main-engine driven generators are an attractive


option when consideration is given to simplicity of
operation and low maintenance costs. The gener-
ator is driven through a tunnel PTO gear with fre-
quency control provided by thyristor invertors or
constant-speed gears.

The tunnel gear is mounted at the intermediate


propeller shaft. Positioning the PTO gear in that
area of the ship depends upon the amount of
space available.

F3.1 Arrangements of PTO

Figure F2 illustrates various arrangements for


PTO with generator. If your particular requirements
are not covered, please do not hesitate to contact
our representative or Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd,
Winterthur, directly.

T1 T2 T3

T T

T1–T3 Tunnel gear Controllable-pitch propeller


T Thyristor bridge
Generator
F10.5231

Fig. F2 Tunnel PTO gear

25.74.07.40 – Issue X.04 – Rev. 0 F–2 Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd


RT-flex96C Engine Selection and Project Manual

J. winGTD – General Technical Data

J1 Included CD-ROM

Plesae note:
CD-ROM is at the present not available. Please
ask WCH.

J1.1 Installation of winGTD and EnSel

J1.1.1 System requirements

winGTD and EnSel requires the following mini-


mum software and hardware:

– Microsoft Windows 9x/NT Fig. J1 winGTD: Selection of engine window


– 16 MB of RAM
– 20 MB free hard disk space The installed CD-ROM contains only the engine
– CD-ROM drive types presented in this ESPM.
Double-click on selected engine type or click the
J1.1.2 Installation ‘Select’ button to access the main window (fig. J2)
and select the particular engine according to the
Use the following procedure to install winGTD or number of cylinders (eg. Sulzer 8RT-flex96C).
EnSel:
J1.2.2 Data input
1. Insert CD-ROM.
2. Follow the on-screen instructions. When the In the main window (fig. J2) enter the desired
installation is complete, a message confirms power and speed to specify the engine rating. The
that the installation was successful. rating point must be within the rating field. The
shaft power can either be expressed in units of kW
J1.1.3 Changes to previous versions of or bhp.
winGTD

The amendments and how this version differs from


previous versions are explained in the file
‘Readme.txt’ located in the winGTD directory on
the CD-ROM.

J1.2 Using winGTD

J1.2.1 Start

After starting winGTD by double-clicking winGTD


icon, click on ‘Start new Project’ button on ‘Wel-
come’ screen and specify desired engine type in
Fig. J2 winGTD: Main window
appearing window (fig. J1):

Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd J–1 25.74.07.40 – Issue X.04 – Rev. 0


Engine Selection and Project Manual RT-flex96C

J. winGTD – General Technical Data

Further input parameters can be entered in sub-


panels to be accessed by clicking on tabs ‘Engine
Spec.’ (eg. for turbocharger selection), ‘Cooling’,
‘Lub. Oil’, ‘Fuel Oil’, ‘Starting Air’ or ‘Exhaust Gas’
relating to the relevant ancillary systems.

J1.2.3 Output results

Clicking the ‘Start Calculation’ button (fig. J2) initi-


ates the calculation with the chosen data to deter-
mine the temperatures, flows of lubricating oil and
cooling water quantities.
Firstly the ‘Engine performance data’ window (fig.
J3) is displayed on the screen. Fig. J4 winGTD: Two-stroke engine propulsion

To see further results, click the appropriate button


in the tool bar or click the ‘Show results’ menu op- The calculation is carried out with all the relevant
tion in the menu bar. design parameters (pump sizes etc.) of the ancil-
laries set at design conditions.
To print the results click the button or click the
button for export to a ASCII file, both in the tool J1.2.5 Saving a project
bar.
To save all data belonging to your project choose
‘Save as...’ from the ‘File’ menu. A windows ’Save
as...’ dialogue box appears.

Type a project name (winGTD proposes a three-


character suffix based on the program you have
selected) and choose a directory location for the
project.
Once you have specified a project name and se-
lected the desired drive and directory, click the
‘Save’ button to save your project data.

Fig. J3 winGTD: General technical data J1.3 EnSel program

J1.2.4 Service conditions EnSel helps in selecting the most suitable diesel
engine for a given project. EnSel presents a list of
Click the button ‘Service Conditions’ in the main all SULZER diesel engines which fulfil your power
window (fig. J2) to access the option window (fig. and speed demands and provides for each ar-
J4) and enter any ambient condition data deviating rangement selected the engine performance data
from design conditions. (BSFC, BSEF and tEaT), engine dimensions and
masses.

25.74.07.40 – Issue X.04 – Rev. 0 J–2 Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd


RT-flex96C Engine Selection and Project Manual

B. Considerations on engine selection

B1 Introduction
Selecting a suitable main engine to meet the power Engine power
demands of a given project involves proper tuning % [R1]
R1
in respect of load range and influence of operating 100
conditions which are likely to prevail throughout
the entire life of the ship. This chapter explains the
main principles in selecting a Sulzer RT-flex low-
speed diesel engine. Rx1
Rx2 Rating line
R3 fulfilling a ship’s
90 power requirement
Every engine has a layout field within which the for a constant speed
combination of power and speed (= rating) can be Nominal propeller
selected. Contrary to the ‘layout field’, the ‘load characteristic
2 1
range’ is the admissible area of operation once the
CMCR has been determined.

80
In order to define the required contract maximum
continuous rating (CMCR), various parameters
need to be considered such as propulsive power,
propeller efficiency, operational flexibility, power
and speed margins, possibility of a main-engine
driven generator, and the ship’s trading patterns.

Selecting the most suitable engine is vital to 70 R2


R4 Engine speed
achieving an efficient cost/benefit response to a % [R1]
specific transport requirement. 85 90 95 100
The contract maximum continuous rating (Rx)
may be freely positioned within the layout field
B2 Layout field for that engine.
F10.4995

The layout field shown in figure B1 is the area of


Fig. B1 Layout field of the Sulzer RT-flex96C engine.
power and engine speed. In this area the contract
maximum continuous rating of an engine can be
The engine speed is given on the horizontal axis
positioned individually to give the desired com-
and the engine power on the vertical axis of the lay-
bination of propulsive power and rotational speed.
out field. Both are expressed as a percentage (%)
Engines within this layout field will be tuned for
of the respective engine’s nominal R1 parameters.
maximum firing pressure and best efficiency.
Experience over the last years has shown that
engines are ordered with CMCR-points in the
upper part of the layout field only.

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Engine Selection and Project Manual RT-flex96C

B. Considerations on engine selection

Percentage values are being used so that the Rating points Rx can be selected within the entire
same diagram can be applied to various engine layout field to meet the requirements of each par-
models. The scales are logarithmic so that expo- ticular project. Such rating points require specific
nential curves, such as propeller characteristics engine adaptations.
(cubic power) and mean effective pressure (mep)
curves (first power), are straight lines. B2.2 Influence of propeller revolutions
on the power requirement
The layout field serves to determine the specific
fuel oil consumption, exhaust gas flow and tem- At constant ship speed and for a given propeller
perature, fuel injection parameters, turbocharger type, lower propeller revolutions combined with a
and scavenge air cooler specifications for a given larger propeller diameter increase the total propul-
engine. sive efficiency. Less power is needed to propel the
vessel at a given speed.
Calculations for specific fuel consumption, ex-
haust gas flow and temperature after turbine are The relative change of required power in function
explained in further chapters. of the propeller revolutions can be approximated
by the following relation:
B2.1 Rating points R1, R2, R3 and R4
a
Px 2ńPx 1 + ǒN 2ńN 1Ǔ
The rating points (R1, R2, R3 and R4) for the
Sulzer RT-flex engines are the corner points of the Pxj = Propulsive power at propeller revolution Nj.
engine layout field (figure B1). Nj = Propeller speed corresponding with propulsive
power Pxj.
The point R1 represents the nominal maximum α = 0.15 for tankers and general cargo ships up to
10 000 dwt.
continuous rating (MCR). It is the maximum
= 0.20 for tankers, bulkcarriers from 10 000 dwt to
power/speed combination which is available for a 30 000 dwt.
particular engine. = 0.25 for tankers, bulkcarriers larger than 30 000 dwt.
= 0.17 for reefers and container ships up to 3000 TEU.
The point R2 defines 100 per cent speed, and 70 = 0.22 for container ships larger than 3000 TEU.
percent power of R1.
This relation is used in the engine selection pro-
The point R3 defines 90 per cent speed and 90 per- cedure to compare different engine alternatives
cent power of R1. and to select optimum propeller revolutions within
the selected engine layout field.
The connection R1–R3 is the nominal 100 per cent
line of constant mean effective pressure of R1. Usually, the selected propeller revolution depends
on the maximum permissible propeller diameter.
The point R4 defines 90 per cent speed and 70 per The maximum propeller diameter is often deter-
cent power of R1. mined by operational requirements such as:
• Design draught and ballast draught limitations.
The connection line R2–R4 is the line of 70 per • Class recommendations concerning pro-
cent power between 90 and 100 per cent speed peller/hull clearance (pressure impulse in-
of R1. duced by the propeller on the hull).

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RT-flex96C Engine Selection and Project Manual

B. Considerations on engine selection

The selection of main engine in combination with The relation between absorbed power and rota-
the optimum propeller (efficiency) is an iterative tional speed for a fixed-pitch propeller can be
procedure where also commercial considerations approximated by the following cubic relation:
(engine and propeller prices) play a great role. 3
P 2ńP 1 + ǒN 2ńN 1Ǔ
According to the above approximation, when a re- in which
quired power/speed combination is known – for Pi = propeller power
example point Rx1 as shown in figure B1 – a Ni = propeller speed
CMCR-line can be drawn which fulfils the ship’s
power requirement for a constant speed. The The propeller curve without sea margin is often
slope of this line depends on the ship’s characteris- called the ‘light running curve’. The nominal pro-
tics (coefficient α). Any other point on this line peller characteristic is a cubic curve through the
represents a new power/speed combination, for CMCR-point. (For additional information, refer to
example Rx2, and requires a specific propeller section B3.4 ‘light running margin’.)
adaptation.
B3.2 Sea trial power
B3 Load range
The sea trial power must be specified. Figure B2
The load range diagram shown in figure B2 defines shows the sea trial power to be the power required
the power/speed limits for the operation of the en- for point ‘B’ on the propeller curve. Often and alter-
gine. Percentage values are given as explained in natively the power required for point ‘A’ on the pro-
section B2, in practice absolute figures might be peller curve is referred to as ‘sea trial power’.
used for a specific installation project.
Engine power
[%Rx]
B3.1 Propeller curves 110

CMCR (Rx)
100
In order to establish the proper location of propeller 95 10% EM/OM
D
curves, it is necessary to know the ship’s speed to 90 Sea trial power
B
power response.
15% SM
80
78.3
The propeller curve without sea margin is for a ship A

with a new and clean hull in calm water and 70


Engine load range
weather, often referred to as ‘trial condition’.
60
The propeller curves can be determined by using
full scale trial results of similar ships, algorithms
developed by maritime research institutes or 50
model tank results. Furthermore, it is necessary to
3.5% LR

define the maximum reasonable diameter of the propeller curve


without SM
propeller which can be fitted to the ship. With this Engine speed
40 [%Rx]
information and by applying propeller series such 65 70 80 90 95 100 104

as the ‘Wageningen’, ‘SSPA’ (Swedish Maritime EM engine margin SM sea margin


OM operational margin LR light running margin
Research Association), ‘MAU’ (Modified AU), etc., F10.5248
the power/speed relationships can be established
Fig. B2 Load range limits of an engine corresponding to a
and characteristics developed. specific rating point Rx

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B. Considerations on engine selection

B3.3 Sea margin (SM) Engine power


[%Rx] CMCR (Rx)

The increase in power to maintain a given ship’s 100


speed achieved in calm weather (point ‘A’ in fig- 10%
EM/OM
ure B2) and under average service condition (point D
90
‘D’), is defined as the ‘sea margin’. This margin can B
vary depending on owner’s and charterer’s
expectations, routes, season and schedules of the 15% SM

ship. The location of the reference point ‘A’ and the 5% LR

magnitude of the sea margin are determined 78.3


A
between the shipbuilder and the owner. They form
part of the newbuilding contract.

With the help of effective antifouling paints, dry- a

docking intervals have been prolonged up to 4 or


5 years. Therefore, it is still realistic to provide an propeller curve
without SM
average sea margin of about 15 per cent of the sea
trial power, refer to figure B2, unless as mentioned
Engine speed
above, the actual ship type and service route dic- [%Rx]
100
tate otherwise.
EM engine margin SM sea margin
F10.3148 OM operational margin LR light running margin

B3.4 Light running margin (LR) Fig. B3 Load diagram for a specific engine showing the
corresponding power and speed margins
The sea trial performance (curve ‘a’) in figure B3
should allow for a 3 to 7 per cent light running of the Assuming, for example, the following:
propeller when compared to the nominal propeller • Drydocking intervals of the ship 5 years.
characteristic (the example in figure B3 shows a • Time between overhauls of the engine 2 years
light running margin of 5 per cent). This margin pro- or more.
vides a sufficient torque reserve whenever full • Full service speed must be attainable, without
power must be attained under unfavourable condi- surpassing the torque limit, under less favour-
tions. Normally, the propeller is hydrodynamically able conditions and without exceeding 100 per
optimized for a point ‘B’. The trial speed found for cent mep.
‘A’ is equal to the service speed at ‘D’ stipulated in
the contract at 90 per cent of CMCR. Therefore the ‘light running margin’ required will be
5 to 6 per cent. This is the sum of the following fac-
The recommended light running margin originates tors:
from past experience. It varies with specific ship
designs, speeds, drydocking intervals, and trade 1. 1.5–2% influence of wind and weather with
routes. an adverse effect on the intake water flow of
the propeller. Difference between Beaufort 2
Please note: it is the shipbuilder’s responsibility to sea trial condition and Beaufort 4–5 average
determine the light running margin large enough service condition. For vessels with a pro-
so that, at all service conditions, the load range nounced wind sensitivity, i.e. containerships or
limits on the left side of nominal propeller char- car carriers this value will be exceeded.
acteristic line are not reached (see section B3.6
and figure B4).

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RT-flex96C Engine Selection and Project Manual

B. Considerations on engine selection

2. 1.5–2% increase of ship’s resistance and ‘D’ or ‘Di’ (in our example 5 per cent) and then
mean effective wake brought about by: along the nominal propeller characteristic to obtain
• Rippling of hull (frame to frame). the CMCR-point. In the examples, the engine
• Fouling of local, damaged areas, i.e. boot power at point ‘B’ was chosen to be at 90 per cent
top and bottom of the hull. and 85 per cent respectively.
• Formation of roughness under paint.
• Influence on wake formation due to small B3.5.1 Continuous service rating
changes in trim and immersion of bulbous (CSR=NOR=NCR)
bow, particularly in the ballast condition.
Point ‘A’ represents power and speed of a ship
3. 1% frictional losses due to increase of pro- operating at contractual speed in calm seas with a
peller blade roughness and consequent drop new clean hull and propeller. On the other hand,
in efficiency, e.g. aluminium bronze propellers: the same ship at the same speed requires a
• New: surface roughness = 12 microns. power/speed combination according to point ‘D’,
• Aged: rough surface but no fouling shown in figure B2 and B3, under service condition
= 40 microns. with aged hull and average weather. ‘D’ is then the
CSR-point.
4. 1% deterioration in engine efficiency such
as: B3.5.2 Contract maximum continuous
• Fouling of scavenge air coolers. rating (CMCR = Rx)
• Fouling of turbochargers.
• Condition of piston rings. By dividing, in our example, the CSR (point D) by
• Fuel injection system (condition and/or 0.90, the 100 per cent power level is obtained and
timing). an operational margin of 10 per cent is provided
• Increase of back pressure due to fouling of (see figures B2 and B3). The found point Rx, also
the exhaust gas boiler, etc. designated as CMCR, can be selected freely with-
in the layout field defined by the four corner points
B3.5 Engine margin (EM) or operational R1, R2, R3 and R4 (see figure B1).
margin (OM)
B3.6 Load range limits
Most owners specify the contractual ship’s loaded
service speed at 85 to 90 per cent of the contract Once an engine is optimized at CMCR (Rx), the
maximum continuous rating. The remaining 10 to working range of the engine is limited by the follow-
15 per cent power can then be utilized to catch up ing border lines, refer to figure B4:
with delays in schedule or for the timing of drydock-
ing intervals. This margin is usually deducted from Line 1 is a constant mep or torque line through
the CMCR. Therefore, the 100 per cent power line CMCR from 100 per cent speed and
is found by dividing the power at point ‘D’ by 0.85 power down to 95 per cent power and
to 0.90. The graphic approach to find the level of speed.
CMCR is illustrated in figures B2 and B3.

In the examples two current methods are shown.


Figure B2 presents the method of fixing point ‘B’
and CMCR at 100 per cent speed thus obtaining
automatically a light running margin B–D of 3.5 per
cent. Figures B3 and B5 show the method of plot-
ting the light running margin from point ‘B’ to point

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Engine Selection and Project Manual RT-flex96C

B. Considerations on engine selection

Line 2 is the overload limit. It is a constant mep Line 6 is defined by the equation:
line reaching from 100 per cent power and 2.45
P 2ńP 1 + ǒN 2ńN 1Ǔ
93.8 per cent speed to 110 per cent power
and 103.2 per cent speed. The latter one through 100 per cent power and 93.8 per
is the point of intersection between the cent speed and is the maximum torque
nominal propeller characteristic and 110 limit in transient conditions.
per cent power. The area above line 1 is the overload
Line 3 is the 104 per cent speed limit where an range. It is only allowed to operate en-
engine can run continuously. For Rx with gines in that range for a maximum dur-
reduced speed (NCMCR ≤ 0.98 NMCR) this ation of one hour during sea trials in the
limit can be extended to 106 per cent, how- presence of authorized representatives of
ever, the specified torsional vibration limits the engine builder.
must not be exceeded. The area between lines 5 and 6 and
constant torque line (grey area of fig. B4)
Line 4 is the overspeed limit. The overspeed should only be used for transient condi-
range between 104 (106) and 108 per cent tions, i.e. during fast acceleration. This
speed is only permissible during sea trials range is called ‘service range with oper-
if needed to demonstrate the ship’s speed ational time limit’.
at CMCR power with a light running pro-
peller in the presence of authorized repre- Engine power
[%Rx]
sentatives of the engine builder. However, CMCR (Rx)
110
the specified torsional vibration limits must 2
Engine load range
not be exceeded. 100
1
95 10%
Line 5 represents the admissible torque limit and EM/OM
90
D B
reaches from 95 per cent power and Constant torque
15% SM
speed to 45 per cent power and 70 per 80
78.3
cent speed. This represents a curve de- A
4
fined by the equation: 70

2.45
P 2ńP 1 + ǒN 2ńN 1Ǔ 3
60
6
When approaching line 5 , the engine will
increasingly suffer from lack of scavenge
air and its consequences. The area 50 5

formed by lines 1 , 3 and 5 represents


103.2
93.8

the range within which the engine should propeller curve


without SM
Engine speed
be operated. The area limited by the nom- 40 [%Rx]
65 70 80 90 95 100 104 108
inal propeller characteristic, 100 per cent
EM engine margin SM sea margin
power and line 3 is recommended for OM operational margin LR light running margin
F10.5249
continuous operation. The area between
the nominal propeller characteristic and Fig. B4 Load range limits, with the load diagram of an en-
gine corresponding to a specific rating point Rx
line 5 has to be reserved for acceler-
ation, shallow water and normal oper-
ational flexibility.

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RT-flex96C Engine Selection and Project Manual

B. Considerations on engine selection

B3.7 Load range with main-engine


driven generator

The load range diagram with main-engine driven


generator, whether it is a shaft generator (S/G)
mounted on the intermediate shaft or driven
through a power take off gear (PTO), is shown by
curve ‘c’ in figure B5. This curve is not parallel to
the propeller characteristic without main-engine
driven generator due to the addition of a constant
generator power over most of the engine load. In
the example of figure B5, the main-engine driven
generator is assumed to absorb 5 per cent of the
nominal engine power.

The CMCR-point is, of course, selected by taking


into account the max. power of the generator.
Engine power CMCR (Rx)
[%Rx]

100
10%
EM/OM
D
90
c 5% S/G
85
D’ B

15% SM

5% LR
73.9
A

PTO power

propeller curve
without SM
Engine speed
[%Rx]
100
EM engine margin SM sea margin
OM operational margin LR light running margin
F10.3149 S/G shaft generator

Fig. B5 Load range diagram for an engine equipped with


a main-engine driven generator, whether it is a
shaft generator or a PTO-driven generator

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Engine Selection and Project Manual RT-flex96C

B. Considerations on engine selection

B4 Ambient temperature consideration

B4.1 Engine air inlet: operating tem- B4.2 Engine air inlet: arctic conditions
peratures from 45°C to 5°C at operating temp. below 5°C

Due to the high compression ratio, the Sulzer RT- Under arctic conditions the ambient air tempera-
flex diesel engines do not require any special tures can meet levels below –50°C. If the combus-
measures, such as pre-heating the air at low tem- tion air is drawn directly from outside, these
peratures, even when operating on heavy fuel oil engines may operate over a wide range of ambient
at part load or idling. The only condition which must air temperatures between arctic condition and
be fulfilled is that the water inlet temperature to the tropical (design) condition (45°C).
scavenge air cooler must not be lower than 25°C.
To avoid the need of a more expensive combustion
This means that: air preheater, a system has been developed that
enables the engine to operate directly with cold air
• When combustion air is drawn directly from the from outside.
engine room, no pre-heating of the combus-
tion air is necessary. If the air inlet temperature drops below 5°C, the air
• When the combustion air is ducted from out- density increases to such an extent that the maxi-
side the engine room and the air temperature mum permissible cylinder pressure is exceeded.
before the turbocharger does not fall below This can be compensated by blowing off a certain
5°C, no measures have to be taken. mass of the scavenge air through a blow-off device
as shown in figure B6.
The central fresh water cooling system permits the
Engine
recovery of the engine’s dissipated heat and main-
tains the required scavenge air temperature after Turbocharger
Air intake casing
the scavenge air cooler by re-circulating part of the
Scavenge
warm water to the scavenge air cooler. air cooler Blow-off
valves
Air filter

The scavenge air cooling water inlet temperature


is to be maintained at a minimum of 25°C. This F10.1964

means that the scavenge air cooling water will Fig. B6 Scavenge air system for arctic conditions
have to be pre-heated in the case of low power
operation. The required heat is obtained from the
lubricating oil cooler and the engine cylinder
cooling.

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RT-flex96C Engine Selection and Project Manual

B. Considerations on engine selection

There are up to three blow-off valves fitted on the


scavenge air receiver. In case the air inlet tempera-
ture to the turbocharger is below 5°C the first blow-
off valve vents. For each actuated blow-off valve,
a higher suction air temperature is simulated by re-
ducing the scavenge air pressure which compen-
sates the high air density. The second blow-off
valve automatically vents as required to maintain
the desired scavenge and firing pressures. Figure
B7 shows the effect of the blow-off valves to the air
flow, the exhaust gas temperature after turbine and
the firing pressure.

Two blow-off One blow-off Blow-off valves closed


valves open valve open normal operation
nm [kg/kwh]
0.6
0.4
0.2
0
Specific air consumption
nt [°C] Exhaust gas temp.
0
–20
–40
–60
np [bar]
10 Firing pressure
5
0

–50 –40 –30 –20 –10 0 10 20 30 40 [°C]


Suction air temperature
F10.1965

Fig. B7 Blow-off effect at arctic conditions

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B. Considerations on engine selection

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RT-flex96C Engine Selection and Project Manual

G. Ancillary systems

G2 Piping systems

G2.1 Cooling and pre-heating water systems

G2.1.1 Central fresh water cooling


system

The cooling system of the RT-flex96C engine runs The cylinder cooling water outlet from the engine
on either one of the following standard layout: is thermostatically controlled by an automatic
valve (012). A static pressure head is provided,
– Central fresh water cooling system with single-
thermal expansion allowed and water losses made
stage scavenge air cooler and integrated HT
up by the expansion tank (021, 022), to be installed
circuit (see figure G4) or separate HT circuit
as high as possible above the pump suction (014)
(see figure G5).
to prevent ingress of air into the cooling system
– Central fresh water cooling system with two- through the pump gland. The fresh water gener-
stage scavenge air cooler for heat recovery ator (020) is not to require more than 50 per cent
and integrated HT circuit (see fig. G6). of the heat dissipated from the cylinder cooling
water at CMCR and is to be used at engine loads
The scavenge air cooler consists of two cooler el- above 40 per cent only. In case more heat is re-
ements which either are connected in series as quired (up to 85%), an additional temperature con-
single-stage cooler or parallel as two-stage cooler, trol system is to be installed ensuring adequate
see illustration in fig D7. The cooler elements as control of the cylinder cooling water outlet tem-
well as the housing are similar for both cooling perature (information can be obtained from WCH).
systems.
Correct treatment of the fresh water is essential for
The central fresh water cooling system showed in safe engine operation. Only totally demineralized
figures G4 to G6 reduces the amount of sea-water water or condensate must be used as water and it
pipework and its attendant problems. This pro- must be treated with a suitable corrosion inhibitor
vides for improved cooling control. Optimizing cen- to prevent corrosive attack, sludge formation and
tral cooling results in lower overall running costs scale deposits in the system. No internally galvan-
when compared with the conventional sea-water ized steel pipes should be used in connection with
cooling system. treated fresh water, since most corrosion inhibitors
have a nitrite base. Nitrites attack the zinc lining of
The cooling medium for the cylinder water cooler galvanized piping and create sludge.
is fresh water as well as for the central cooling
system.

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Engine Selection and Project Manual RT-flex96C

G. Ancillary systems

Seawater pipes Remarks:


LT freshwater pipes *4) Only when pos. 015 is installed.
HT freshwater pipes *6) Depending on vibration, a flexible hose connection may be
Balance pipes recommendable.
Ancillary equipment pipes Air vent pipes and drain valves where necessary.
Drain / overflow pipes Air vent and drain pipes must be fully functional at all inclination
Air vent pipes angles of the ship at which the engine must be operational.
Control / feedback
Pipes on engine / pipe connections Note:
For legend see table G7
347.521

Fig. G4 Central fresh water cooling system with single-stage scavenge air cooler and integrated HT circuit

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RT-flex96C Engine Selection and Project Manual

G. Ancillary systems

001 Main engine RTflex96C


002 Low sea chest *1)
003 High sea chest
004 Seawater strainer
005 Air vent (air vent pipe or equal venting system acc. to shipyard's design)
006 Seawater circulating pump
007 Central seawater cooler
008 Automatic temperature control valve for LT circuit
009 Temperature sensor of regulating system, min. temp. of SAC inlet: 25 °C
010 Freshwater pump for LT circuit
011 Lubricating oil cooler
012 Automatic temperature control valve for HT circuit
013 Temperature sensor of regulating system, constant temp. at engine outlet
014 Cylinder cooling water pump for HT circuit
015 Preheating circulating pump (optional), capacity 10% from pump 014 *7)
016 Heater for main engine (HT circuit)
017 Air vent pipe (piping on engine, at free end or at driving end)
018 Throttling disc (adjustable on engine, at free end or at driving end)
019 Throttling disc *2)
020 Freshwater generator Remarks:
021 Cooling water expansion tank for LT circuit
022 Cooling water expansion tank for HT circuit *1) If requested, two low sea chests are applicable.
023 Filling pipe / inlet chemical treatment *3) *2) When using a valve, lock in proper position to avoid mis
025 Scavenge air cooler handling.
1 Cylinder cooling water inlet (at free end or at driving end) *3) Other designs like hinged covers, etc. are also possible.
2 Cylinder cooling water outlet (at free end or at driving end) *5) The inlet and outlet pipes to SAC have to be designed to
allow for engine thermal expansion, or expansion parts
5 Scavenge air cooler, cooling water inlet *5)
have to be fitted.
7 Scavenge air cooler, cooling water outlet and air vent *5)
*7) For guidance only, final layout according to actual engine
16 Cylinder cooling water air vent (at free end or at driving end) preheating requirements.
347.521

Table G7 Central fresh water cooling system with single-stage scavenge air cooler and integrated HT circuit

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Engine Selection and Project Manual RT-flex96C

G. Ancillary systems

Seawater pipes Remarks:


LT freshwater pipes *4) Only when pos. 015 is installed.
HT freshwater pipes *6) Depending on vibration, a flexible hose connection may be
Balance pipes recommendable.
Ancillary equipment pipes Air vent pipes and drain valves where necessary.
Drain / overflow pipes Air vent and drain pipes must be fully functional at all inclination
Air vent pipes angles of the ship at which the engine must be operational.
Control / feedback
Pipes on engine / pipe connections Note:
For legend see table G8
333.620c

Fig. G5 Central fresh water cooling system with single-stage scavenge air cooler and separate HT circuit

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RT-flex96C Engine Selection and Project Manual

G. Ancillary systems

001 Main engine RTflex96C


002 Low sea chest *1)
003 High sea chest
004 Seawater strainer
005 Air vent (air vent pipe or equal venting system acc. to shipyard's design)
006 Seawater circulating pump
007 Central seawater cooler
008 Automatic temperature control valve for LT circuit
009 Temperature sensor of regulating system, min. temp. of SAC inlet: 25 °C
010 Freshwater pump for LT circuit
011 Lubricating oil cooler
012 Automatic temperature control valve for HT circuit
013 Temperature sensor of regulating system, constant temp. at engine outlet
014 Cylinder cooling water pump for HT circuit
015 Preheating circulating pump (optional), capacity 10% from pump 014 *7)
016 Heater for main engine (HT circuit)
017 Air vent pipe (piping on engine, at free end or at driving end)
018 Throttling disc (adjustable on engine, at free end or at driving end)
019 Throttling disc *2)
020 Freshwater generator
021 Cooling water expansion tank for LT circuit Remarks:
022 Cooling water expansion tank for HT circuit
*1) If requested, two low sea chests are applicable.
023 Filling pipe / inlet chemical treatment *3)
025 Scavenge air cooler *2) When using a valve, lock in proper position to avoid mis
026 Cylinder cooling water cooler handling.
1 Cylinder cooling water inlet (at free end or at driving end) *3) Other designs like hinged covers, etc. are also possible.
2 Cylinder cooling water outlet (at free end or at driving end) *5) The inlet and outlet pipes to SAC have to be designed to
allow for engine thermal expansion, or expansion parts
5 Scavenge air cooler, cooling water inlet *5)
have to be fitted.
7 Scavenge air cooler, cooling water outlet and air vent *5)
*7) For guidance only, final layout according to actual engine
16 Cylinder cooling water air vent (at free end or at driving end) preheating requirements.
333.620c

Table G8 Central fresh water cooling system with single-stage scavenge air cooler and separate HT circuit

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Engine Selection and Project Manual RT-flex96C

G. Ancillary systems

Seawater pipes Remarks:


LT freshwater pipes *4) Only when pos. 015 is installed.
HT freshwater pipes *6) Depending on vibration, a flexible hose connection may be
Balance pipes recommendable.
Ancillary equipment pipes Air vent pipes and drain valves where necessary.
Drain / overflow pipes Air vent and drain pipes must be fully functional at all inclination
Air vent pipes angles of the ship at which the engine must be operational.
Control / feedback
Pipes on engine / pipe connections Note:
For legend see table G9
333.600

Fig. G6 Central fresh water cooling system with two-stage scavenge air cooler and integrated HT circuit

25.74.07.40 – Issue X.04 – Rev. 0 G–14 Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd


RT-flex96C Engine Selection and Project Manual

G. Ancillary systems

001 Main engine RTflex96C


002 Low sea chest *1)
003 High sea chest
004 Seawater strainer
005 Air vent (air vent pipe or equal venting system acc. to shipyard's design)
006 Seawater circulating pump
007 Central seawater cooler
008 Automatic temperature control valve for LT circuit
009 Temperature sensor of regulating system, min. temp. of SAC inlet: 25 °C
010 Freshwater pump for LT circuit
011 Lubricating oil cooler
012 Automatic temperature control valve for HT circuit
013 Temperature sensor of regulating system, constant temp. at engine outlet
014 Cylinder cooling water pump for HT circuit
015 Preheating circulating pump (optional), capacity 5% from pump 014 *7)
016 Heater for main engine (HT circuit)
017 Air vent pipe (piping on engine, at free end or at driving end)
018 Throttling disc (adjustable on engine, at free end or at driving end)
019 Throttling disc *2)
020 Freshwater generator
021 Cooling water expansion tank for LT circuit
022 Cooling water expansion tank for HT circuit
023 Filling pipe / inlet chemical treatment *3)
024 Scavenge air cooler, LT Remarks:
025 Scavenge air cooler, HT *1) If requested, two low sea chests are applicable.
1 Cylinder cooling water inlet (at free end or at driving end) *2) When using a valve, lock in proper position to avoid mis
2 Cylinder cooling water outlet (at free end or at driving end) handling.
3 Scavenge air cooler, cooling water inlet. HT *5) *3) Other designs like hinged covers, etc. are also possible.
4 Scavenge air cooler, cooling water outlet and air vent, HT *5) *5) The inlet and outlet pipes to SAC have to be designed to
5 Scavenge air cooler, cooling water inlet, LT *5) allow for engine thermal expansion, or expansion parts
have to be fitted.
7 Scavenge air cooler, cooling water outlet and air vent, LT *5)
*7) For guidance only, final layout according to actual engine
16 Cylinder cooling water air vent (at free end or at driving end) preheating requirements.
333.600

Table G9 Central fresh water cooling system with two-stage scavenge air cooler and integrated HT circuit

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Engine Selection and Project Manual RT-flex96C

G. Ancillary systems

G2.1.2 Pre-heating system

To prevent corrosive liner wear when not in service Example for 8RT-flex96C
during short stays in port, it is important that the – Estimated heating-up time: 6 h.
main engine is kept warm. Warming-through can – Engine ambient temperature: 40 °C.
be provided by a dedicated heater (016) as shown – Required engine temperature: 60 °C.
in figures G4 to G6 ‘Central fresh water cooling From the graph in figure G7:
system’, using boiler raised steam, hot water from • the approximate amount of heat per cylin-
the diesel auxiliaries, or by direct circulation from der is 26 kW.
the diesel auxiliaries. If the requirement is for a • heater capacity required is
separate pre-heating pump, an additional non-re- 8  26 kW = 208 kW.
turn valve between the main pumps and the heater
is to be installed. The appropriate value of the pre- 300
heating pump’s capacity is indicated in tables G7 240

and G9. In addition, the pumps are to be electrically 180


Approx. heater capacity [kW/cyl]

interlocked to prevent both pumps running at the 140

Ambient air temperature [C°]


120
same time. The operation of the heater is con- 100 10
trolled by a separate temperature sensor installed 80

at the engine outlet and the flow rate is set by a 60 20


50
throttling disc. If the diesel auxiliaries are to be
40
used to provide warming-through directly, it is im- 30
30
portant at the design stage to ensure that there is
sufficient heat available and that cross-connecting 20 40

pipework and isolating non-return valves are in-


cluded. 10
50
1 1.5 2 3 4 5 6 8 10 12
Before starting and operating the engine, a tem- F10.3717
Heating up time [h]
perature of 60°C at the cylinder cooling water
Fig. G7 Engine pre-heating power
outlet of the main engine is recommended.

To estimate the heater power capacity required to


achieve 60°C, the heating-up time and the engine
ambient temperature are the most important para-
meters. They are plotted on the graph shown in fig-
ure G7. To reach the required capacity per cylin-
der; this figure is multiplied by the number of
cylinders to give the total heater capacity required.

25.74.07.40 – Issue X.04 – Rev. 0 G–16 Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd


RT-flex96C

Engine Selection
and Project Manual
Issue October 2004

Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd Tel. +41 52 262 49 22


PO Box 414 Fax +41 52 212 49 17
CH-8401 Winterthur http://www.wartsila.com
Switzerland

E 2004 Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd, Printed in Switzerland


This manual covers the following Sulzer diesel engines:

The Sulzer RT-flex96C engines with the following MCR rating:

– Power per cylinder 5720 kW 7780 bhp


– Speed 102 rpm

This issue of the Engine Selection and Project Manual (ESPM) is the first edition
covering the Sulzer 6–12RT-flex96C and 14RT-flex96C engines.

Attention is drawn to the following:

a) All data are related to engines tuned for compliance with the
IMO-2000 regulations.
b) The engine performance data (BSFC, BSEF and tEaT) and other data
can be obtained from the winGTD-program.
c) The inclusion of information referring to IMO-2000 regulations.
d) The inclusion of information referring to winGTD (version 2.8) and EnSel
(version 4.3) on the CD-ROM included in this manual. The CD-ROM
also contains the complete manual (ESPM).

Revision:
Rev. 1 performed: February 23rd 2005

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RT-flex96C Engine Selection and Project Manual

H. Engine management system

H1 Introduction

Developments in engine management systems All those systems provide data bus connection to
(EMS) at Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd are focussed on the ship automation to make specific data avail-
the latest trends in ship automation that tends to al- able wherever required and facilitate installation.
ways higher integration levels.
Complete ship automation systems provided by
The standard electrical interface, designated one of the leading suppliers approved by Wärtsilä
DENIS-9520 (Diesel Engine CoNtrol and optImiz- Switzerland offer the degree of integration de-
ing Specification), assures a perfect match with manded in modern shipbuilding while being per-
approved remote control systems, while the fectly adapted to the engine’s requirements.
WECS-9520 (Wärtsilä Engine Control System)
takes care of all RT-flex specific control functions. Applying a single supplier strategy for the entire
Computer based tools under the designation of the ship automation shows many other advantages in
product family MAPEX (Monitoring and mAinten- terms of full responsibility, ease in operation and
ance Performance Enhancement with eXpert maintenance.
knowledge) enable ship-owners and operators to
improve the operating economy of their diesel
engines.

Spares &
Engine Engine Maintenance
Remote Alarm Safety Optimizing Engine
Fitness Operation Management
Control System System Functions Control
Systems Support Support &
Tools

DENIS Family MAPEX Engine Fitness Family

Operation MAPEX-SM
DENIS-1 SIPWA-TP Manual
Engine
DENIS-5 MAPEX-PR Service Parts
RT-flex Bulletin
Dataset
DENIS-6 WECS-9520 MAPEX-TV Code Book CBM
DENIS-9520 MAPEX-AV Maintenance Service
Video Agreement

F10.4893

Fig. H1 EMS concept comprising DENIS, WECS and MAPEX modules

Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd H–1 25.74.07.40 – Issue X.04 – Rev. 0


Engine Selection and Project Manual RT-flex96C

H. Engine management system

RT-flex automation layout

Propulsion Control System Alarm and Monitoring


System

DENIS-9520 remote control specification

Alarm
signals
Independent sub-systems: Alarms
Slow-downs

Alarm and
Telegraph system
Electronic speed
Remote control

service access
control system
Safety system

Connector for
ECR Manual slow-down
control panel signals
system

2 x CANopen 2 x Modbus
Command orders from RCS/spd ctrl.

CANopen to ECR manual control

or Modbus
Feedback signals from WECS

Signals for alarm and slow-down


CANopen for service access

WECS alarm signals


Signals for control

Signals for safety

Signals for alarm


Indications

D E N I S - 9 5 2 0 E n g i n e S p e c i f i c a t i o n

CANopen
to LCP

E10, E20, etc. E90 E110, E120, etc.


Control terminal boxes E25 WECS shipyard interface box Alarm terminal boxes
Local control
panel
Sensors and actuators WECS-9520 Alarm sensors

Local WECS sensors and actuators


indications

RT-flex diesel engine


F10.5322

Fig. H2 RT-flex automation layout

25.74.07.40
25.74.07.40 – Issue
– Issue X.04X.04 – Rev.
– Rev. 0 1 H–2 Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd
RT-flex96C Engine Selection and Project Manual

H. Engine management system

H1.1 DENIS H2 DENIS-9520

The DENIS family contains specifications for the H2.1 General


engine management systems of all modern types
of Sulzer diesel engines. The diesel engine inter- The concept of DENIS-9520 meets the require-
face specification applicable for all current types of ments of increased flexibility and higher integration
RT-flex engines is DENIS-9520. in modern ship automation and provides the fol-
lowing advantages for ship-owners, shipyards and
H1.2 WECS engine builders:
• Clear interface definition
Under the designation of WECS-9520 Wärtsilä
The well defined and documented interface re-
Switzerland provides a computerised control sys-
sults in a clear separation of the responsibi-
tem for all RT-flex functions. As such it is a compo-
lities between engine builder and automation
nent of the RT-flex system and includes all necess-
supplier.
ary interfaces to the engine as well as to the remote
It allows that authorised suppliers adapt their
control and electronic speed control system.
systems to Sulzer RT-flex engines with re-
duced engineering effort.
With the same well proven engine control functions
The clear signal exchange simplifies trouble-
like the previous WECS-9500 it enhances the in-
shooting.
tegration into the ship management system by pro-
viding data bus communication to all external sys- • Approved propulsion control systems
tems. Propulsion control systems including remote
control, speed control, safety and telegraph
H1.3 MAPEX systems are available from suppliers ap-
proved by Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd. This
The products of the MAPEX family are designed to cooperation ensures that these systems fully
improve the engine’s efficiency through better comply with the specifications of the engine
management and planning and save money by designer.
making available the knowledge of our engine • Easy integration in ship management
management specialists. system
Providing data bus communication between
For the further description of the MAPEX products WECS, the propulsion control and the vessel’s
please refer to section H4. alarm and monitoring system facilitates an
easy integration of the various systems. The
existing man–machine interface (MMI) of the
vessel’s automation can therefore handle also
the additional MMI functions attributed to the
WECS.
• Ship automation from one supplier –
Integrated solution
Automation suppliers approved by Wärtsilä
Switzerland Ltd can handle all ship board au-
tomation tasks. Complete automation sys-
tems from one supplier show advantages like
easier engineering, standardisation, easier
operation, less training, fewer spare parts, etc.

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Engine Selection and Project Manual RT-flex96C

H. Engine management system

The WECS-9520 is well suited to support this With the replacement of previous camshaft-
integrated automation concept by providing controlled function by the WECS-9520, the en-
redundant data bus lines that deliver all neces- gine built control components are reduced to
sary information for propulsion control, alarm a minimum.
/ monitoring system and man–machine inter- Instrumentation is based on the conventional
face. The MMI of the WECS-9520 can provide RTA engine with RT-flex-specific components
additional features when using such an inte- added.
grated solution.
• DENIS remote control specification
• Ship automation from different suppliers – This file contains the detailed functional speci-
Split solution fication of the remote control system.
In the case that propulsion control and alarm The intellectual property on this remote control
/ monitoring systems are from different suppli- specification remains with Wärtsilä Switzer-
ers the WECS-9520 supports also such a split land Ltd. Therefore this file is licensed to
solution by providing two separate redundant Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd’s remote control part-
data bus lines one each for propulsion control ners only. These companies offer systems,
and alarm / monitoring system. MMI functions built completely according to the engine de-
are then also split within propulsion control and signer’s specifications, tested and approved
alarm / monitoring system. by Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd.

DENIS-9520 describes the signal interface be- H2.2 Propulsion control system
tween the RT-flex engine including its flex engine
control system (WECS) and the ship automation. The propulsion control system is divided into the
following sub-systems:
The DENIS specification does not include any
• Remote control system.
hardware. It summarises all the data exchanged
• Safety system.
and defines the control functions required by the
• Electronic speed control system.
engine.
• Telegraph system.
The DENIS specification is presented in
Safety system and telegraph system work inde-
two sets of documents:
pendently and are fully operative even with the re-
• DENIS engine specification mote control system out of order.
This file contains the specification of the signal
interface on the engine and is made access-
ible to engine builders and shipyards. It con-
sists basically of the control diagram of the en-
gine, the signal list including a minimum of
functional requirements and gives all informa-
tion related to the electrical wiring on the en-
gine. It lists also the necessary alarm and dis-
play functions to be realised in the vessel’s
alarm and monitoring system.
The DENIS-9520 engine specification covers
the engine-built components for control, alarm
and indication.

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RT-flex96C Engine Selection and Project Manual

H. Engine management system

H2.2.1 Approved propulsion control systems

Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd has an agreement con- trol and safety systems for their Sulzer RT-flex en-
cerning the development, production, sales and gines with each of the following leading marine au-
servicing of remote control, electronic speed con- tomation suppliers:

Electronic
Supplier / Company Remote Control System
Speed Control System

Kongsberg Marine
Kongsberg Maritime AS
P.O. Box 1009 AutoChief C20 DGS C20
N-3191 Horten Tel. +47-330 41 436
Norway Fax +47-330 42 250

Nabtesco Corporation
Nabtesco corp., Control Systems Division
2-2-21 Isogami dori Chuo-ku M-800-III MG-800 FLEX
Kobe Tel. +81-78 251 8109
Japan Fax +81-78 251 8090

SAM Electronics GmbH / Lyngsø Marine


SAM Electronics GmbH
Behringstrasse 120
D-22763 Hamburg Tel. +49-40 88 25 0
Germany Fax +49-40 88 25 4116 DMS2100i EGS2000RTf
Lyngsø Marine AS
2, Lyngsø Allé
DK-2970 Hrøsholm Tel. +45 45 16 62 00
Denmark Fax +45 45 16 62 62

Table H1 Suppliers of remote control systems and electronic speed control systrems

Modern remote control systems consist of elec- on the main engine. In this case the electronic
tronic modules and operator panels for display and modules for remote control, safety and speed con-
order input for engine control room and bridge. The trol system are located in the same boxes used as
different items normally communicate via serial terminal boxes for any other propulsion control
bus connections. The engine signals described in system.
the DENIS-9520 specification are usually con-
This facilitates to commission and test the com-
nected via the terminal boxes on the engine to the
plete propulsion control system already at the en-
electronic modules placed in the engine control
gine maker’s testbed. The wiring at the shipyard is
room.
then limited to a few power cables and bus commu-
These electronic modules are in most cases built nication wires whereas the conventional arrange-
to be located either inside the ECR console or in a ment requires more cables between the terminal
separate cabinet to be located in the ECR. The op- boxes on the engine and the electronic modules of
erator panels are to be inserted in the ECR con- the remote control system in the engine control
sole’s surface. room.
Kongsberg Maritime has designed the electronic These boxes with the electronic modules are part
modules of the AutoChief C20 propulsion control of the propulsion control system scope of supply
system in a way that they can be mounted directly and shall be delivered to the engine builder for
mounting on the engine.

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Engine Selection and Project Manual RT-flex96C

H. Engine management system

Remote control system

Bridge wing (option) Bridge Bridge wing (option)

Control Remote control, Safety


room and Electronic speed control

Ship alarm
system

Engine
room
WECS-9520 Local
flex engine control system panel

RT-flex engine

F10.5065

Fig. H3 DENIS-9520 remote control system layout

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RT-flex96C Engine Selection and Project Manual

H. Engine management system

H2.2.2 Functions of the propulsion Electronic speed control system


control system • Keeps engine speed at the set point given by
the remote control system.
Approved propulsion control systems comprise • Sends fuel command to the WECS-9520.
the following independent sub-systems: • Limits fuel amount in function of charge air and
measured speed for proper engine protection.
Remote control system
Main functions: Wärtsilä Switzerland has always requested that re-
mote control systems and speed control systems
• Start, stop, reversing. of the same supplier are applied, in order to avoid
• Cylinder pre-/post-lubrication. compatibility problems and increased engineering
• Automatic slow turning. efforts.
• Auxiliary blower control.
• Control transfer. Traditionally the electronic speed control system
• Speed setting. was considered as a part of the main engine and
• Automatic speed programme. was therefore usually delivered together with the
• Load-dependent cylinder lubrication CLU-3. engine.

Indications: With the introduction of WECS-9520 and


The remote control system is delivered with control DENIS-9520, the electronic speed control system
panels for local, control room and bridge control, is assigned to the propulsion control system and
including all necessary order input elements and therefore shall be delivered together with the
indications e.g. push buttons/switches and indica- corresponding remote control system and further
tion lamps or alternatively a respective display. components of the propulsion control package by
the party responsible for the complete propulsion
The following instruments for remote indication in control system, i.e. in most cases the shipyard.
the control room are specified in the DENIS-9520
standard as a minimum: The details regarding system layout, mechanical
dimensions of components as well as the informa-
• Starting air pressure. tion regarding electrical connections has to be
• Engine speed. taken from the technical documentation of the re-
• Revolution counter. spective supplier.
• Running hour counter.
• Load indicator. Safety system
• Turbocharger speed. Main functions:
• Scavenge air pressure in air receiver.
• Emergency stop functions.
The following instruments for remote indication on • Overspeed protection.
the bridge are specified in the DENIS-9520 stan- • Automatic shut-down functions.
dard as a minimum: • Automatic slow-down functions.
• Starting air pressure.
• Engine speed. Telegraph system
In addition to those indications, common for RTA • Order communication between different con-
and RT-flex engines, the remote control system trol locations.
applied to the RT-flex engine includes display of
the most important values of the flex engine control ECR manual control panel
system (WECS) like fuel pressure, servo oil pres- A manual control panel delivered together with the
sure etc. propulsion control system and fitted in the ECR
console allows to operate the engine manually and

Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd H–7 25.74.07.40 – Issue X.04 – Rev. 0


Engine Selection and Project Manual RT-flex96C

H. Engine management system

independently from the remote control system. and indication for safety system, telegraph system
The functions of the ECR manual control are equal and WECS-9520.
to the control function on the local control panel at
The local control box with the local manual control
the engine side.
panel is included in the package delivered by ap-
proved remote control system suppliers.
Local manual control
Local manual control of the engine is performed Options
from a control panel located on the engine. This
• Bridge wing control.
panel includes elements for manual order input
• Order recorder.

H2.2.3 Recommended manoeuvring characteristics

Recommended values for the


manoeuvring positions are given
in figure H4.

F10.1972
Fig. H4 Recommended manoeuvring characteristics

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RT-flex96C Engine Selection and Project Manual

H. Engine management system

H2.3 Interface to alarm and monitoring systems

H2.3.1 General layout – operator inter- have to be delivered to the engine builder for
face OPI mounting to the engine and connection of the sen-
sors.
On a conventional RTA engine, hardwired signals Commissioning and testing of the complete set of
from alarm sensors mounted to the engine had to alarm signals already at the engine maker’s
be connected to the vessel’s alarm and monitoring testbed is thus facilitated and the wiring at the ship-
system. yard is limited to a few power cables and bus com-
On a RT-flex engine, basically the same alarm sen- munication.
sors are available. Additional sensors with hard-
wired connection are fitted to monitor RT-flex spe- Split solution
cific circuits of the engine. Propulsion control system and alarm / monitoring
In addition to that, the flex engine control system system from different suppliers:
(WECS) provides alarm values and analogue indi- The propulsion control system is connected
cations via data bus connection to the ship’s alarm through one redundant bus line (CANopen or Mod-
and monitoring system as part of the operator in- bus, depending on automation maker) to the
terface of the RT-flex engine. WECS.
Connection from the WECS-9520 to the engine For the separate alarm and monitoring system an
automation can be made in two ways (refer to fig- additional redundant Modbus connection is avail-
ure H5). able.
Also the operator interface is then split in this case:
Integrated solution • Changing of parameters accessible to the op-
Propulsion control system and alarm / monitoring erator and display of parameters relevant for
system from same supplier: the engine operation is included in the remote
This allows to connect both propulsion control sys- control system.
tem and alarm / monitoring system through one re- • The alarm / monitoring system has to include:
dundant bus line only (CANopen or Modbus, de- – Display of some flex system indications,
pending on automation maker) to the WECS-9520. like e.g. fuel pressure, servo oil pressure
etc.
With this integrated solution an extended pres-
– Display of the flex system alarms provided
entation of relevant parameters is possible as well
by the WECS.
as a comfortable access to changeable user para-
• WCH provides modbus lists specifying the dis-
meters taking full profit of the graphical user inter-
play values and alarm conditions as part of the
face functions available in the alarm and monitor-
DENIS engine specification.
ing system.
Requirements for any alarm and monitoring sys-
A further step in integration is possible when using
tem to be applied in a split solution:
a DataChief C20 alarm and monitoring system of
• Possibility to read values from a redundant
Kongsberg Maritime. In this case also all the con-
Modbus line according to standard Modbus
ventional sensors and the additional flex sensors
RTU protocol.
can be connected via data bus lines. The design al-
• Ability to display analogue flex system values
lows that the data acquisition units are mounted di-
(typically 20 values) and add alarm values pro-
rectly on the engine in the same boxes used as ter-
vided from WECS to the standard alarm list
minal boxes for any other alarm and monitoring
(100–200 alarms depending on engine type
system.
and number of cylinders).
These boxes which are part of the alarm and moni-
toring system usually provided by the shipyard

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Engine Selection and Project Manual RT-flex96C

H. Engine management system

Integrated solution
Propulsion Control and Alarm and Monitoring System from same suppliers
E10
Sensors and
actuators E20
for control Propulsion
E25
Control System
2 x CANopen or Modbus

WECS-9520 E90

Flex sensors E130


for alarm Alarm and Monitoring
System
Standard E110
sensors
for alarm E120

Integrated solution
Propulsion Control and Alarm and Monitoring System from Kongsberg

Sensors and E10


actuators E20
for control 2 x CANopen Propulsion
E25
Control System

WECS-9520 E90

Flex sensors E130


for alarm Alarm and Monitoring
System
2 x CANopen
Standard E110
sensors E120.1
for alarm E120.2

Split solution
Propulsion Control and Alarm and Monitoring System from different suppliers
E10
Sensors and
actuators E20
for control Propulsion
E25 Control System
2 x CANopen or Modbus

WECS-9520 E90
2 x Modbus

Flex sensors E130 Alarm and Monitoring


for alarm System
Standard E110
sensors
for alarm E120
F10.5323

Fig. H5 Integrated/split solution

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RT-flex96C Engine Selection and Project Manual

H. Engine management system

H2.3.2 Alarm sensors and safety functions

The classification societies require different alarm The exact extent of delivery of alarm and safety
and safety functions, depending on the class of the sensors has to cover the requirements of the re-
vessel and its degree of automation. spective classification society, Wärtsilä Switzer-
These requirements are listed together with a set land Ltd, the shipyard and the owner.
of sensors defined by Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd in
tables H2 to H4 “Alarm and safety functions of Sul- The sensors delivered with the engine are basi-
zer RT-flex96C marine diesel engines”. cally connected to terminal boxes mounted on the
engine. Signal processing has to be performed in
The time delays for the slow-down and shut-down a separate alarm and monitoring system usually
functions given in tables H2 to H4 are maximum provided by the shipyard.
values. They may be reduced at any time accord-
ing to operational requirements. When decreasing
the values for the slow-down delay times, the delay
times for the respective shut-down functions are to
be adjusted accordingly.
The delay values are not to be increased without
written consent of Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd.

Included in the standard scope of supply are the


minimum of safety sensors as required by WCH for
attended machinery space (AMS). If the option of
unattended machinery space (UMS) has been se-
lected the respective sensors according to
Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd’s requirement have to be
added. There are also some additional sensors de-
fined for the monitoring of flex system specific en-
gine circuits.

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Engine Selection and Project Manual RT-flex96C

H. Engine management system

min. WCH
Alarm and safety functions for RT-flex96C engines Values requirements Request of classification societies for UMS

add. to AMS for UMS


time delay [sec.]
Function

Setting
Level

MRS
Physical unit

IACS
ABS
BV

GL

LR
CCS
DNV

KR

NK
PRS
RINA
max. allowable
Medium Location Signal No.

add. flex signals


for AMS
Cylinder cooling water Pressure Engine inlet PT1101A ALM L 3.0 bar 0
SLD L 2.8 bar 60
PS1101S SHD L 2.5 bar 60
Temp. Engine inlet TE1111A ALM L 70 °C 0
Outlet each TE1121-34A ALM H 95 °C 0
cylinder
SLD H 97 °C 60
Scavenge air cooling water Pressure Inlet cooler PT1301A ALM L 3.0 bar 0
fresh water, two-stage SLD L 2.5 bar 60
*1) HT circuit Temp. Outlet cooler TE1331-34A ALM H 120 °C 0
SLD H 125 °C 60
Pressure Inlet cooler PT1361A ALM L 2.0 bar 0
LT circuit Temp. Inlet cooler TE1371A ALM L 25 °C 0
Outlet cooler TE1381-84A ALM H 57 °C 0
Scavenge air cooling water Pressure Inlet cooler PT1361A ALM L 1.0 bar 0
fresh water, single-stage Temp. Inlet cooler TE1371A ALM L 25 °C 0
*1) Outlet cooler TE1381-84A ALM H 76 °C 0
Main bearing oil Pressure Supply PT2001A ALM L 4.8 bar 0
SLD L 4.6 bar 60
PS2001S SHD L 4.4 bar 60
PS2002S SHD LL 4.1 bar 10
Temp. Supply TE2011A ALM H 50 °C 0
SLD H 55 °C 60
Crosshead bearing oil Pressure Supply PT2021A ALM L 10 bar *2) 0
SLD L 9 bar *2) 60
Servo oil Pressure Pump inlet PT2051A ALM L 3.8 bar 0
ALM H 6.5 bar 0
Failure Automat. filter XS2053A ALM F – 0
Oil leakage monitoring Level Supply unit LS2055A ALM H max. 0
Control oil Pressure Supply unit PT2083A ALM H 50 bar 0
leakage monitoring
Level Supply unit LS2085A ALM H max. 0
Main bearing oil Temp. Outlet TE2101-17A ALM H 65 °C 0 A A A A A A A A A A A
Thrust bearing oil Temp. Outlet TE2121A ALM H 65 °C 0
SLD H 70 °C 60
TS2121S SHD H 85 °C 60
Crank bearing oil Temp. Outlet TE2201-14A ALM H 65 °C 0 A A A A A A A A A A A
Crosshead bearing oil Temp. Outlet TE2301-14A ALM H 65 °C 0 A A A A A A A A A A A
Oil mist concentration Concen- Crankcase AS2401A ALM H – 0 B B B B B B B B B B B
tration
AS2401S SLD H – 60 B B B B B B B B B B B
Failure Detection unit XS2411A ALM F – 0
Piston cooling oil Temp. Outlet each TE2501-14A ALM H 80 °C 0
cylinder
*3) TE2501-14S SLD H 85 °C 60
Flow Inlet each cyl. FS2521-34S SHD L no flow 15
Diff.press. Inlet each cyl. PS2541-54S SHD H 0.6 bar 15
Flow Outlet each ALM L no flow –
cylinder *4)
SLD L no flow –

Table H2 Alarm and safety functions of Sulzer RT-flex96C marine diesel engines

25.74.07.40 – Issue X.04 – Rev. 0 H–12 Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd


RT-flex96C Engine Selection and Project Manual

H. Engine management system

min. WCH
Alarm and safety functions for RT-flex96C engines Values requirements Request of classification societies for UMS

add. to AMS for UMS


time delay [sec.]
Function

Setting
Level

MRS
Physical unit

IACS
ABS
BV

GL

LR
CCS
DNV

KR

NK
PRS
RINA
max. allowable
Medium Location Signal No.

add. flex signals


for AMS
Turbocharger bearing oil Pressure Inlet each TC PT2611-14A ALM L 1.0 bar 5
*8) SLD L 0.8 bar 60
*7)
ABB TPL Inlet each TC PS2611-14S SHD L 0.6 bar 5
Temp. Outlet TC TE2601-04A ALM H 110 °C 0
*7) SLD H 120 °C 60
Pressure Inlet each TC PT2611-14A ALM L 0.7 bar 5
SLD L 0.6 bar 60
MHI MET Inlet each TC PS2611-14S SHD L 0.4 bar 5
Temp. Outlet TC TE2601-04A ALM H 85 °C 0
SLD H 95 °C 60
additional requirement Temp. Inlet TC TE2621A ALM H 80 °C 0
when separate oil supply
SLD H 85 °C 60
Geislinger damper oil Pressure Casing inlet PT2711A ALM L 1.0 bar 0
Axial damper (detuner) oil Pressure aft side PT2721A ALM L 1.7 bar 60
Damp. chamber
fore side PT2722A ALM L 1.7 bar 60
Cylinder lubricating oil Flow Cylinder inlet FS3101-14A ALM L no flow 30
FE3101-14A ALM L no flow 30
FS3100S SLD L no flow 60
Level Cyl.lub.oil pump LS3125A ALM L min. –
Fuel oil Temp. Fuel pump outlet TE3431-38A ALM D –15 °C 30
Viscosity before ALM H 17 cST 0 D D D D D D D D D D D D
supply unit
ALM L 12 cST 0
Leakage Level Supply unit LS3426A ALM H max. 0
Rail unit LS3444-45A ALM H max. 0
Fuel pipe LS3446A ALM H max. 0
Fuel pipe LS3447A ALM H max. 0
Pressure before PT3421A ALM L 7 bar 0
supply unit
Temp. TE3411A ALM L 60–120°C 0 C C C C C C C C C C C C
Exhaust gas Temp. after each TT3701-14A ALM H 515 °C 0 E E E
cylinder $ 50 °C
ALM D 0 F F F
SLD H 530 °C 60 G G
SLD D $ 70 °C 60 H
before each TT3721-24A ALM H 515 °C 0
turbocharger
SLD H 530 °C 60 H
after each TT3731-34A ALM H 480 °C 0
turbocharger
SLD H 500 °C 60
Scavenge air Temp. after each TE4031-34A ALM L 25 °C 0 I I I
cooler *6)
ALM H 60 °C 0 I
SLD H 70 °C 60 I
Temp. each piston TE4081-94A ALM H 80 °C 0 K
underside
SLD H 120 °C 60 K
Water separ- LS4071-74A ALM H max. 0 K K K
ator
*5) Condensation Level SLD H max. 60
water
before each LS4075-78A ALM H max. 0 K K K
water separ.
SLD H max. 60

Table H3 Alarm and safety functions of Sulzer RT-flex96C marine diesel engines

Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd H–13 25.74.07.40 – Issue X.04 – Rev. 0


Engine Selection and Project Manual RT-flex96C

H. Engine management system

min. WCH
Alarm and safety functions for RT-flex96C engines Values requirements Request of classification societies for UMS

add. to AMSfor UMS


time delay [sec.]
Function

Setting
Level

MRS
Physical unit

IACS
ABS
BV

GL

LR
CCS
DNV

KR

NK
PRS
RINA
max. allowable
Medium Location Signal No.

add. flex signals


for AMS
Starting air Pressure Engine inlet PT4301C ALM L 12.0 bar 0
Air spring air Pressure Distributor PT4341A ALM H 7.5 bar 0
ALM L 5.5 bar 0
SLD L 5.0 bar 60
PS4341S SHD LL 4.5 bar 0
Leakage oil Level Exh.valve air LS4351-52A ALM H max. 0
Control air normal supply Pressure Engine inlet PT4401A ALM L 6.0 bar 0
stand-by supply Pressure Engine inlet PT4411A ALM L 5.5 bar 0
Pressure Engine inlet PT4421A ALM L 5.0 bar 0
Fuel actuator Failure Supply unit XS5046-49A ALM F – –
WECS-9520 control system Pwr. fail Pwr. sup. box XS5056A ALM F – –
Engine Overspeed Speed Crankshaft ST5111-12S SHD H 110 % 0

Classification societies: *1) Only one of these cooling systems is necessary at a time for an engine.
IACS International Association *2) ALM & SLD are suppressed below part-load.
of Classification Societies *3) Sensor (TE2501-14S) only necessary if ABS is applied.
ABS American Bureau of Shipping *4) For technical reasons, WCH uses FS2521-34S and PS2541-54S at the piston cooling
BV Bureau Veritas oil inlet for flow monitoring instead. FS25xxS and PS25xxS are combined to one binary
CCS Chinese Classification Society input to the safety system.
DNV Det Norske Veritas WCH strongly requests shut down for “piston cooling no flow”!
GL Germanischer Lloyd
*5) Alternatively, low temperature alarm or condensation water high level alarm.
KR Korean Register
*6) For water separators made from plastic material the sensor must be placed right after
LR Lloyd’s Register
the separator.
MRS Maritime Register of Shipping
*7) The indicated setting values are valid for TC lubrication by main bearing oil system.
(Russia)
For TC lubrication by separate lubrication system the following values apply:
NK Nippon Kaiji Kyokai
Pressure: ALM: 1.3 bar, SLD: 1.1 bar, SHD: 0.9 bar.
PRS Polski Rejestr Statkow
Temperature: ALM: 120 °C, SLD 130 °C.
RINA Registro Italiano Navale
*8) The indicated alarm and slow-down values and the values indicated in *7) are minimum
Signals for two-stage scavenge air settings allowed by the TC maker. In order to achieve an earlier warning, the ALM and
cooling, Geislinger damper, PTO SLD values may be increased up to 0.4 bar below the minimum effective pressure
coupling, electric speed control and measured within the entire engine operation range. The final ALM/SLD setting shall be
turbocharger vibration apply only if determined during commissioning / sea trial of the vessel.
respective equipment is used.

Function: Level: Request of classification societies for UMS:


ALM: alarm D: deviation Request A or B are requested alternatively
SLD: slow down F: failure Recommendation C or D are requested alternatively
SHD: shut down H: high AMS Attended machinery space E or F are requested alternatively
HH: very high UMS Unattended machinery space G or H are requested alternatively
L: low I or K are requested alternatively
LL: very low

Table H4 Alarm and safety functions of Sulzer RT-flex96C marine diesel engines

25.74.07.40 – Issue X.04 – Rev. 0 H–14 Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd


RT-flex96C Engine Selection and Project Manual

H. Engine management system

H3 WECS-9520 – flex engine control system

H3.1 WECS-9520 – system layout When installing an new FCM-20 into a


WECS-9520 it will be automatically detected as a
WECS-9520 covers RT-flex functions related to new module and receive all necessary application
the engine as a whole (e.g. common rail pressure data from the other modules of the WECS-9520.
control, servo oil pressure control) as well as the As the download of the respective data may take
cylinder specific RT-flex functions (e.g. control of some time WCH has found an ultimate arrange-
volumetric injection, exhaust valve and start ment to provide immediate functioning of an
valves). FCM-20 after replacement: The online spare mod-
ule FCM-20. An additional FCM-20 numbered #00
The WECS-9520 consists of the following compo- is always fitted in the shipyard interface box E90
nents (refer to figure H6): ready to be used as spare with all application data
• 1 control box E95.n per cylinder, including one already loaded. In case that a FCM-20 needs to be
FCM-20 each, perfoming cylinder control and replaced this FCM20 #00 spare is taken as spare
common control functions. and allows full functionality immediately after re-
• 1 shipyard interface box (SIB) E90 providing placement. An additional FCM-20 from the stock is
all external connections. E90 includes one then to be placed in the E90 as new online spare
FCM-20 “online spare module”. module. This module will download all necessary
• 1 Power supply box E85 data from the other modules within a certain time
without compromising engine operation.
For the RT-flex96C the control of the servo oil
pumps is provided in an additional control box E87. H3.3 WECS-9520 – communication to
The control boxes E95.n and the shipyard inter- external systems
face box E90 are incorporated in the rail unit. The
power supply boxes E85 and the servo oil control With WECS-9520, direct hard wired connection to
box E87 are supplied loose for mounting in the en- external systems is limited to a minimum.
gine room.
WECS-9520 provides data bus connections to
propulsion control system and ship alarm / moni-
H3.2 WECS-9520 – online spare
toring system. It also provides data bus connection
module
to the local manual control panel on the engine and
to the ECR manual control panel of the RT-flex en-
With WECS-9520 WCH introduces an unique fea-
gine.
ture for automatic loading application software and
parameter settings when replacing a flex control
With the WECS-9520 the man–machine interface
module (FCM-20). This includes the mounting of a
(MMI) also referred to as operator interface (OPI)
so called “online spare module” in the shipyard in-
of the main engine and the WECS-9520 engine
terface box E90.
control system is integrated in the ship automation
in either the integrated or split solution an de-
With the automatic software loading procedure
scribed in section H2.3.1.
built into the WECS-9520 it is possible to replace
any FCM-20 by any spare module available on
board without prior downloading of any data.

Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd H–15 25.74.07.40 – Issue X.04 – Rev. 0


Engine Selection and Project Manual RT-flex96C

H. Engine management system

In the standard configuration the WECS-9520 pro- SAM Electronic / Lyngsø Marine
vides the following external connections:
• Integrated solution
• 2 redundant CANopen lines intended for the Propulsion control system DMS2100i and
connection of the remote control system. alarm / monitoring system UMS2100:
• 2 redundant Modbus lines as an alternative Connection of two Modbus lines only. The pro-
connection of the remote control system. pulsion control system with remote control,
• 2 redundant Modbus connections for the safety system and electronic speed control
ship’s alarm and monitoring system in the split system is connected directly to the Modbus
solution. lines while the data to the alarm and monitor-
• 1 CANopen line for connection of the local ing system is routed through the propulsion
manual control panel. control system.
• 1 CANopen line for connection of the ECR
• Split solution
manual control panel.
Propulsion control system DMS2100i with an
• 1 CAN bus connection to a plug on the backup
alarm and monitoring system of any other
panel of the remote control system foreseen
maker:
for the connection of a notebook of a service
The propulsion control system with remote
engineer.
control, safety system and electronic speed
control system is connected to the two redun-
The use of the bus connection on the WECS-9520
dant Modbus lines provided for remote control.
with the different approved system makers is as
The alarm and monitoring system is to be con-
follows:
nected to the additionally provided two redun-
dant Modbus lines.
Kongsberg Maritime
• Integrated solution Nabtesco
Propulsion control system AutoChief C20 and
• Split solution
alarm / monitoring system DataChief C20:
Nabtesco propulsion control system M-800-III
Connection of two CANopen lines only. The
with an alarm and monitoring system of any
propulsion control system with remote control,
other maker:
safety system and electronic speed control
The propulsion control system with remote
system is connected directly to the CANopen
control, safety system and electronic speed
lines while the data to the alarm and monitor-
control system is connected to the two redun-
ing system is routed through CAN couplers
dant CANopen lines provided for remote con-
from the same two CANopen lines.
trol.
• Split solution The alarm and monitoring system is to be con-
Propulsion control system AutoChief C20 with nected to the additionally provided two redun-
an alarm and monitoring system of any other dant Modbus lines.
maker:
The propulsion control system with remote
control, safety system and electronic speed
control system is connected to the two redun-
dant CANopen lines.
The alarm and monitoring system is to be con-
nected to the additionally provided two redun-
dant Modbus lines.

25.74.07.40 – Issue X.04 – Rev. 0 H–16 Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd


H.
General system layout of WECS-9520

Propulsion control system Service connector

Electr. speed Main engine Telegraph Remote control ECR manual


Ship alarm and
Engine control room control system safety system system system control panel monitoring system

Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd


Engine room
RT-flex96C

RT-flex engine

Local manual
ctrl. panel

Rail unit Rail unit


free end drive end
E95.12 E95.11 E95.10 E95.09 E95.08 E95.07 E90 SIB E95.06 E95.05 E95.04 E95.03 E95.02 E95.01
Engine management system

FCM-20 FCM-20 FCM-20 FCM-20 FCM-20 FCM-20 FCM-20 FCM-20 FCM-20 FCM-20 FCM-20 FCM-20 FCM-20
online
Cyl. 12 Cyl. 11 Cyl. 10 Cyl. 09 Cyl. 08 Cyl. 07 spare Cyl. 06 Cyl. 05 Cyl. 04 Cyl. 03 Cyl. 02 Cyl. 01

2 x CANopen System bus


2 x Modbus
2 x Modbus
2 x CANopen

H–17
2 x SSI Crank angle bus

CA unit Fuel pressure


Supply unit
Shaft encoder E96 E91 actuator # A1
Fuel pressure
actuator # B1
Fuel pressure
actuator # A2 Fuel pressure
actuator # B2
Servo oil pump
E94

E20
Engine TDC signal

Power Ctrl oil pump #1


Starter unit
24 VDC power supply
Ctrl oil pump #2
Power

25.74.07.40
Starter unit
Power supply Servo oil pump control signals
WECS E85 6 x CANopen

25.74.07.40
2 x 220 VAC
(single phase) Power supply Power supply

– Issue
2 x 220 VAC Servo oil E87
(single phase) pump control
WECS-9520

– Issue
X.04X.04
– Rev.
Fig. H6 General system layout of WECS-9520

– Rev.
1 0
Engine Selection and Project Manual
Engine Selection and Project Manual RT-flex96C

H. Engine management system

H4 MAPEX Engine Fitness Family

An intelligent engine management system also The MAPEX Engine Fitness Family currently com-
needs to include functions such as the monitoring prises six systems: SIPWA-TP, MAPEX-PR,
of specific engine parameters, analysing data, and MAPEX-TV / AV and MAPEX-SM.
managing maintenance and spare parts purchas-
ing activities. Many of these functions involve spe- Further members of the MAPEX Engine Fitness
cific and complex engine knowledge and are most Family are also envisaged.
appropriately handled directly by the engine de-
signer. In each case special emphasis has been placed on
user friendliness and ease of installation.
Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd provides a full range of
equipment for carrying out these functions, called
For further information regarding products of the
the MAPEX Engine Fitness Family. MAPEX, or
MAPEX Engine Fitness Family contact your WCH
‘Monitoring and mAintenance Performance En-
sales representative.
hancement with eXpert knowledge’, encompasses
the following principles:
• Improved engine performance through re-
duced down time.
• Monitoring of critical engine data, and intelli-
gent analysis of that data.
• Advanced planning of maintenance work.
• Management support for spare parts and for
maintenance.
• Access on board ship to the knowledge of
experts.
• Full support of data storage and transmission
by floppy disc and by satellite communication.
• Reduced costs and improved efficiency.

25.74.07.40 – Issue X.04 – Rev. 0 H–18 Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd


RT-flex96C Engine Selection and Project Manual

H. Engine management system

H4.1 SIPWA-TP (Piston-ring Wear)

The Sulzer Integrated Piston-ring Wear-detecting Customer benefit of SIPWA-TP


Arrangement with Trend Processing is a powerful
Supplied with this information you are able to per-
tool for online monitoring the piston-ring wear and
form your maintenance based on the actual condi-
rotation on Sulzer large-bore two stroke engines.
tion of your piston-rings, i.e. condition based main-
With the newly developed Sensor 96, SIPWA-TP
tenance, in case to extend TBO of your piston
is avoiding all the shortcomings of the past design:
overhauls.
• No electrical plug.
Thanks to the SIPWA-TP alarming system you are
• The measuring coil is shifted away from the hot
able to detect an abnormal piston-ring wear with-
cylinder liner running surface.
out opening the engine – and enforce early
• Easy installation procedure.
countermeasures.
• Compatible to all Sulzer RT-flex and RTA
engines.
Each single SIPWA-TP piston-ring is checked by
ultra sonic means to supply you with the best possi-
The new sensor delivers more stable measuring
ble quality.
signals and all electrical contacts are fully pro-
The newly developed SIPWA-TP Sensor 96 is also
tected in casting resin. The contact between con-
compatible to all old installations, but more reliable
verter and adapter is made through an electromag-
and available at lower costs.
netic contact surface, the patent is still pending.
SIPWA-TP allows you to monitor the condition of
The SIPWA-TP Sensor 96 is located in each cylin- the piston-rings on-line.
der liner just above the scavenge air port in order
to measure the width of the triangular-shaped SIPWA-TP
brass insert in the SIPWA-TP piston-ring. The re-
• Reduces your operating and maintenance
duction in the width of this triangular section direct-
costs.
ly corresponds to the wear of the piston-ring.
• Helps to keep your vessel on schedule.
The following data are monitored and graphically • Monitors piston-ring wear on-line and allows a
displayed over periods of 400, 1000 and 3000 en- trend processing.
gine running hours: • Displays the rotation of your piston-rings.
• Enables you to extend the TBO of your piston
• Average piston-ring wear.
overhauls.
• Piston-ring segment wear.
• Allows condition based maintenance.
• Piston-ring wear distribution.
• Is your round-the-clock watchful eye.
• Piston-ring rotation.
• Gives the best protection of your engine, in
combination with MAPEX-PR,
All this data (incl. rpm) are continuously stored for
• Allows adjustment of cylinder lubricating oil to
the entire engine lifetime.
the optimum level.

Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd H–19 25.74.07.40 – Issue X.04 – Rev. 0


Engine Selection and Project Manual RT-flex96C

H. Engine management system

Demo-Plant – Average Ring Wear – SIPWA-TP Demo-Plant – Ring Rotation – SIPWA-TP

F10.3614

Fig. H7 SIPWA-TP

25.74.07.40 – Issue X.04 – Rev. 0 H–20 Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd


RT-flex96C Engine Selection and Project Manual

H. Engine management system

H4.2 Mapex-PR (Piston-running Reliability)

MAPEX-PR continuously monitors the piston-run- Customers benefit of MAPEX-PR


ning behaviour on large-bore Sulzer two-stroke
Thanks to the MAPEX-PR alarming system you
diesel engines with an alarm if adverse conditions
are able to detect an abnormal behaviour of the
should appear. It complements SIPWA-TP by pro-
piston-running without opening the engine. So you
viding a shorter response and alarm function.
can save your engine from major damage and
For example, an alarm is signalled if, among other
therefore increase the availability of your vessel’s
criteria, the local temperature on the liner is abnor-
main propulsion system.
mally high due to piston-ring scuffing or inad-
equate ring sealing. Thanks to the compatibility with SIPWA-TP, you
can install both systems on your engine, using the
The measured data are stored in an electronic unit
same electronic unit and the same software.
and can be viewed on a personal computer. Pre-
Together with SIPWA-TP you get a powerful tool to
ferably an industrial-PC installed in a ideally suited
rely on the condition of piston-rings and liner.
cabinet. All data and charts can be printed and co-
pied to floppy discs or other media. MAPEX-PR is the tool to check the piston-running
behaviour.
The following data are monitored over periods of 1,
4.5, 24 or 400 engine running hours and displayed MAPEX-PR
graphically: • Alarms if the liner wall temperature shows high
• Liner wall temperature (two sensor per piston-ring friction.
cylinder). • Works ideally together with SIPWA-TP for kee-
• Cylinder cooling water temperature inlet and ping piston-running behaviour under control.
outlet. • Checks the hot spots of the diesel engine.
• Scavenge air temperature after each cooler. • Is an on-line display for piston-ring and nozzle
• Engine speed. performance.
• Engine load indicator position. • Is capable to detect malfunctions such as blow
• Alarms. by and adhesive wear.
• Informs if thermal overload should occur on
The following alarms can be connected to the the cylinder liner.
ship’s alarm system to inform the engineers about • Is your round-the-clock watchful eye.
any unexpected situation:
• High-High alarm for: High friction on one or
both side of the cylinder liner.
• High alarms for: Deviation of temperature of
one cylinder.
• Average temperature of the engine.
• Cooling water fluctuation.
• Scavenge air temperature.
• System alarm for: System failure.

Together with the ”normal” Manual, Wärtsilä


Switzerland Ltd delivers also a digital version,
which will be installed together with the software
MAPEX-PR / SIPWA-TP.

Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd H–21 25.74.07.40 – Issue X.04 – Rev. 0


Engine Selection and Project Manual RT-flex96C

H. Engine management system

Demo-Plant – LWT Graphic Display – MAPEX-PR Demo-Plant – Sat Cwt Load Speed – MAPEX-PR

F10.3615

Fig. H8 MAPEX-PR

25.74.07.40 – Issue X.04 – Rev. 0 H–22 Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd


RT-flex96C Engine Selection and Project Manual

H. Engine management system

H4.3 Mapex-TV / AV (Torsional Vibration / Axial Vibration Detection)


MAPEX-TV continuously calculates the amplitude There is a quick reference guide in English fixed on
of the 1st and 2nd order of torsional vibrations of the system cover. This gives you the possibility to
your engine. handle the most used functions without looking
MAPEX-AV permanently measures the absolute into the manual. Nevertheless, we will deliver a full
value of axial vibrations of your engine. manual either in English, German or French.
You have also the possibility to use an already
MAPEX-TV used engine-speed pickup or install a separate
• Detects misfiring. pickup for MAPEX-TV. The signal for MAPEX-AV
• Measures torsional vibrations. is always produced by an inductive proximity
• Prevents you from wrong alarms during rough sensor.
sea or when manoeuvring. The size of the MAPEX-TV / AV system per engine
is about 32 cm x 40 cm x 16 cm (12.6 in x 15.8 in
MAPEX-AV x 6.3 in). It can be installed everywhere in your con-
• Measures axial vibrations of two-stroke trol or engine room as long as the ambient tem-
engines. perature is not higher than 50°C and the humidity
does not exceed 95%, but it should not be installed
With MAPEX-TV / AV you are alarmed in case of directly on your engine.
any irregularities and you can observe the results MAPEX-TV / AV is the tool to keep an eye on your
of all measurements on your panel in detail. engine vibrations.
The alarm values can be dependent on the load or
on the engine speed. There are two alarm levels. MAPEX-TV / AV
The HH-level is used, if the torsional or axial vibra- • Prevents your engine from major damage due
tions reach a limit, that demands sudden activities to unacceptable high torsional or axial
to prevent your engine from major damages. The vibrations.
H-level can be used as an information, e. g. if a mis- • Is easy to handle due to a quick reference
firing occurred on your engine, but the torsional guide, which is directly fixed on the system
vibrations are still in a safe range. There is a certain cover.
delay of these alarms, which is also adjustable. • Perfectly suited for propulsion systems with
PTO gears.

F10.4913

Fig. H9 MAPEX-AV / TV

Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd H–23 25.74.07.40 – Issue X.04 – Rev. 0


Engine Selection and Project Manual RT-flex96C

H. Engine management system

H4.4 MAPEX-SM (Spare parts and Maintenance)

MAPEX-SM is an advanced management tool for By installing MAPEX-SM at the head office as well
the administration and planning of Spare parts and as on board ship, the owner can centralize requisi-
Maintenance. It comes complete with the original tioning and purchasing operations for the entire
Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd data for the shipowner’s fleet on a single system. This also allows planning
specific engines. The system is user friendly and of major maintenance work and recording of main-
operates on windows compatible computers. Fea- tenance histories for each vessel. Statistical fea-
tures include purchasing of engine spare parts, in- tures provide an overview of fleet maintenance
ventory control, statistical reporting, issuing of and purchasing, and assist in corporate strategic
work orders, maintenance history recording, and planning. MAPEX-SM is modular, so that it can be
much more. installed in phases if desired, beginning with the
head office and later expanding to include vessels
as the shipowner’s budget permits.

Satcom

Ship Wärtsilä Switzerland

DATABASE MAINTENANCE TRANSFER


Export to NSD
Import
Ship owner’s
MAPEX-SM
MAPEX-SM Headquarter

PC Modem Modem PC

F10.5179

Fig. H10 MAPEX-communication

25.74.07.40 – Issue X.04 – Rev. 0 H–24 Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd


RT-flex96C Engine Selection and Project Manual

D. Engine data

D1 Reference conditions D3 Ancillary system design


parameters
The engine can be operated in the ambient condi-
tion range between reference conditions and The layout of the ancillary systems of the engine
design (tropical) conditions, see section B4. bases on the performance of its specified rating
point Rx (CMCR). The given design parameters
The engine performance data, like BSFC, BSEF must be considered in the plant design to ensure
and tEaT and others are based on reference a proper function of the engine and its ancillary sys-
conditions. They are specified in ISO Standard tems.
15550 (core standard) and for marine application
in ISO Standard 3046 (satellite standard) as fol- • Cylinder water outlet temp. : 90°C
lows: • Oil temperature before engine : 45°C
• Air temperature before blower 25°C • Exhaust gas back pressure
• Engine room ambient air temp. 25°C at rated power (Rx) : 30 mbar.
• Coolant temp. before SAC 25°C for SW
• Coolant temp. before SAC 29°C for FW The engine power is independent from ambient
• Barometric pressure 1000 mbar conditions. The cylinder water outlet temperature
• Relative air humidity 30 % and the oil temperature before engine are system-
internally controlled and have to remain at the
The reference for the engine room air inlet tem- specified level.
perature is specified in ISO Standard 8861 with
35°C, taken from outboard.

Note: D4 Engine performance data


The lower calorific value (LCV) of the fuel refers to
an international marine convention. The specified The calculation of the performance data BSFC,
LCV of 42.7 MJ/kg differs from the ISO Standard BSEF and tEaT for any engine power will be done
which is specified at 42.0 MJ/kg. with the help of the winGTD program.

Data for Delta Tuning are available on the winGTD


program.
D2 Design conditions
If needed we offer a computerized information ser-
The capacities of ancillaries are specified accord- vice to analyze the engine’s heat balance and
ing to ISO Standard 3046-1 (clause 11.4) following determine main system data for any rating point
the International Association of Classification within the engine layout field.
Societies (IACS) and are defined as design condi- For details of this service please refer to section
tions: G1.3.1 and chapter J.
• Air temperature before blower 45°C The installation of the winGTD and the hardware
• Engine ambient air temp. 45°C specification are explained in chapter J.
• Coolant temp. before SAC 32°C for SW
• Coolant temp. before SAC 36°C for FW
• Barometric pressure 1000 mbar.
• Relative air humidity 60 %

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Engine Selection and Project Manual RT-flex96C

D. Engine data

D5 Vibration aspects

D5.1 Introduction

As a leading designer and licensor we are con- Figure D1 shows the external forces and moments
cerned that satisfactory vibration levels are ob- acting on the engine.
tained with our engine installations. The assess-
ment and reduction of vibration is subject to External forces and moments due to the recipro-
continuing research. Therefore, we have devel- cating and rotating masses (see table D1):
oped extensive computer software, analytical pro-
cedures and measuring techniques to deal with F1V: resulting first order vertical force.
this subject. F1H: resulting first order horizontal force.
F2V: resulting second order vertical force.
For successful design, the vibration behaviour F4V: resulting fourth order vertical force.
needs to be calculated over the whole operating M1V: first order vertical mass moment.
range of the engine and propulsion system. The M1H: first order horizontal mass moment.
following vibration types and their causes are to be M2V: second order vertical mass moment.
considered: M4V: fourth order vertical mass moment.

– External mass forces and moments.


– Lateral engine vibration.
– Longitudinal engine vibration.
– Torsional vibration of the shafting. F1V, F2V, F4V

– Axial vibration of the shafting.

F1H
D5.2 External forces and moments
M1V, M2V, M4V
In the design of the Sulzer RT-flex96C engine free
mass forces are eliminated and unbalanced exter- M1H
+ +
nal moments of first, second and fourth order are
minimized. However, six-cylinder engines gener- –

ate second order unbalanced moments of a


magnitude greater than those encountered with
higher numbers of cylinders.
Depending on the ship’s design, the moments of
fourth order have to be considered too. Forces and moments due to reciprocating
and rotating masses
F10.5173

Under unfavourable conditions, depending on hull Fig. D1 External forces and moments
structure, type, distribution of cargo and location of
the main engine, the unbalanced moments of first,
second and fourth order may cause unacceptable
vibrations throughout the ship and thus call for
countermeasures.

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RT-flex96C Engine Selection and Project Manual

D. Engine data

D5.2.1 Balancing free first order


moments
Electrically driven
Standard counterweights fitted to the ends of the 2nd-order balancer
crankshaft reduce the first order mass moments to
acceptable limits. However, in special cases non- F2V
standard counterweights can be used to reduce
either M1V or M1H, if needed.

D5.2.2 Balancing free second order M2V


moments

The second order vertical moment (M2V) is higher


on six-cylinder engines compared with 7–14-cylin- L
der engines; the second order vertical moment
being negligible for the 7–14-cylinder engines. M2V = F2V S L
Since no engine-fitted 2nd order balancer is avail- F10.5218

able, Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd. recommends for Fig. D2 Locating electrically driven balancer
six-cylinder engines to install an electrically driven
balancer on the ship’s structure (figure D2) to re-
duce the second order moments to acceptable
values.

If no experience is available from a sister ship, it is


advisable to establish at the design stage, what
form the ship’s vibration will be. Table NO TAG as-
sists in determining the effect of installing the
Sulzer 6RT-flex96C engine.

However, when the ship’s vibration pattern is not


known at the early stage, an external electrically
balancer can be installed later, should disturbing
vibrations occur; provision should be made for this
countermeasure.
Such a balancer is usually installed in the steering
compartment, as shown in figure D2. It is tuned to
the engine operating speed and controlled
accordingly.

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– Issue – Rev. 1 0
– Rev.
Engine Selection and Project Manual RT-flex96C

D. Engine data

D5.2.3 Power related unbalance (PRU)

The so-called Power Related Unbalance (PRU) values can be used to evaluate if there is a risk that free
external mass moments of 1st and 2nd order may cause unacceptable hull vibrations, see figure D3.

250
Free external mass moments
Power Related Unbalance (PRU) at R1 rating

200 M1V external moment [Nm]


PRU = = [Nm/kW]
M1H engine power [kW]
M2V

A
PRU [Nm/kW]

No engine-fitted 2nd order balancer available. If reduction of


150 M2v is needed, an external compensator has to be applied.

100

B
50

C
PRU = 0
0
6RT-flex96C 7RT-flex96C 8RT-flex96C 9RT-flex96C 10RT-flex96C 11RT-flex96C 12RT-flex96C 14RT-flex96C

A-range: balancing countermeasure is likely needed.


B-range: balancing countermeasure is unlikely needed.
F10.5245 C-range: balancing countermeasure is not relevant.
Fig. D3 Free external mass moments

The external moments M1 and M2 given in table NO TAG are related to R1 speed. For other engine speeds,
the corresponding external moments are calculated with the following formula:

MRx = MR1  (nRx/nR1)2

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– Rev. 0 1 D–4 Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd
RT-flex96C Engine Selection and Project Manual

D. Engine data

D5.3 Lateral engine vibration (rocking)

The lateral components of the forces acting on the The ‘X-type’ lateral vibrations are caused by the
crosshead induce lateral rocking depending on the resulting lateral guide force moment MLX. The driv-
number of cylinders and firing order. These forces ing- and free-end side of the engine top vibrate in
may be transmitted to the engine-room bottom counterphase.
structure. From there hull resonance or local vibra-
tions in the engine room may be excited. Table D1 gives the values of resulting lateral guide
forces and moments of the relevant orders.
There are two different modes of lateral engine
vibration, the so-called ‘H-type’ and ‘X-type’, The amplitudes of the vibrations transmitted to the
please refer to figure D4. hull depend on the design of the engine seating,
frame stiffness and exhaust pipe connections. As
The ‘H-type’ lateral vibrations are characterized by the amplitude of the vibrations cannot be predicted
a deformation where the driving and free end side with absolute accuracy, the support to the ship’s
of the engine top vibrate in phase as a result of the structure and space for installation of lateral stays
lateral guide force FL and the lateral H-type should be considered in the early design stages of
moment. The torque variation (∆M) is the reaction the engine-room structure. Please refer to table
moment to MLH. D2, countermeasure for dynamic effects.

FL resulting guide force MLX resulting lateral X-type moment


MLH resulting lateral H-type moment
F10.5172

Fig. D4 External forces and moments

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D. Engine data

D5.3.1 Stays

Fitting of lateral stays between the upper platform


level and the hull reduces transmitted vibration and Free end
lateral rocking (see figures D5 and D6). Two stay lateral

types can be considered:


– Hydraulic stays: installed on the exhaust and
on the fuel side of the engine (lateral).
– Friction stays: installed on the engine exhaust
side (lateral).

Hydraulic stays

fuel side exhaust


side Driving end

F10.5278/2

Fig. D6 General arrangement of friction stays

D5.3.2 Electrically driven compensator

If for some reasons it is not possible to install lateral


Friction stays stays, an electrically driven compensator can be
installed which is able to reduce the lateral engine
vibrations and their effect on the ship’s superstruc-
ture. It is important to note, that only one harmonic
excitation can be compensated at a time. In the
case of an ‘X-type’ vibration mode, two compensa-
tors, one fitted at each end of the engine top, are
necessary.

F10.5278/1

Fig. D5 General arrangement of lateral stays

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RT-flex96C Engine Selection and Project Manual

D. Engine data

D5.4 Longitudinal engine vibration D5.6 Axial vibration


(pitching)
The shafting system is also able to vibrate in axial
In some cases with five-cylinder engines, direction. This vibration is due to axial excitations
specially those coupled to very stiff intermediate coming from the engine and the propeller and due
and propeller shafts, the engine foundation can be to the coupling effect with torsional vibrations. In
excited at a frequency close to the full load speed order to limit the influence of these excitations, and
range resonance. Thus leading to increased axial limit the level of axial vibration, an integrated axial
(longitudinal) vibration at the engine top and as a damper is fitted to the crankshaft of all Sulzer RTA
result of this to vibrations in the ship’s superstruc- and RT-flex engines.
ture. In order to prevent this vibration, stiffness of
the double-bottom structure should be as high as D5.7 Hull vibration
possible.
For the Sulzer RT-flex96C, as the minimum The hull and accommodation are susceptible to
number of cylinders is six, no longitudinal vibration caused by the propeller, machinery and
stays are needed. sea conditions. Controlling hull vibration is
achieved by a number of different means and may
require fitting longitudinal and lateral stays to the
D5.5 Torsional vibration main engine and installing second order balancer.

This involves the whole shafting system compris- Eliminating hull vibration requires co-operation be-
ing crankshaft, propulsion shafting, propeller, en- tween the propeller manufacturer, naval architect,
gine running gear, flexible couplings and power shipyard and engine builder.
take off. It is caused by gas and inertia forces, as
well as by variations of the propeller torque.
It is vitally important to limit torsional vibration in
order to avoid damage to the shafting. If the vibra-
tion at a critical speed reaches dangerous stress
levels, the corresponding speed range has to be
passed through rapidly (barred-speed range).
However, barred-speed ranges can be reduced,
shifted, and in some cases avoided by installing a
heavy flywheel at the driving end, and/or a tuning
wheel, or a torsional vibration damper at the free
end of the crankshaft.

Torsional vibration dampers of various designs are


available to reduce energy on different levels of
vibration.
Lower energy vibrations are absorbed by viscous
dampers.
Higher energy vibrations are absorbed by a spring
loaded damper type. In this case the damper is
supplied with oil from the engine’s lubricating sys-
tem, and depending on the the torsional vibration
energy to be absorbed can dissipate up to 100 kW.

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D. Engine data

D5.8 External forces and moments

Engine type: Sulzer RT-flex96C Number of cylinders 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 14


Rating R1: 5720 kW/cyl. at 102 rpm Engine power kW 34 320 40 040 45 760 51 480 57 200 62 920 68 640 80 080
Massmoments / Forces
Free forces
F1V [$kN] 0 0 0 0 43 0 0 15
F1H [$kN] 0 0 0 0 45 0 0 15
F2V [$kN] 0 0 0 0 26 0 0 21
F4V [$kN] 0 0 0 0 22 0 0 86
External moments *1)
M1V [$kNm] 0 562 628 1941 51 1347 0 45
M1H [$kNm] 0 580 698 1997 42 1388 0 45
M2V [$kNm] 6753 1960 0 2204 1612 1769 0 11
M4V [$kNm] 345 981 399 497 489 188 690 588
Lateral H-moments MLH *2) *3)
Order 1 [$kNm] 0 0 0 0 59 0 0 22
Order 2 [$kNm] 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 1
Order 3 [$kNm] 0 0 0 0 73 0 0 34
Order 4 [$kNm] 0 0 0 0 253 0 0 969
Order 5 [$kNm] 0 0 0 0 455 0 0 180
Order 6 [$kNm] 2088 0 0 0 203 0 0 75
Order 7 [$kNm] 0 1596 0 0 191 0 0 141
Order 8 [$kNm] 0 0 1082 0 32 0 0 69
Order 9 [$kNm] 0 0 0 672 8 0 0 41
Order 10 [$kNm] 0 0 0 0 420 0 0 156
Order 11 [$kNm] 0 0 0 0 15 279 0 22
Order 12 [$kNm] 107 0 0 0 1 0 214 3
Order 13 [$kNm] 0 0 0 0 23 0 0 10
Order 14 [$kNm] 0 128 0 0 22 0 0 219
Lateral X-moments MLX *3)
Order 1 [$kNm] 0 314 364 1082 13 751 0 24
Order 2 [$kNm] 1083 314 0 354 261 284 0 1
Order 3 [$kNm] 951 1041 1483 1799 2229 2695 3228 4234
Order 4 [$kNm] 1232 3501 1423 1774 1750 673 2464 2117
Order 5 [$kNm] 0 256 3570 1269 272 1687 0 751
Order 6 [$kNm] 0 35 0 2258 679 880 0 505
Order 7 [$kNm] 0 0 29 104 1983 174 0 674
Order 8 [$kNm] 183 14 0 49 200 1348 366 38
Order 9 [$kNm] 249 28 9 0 55 25 845 121
Order 10 [$kNm] 61 173 0 16 36 11 0 123
Order 11 [$kNm] 0 105 149 12 15 0 0 450
Order 12 [$kNm] 0 7 29 122 18 5 0 25
Order 13 [$kNm] 0 2 106 38 148 7 0 102
Order 14 [$kNm] 26 0 0 38 41 193 0 52
Torque variation (Synthesis value) [$kNm] 2155 1651 1119 681 1501 310 241 1596

Remarks: *1) The external moments M1 and M2 are related to R1 speed. For other engine speeds the corresponding external moments
are calculated with the relation: MRx = MR1 S (nRx/nR1)2.
No engine-fitted 2nd order balancer available. If reduction on M2v is needed, an external compensator has to be applied.
*2) The resulting lateral guide force can be calculated as follows: FL = MLH S 0.241 [kN].
*3) The values for other engine ratings are available on request.
— Crankshaft type: forged.
Table D1 External forces and moments

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– Rev. 0 1 D–8 Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd
RT-flex96C Engine Selection and Project Manual

D. Engine data

D5.9 Summary of countermeasures for dynamic effects

The following tables indicate where special attention is to be given to dynamic effects and the counter-
measures required to reduce them.

External mass moments

Number of cylinders 2nd order balancer *2)


6 balancing countermeasure is likely needed *1) A
7–14 balancing countermeasure is not relevant C
Remarks: *1) No engine-fitted 2nd order balancer available.
If reduction on M2v is needed, an external compensator has to be applied.
*2) Refer also to figure D3.
Table D2 Countermeasures for external mass moments

Lateral and longitudinal rocking

Number of cylinders Lateral stays Longitudinal stays


6 B C
7 C C
8 A C
9 B C
10 B C
11 A C
12 B C
14 A C
Remarks: A: The countermeasure indicated is needed.
B: The countermeasure indicated may be needed and provision for the corresponding
countermeasure is recommended.
C: The countermeasure indicated is not needed.
Table D3 Countermeasures for lateral and longitudinal rocking

Torsional vibration & axial vibration


Where installations incorporate PTO arrangements further investigation is required and Wärtsilä
Switzerland Ltd, Winterthur, should be contacted.

Number of cylinders Torsional vibrations Axial vibrations


An integrated axial damper is fitted
Detailed calculations have to be
as standard to reduce the axial
carried out for every installation,
vibration in the crankshaft.
countermeasures to be selected ac-
6–14 However, the effect of the coupled
cordingly (shaft diameter, critical or
axial vibration to the propulsion
barred speed range, flywheel,
shafting components should be
tuning wheel, damper).
checked by calculation.
Table D4 Countermeasures for torsional & axial vibration

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– Issue – Rev. 1 0
– Rev.
Engine Selection and Project Manual RT-flex96C

D. Engine data

D6 Order forms for vibration calculations and simulation

For system dynamics and vibration analysis, Minimum required data needed for provisional
please send or fax a copy of the completed rel- calculation are highlighted in the forms (tables D5
evant forms to the following address: to D8) as follows:

Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd


Dept. 7055
‘Engine and System Dynamics’
PO Box 414
CH-8401 Winterthur
Switzerland
Fax: +41-52-262 07 25

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– Issue X.04X.04 – Rev.
– Rev. 0 1 D–10 Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd
RT-flex96C Engine Selection and Project Manual

D. Engine data

D6.1 Marine installation Torsional Vibration Calculation

Client Information Name: Phone:

Order Date: Order deadline:

Project Project name:

Shipyard: Hull No.:

Classification society:

Engine Engine type:

Engine power: kW Engine speed: rpm

Rotation: clockwise j anticlockwise j Engine tuning (RT-flex): Standard j DeltaTuning j

Barred speed range accepted: Y j N j if yes, in which speed range: rpm

Shafting

Intermediate shaft diameter: mm Propeller shaft diameter: mm

Intermediate shaft length: mm Propeller shaft length: mm

Intermediate shaft UTS: N/mm2 Propeller shaft UTS: N/mm2

If possible, a drawing or sketch of the propulsion shafting should be enclosed. In case the
installation consists of a CP-Propeller, a detailed drawing of the oil-distribution shaft is needed.

Propeller

Type: FP j CP j Number of blades: 4 j 5 j 6 j

Diameter: m Mass: kg

Mean pitch: m Expanded area blade ratio:

Inertia in air: kgm2 Inertia with entr. water*: kgm2

*In case of a CP-Propeller, the inertia in water for full pitch has to be given and if possible,
the inertia of the entrained water depending on the pitch to be enclosed.

PTO Type: Free end gear (RTA) j Tunnel gear j Camshaft gear (RTA) j Shaft generator j

PTO-Gear Manufacturer:

Detailed drawings with the gearwheel inertias and gear ratios to be enclosed.

PTO-Clutches/Elastic couplings

The arrangement and the type of couplings to be enclosed.

PTO-Generator Manufacturer: Service speed range: rpm

Generator speed: rpm Rated voltage: V

Rated apparent power: kVA Grid frequency: Hz

Rotor inertia: kgm2 Power factor cos ϕ:

Frequency control system: No j Thyristor j Constant speed gear j

If possible, drawing of generator shaft to be enclosed

Minimum required data needed for provisional calculation.

Table D5 Vibration calculation form (ad-t1-tvc-marine-order-form)

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– Issue – Rev. 1 0
– Rev.
Engine Selection and Project Manual RT-flex96C

D. Engine data

D6.2 Testbed installation Torsional Vibration Calculation

Client Information Name: Phone:

Order Date: Order deadline:

Project Project name:

Shipyard: Hull No.:

Classification society:

Engine Engine type:

Engine power: kW Engine speed: rpm

Rotation: clockwise j anticlockwise j Engine tuning (RT-flex): Standard j DeltaTuning j

Flywheel inertia: kgm2 Front disc inertia: kgm2

TV damper type / designation: TV damper manufacturer:

Details of the dynamic characteristics of TV damper to be enclosed if already known.

Shafting

Intermediate shaft diameter: mm Intermediate shaft length: mm

Intermediate shaft UTS: N/mm2 Propeller shaft UTS: N/mm2

A drawing or sketch of the propulsion shafting should be enclosed.

Water brake

Type: Manufacturer:

Inertia of rotor with entr. water: kgm2 Drw.No.:

Elasticity of brake shaft: rad/Nm (between flange and rotor)

PTO Type: Free end gear j Camshaft gear j

PTO-Gear Manufacturer:

Detailed drawings with the gearwheel inertias and gear ratios to be enclosed.

PTO-Clutches/Elastic couplings

The arrangement and the type of couplings to be enclosed.

PT-Generator Manufacturer: Service speed range: rpm

Generator speed: rpm

Rotor inertia: kgm2 Rotor mass: kg

If possible, drawing of generator shaft to be enclosed

Minimum required data needed for provisional calculation.

Table D6 Vibration calculation form (ad-t1-tvc-testbed-order-form)

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– Rev. 0 1 D–12 Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd
RT-flex96C Engine Selection and Project Manual

D. Engine data

D6.3 Marine installation Coupled Axial Vibration Calculation

Client Information Name: Phone:

Order Date: Order deadline:

Project Project name:

Shipyard: Hull No.:

Classification society:

Engine Engine type:

Engine power: kW Engine speed: rpm

Rotation: clockwise j anticlockwise j Engine tuning (RT-flex): Standard j DeltaTuning j

Flywheel inertia: kgm2 Flywheel mass: kg

Front disc inertia: kgm2 Front disc mass: kg

TV damper type / designation: TV damper manufacturer:

Details of the dynamic characteristics of TV damper to be enclosed if already known.

Shafting

Intermediate shaft diameter: mm Propeller shaft diameter: mm

Intermediate shaft length: mm Propeller shaft length: mm

Intermediate shaft UTS: N/mm2 Propeller shaft UTS: N/mm2

If possible, a drawing or sketch of the propulsion shafting should be enclosed. In case the
installation consists of a CP-Propeller, a detailed drawing of the oil-distribution shaft is needed

Propeller

Type: FP j CP j Number of blades: 4 j 5 j 6 j

Diameter: m

Mean pitch: m Expanded area blade ratio:

Inertia in air: kgm2 Mass in air: kg

Inertia with entr. water*: kgm2 Mass with entrained water: kg

*In case of a CP-Propeller, the inertia in water for full pitch has to be given and if possible,
the inertia of the entrained water depending on the pitch to be enclosed.

PTO Type: Free end gear (RTA) j Tunnel gear j Camshaft gear (RTA) j Shaft generator j

PTO-Gear Manufacturer:

Detailed drawings with the gearwheel inertias and gear ratios to be enclosed.

PTO-Clutches/Elastic couplings

The arrangement and the type of couplings to be enclosed.

PTO-Generator Manufacturer: Service speed range: rpm

Generator speed: rpm

Rotor inertia: kgm2 Rotor mass: kg

If possible, drawing of generator shaft to be enclosed

Table D7 Vibration calculation form (ad-t1-avc-marine-order-form)

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– Issue – Rev. 1 0
– Rev.
Engine Selection and Project Manual RT-flex96C

D. Engine data

D6.4 Marine installation Bending Vibration & Alignment Calculation

Client Information Name: Phone:

Order Date: Order deadline:

Project Project name:

Shipyard: Hull No.:

Classification society:

Engine Engine type:

Engine power: kW Engine speed: rpm

Rotation: clockwise j anticlockwise j Engine tuning (RT-flex): Standard j DeltaTuning j

Flywheel inertia: kgm2 Flywheel mass: kg

Front disc inertia: kgm2 Front disc mass: kg

TV damper type / designation: TV damper manufacturer:

Details of the dynamic characteristics of TV damper to be enclosed if already known.

Shafting

Intermediate shaft diameter: mm Propeller shaft diameter: mm

Intermediate shaft length: mm Propeller shaft length: mm

Intermediate shaft UTS: N/mm2 Propeller shaft UTS: N/mm2

A drawing or sketch of the propulsion shafting should be enclosed. In case the installation
consists of a CP-Propeller, a detailed drawing of the oil-distribution shaft is needed

Propeller Type: FP j CP j Number of blades: 4 j 5 j 6 j

Diameter: m

Mean pitch: m Expanded area blade ratio:

Inertia in air: kgm2 Mass in air: kg

Inertia with entr. water*: kgm2 Mass with entrained water: kg

PTO Type: Free end gear (RTA) j Tunnel gear j Camshaft gear (RTA) j Shaft generator j

PTO-Gear Manufacturer:

Detailed drawings with the gearwheel inertias, masses and gear ratios to be enclosed.

PTO-Clutches/Elastic couplings

The arrangement and the type of couplings to be enclosed.

PTO-Generator Manufacturer: Service speed range: rpm

Generator speed: rpm

Rotor inertia: kgm2 Rotor mass: Kg

Shaft bearings Type:

Stiffness horizontal: N/m Stiffness vertical: N/m

Sterntube stiffn. horiz.: N/m Sterntube stiffn. vertical: N/m

Table D8 Vibration calculation form (ad-t1-bending&alignment-order-form)

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– Issue X.04X.04 – Rev.
– Rev. 0 1 D–14 Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd
RT-flex96C Engine Selection and Project Manual

D. Engine data

D7 Turbocharger and scavenge air cooler

The selections of turbochargers covering the types The data can be calculated directly by the winGTD-
ABB TPL and MHI MET are shown in figures D8 program (see section J1.2). Parameters and de-
and D9. The selection of scavenge air coolers fol- tails of the scavenge air coolers (SAC) are shown
lows the demand of the selected turbochargers. in table D9 and figure D7, weights of turbochargers
in table D10.

Parameters for single-stage scavenge air coolers


Insert (WCH recommended cooler)
Cooler Water flow Design Pressure drop *1) Water Length Mass
air flow content (incl. conn. tubes) [tonnes]
small bundle large bundle
[m3/h] [kg/h] Water [bar] Air [mbar] [ dm3] [mm]
unit unit
SAC47F 330 195 000 0.55 t 20 600 2810 (3070) 1.0 3.6
Parameters for two-stage scavenge air coolers
SAC48F LT 220 195 000 0.55 490 2810 (3070) 1.0 3.6
t 20
SAC48F HT 110 195 000 0.27 110 2810 (3070) 1.0 3.5

Remarks: *1) At design flow


Table D9 Scavenge air cooler parameters

Single-stage cooler Two-stage cooler

water outlet (HT)

water inlet water inlet (LT)


Air flow Air flow

water outlet water outlet (LT)

water inlet (HT)


connecting tubes ”pre-stage” Remarks:
All data refer to cooler specification.
Singlestage SAC equipped with two on waterside interconnected cooler tube units ("pre
stage"). The smaller unit being placed upstream of air flow, facilitates cleaning procedure.
For twostage cooling application please contact Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd.
F10.5242

Fig. D7 Scavenge air cooler details (rated at R1)

Type TPL85-B11 TPL85-B12 ––


ABB
Mass [tonnes] 10.4 ––
Type MET83SD MET83SE MET83SEII ––
MHI (Mitsubishi)
Mass [tonnes] 10.5 ––

Table D10Turbocharger weights

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Engine Selection and Project Manual RT-flex96C

D. Engine data

D7.1 Turbocharger and scavenge air cooler selection

The SAC and TC selection for the engines RT-flex96C is given in the layout fields in figures D8 to D9.

Power [%] Power [%] Power [%]


R1 R1 R1
100 100 100
6RT-flex96C 7RT-flex96C 8RT-flex96C
95 95 95

R3 R3 R3
90 90 90
2 x TPL85-B12
2 x SAC47/48
85 85 85

2 x TPL85-B11 2 x TPL85-B11
80 2 x SAC47/48 80 2 x SAC47/48 80

75 75 75 2 x TPL85-B11
2 x SAC47/48

70 70 70
R4 R1: 34320 kW / 102 rpm R2 R4 R1: 40040 kW / 102 rpm R2 R4 R1: 45760 kW / 102 rpm R2

90 95 100 90 95 100 90 95 100


Speed [%] Speed [%] Speed [%]

Power [%] Power [%] Power [%]


R1 R1 R1
100 100 100
9RT-flex96C 10RT-flex96C 11RT-flex96C 3 x TPL85-B12
95 95 95
3 x SAC47/48
3 x TPL85-B11
R3 R3 R3
90 3 x SAC47/48 90 90

85 85 85

3 x TPL85-B11 3 x TPL85-B11
80 80 3 x SAC47/48 80
2 x TPL85-B12 3 x SAC47/48
2 x SAC47/48
75 75 75

70 70 70
R4 R1: 51480 kW / 102 rpm R2 R4 R1: 57200 kW / 102 rpm R2 R4 R1: 62920 kW / 102 rpm R2

90 95 100 90 95 100 90 95 100


Speed [%] Speed [%] Speed [%]

Power [%] Power [%]


R1 R1
100 100
12RT-flex96C 14RT-flex96C
95 95

R3 R3
90 90
4 x TPL85-B11
3 x TPL85-B12 4 x SAC47/48
85 3 x SAC47/48 85

80 80

3 x TPL85-B11 3 x TPL85-B12
75 75 3 x SAC47/48
3 x SAC47/48

70 70
R4 R1: 68640 kW / 102 rpm R2 R4 R1: 80080 kW / 102 rpm R2

90 95 100 90 95 100
Speed [%] Speed [%]

F10.52298

Fig. D8 Turbocharger and scavenge air cooler selection (ABB TPL type turbocharger)

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RT-flex96C Engine Selection and Project Manual

D. Engine data

Power [%] Power [%] Power [%]


R1 R1 R1
100 100 100
6RT-flex96C 7RT-flex96C 8RT-flex96C
95 95 95

R3 R3 R3
90 2 x MET83SE 90 2 x MET83SE 90
2 x SAC47/48 2 x SAC47/48
2 x MET83SEII
85 85 85 2 x SAC47/48

80 80 80

2 x MET83SD 2 x MET83SD 2 x MET83SD


75 75 75
2 x SAC47/48 2 x SAC47/48 2 x SAC47/48

70 70 70
R4 R1: 34320 kW / 102 rpm R2 R4 R1: 40040 kW / 102 rpm R2 R4 R1: 45760 kW / 102 rpm R2

90 95 100 90 95 100 90 95 100


Speed [%] Speed [%] Speed [%]

Power [%] Power [%] Power [%]


R1 R1 R1
100 100 100
9RT-flex96C 10RT-flex96C 11RT-flex96C
95 95 95 3 x MET83SEII
3 x SAC47/48
R3 R3 R3
90 3 x MET83SE 90 3 x MET83SE 90 3 x MET83SE
3 x SAC47/48 3 x SAC47/48 3 x SAC47/48

85 3 x MET83SD 85 85
3 x SAC47/48

80 80 80

2 x MET83SEII 3 x MET83SD 3 x MET83SD


75 75 75
2 x SAC47/48 3 x SAC47/48 3 x SAC47/48

70 70 70
R4 R1: 51480 kW / 102 rpm R2 R4 R1: 57200 kW / 102 rpm R2 R4 R1: 62920 kW / 102 rpm R2

90 95 100 90 95 100 90 95 100


Speed [%] Speed [%] Speed [%]

Power [%] Power [%]


R1 R1
100 100
12RT-flex96C 14RT-flex96C
95 95

R3 R3
90 90 4 x MET83SE
4 x SAC47/48
3 x MET83SEII
85 3 x SAC47/48 85
4 x MET83SD
4 x SAC47/48
80 80

3 x MET83SD
75 75 3 x MET83SEII
3 x SAC47/48
3 x SAC47/48

70 70
R4 R1: 68640 kW / 102 rpm R2 R4 R1: 80080 kW / 102 rpm R2

90 95 100 90 95 100
Speed [%] Speed [%]
F10.52299

Fig. D9 Turbocharger and scavenge air cooler selection (MHI MET type turbocharger)

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Engine Selection and Project Manual RT-flex96C

D. Engine data

D8 Auxiliary blower
For manoeuvring and operating at low powers,
electrically driven auxiliary blowers must be used
to provide sufficient combustion air.
Table D11 shows the number of blowers required.

Number of cylinders 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 14
Number of auxiliary air blowers required 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 4

Table D11 Number of auxiliary blowers per engine

D9 Electric power requirement in [kW]

Electrical power Power requirement [kW] referring to numbers of cylinders


Supply voltage
consumers 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 14

Auxiliary blowers *1) 380 VAC / 50 Hz 2 x 80 2 x 95 2 x 104 2 x 104 2 x 104 2 x 142 2 x 142 4 x 95
(shaft input, estimated values) 440 VAC / 60 Hz 2 x 80 2 x 95 2 x 115 2 x 115 2 x 115 2 x 145 2 x 145 4 x 95
380 VAC / 50 Hz 9 12.5 –
Turning gear
440 VAC / 60 Hz 11 15 22
Cylinder lubrication CLU-3 *2) 380/440 VAC / 50/60 Hz 1.5
380 VAC / 50 Hz 2 x (to be determined)
Control oil pumps
440 VAC / 60 Hz 2 x (to be determined)
Servo automatic filter *2) 380/440 VAC / 50/60 Hz 0.1
WECS power supply, box E85 220 VAC 50/60 Hz
1.6 1.8 2.0 2.2 2.4 2.6 2.8 3.2
*2) single phase
220 VAC 50/60 Hz 0.8 1.0 1.2
Servo oil pump control, box E87
single phase (for 4 pumps) (for 5 pumps) (for 6 pumps)
Propulsion control system 24 V DC UPS acc. to maker specifications
Additional monitoring devices acc. to
acc. to maker specifications
(e.g. oil mist detector etc.) maker specifications

Remark: *1) Power requirement of blower (shaft input) is indicated. The actual electric power requirement depends
on the size, type and voltage/frequency of the installed electric motor. The output of the installed motor should be
at least 10% higher than the maximum power demand at the shaft of the auxiliary blower.
Direct starting or Star-Delta starting to be specified when ordering.
*2) Two redundant power supplies from different feeder panels required; indicated power for each power supply.

Table D12 Electric power consumers

D10 Pressure and temperature ranges

Table D13 represents a summary of the required the pressure losses in the piping system, filters,
pressure and temperature ranges at continuous coolers, valves, etc., and the vertical level pres-
service rating (CSR). The gauge pressures are sure difference between pump suction and pres-
measured about 5 m above the crankshaft centre sure gauge to the values in the table on the next
line. The pump delivery head is obtained by adding page.

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– Issue X.04X.04 – Rev.
– Rev. 0 1 D–18 Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd
RT-flex96C Engine Selection and Project Manual

D. Engine data

Gauge pressure Temperature


Location of limit values [bar] limit values [°C]
Medium System measurement
Min Max Min Max Diff
Inlet 3.0 5.0 – –
Fresh water Cylinder cooling max 15
Outlet each cylinder – – 85 95

LT circuit Inlet cooler 1.0 4.0 25 36


* 1)
(single-stage SAC) Outlet cooler – – – –
Fresh water Inlet cooler 2.0 4.0 25 36
LT circuit
(Scavenge air * 1)
(two-stage SAC) Outlet cooler – – – –
cooling)
HT circuit Inlet cooler 3.0 5.0 70 80

(two-stage SAC) Outlet cooler – – – 120
Lubricating oil
Crosshead bearing oil Supply 10.0 12.0 40 50 –
(high pressure)
Servo oil Servo oil pump inlet 3.8 6.5 – – –
Supply 4.8 6.0 40 50 –
Main bearing oil
Outlet – – – – –
Inlet 4.8 6.0 40 50
Piston cooling oil max 30
Outlet – – – –
Thrust bearing Outlet – – – 65 –

Torsional vibration damper Supply – – – – –


(if steel spring damper is used) Inlet casing 1.0 – – – –
Lubricating oil
(low pressure) Supply 4.8 6.0 – – –
Integrated axial vibration damper (detuner)
Damp. chamber 1.7 – – – –

Turbocharger bearing oil Inlet 1.0 – – – –


(ABB TPL on engine lub. oil system) Outlet – – – 110 –

Turbocharger bearing oil Inlet 1.3 – – – –


(ABB TPL with separate lub. oil system) Outlet – – – 120 –
Inlet 0.7 – – – –
Turbocharger bearing oil (MHI MET)
Outlet – – – 85 –
Booster (supply unit) Inlet 7.0 *2) 10.0 *3) – 150 –
Fuel oil
After retaining valve (supply unit) Return 3.0 5.0 – – –
Intake from engine room (pressure drop, max) Air filter / Silencer max 10 mbar – – –
Intake from outside (pressure drop, max) Ducting and filter max 20 mbar – – –
Scavenge air
New SAC max 30 mbar – – –
Cooling (pressure drop)
Fouled SAC max 50 mbar – – –
Starting air Engine inlet 12 25 or 30 – – –
6.0 7.5
Control air Engine inlet – – –
Air normal 6.5
6.0 7.5 – – –
Air spring air for exhaust valve Main distributor
normal 6.5 – – –
Deviation
After each cylinder – – – 515
Exhaust gas "50

Exhaust gas Before each TC – – – 515 –


Design maximum 30 mbar – – –
Manifold after turbocharger
Fouled maximum 50 mbar – – –

Remark: *1) The water flow has to be within the prescribed limits.
*2) At 100 % engine power.
*3) At stand-by condition; during commissioning of the fuel oil
system the fuel oil pressure is adjusted to 10 bar.
–– See alarm setting values in tables H2 to H4.
Table D13 Pressure and temperature ranges

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Engine Selection and Project Manual RT-flex96C

D. Engine data

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RT-flex96C Engine Selection and Project Manual

C. Engine description

The Sulzer RT-flex96C engine is a camshaft-less


Overall sizes of engines 6 cyl. 14 cyl.
low-speed, direct-reversible, two-stroke engine,
fully electronically controlled. Length [m] 12.96 27.31
The Sulzer RT-flex96C is designed for running on
Height [m] 12.72 12.72
a wide range of fuels from marine diesel oil (MDO)
to heavy fuel oils (HFO) of different qualities. Dry weight [t] 1160 2300

Main features:
Bore 960 mm The design of the Sulzer RT-flex96C includes the
Stroke 2500 mm well-proven features of the RTA engines like the
Number of cylinders 6 to 12 and 14 bore-cooling principle for the pistons, cylinder
liners, cylinder covers and exhaust valve seats.
Main parameters (R1):
Power (MCR) 5720 kW/cyl
Speed (MCR) 102 rpm The RT-flex system (figure C1)
Mean effect. press. 18.6 bar
Mean piston speed 8.5 m/s The classic RTA configuration of fuel injection
pumps and valve drives with the camshaft and its
The Sulzer RT-flex96C is available with 6 to 12 and gear train is replaced by a compact set of supply
14 cylinders rated at 5720 kW/cyl to provide a pumps in the supply unit and the common rail with
maximum output of 80 080 kW for the 14-cylinder the integrated electronic Wärtsilä engine control
engine (primary engine data on table A1). system WECS-9520.

RT-flex engine RTA engine

Rail unit Fuel pump

Supply unit

Camshaft
Servomotor
Start air distr.

Supply unit
drive
Camshaft drive

Electronic
system control
(individually located)
F10.5252

Fig. C1 Significant difference between Sulzer RTA engines and RT-flex engines.

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Engine Selection and Project Manual RT-flex96C

C. Engine description

All engine key-functions like fuel injection, exhaust


valve drives, engine starting and cylinder lubrica-
tion are fully under electronic control. The timing of
the fuel injection, its volumetric and various injec-
tion patterns are regulated and controlled by the
WECS-9520 control system.

Engine installation and operation


Compared with the RTA engines, the RT-flex has
no additional or particular requirements for the en-
gine installation and shipboard operation.
The engine outline dimensions and foundation, the
installation, the engine key-parameters, the in-
tegration into ship automation and other interfaces
of the RT-flex are identical with the RTA engines.

The major benefits of the RT-flex system are:


• Adaptation to different operating modes.
• Adaptation to different fuels.
• Delta Tuning, as an optional application, for re-
duced brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC)
in the part load range below 90%.
• Optimised fuel consumption, especially at part
Remark: * Direction of rotation: clockwise as standard
load. (viewed from the propeller towards the engine).
• Precise speed regulation, in particular at slow Note: This cross section is considered as general
steaming down to about 15 to 12 rpm. information only
F10.5263
• Smokeless mode for slow steaming.
Fig. C2 Cross section of a typical Sulzer RT-flex engine
• Benefits in terms of operating costs, mainten-
ance requirement and compliance with
emissions regulations. 3. Semi-built crankshaft.

Common design features of RTA and 4. Main bearing jack bolts for easier assembly
RT-flex engines: and disassembly of white metal shell bearings.

1. Welded bedplate with integrated thrust bear- 5. Thin-shell white metal bottom-end bearings.
ings and main bearings designed as large thin-
shell white metal bearings. 6. Crosshead with crosshead pin and single-
piece white metal large surface bearings lubri-
2. Sturdy engine structure with stiff thin-wall box cated by a separate high-pressure oil supply
type columns and cast iron cylinder blocks for hydrostatic lift off.
attached to the bedplate by pre-tensioned
vertical tie rods. 7. Rigid cast iron cylinder monoblock.

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RT-flex96C Engine Selection and Project Manual

C. Engine description

8. Special grey cast iron cylinder liners with bore 11. Constant-pressure turbocharging system
cooling and load dependent cylinder lubrica- comprising high-efficiency turbochargers and
tion. auxiliary blowers for low-load operation.

9. Bore-cooled cylinder cover of high-grade ma- 12. TriboPack designed as a standard feature for
terial with a bolted-on exhaust valve cage con- excellent piston running and extended TBO up
taining a Nimonic 80A exhaust valve. to 3 years.

10. Piston with crown cooled by combined jet-


shaker oil cooling.

The RT-flex key parts:


WECS-9520
control
13. Supply unit: High-efficiency fuel pumps feed-
ing the 1000 bar fuel manifold. 15
Volumetric
injection
14. Rail unit (Common rail): Both, common rail in- control
jection and exhaust valve actuation are con-
trolled by quick acting solenoid valves (Sulzer
Rail Valve LP-1).

15. Electronic engine control WECS-9520 for


monitoring and controlling the engine’s key- 14
functions.
13

F10.5250

Fig. C3 Sulzer RT-flex system


comprising supply unit (13), common rail (14),
electronic engine control system WECS-9520
(15)

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Engine Selection and Project Manual RT-flex96C

C. Engine description

25.74.07.40 – Issue X.04 – Rev. 0 C–4 Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd


RT-flex96C Engine Selection and Project Manual

I. Engine emissions

I2 Engine noise
It is very important to protect the ship’s crew/pass- and gas inlet of turbocharger) should be equipped
engers from the effects of machinery space noise. with the standard insulation, and the turbocharger
Therefore the scavenge air ducts and the exhaust with the standard intake silencer.
duct system (both expansion joints of gas outlet

I2.1 Engine surface sound pressure level

Figure I3 shows the average air borne noise level, measured noise level will normally be about 3–5
measured at 1m distance and at nominal MCR. dB(A) higher than the average noise level of the
Near to the turbocharger (air intake) the maximum engine.

Overall
Lp [dB] average LpA in dB(A)
130
130

120
120

110
110
14RT-flex96C
100
100 6RT-flex96C

90
14RT-flex96C
6RT-flex96C
80
80

70
70

60
20 30 40 50 NR60

50
31.5 63 125 250 500 1k 2k 4k 8k
Octave band centre frequency in [Hz]
Average values Lp in dB in comparison with ISO’s NR-curves and overall average values LpA
F105292 in dB(A), at nominal MCR.
Fig. I3 Engine sound pressure level at 1 m distance

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Engine Selection and Project Manual RT-flex96C

I. Engine emissions

I2.2 Engine exhaust sound pressure level at funnel top


The sound pressure level from the engine exhaust Depending on the actual noise level allowed on the
gas system without boiler and silencer – given in bridge wing – which is normally maximum 60–70
figure I4 – is related to: dB(A) – a simple flow silencer of the absorption
• a distance of of one metre from the edge of the type may be necessary and placed after the ex-
exhaust gas pipe opening (uptake) haust gas boiler.
• an angle of 30° to the gas flow direction The silencer is dimensioned for a gas velocity of
• nominal MCR approximately 35 m/s with a pressure loss of ap-
prox. 2 mbar at specified MCR.
Each doubling of the distances reduces the noise
level for about 6dB.

Overall
Lp [dB] average LpA in dB(A)
140

130
130

14RT-flex96C
120
120
6RT-flex96C
110
110

100
100

90 14RT-flex96C

6RT-flex96C
80
80

70
70

60
20 30 40 50 NR60

50
31.5 63 125 250 500 1k 2k 4k 8k
Octave band centre frequency in [Hz]
Average values Lp in dB in comparison with ISO’s NR-curves and overall average values LpA
in dB(A), at nominal MCR; at 1m distance from the edge of the exhaust gas pipe opening at an
F10.5293 angle of 30° to the gas flow. Exhaust gas system without boiler and silencer.
Fig. I4 Engine exhaust gas sound pressure level at funnel top

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RT-flex96C Engine Selection and Project Manual

I. Engine emissions

I2.3 Engine structure borne noise


The vibrational energy is propagated via engine The sound pressure levels in the accommodations
structure, bedplate flanges and engine foundation can be estimated with the aid of standard empirical
to the ship’s structure which starts to vibrate, and formulas and the vibration velocity levels given in
thus emits noise. figure I5.

Lv, re 5E-8 m/s [d/B]


100

90

80

70

60

14RT-flex96C
50
6RT-flex96C

40

30
31.5 63 125 250 500 1k 2k 4k 8k 16k
Octave band centre frequency in [Hz]

F10.5294 Structure borne noise level Lv in dB at nominal MCR.


Fig. I5 Structure borne noise level at engine feet vertical

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Engine Selection and Project Manual RT-flex96C

I. Engine emissions

25.74.07.40 – Issue X.04 – Rev. 0 I–6 Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd


RT-flex96C

Engine Selection
and Project Manual
Issue October 2004

Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd Tel. +41 52 262 49 22


PO Box 414 Fax +41 52 212 49 17
CH-8401 Winterthur http://www.wartsila.com
Switzerland

 2004 Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd, Printed in Switzerland


This manual covers the following Sulzer diesel engines:

The Sulzer RT-flex96C engines with the following MCR rating:

– Power per cylinder 5720 kW 7780 bhp


– Speed 102 rpm

This issue of the Engine Selection and Project Manual (ESPM) is the first edition
covering the Sulzer 6–12RT-flex96C and 14RT-flex96C engines.

Attention is drawn to the following:

a) All data are related to engines tuned for compliance with the
IMO-2000 regulations.
b) The engine performance data (BSFC, BSEF and tEaT) and other data
can be obtained from the winGTD-program.
c) The inclusion of information referring to IMO-2000 regulations.
d) The inclusion of information referring to winGTD (version 2.8) and EnSel
(version 4.3) on the CD-ROM included in this manual. The CD-ROM
also contains the complete manual (ESPM).

Revision:
Rev. 1 performed: February 23rd 2005

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RT-flex96C Engine Selection and Project Manual

List of contents

A Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A–1

A1 Primary engine data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A–2

A2 Delta Tuning of RT-flex engines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A–3


A2.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A–3
A2.2 Delta Tuning outline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A–3
A2.3 Further aspects of Delta Tuning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A–4

B Considerations on engine selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B–1

B1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B–1

B2 Layout field . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B–1


B2.1 Rating points R1, R2, R3 and R4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B–2
B2.2 Influence of propeller revolutions on the power requirement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B–2

B3 Load range . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B–3


B3.1 Propeller curves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B–3
B3.2 Sea trial power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B–3
B3.3 Sea margin (SM) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B–4
B3.4 Light running margin (LR) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B–4
B3.5 Engine margin (EM) or operational margin (OM) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B–5
B3.5.1 Continuous service rating (CSR=NOR=NCR) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B–5
B3.5.2 Contract maximum continuous rating (CMCR = Rx) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B–5
B3.6 Load range limits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B–5
B3.7 Load range with main-engine driven generator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B–7

B4 Ambient temperature consideration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B–8


B4.1 Engine air inlet: operating temperatures from 45°C to 5C . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B–8
B4.2 Engine air inlet: arctic conditions at operating temp. below 5°C . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B–8

C Engine description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C–1

D Engine data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D–1

D1 Reference conditions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D–1

D2 Design conditions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D–1

D3 Ancillary system design parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D–1

D4 Engine performance data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D–1

Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd a 25.74.07.40 – Issue X.04 – Rev. 0


Engine Selection and Project Manual RT-flex96C

List of contents

D5 Vibration aspects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D–2


D5.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D–2
D5.2 External forces and moments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D–2
D5.2.1 Balancing free first order moments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D–3
D5.2.2 Balancing free second order moments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D–3
D5.2.3 Power related unbalance (PRU) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D–4
D5.3 Lateral engine vibration (rocking) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D–5
D5.3.1 Stays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D–6
D5.3.2 Electrically driven compensator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D–6
D5.4 Longitudinal engine vibration (pitching) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D–7
D5.5 Torsional vibration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D–7
D5.6 Axial vibration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D–7
D5.7 Hull vibration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D–7
D5.8 External forces and moments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D–8
D5.9 Summary of countermeasures for dynamic effects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D–9

D6 Order forms for vibration calculations and simulation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D–10


D6.1 Marine installation Torsional Vibration Calculation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D–11
D6.2 Testbed installation Torsional Vibration Calculation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D–12
D6.3 Marine installation Coupled Axial Vibration Calculation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D–13
D6.4 Marine installation Bending Vibration & Alignment Calculation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D–14

D7 Turbocharger and scavenge air cooler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D–15


D7.1 Turbocharger and scavenge air cooler selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D–16

D8 Auxiliary blower . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D–18

D9 Electric power requirement in [kW] . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D–18

D10 Pressure and temperature ranges . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D–18

E Installation data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E–1

E1 Dimensions, masses and dismantling heights . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E–1


E1.1 Contents of fluid in the engine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E–2

E2 Engine outlines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E–3


E2.1 Engine seating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E–14

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RT-flex96C Engine Selection and Project Manual

List of contents

F Auxiliary power generation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F–1

F1 General information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F–1


F1.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F–1
F1.2 System description and layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F–2

F2 Waste heat recovery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F–2

F3 Power take off (PTO) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F–2


F3.1 Arrangements of PTO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F–2
F3.2 PTO power and speed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F–2

G Ancillary systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G–1

G1 General information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G–1


G1.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G–1
G1.2 Part-load data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G–1
G1.3 Engine system data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G–1
G1.3.1 Questionnaire for engine data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G–2
G1.3.2 Engine system data for central fresh water cooling system (single-stage)
at nominal maximum continuous rating (R1) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G–3
G1.3.3 Engine system data for central fresh water cooling system (two-stage)
at nominal maximum continuous rating (R1) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G–7

G2 Piping systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G–9


G2.1 Cooling and pre-heating water systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G–9
G2.1.1 Central fresh water cooling system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G–9
G2.1.2 Pre-heating system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G–16
G2.2 Lubricating oil systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G–17
G2.2.1 General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G–17
G2.2.2 Optional lubricating oil systems for turbochargers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G–17
G2.2.3 Lubricating oil maintenance and treatment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G–18
G2.3 Fuel oil systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G–23
G2.3.1 Fuel oil requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G–23
G2.3.2 Fuel oil treatment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G–25
G2.3.3 Pressurized fuel oil system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G–27
G2.4 Starting and control air system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G–29
G2.5 Leakage collection system and washing devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G–31

G3 Tank capacities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G–33

G4 Fire protection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G–33

G5 Exhaust gas system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G–34

G6 Engine air supply / Engine room ventilation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G–37

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Engine Selection and Project Manual RT-flex96C

List of contents

H Engine management system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H–1

H1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H–1
H1.1 DENIS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H–3
H1.2 WECS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H–3
H1.3 MAPEX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H–3

H2 DENIS-9520 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H–3
H2.1 General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H–3
H2.2 Propulsion control system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H–4
H2.2.1 Approved propulsion control systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H–5
H2.2.2 Functions of the propulsion
control system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H–7
H2.2.3 Recommended manoeuvring characteristics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H–8
H2.3 Interface to alarm and monitoring systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H–9
H2.3.1 General layout – operator interface OPI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H–9
H2.3.2 Alarm sensors and safety functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H–11

H3 WECS-9520 – flex engine control system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H–15


H3.1 WECS-9520 – system layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H–15
H3.2 WECS-9520 – online spare module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H–15
H3.3 WECS-9520 – communication to external systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H–15

H4 MAPEX Engine Fitness Family . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H–18


H4.1 SIPWA-TP (Piston-ring Wear) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H–19
H4.2 Mapex-PR (Piston-running Reliability) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H–21
H4.3 Mapex-TV / AV (Torsional Vibration / Axial Vibration Detection) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H–23
H4.4 MAPEX-SM (Spare parts and Maintenance) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H–24

I Engine emissions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I–1

I1 Exhaust gas emissions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I–1


I1.1 IMO-2000 regulations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I–1
I1.1.1 IMO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I–1
I1.1.2 Establishment of emission limits for ships . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I–1
I1.1.3 Regulation regarding NOx emissions of diesel engines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I–1
I1.1.4 Date of application of Annex VI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I–1
I1.1.5 Procedure for certification of engines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I–2
I1.2 Measures for compliance with the IMO regulation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I–2
I1.2.1 Low NOx Tuning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I–2
I1.2.2 Extended measures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I–2

25.74.07.40 – Issue X.04 – Rev. 0 d Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd


RT-flex96C Engine Selection and Project Manual

List of contents

I2 Engine noise . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I–3


I2.1 Engine surface sound pressure level . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I–3
I2.2 Engine exhaust sound pressure level at funnel top . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I–4
I2.3 Engine structure borne noise . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I–5

J winGTD – General Technical Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . J–1

J1 Included CD-ROM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . J–1


J1.1 Installation of winGTD and EnSel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . J–1
J1.1.1 System requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . J–1
J1.1.2 Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . J–1
J1.1.3 Changes to previous versions of winGTD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . J–1
J1.2 Using winGTD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . J–1
J1.2.1 Start . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . J–1
J1.2.2 Data input . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . J–1
J1.2.3 Output results . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . J–2
J1.2.4 Service conditions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . J–2
J1.2.5 Saving a project . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . J–2
J1.3 EnSel program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . J–2

K Appendix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . K–1

K1 Reference to other Wärtsilä Switzerland documentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . K–1

K2 Piping symbols . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . K–2

K3 SI dimensions for internal combustion engines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . K–5

K4 Approximate conversion factors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . K–6

K5 Questionnaire order specification for Sulzer RT-flex96C engines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . K–7

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Engine Selection and Project Manual RT-flex96C

List of figures

Fig. A1 Power/speed range of all IMO-2000 regulation compatible RTA and


RT-flex engines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A–1
Fig. A2 Comparison of Delta Tuning and Standard Tuning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A–3
Fig. A3 Delta Tuning area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A–4
Fig. B1 Layout field of the Sulzer RT-flex96C engine. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B–1
Fig. B2 Load range limits of an engine corresponding to a specific rating point Rx . . . . . . . B–3
Fig. B3 Load diagram for a specific engine showing the corresponding power
and speed margins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B–4
Fig. B4 Load range limits, with the load diagram of an engine corresponding to
a specific rating point Rx . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B–6
Fig. B5 Load range diagram for an engine equipped with a main-engine driven generator,
whether it is a shaft generator or a PTO-driven generator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B–7
Fig. B6 Scavenge air system for arctic conditions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B–8
Fig. B7 Blow-off effect at arctic conditions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B–9
Fig. C1 Significant difference between Sulzer RTA engines and RT-flex engines. . . . . . . . . C–1
Fig. C2 Cross section of a typical Sulzer RT-flex engine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C–2
Fig. C3 Sulzer RT-flex system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C–3
Fig. D1 External forces and moments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D–2
Fig. D2 Locating electrically driven balancer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D–3
Fig. D3 Free external mass moments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D–4
Fig. D4 External forces and moments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D–5
Fig. D5 General arrangement of lateral stays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D–6
Fig. D6 General arrangement of friction stays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D–6
Fig. D7 Scavenge air cooler details (rated at R1) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D–15
Fig. D8 Turbocharger and scavenge air cooler selection (ABB TPL type turbocharger) . . . D–16
Fig. D9 Turbocharger and scavenge air cooler selection (MHI MET type turbocharger) . . . D–17
Fig. E1 Engine dimensions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E–1
Fig. E2 End elevation of Sulzer RT-flex96C engines with ABB TPL85-B
turbochargers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E–3
Fig. E3 Exhaust side elevation and plan view of Sulzer 7RT-flex96C engine
with 2 x ABB TPL85-B turbochargers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E–4
Fig. E4 Exhaust side elevation and plan view of Sulzer 8RT-flex96C engine
with 2 x ABB TPL85-B turbochargers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E–5
Fig. E5 Exhaust side elevation and plan view of Sulzer 10RT-flex96C engine
with 3 x ABB TPL85-B turbochargers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E–6
Fig. E6 Exhaust side elevation and plan view of Sulzer 12RT-flex96C engine
with 3 x ABB TPL85-B turbochargers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E–7
Fig. E7 Exhaust side elevation of Sulzer 14RT-flex96C engine
with 4 x ABB TPL85-B turbochargers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E–8
Fig. E8 Plan view of Sulzer 14RT-flex96C engine with 4 x ABB TPL85-B
turbochargers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E–9
Fig. E9 End elevation of Sulzer RT-flex96C engines with MHI MET83SE
turbochargers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E–10
Fig. E10 Exhaust side elevation and plan view of Sulzer 8RT-flex96C engine
with 2 x MHI MET83SE turbochargers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E–11

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List of figures

Fig. E11 Exhaust side elevation of Sulzer 14RT-flex96C engine


with 4 x MHI MET83SE turbochargers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E–12
Fig. E12 Plan view of Sulzer 14RT-flex96C engine with
4 x MHI MET83SE turbochargers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E–13
Fig. E13 Engine seating (foundation) with epoxy resin chocks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E–14
Fig. F1 Heat recovery, typical system layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F–1
Fig. F2 Tunnel PTO gear . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F–2
Fig. G1 Central fresh water cooling system with single-stage SAC
and integrated HT circuit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G–3
Fig. G2 Central fresh water cooling system with single-stage SAC
and separate HT circuit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G–5
Fig. G3 Central fresh water cooling system with two-stage SAC
and integrated HT circuit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G–7
Fig. G4 Central fresh water cooling system with single-stage scavenge air cooler
and integrated HT circuit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G–10
Fig. G5 Central fresh water cooling system with single-stage scavenge air cooler
and separate HT circuit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G–12
Fig. G6 Central fresh water cooling system with two-stage scavenge air cooler
and integrated HT circuit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G–14
Fig. G7 Engine pre-heating power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G–16
Fig. G8 Main lubricating oil system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G–19
Fig. G9 Lubricating oil system for 2 x ABB-TPL turbochargers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G–20
Fig. G10 Lubricating oil system for 3 x ABB-TPL turbochargers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G–21
Fig. G11 Fuel oil viscosity/temperature diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G–24
Fig. G12 Heavy fuel oil treatment layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G–26
Fig. G13 Pressurized fuel oil system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G–28
Fig. G14 Starting and control air system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G–29
Fig. G15 Leakage collection and washing layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G–31
Fig. G16 Determination of exhaust pipe diameter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G–34
Fig. G17 Estimation of exhaust gas density . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G–35
Fig. G18 Estimation of exhaust pipe diameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G–35
Fig. G19 Air filter size . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G–38
Fig. H1 EMS concept comprising DENIS, WECS and MAPEX modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H–1
Fig. H2 RT-flex automation layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H–2
Fig. H3 DENIS-9520 remote control system layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H–6
Fig. H4 Recommended manoeuvring characteristics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H–8
Fig. H5 Integrated/split solution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H–10
Fig. H6 General system layout of WECS-9520 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H–17
Fig. H7 SIPWA-TP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H–20
Fig. H8 MAPEX-PR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H–22
Fig. H9 MAPEX-AV / TV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H–23
Fig. H10 MAPEX-communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H–24
Fig. I1 Speed dependent maximum average NOx emissions by engines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I–1
Fig. I2 Sulzer RT-flex96C: compliance with IMO regulations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I–2
Fig. I3 Engine sound pressure level at 1 m distance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I–3

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List of figures

Fig. I4 Engine exhaust gas sound pressure level at funnel top . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I–4
Fig. I5 Structure borne noise level at engine feet vertical . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I–5
Fig. J1 winGTD: Selection of engine window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . J–1
Fig. J2 winGTD: Main window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . J–1
Fig. J3 winGTD: General technical data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . J–2
Fig. J4 winGTD: Two-stroke engine propulsion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . J–2
Fig. K1 Piping symbols 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . K–2
Fig. K2 Piping symbols 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . K–3
Fig. K3 Piping symbols 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . K–4

25.74.07.40 – Issue X.04 – Rev. 0 h Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd


RT-flex96C Engine Selection and Project Manual

List of tables

Table A1 Primary engine data of Sulzer RT-flex96C . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A–2


Table D1 External forces and moments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D–8
Table D2 Countermeasures for external mass moments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D–9
Table D3 Countermeasures for lateral and longitudinal rocking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D–9
Table D4 Countermeasures for torsional & axial vibration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D–9
Table D5 Vibration calculation form (ad-t1-tvc-marine-order-form) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D–11
Table D6 Vibration calculation form (ad-t1-tvc-testbed-order-form) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D–12
Table D7 Vibration calculation form (ad-t1-avc-marine-order-form) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D–13
Table D8 Vibration calculation form (ad-t1-bending&alignment-order-form) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D–14
Table D9 Scavenge air cooler parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D–15
Table D10 Turbocharger weights . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D–15
Table D11 Number of auxiliary blowers per engine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D–18
Table D12 Electric power consumers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D–18
Table D13 Pressure and temperature ranges . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D–19
Table E1 Engine dimensions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E–1
Table E2 Engine masses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E–2
Table E3 Fluid quantities in the engine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E–2
Table F1 PTO power and speed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F–2
Table G1 R1 data for central fresh water cooling system with single-stage SAC
and integrated HT circuit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G–3
Table G2 R1 data for central fresh water cooling system with single-stage SAC
and integrated HT circuit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G–4
Table G3 R1 data for central fresh water cooling system with single-stage SAC
and separate HT circuit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G–5
Table G4 R1 data for central fresh water cooling system with single-stage SAC
and separate HT circuit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G–6
Table G5 R1 data for central fresh water cooling system with two-stage SAC
and integrated HT circuit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G–7
Table G6 R1 data for central fresh water cooling system with two-stage SAC
and integrated HT circuit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G–8
Table G7 Central fresh water cooling system with single-stage scavenge air cooler
and integrated HT circuit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G–11
Table G8 Central fresh water cooling system with single-stage scavenge air cooler
and separate HT circuit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G–13
Table G9 Central fresh water cooling system with two-stage scavenge air cooler
and integrated HT circuit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G–15
Table G10 Lubricating oils . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G–22
Table G11 Fuel oil requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G–23
Table G12 Air receiver and air compressor capacities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G–30
Table G13 Leakage collection and washing layout: legend to layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G–32
Table G14 Tank capacities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G–33
Table G15 Recommended quantities of fire extinguishing medium . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G–33
Table G16 Guidance for air filtration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G–37

Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd i 25.74.07.40 – Issue X.04 – Rev. 0


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List of tables

Table H1 Suppliers of remote control systems and electronic speed control systrems . . . . . . H–5
Table H2 Alarm and safety functions of Sulzer RT-flex96C marine diesel engines . . . . . . . . . H–12
Table H3 Alarm and safety functions of Sulzer RT-flex96C marine diesel engines . . . . . . . . . H–13
Table H4 Alarm and safety functions of Sulzer RT-flex96C marine diesel engines . . . . . . . . . H–14
Table K1 SI dimensions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . K–5
Table K2 Questionnaire 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . K–8
Table K3 Questionnaire 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . K–9
Table K4 Questionnaire 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . K–10
Table K5 Questionnaire 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . K–11
Table K6 Questionnaire 5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . K–12
Table K7 Questionnaire 6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . K–13
Table K8 Questionnaire 7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . K–14
Table K9 Questionnaire 8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . K–15
Table K10 Questionnaire 9 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . K–16
Table K11 Questionnaire 10 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . K–17
Table K12 Questionnaire 11 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . K–18
Table K13 Questionnaire 12 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . K–19
Table K14 Questionnaire 13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . K–20
Table K15 Questionnaire 14 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . K–21

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RT-flex96C Engine Selection and Project Manual

Index

A F
Address Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd, A–1 Fire protection, G–33
Air filter size, G–37 Fluid quantities in the engine, E–2
Ambient temperature consideration, B–8 Free first order moments, D–3
Engine air inlet (arctic conditions), B–8 Free second order moments, D–3
Auxiliary blower, D–18 Fresh water generator, G–9
Axial damper, D–7 Fuel oil systems, G–23
Axial vibration, D–7 Fuel oil viscosity/temperature diagram, G–24

B I
Blowing off at arctic conditions, B–8 Installation of winGTD, J–1
Introduction, A–1, B–1
C ISO Standard 15550, D–1
CD-ROM, J–1 ISO Standard 3046-1, D–1
CMCR, B–1, B–5
Consideration on engine selection, B–1 L
Contents of fluid in the engine, E–2 Lateral engine vibration, D–5
Continuous service rating, B–5 Lateral stays, D–6, D–7
Conversion factors, K–6 Layout field, B–1
Cooling and pre-heating water systems, G–9 Leakage collection, G–31
Cross section, C–2 Light running margin (LR), B–4
Load range, B–3
D Load range with main-engine driven generator, B–7
Delta Tuning, A–3 Load range limits, B–5
Design conditions, D–1 Longitudinal engine vibration, D–7
Dimensions, masses and dism. heights, E–1 Lubricating oil system, G–17

E M
Electrical power consumers, D–18 MAPEX-SM, H–24
Electrically driven auxiliary blowers, D–18 MAPEX Engine Fitness Family, H–18
Electrically driven compensator, D–6
Engine air inlet operating temperatures, B–8 N
Engine air supply, G–37 Noise, I–3
Engine room ventilation, G–37 NOx emissions, I–1
Engine system data, G–1
Engine dimensions, E–1 O
Engine emissions, I–1 Operational margin (OM), B–5
Engine margin (EM), B–5 Order forms for vibration calculations and simulation, D–10
Engine outlines, E–3 Order specification, K–7
Engine performance data, D–1 Overload limit, B–6
Engine seating, E–14 Overspeed limit, B–6
Exhaust gas system, G–34

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Engine Selection and Project Manual RT-flex96C

Index

P T
Part-load data, G–1 Tank capacities, G–33
Piping symbols, K–2 TC and SAC selection, D–16
Piping systems, G–9 Torsional vibration, D–7
Power demand of an engine, B–1 Turbocharger and scavenge air coolers, D–15
Power related unbalance, D–4 Turbocharger weights, D–15
Power/speed combination, B–1
Power/speed range of RTA and RT-flex engines, A–1 U
Pre-heating system, G–16 Using winGTD, J–1
Pressure and temperature ranges, D–18
Primary engine data, A–2 V
Propeller characteristics, B–2 Vibration aspects, D–2
Propeller curve, B–3
Propeller efficiency, B–1 W
PTO arrangements, F–2 Waste heat recovery, F–2

Q
Questionnaire winGTD, G–2

R
Rating, B–1
Rating points, B–2
Reference conditions, D–1
Reference to other documentation, K–1
Rocking, D–5
RT-flex key parts, C–3
RT-flex system, C–1

S
Scavenge air and exhaust gas system, G–34
Scavenge air cooler details, D–15
Scavenge air system for arctic conditions, B–8
Sea margin (SM), B–4
Sea trial power, B–4
SI dimensions, K–5
Starting and control air system, G–29

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RT-flex96C Engine Selection and Project Manual

Abbreviations

ABB ASEA Brown Boveri M2V External moment 2nd order vertical
ALM Alarm MCR Maximum continuous rating (R1)
AMS Attended machinery space MDO Marine diesel oil
BFO Bunker fuel oil mep Mean effective pressure
BN Base Number MET Turbocharger (Mitsubishi manufacture)
BSEF Brake specific exhaust gas flow MHI Mitsubishi Heavy Industries
BSFC Brake specific fuel consumption MIM Marine installation manual
CCR Conradson carbon MMI Man–machine interface
CCW Cylinder cooling water N, n Speed of rotation
CMCR Contract maximum continuous rating (Rx) NCR Nominal continuous rating
CPP Controllable pitch propeller NOR Nominal operation rating
CSR Continuous service rating (also OM Operational margin
designated NOR and NCR) OPI Operator interface
cSt centi-Stoke (kinematic viscosity) PAL Pressure alarm, low
DAH Differential pressure alarm, high P Power
DENIS Diesel engine control and optimizing PI Pressure indicator
specification ppm Parts per million
EM Engine margin PRU Power related unbalance
EnSel  Engine selection program PTO Power take off
ESPM Engine selection and project manual RCS Remote control system
FCM Flex control module RW1 Redwood seconds No. 1 (kinematic
FPP Fixed pitch propeller viscosity)
FQS Fuel quality setting SAC Scavenge air cooler
FW Fresh water SAE Society of Automotive Engineers
GEA Scavenge air cooler (GEA manufacture) S/G Shaft generator
HFO Heavy fuel oil SHD Shut down
HT High temperature SIB Shipyard interface box
IMO International Maritime Organisation SIPWA-TP Sulzer integrated piston ring wear detec-
IND Indication ting arrangement with trend processing
IPDLC Integrated power-dependent liner cooling SLD Slow down
ISO International Standard Organisation SM Sea margin
kW Kilowatt SSU Saybolt second universal
kWe Kilowatt electrical SW Sea-water
kWh Kilowatt hour TBO Time between overhauls
LAH Level alarm, high TC Turbocharger
LAL Level alarm, low TI Temperature indicator
LCV Lower calorific value TPL Turbocharger (ABB manufacture)
LI Level indicator tEaT Temperature of exhaust gas after turbine
LR Light running margin UMS Unattended machinery space
LSL Level switch, low VI Viscosity index
LT Low temperature WCH Wärtsilä Switzerland
M Torque WECS Wärtsilä Engine Control System
MAPEX Monitoring and maintenance performance winGTD General Technical Data program
enhancement with expert knowledge nM Torque variation
M1H External moment 1st order horizontal
M1V External moment 1st order vertical

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Abbreviations

25.74.07.40 – Issue X.04 – Rev. 0 n Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd


RT-flex96C Engine Selection and Project Manual

A. Introduction

The Sulzer RT-flex system represents a major step forward in the technology of large diesel engines:
Common rail injection – fully suitable for heavy fuel oil operation.

The Sulzer RT-flex96C low-speed diesel engine is designed for today’s large container ships and is avail-
able with any or all of the following options:

1. Delta Tuning for reduced brake specific fuel Engine power Engine power
[kW] [bhp]
consumption (BSFC) in the part load range 100 000
below 90% load. 80 000
120 000
100 000
2. Fresh water cooling system with single-stage RT-flex96C
60 000 80 000
or two-stage scavenge air cooler. 50 000
all other RTA 60 000
3. ABB TPL or Mitsubishi MET turbochargers. 40 000 and RT-flex engines

30 000 40 000

20 000

20 000
With this manual we provide our clients with in-
formation, enabling them to select the engine and 10 000

options to meet the needs of their vessels. 8 000


10 000
6 000 8 000

6 000
4 000

4 000

2 000
50 60 70 80 90 100 120 140 160 180 200
Engine speed
F10.5301 [rpm]

Fig. A1 Power/speed range of all IMO-2000 regulation


compatible RTA and RT-flex engines

This book provides the information required for the layout of marine propulsion plants. Its con-
tent is subject to the understanding that any data and information herein have been prepared
with care and to the best of our knowledge. We do not, however, assume any liability with re-
gard to unforeseen variations in accuracy thereof or for any consequences arising therefrom.

Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd


PO Box 414
CH-8401 Winterthur, Switzerland
Telephone: +41 52 2624922
Telefax: +41 52 2124917
Direct Fax: +41 52 2620707
http://www.wartsila.com

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Engine Selection and Project Manual RT-flex96C

A. Introduction

A1 Primary engine data

Engine Sulzer RT-flex96C


Bore x stroke [mm] 960 x 2500
Speed [rpm] 102 102 92 92

Engine power (MCR)

Cylinder Power R1 R2 R3 R4
[kW] 34 320 24 000 30 960 24 000
6
[bhp] 46 680 32 640 42 120 32 640
[kW] 40 040 28 000 36 120 28 000
7
[bhp] 54 460 38 080 49 140 38 080
[kW] 45 760 32 000 41 280 32 000
8
[bhp] 62 240 43 520 56 160 43 520
[kW] 51 480 36 000 46 440 36 000
9
[bhp] 70 020 48 960 63 180 48 960
[kW] 57 200 40 000 51 600 40 000
10
[bhp] 77 800 54 400 70 200 54 400
[kW] 62 920 44 000 56 760 44 000
11
[bhp] 85 580 59 840 77 220 59 840
[kW] 68 640 48 000 61 920 48 000
12
[bhp] 93 360 65 280 84 240 65 280
[kW] 80 080 56 000 72 240 56 000
14
[bhp] 108 920 76 160 98 280 76 160

Brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC)


Load
[g/kWh] 171 163 171 164
100 %
[g/bhph] 126 120 126 121
mep [bar] 18.6 13.0 18.6 14.4

Lubricating oil consumption (for fully run-in engines under normal operating conditions)
System oil approximately 10 kg/cyl per day
Cylinder oil *1) 0.9 – 1.3 g/kWh

Remark: *1) This data is for guidance only, it may have to be increased as the actual
cylinder lubricating oil consumption in service is dependent on operational factors.

Table A1 Primary engine data of Sulzer RT-flex96C

All brake specific fuel consumptions (BSFC) are To determine the power and BSFC figures accu-
quoted for fuel of lower calorific value 42.7 MJ/kg rately in bhp and g/bhph respectively, the standard
(10 200 kcal/kg). All other reference conditions kW-based figures have to be converted by
refer to ISO standard (ISO 3046-1). The figures for factor 1.36.
BSFC are given with a tolerance of +5 %.

The values of power in kilowatt (kW) and fuel con-


sumption in g/kWh are the standard figures, and
discrepancies occur between these and the corre-
sponding brake horsepower (bhp) values owing to
the rounding of numbers.

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– Issue X.04X.04 – Rev.
– Rev. 0 1 A–2 Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd
RT-flex96C Engine Selection and Project Manual

A. Introduction

A2 Delta Tuning of RT-flex engines

A2.1 Introduction Due to the trade-off between BSFC and NOx


emissions, the associated increase in NOx
With the introduction of the Sulzer RT-flex engines, emissions at part load must then be compensated
a major step in the development of marine 2-stroke by a corresponding decrease in the full load NOx
engine was taken. Now Wärtsilä is taking this de- emissions. Hence, there is also a slight increase in
velopment even further by introducing Delta Tun- full load BSFC, in order to maintain compliance of
ing for RT-flex engines. the engine with the IMO NOx regulations.

Delta Tuning makes it possible to further reduce The concept is based on tailoring the firing pres-
the specific fuel oil consumption while still comply- sure and firing ratio for maximum efficiency in the
ing with all existing emission legislation. Moreover, range up to 90% load and then reducing them
this is achieved only by changing software para- again towards full load. In this process, the same
meters and without having to modify a single en- design-related limitations with respect to these two
gine part. quantities are applied as in the specification of the
standard tuning.
A2.2 Delta Tuning outline
The reliability of the engine is by no means im-
In realising Delta Tuning, the flexibility of the RT- paired by the application of Delta Tuning since
flex system in terms of free selection of injection all existing limitations to mechanical stresses
and exhaust valve control parameters, specifically and thermal load are observed.
variable injection timing (VIT) and variable exhaust
closing (VEC) is utilised for reducing the brake spe-
cific fuel consumption (BSFC) in the part load
range below 90% load.

3 RTA, Standard Tuning

2 RT-flex, Standard Tuning


RT-flex, Delta Tuning
1
Reduction of BSFC [g/kWh]

0 BSFC at R1 [g/kWh]

–1

–2

–3

–4

–5

–6

–7

–8
ISO conditions, tolerance +5%
–9
50% 75% Load 100%
Fig. A2 Comparison of Delta Tuning and Standard Tuning

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Engine Selection and Project Manual RT-flex96C

A. Introduction

A2.3 Further aspects of Delta Tuning

Delta Tuning for de-rated engines: Project specification for RT-flex engines:
For various reasons, the margin against the IMO Although Delta tuning is realised in such a way that
NOx limit decreases for de-rated engines. Delta it could almost be considered a pushbutton option,
Tuning thus holds the highest benefits for engines its selection has an effect on other aspects of en-
rated close to R1. With the de-rating, the effect gine and system design as well.
diminishes and, in fact, Delta Tuning is not appli- This is why the tuning option to be applied to RT-
cable in the entire field (see figure A3). flex engines needs to be specified at a very early
stage in the project:
Engine power
[% R1] R1
– The calculations of the torsional and axial
100 vibrations of the installation have to be per-
RT-flex96C engines
formed using the correct data.
95

R3 – The layout of the ancillary systems has to be


90 based on the correct specifications.
85 Delta Tuning area – In order to prepare the software for the RT-flex
system control, the parameters also have to be
80 known in due time before commissioning of
the engine.
75

70
R4 R2

Engine speed
65 [% R1]
70 75 80 85 90 95 100
Fig. A3 Delta Tuning area

Effect on engine dynamics:


The application of Delta Tuning has an influence
on the harmonic gas excitations and, as a conse-
quence, the torsional and axial vibrations of the in-
stallation. Hence, the corresponding calculations
have to be carried out with the correct data in order
to be able to apply appropriate countermeasures,
if necessary.

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RT-flex96C Engine Selection and Project Manual

B. Considerations on engine selection

B1 Introduction
Selecting a suitable main engine to meet the power Engine power
demands of a given project involves proper tuning % [R1]
R1
in respect of load range and influence of operating 100
conditions which are likely to prevail throughout
the entire life of the ship. This chapter explains the
main principles in selecting a Sulzer RT-flex low-
speed diesel engine. Rx1
Rx2 Rating line
R3 fulfilling a ship’s
90 power requirement
Every engine has a layout field within which the for a constant speed
combination of power and speed (= rating) can be Nominal propeller
selected. Contrary to the ‘layout field’, the ‘load characteristic
2 1
range’ is the admissible area of operation once the
CMCR has been determined.

80
In order to define the required contract maximum
continuous rating (CMCR), various parameters
need to be considered such as propulsive power,
propeller efficiency, operational flexibility, power
and speed margins, possibility of a main-engine
driven generator, and the ship’s trading patterns.

Selecting the most suitable engine is vital to 70 R2


R4 Engine speed
achieving an efficient cost/benefit response to a % [R1]
specific transport requirement. 85 90 95 100
The contract maximum continuous rating (Rx)
may be freely positioned within the layout field
B2 Layout field for that engine.
F10.4995

The layout field shown in figure B1 is the area of


Fig. B1 Layout field of the Sulzer RT-flex96C engine.
power and engine speed. In this area the contract
maximum continuous rating of an engine can be
The engine speed is given on the horizontal axis
positioned individually to give the desired com-
and the engine power on the vertical axis of the lay-
bination of propulsive power and rotational speed.
out field. Both are expressed as a percentage (%)
Engines within this layout field will be tuned for
of the respective engine’s nominal R1 parameters.
maximum firing pressure and best efficiency.
Experience over the last years has shown that
engines are ordered with CMCR-points in the
upper part of the layout field only.

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Engine Selection and Project Manual RT-flex96C

B. Considerations on engine selection

Percentage values are being used so that the Rating points Rx can be selected within the entire
same diagram can be applied to various engine layout field to meet the requirements of each par-
models. The scales are logarithmic so that expo- ticular project. Such rating points require specific
nential curves, such as propeller characteristics engine adaptations.
(cubic power) and mean effective pressure (mep)
curves (first power), are straight lines. B2.2 Influence of propeller revolutions
on the power requirement
The layout field serves to determine the specific
fuel oil consumption, exhaust gas flow and tem- At constant ship speed and for a given propeller
perature, fuel injection parameters, turbocharger type, lower propeller revolutions combined with a
and scavenge air cooler specifications for a given larger propeller diameter increase the total propul-
engine. sive efficiency. Less power is needed to propel the
vessel at a given speed.
Calculations for specific fuel consumption, ex-
haust gas flow and temperature after turbine are The relative change of required power in function
explained in further chapters. of the propeller revolutions can be approximated
by the following relation:
B2.1 Rating points R1, R2, R3 and R4
a
Px 2ńPx 1 + ǒN 2ńN 1Ǔ
The rating points (R1, R2, R3 and R4) for the
Sulzer RT-flex engines are the corner points of the Pxj = Propulsive power at propeller revolution Nj.
engine layout field (figure B1). Nj = Propeller speed corresponding with propulsive
power Pxj.
The point R1 represents the nominal maximum α = 0.15 for tankers and general cargo ships up to
10 000 dwt.
continuous rating (MCR). It is the maximum
= 0.20 for tankers, bulkcarriers from 10 000 dwt to
power/speed combination which is available for a 30 000 dwt.
particular engine. = 0.25 for tankers, bulkcarriers larger than 30 000 dwt.
= 0.17 for reefers and container ships up to 3000 TEU.
The point R2 defines 100 per cent speed, and 70 = 0.22 for container ships larger than 3000 TEU.
percent power of R1.
This relation is used in the engine selection pro-
The point R3 defines 90 per cent speed and 90 per- cedure to compare different engine alternatives
cent power of R1. and to select optimum propeller revolutions within
the selected engine layout field.
The connection R1–R3 is the nominal 100 per cent
line of constant mean effective pressure of R1. Usually, the selected propeller revolution depends
on the maximum permissible propeller diameter.
The point R4 defines 90 per cent speed and 70 per The maximum propeller diameter is often deter-
cent power of R1. mined by operational requirements such as:
• Design draught and ballast draught limitations.
The connection line R2–R4 is the line of 70 per • Class recommendations concerning pro-
cent power between 90 and 100 per cent speed peller/hull clearance (pressure impulse in-
of R1. duced by the propeller on the hull).

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RT-flex96C Engine Selection and Project Manual

B. Considerations on engine selection

The selection of main engine in combination with The relation between absorbed power and rota-
the optimum propeller (efficiency) is an iterative tional speed for a fixed-pitch propeller can be
procedure where also commercial considerations approximated by the following cubic relation:
(engine and propeller prices) play a great role. 3
P 2ńP 1 + ǒN 2ńN 1Ǔ
According to the above approximation, when a re- in which
quired power/speed combination is known – for Pi = propeller power
example point Rx1 as shown in figure B1 – a Ni = propeller speed
CMCR-line can be drawn which fulfils the ship’s
power requirement for a constant speed. The The propeller curve without sea margin is often
slope of this line depends on the ship’s characteris- called the ‘light running curve’. The nominal pro-
tics (coefficient α). Any other point on this line peller characteristic is a cubic curve through the
represents a new power/speed combination, for CMCR-point. (For additional information, refer to
example Rx2, and requires a specific propeller section B3.4 ‘light running margin’.)
adaptation.
B3.2 Sea trial power
B3 Load range
The sea trial power must be specified. Figure B2
The load range diagram shown in figure B2 defines shows the sea trial power to be the power required
the power/speed limits for the operation of the en- for point ‘B’ on the propeller curve. Often and alter-
gine. Percentage values are given as explained in natively the power required for point ‘A’ on the pro-
section B2, in practice absolute figures might be peller curve is referred to as ‘sea trial power’.
used for a specific installation project.
Engine power
[%Rx]
B3.1 Propeller curves 110

CMCR (Rx)
100
In order to establish the proper location of propeller 95 10% EM/OM
D
curves, it is necessary to know the ship’s speed to 90 Sea trial power
B
power response.
15% SM
80
78.3
The propeller curve without sea margin is for a ship A

with a new and clean hull in calm water and 70


Engine load range
weather, often referred to as ‘trial condition’.
60
The propeller curves can be determined by using
full scale trial results of similar ships, algorithms
developed by maritime research institutes or 50
model tank results. Furthermore, it is necessary to
3.5% LR

define the maximum reasonable diameter of the propeller curve


without SM
propeller which can be fitted to the ship. With this Engine speed
40 [%Rx]
information and by applying propeller series such 65 70 80 90 95 100 104

as the ‘Wageningen’, ‘SSPA’ (Swedish Maritime EM engine margin SM sea margin


OM operational margin LR light running margin
Research Association), ‘MAU’ (Modified AU), etc., F10.5248
the power/speed relationships can be established
Fig. B2 Load range limits of an engine corresponding to a
and characteristics developed. specific rating point Rx

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B. Considerations on engine selection

B3.3 Sea margin (SM) Engine power


[%Rx] CMCR (Rx)

The increase in power to maintain a given ship’s 100


speed achieved in calm weather (point ‘A’ in fig- 10%
EM/OM
ure B2) and under average service condition (point D
90
‘D’), is defined as the ‘sea margin’. This margin can B
vary depending on owner’s and charterer’s
expectations, routes, season and schedules of the 15% SM

ship. The location of the reference point ‘A’ and the 5% LR

magnitude of the sea margin are determined 78.3


A
between the shipbuilder and the owner. They form
part of the newbuilding contract.

With the help of effective antifouling paints, dry- a

docking intervals have been prolonged up to 4 or


5 years. Therefore, it is still realistic to provide an propeller curve
without SM
average sea margin of about 15 per cent of the sea
trial power, refer to figure B2, unless as mentioned
Engine speed
above, the actual ship type and service route dic- [%Rx]
100
tate otherwise.
EM engine margin SM sea margin
F10.3148 OM operational margin LR light running margin

B3.4 Light running margin (LR) Fig. B3 Load diagram for a specific engine showing the
corresponding power and speed margins
The sea trial performance (curve ‘a’) in figure B3
should allow for a 3 to 7 per cent light running of the Assuming, for example, the following:
propeller when compared to the nominal propeller • Drydocking intervals of the ship 5 years.
characteristic (the example in figure B3 shows a • Time between overhauls of the engine 2 years
light running margin of 5 per cent). This margin pro- or more.
vides a sufficient torque reserve whenever full • Full service speed must be attainable, without
power must be attained under unfavourable condi- surpassing the torque limit, under less favour-
tions. Normally, the propeller is hydrodynamically able conditions and without exceeding 100 per
optimized for a point ‘B’. The trial speed found for cent mep.
‘A’ is equal to the service speed at ‘D’ stipulated in
the contract at 90 per cent of CMCR. Therefore the ‘light running margin’ required will be
5 to 6 per cent. This is the sum of the following fac-
The recommended light running margin originates tors:
from past experience. It varies with specific ship
designs, speeds, drydocking intervals, and trade 1. 1.5–2% influence of wind and weather with
routes. an adverse effect on the intake water flow of
the propeller. Difference between Beaufort 2
Please note: it is the shipbuilder’s responsibility to sea trial condition and Beaufort 4–5 average
determine the light running margin large enough service condition. For vessels with a pro-
so that, at all service conditions, the load range nounced wind sensitivity, i.e. containerships or
limits on the left side of nominal propeller char- car carriers this value will be exceeded.
acteristic line are not reached (see section B3.6
and figure B4).

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RT-flex96C Engine Selection and Project Manual

B. Considerations on engine selection

2. 1.5–2% increase of ship’s resistance and ‘D’ or ‘D’ (in our example 5 per cent) and then
mean effective wake brought about by: along the nominal propeller characteristic to obtain
• Rippling of hull (frame to frame). the CMCR-point. In the examples, the engine
• Fouling of local, damaged areas, i.e. boot power at point ‘B’ was chosen to be at 90 per cent
top and bottom of the hull. and 85 per cent respectively.
• Formation of roughness under paint.
• Influence on wake formation due to small B3.5.1 Continuous service rating
changes in trim and immersion of bulbous (CSR=NOR=NCR)
bow, particularly in the ballast condition.
Point ‘A’ represents power and speed of a ship
3. 1% frictional losses due to increase of pro- operating at contractual speed in calm seas with a
peller blade roughness and consequent drop new clean hull and propeller. On the other hand,
in efficiency, e.g. aluminium bronze propellers: the same ship at the same speed requires a
• New: surface roughness = 12 microns. power/speed combination according to point ‘D’,
• Aged: rough surface but no fouling shown in figure B2 and B3, under service condition
= 40 microns. with aged hull and average weather. ‘D’ is then the
CSR-point.
4. 1% deterioration in engine efficiency such
as: B3.5.2 Contract maximum continuous
• Fouling of scavenge air coolers. rating (CMCR = Rx)
• Fouling of turbochargers.
• Condition of piston rings. By dividing, in our example, the CSR (point D) by
• Fuel injection system (condition and/or 0.90, the 100 per cent power level is obtained and
timing). an operational margin of 10 per cent is provided
• Increase of back pressure due to fouling of (see figures B2 and B3). The found point Rx, also
the exhaust gas boiler, etc. designated as CMCR, can be selected freely with-
in the layout field defined by the four corner points
B3.5 Engine margin (EM) or operational R1, R2, R3 and R4 (see figure B1).
margin (OM)
B3.6 Load range limits
Most owners specify the contractual ship’s loaded
service speed at 85 to 90 per cent of the contract Once an engine is optimized at CMCR (Rx), the
maximum continuous rating. The remaining 10 to working range of the engine is limited by the follow-
15 per cent power can then be utilized to catch up ing border lines, refer to figure B4:
with delays in schedule or for the timing of drydock-
ing intervals. This margin is usually deducted from Line 1 is a constant mep or torque line through
the CMCR. Therefore, the 100 per cent power line CMCR from 100 per cent speed and
is found by dividing the power at point ‘D’ by 0.85 power down to 95 per cent power and
to 0.90. The graphic approach to find the level of speed.
CMCR is illustrated in figures B2 and B3.

In the examples two current methods are shown.


Figure B2 presents the method of fixing point ‘B’
and CMCR at 100 per cent speed thus obtaining
automatically a light running margin B–D of 3.5 per
cent. Figures B3 and B5 show the method of plot-
ting the light running margin from point ‘B’ to point

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Engine Selection and Project Manual RT-flex96C

B. Considerations on engine selection

Line 2 is the overload limit. It is a constant mep Line 6 is defined by the equation:
line reaching from 100 per cent power and 2.45
P 2ńP 1 + ǒN 2ńN 1Ǔ
93.8 per cent speed to 110 per cent power
and 103.2 per cent speed. The latter one through 100 per cent power and 93.8 per
is the point of intersection between the cent speed and is the maximum torque
nominal propeller characteristic and 110 limit in transient conditions.
per cent power. The area above line 1 is the overload
Line 3 is the 104 per cent speed limit where an range. It is only allowed to operate en-
engine can run continuously. For Rx with gines in that range for a maximum dur-
reduced speed (NCMCR ≤ 0.98 NMCR) this ation of one hour during sea trials in the
limit can be extended to 106 per cent, how- presence of authorized representatives of
ever, the specified torsional vibration limits the engine builder.
must not be exceeded. The area between lines 5 and 6 and
constant torque line (grey area of fig. B4)
Line 4 is the overspeed limit. The overspeed should only be used for transient condi-
range between 104 (106) and 108 per cent tions, i.e. during fast acceleration. This
speed is only permissible during sea trials range is called ‘service range with oper-
if needed to demonstrate the ship’s speed ational time limit’.
at CMCR power with a light running pro-
peller in the presence of authorized repre- Engine power
[%Rx]
sentatives of the engine builder. However, CMCR (Rx)
110
the specified torsional vibration limits must 2
Engine load range
not be exceeded. 100
1
95 10%
Line 5 represents the admissible torque limit and EM/OM
90
D B
reaches from 95 per cent power and Constant torque
15% SM
speed to 45 per cent power and 70 per 80
78.3
cent speed. This represents a curve de- A
4
fined by the equation: 70

2.45
P 2ńP 1 + ǒN 2ńN 1Ǔ 3
60
6
When approaching line 5 , the engine will
increasingly suffer from lack of scavenge
air and its consequences. The area 50 5

formed by lines 1 , 3 and 5 represents


103.2
93.8

the range within which the engine should propeller curve


without SM
Engine speed
be operated. The area limited by the nom- 40 [%Rx]
65 70 80 90 95 100 104 108
inal propeller characteristic, 100 per cent
EM engine margin SM sea margin
power and line 3 is recommended for OM operational margin LR light running margin
F10.5249
continuous operation. The area between
the nominal propeller characteristic and Fig. B4 Load range limits, with the load diagram of an en-
gine corresponding to a specific rating point Rx
line 5 has to be reserved for acceler-
ation, shallow water and normal oper-
ational flexibility.

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RT-flex96C Engine Selection and Project Manual

B. Considerations on engine selection

B3.7 Load range with main-engine


driven generator

The load range diagram with main-engine driven


generator, whether it is a shaft generator (S/G)
mounted on the intermediate shaft or driven
through a power take off gear (PTO), is shown by
curve ‘c’ in figure B5. This curve is not parallel to
the propeller characteristic without main-engine
driven generator due to the addition of a constant
generator power over most of the engine load. In
the example of figure B5, the main-engine driven
generator is assumed to absorb 5 per cent of the
nominal engine power.

The CMCR-point is, of course, selected by taking


into account the max. power of the generator.
Engine power CMCR (Rx)
[%Rx]

100
10%
EM/OM
D
90
c 5% S/G
85
D’ B

15% SM

5% LR
73.9
A

PTO power

propeller curve
without SM
Engine speed
[%Rx]
100
EM engine margin SM sea margin
OM operational margin LR light running margin
F10.3149 S/G shaft generator

Fig. B5 Load range diagram for an engine equipped with


a main-engine driven generator, whether it is a
shaft generator or a PTO-driven generator

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Engine Selection and Project Manual RT-flex96C

B. Considerations on engine selection

B4 Ambient temperature consideration

B4.1 Engine air inlet: operating tem- B4.2 Engine air inlet: arctic conditions
peratures from 45°C to 5°C at operating temp. below 5°C

Due to the high compression ratio, the Sulzer RT- Under arctic conditions the ambient air tempera-
flex diesel engines do not require any special tures can meet levels below –50°C. If the combus-
measures, such as pre-heating the air at low tem- tion air is drawn directly from outside, these
peratures, even when operating on heavy fuel oil engines may operate over a wide range of ambient
at part load or idling. The only condition which must air temperatures between arctic condition and
be fulfilled is that the water inlet temperature to the tropical (design) condition (45°C).
scavenge air cooler must not be lower than 25°C.
To avoid the need of a more expensive combustion
This means that: air preheater, a system has been developed that
enables the engine to operate directly with cold air
• When combustion air is drawn directly from the from outside.
engine room, no pre-heating of the combus-
tion air is necessary. If the air inlet temperature drops below 5°C, the air
• When the combustion air is ducted from out- density increases to such an extent that the maxi-
side the engine room and the air temperature mum permissible cylinder pressure is exceeded.
before the turbocharger does not fall below This can be compensated by blowing off a certain
5°C, no measures have to be taken. mass of the scavenge air through a blow-off device
as shown in figure B6.
The central fresh water cooling system permits the
Engine
recovery of the engine’s dissipated heat and main-
tains the required scavenge air temperature after Turbocharger
Air intake casing
the scavenge air cooler by re-circulating part of the
Scavenge
warm water to the scavenge air cooler. air cooler Blow-off
valves
Air filter

The scavenge air cooling water inlet temperature


is to be maintained at a minimum of 25°C. This F10.1964

means that the scavenge air cooling water will Fig. B6 Scavenge air system for arctic conditions
have to be pre-heated in the case of low power
operation. The required heat is obtained from the
lubricating oil cooler and the engine cylinder
cooling.

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RT-flex96C Engine Selection and Project Manual

B. Considerations on engine selection

There are up to three blow-off valves fitted on the


scavenge air receiver. In case the air inlet tempera-
ture to the turbocharger is below 5°C the first blow-
off valve vents. For each actuated blow-off valve,
a higher suction air temperature is simulated by re-
ducing the scavenge air pressure which compen-
sates the high air density. The second blow-off
valve automatically vents as required to maintain
the desired scavenge and firing pressures. Figure
B7 shows the effect of the blow-off valves to the air
flow, the exhaust gas temperature after turbine and
the firing pressure.

Two blow-off One blow-off Blow-off valves closed


valves open valve open normal operation
nm [kg/kwh]
0.6
0.4
0.2
0
Specific air consumption
nt [°C] Exhaust gas temp.
0
–20
–40
–60
np [bar]
10 Firing pressure
5
0

–50 –40 –30 –20 –10 0 10 20 30 40 [°C]


Suction air temperature
F10.1965

Fig. B7 Blow-off effect at arctic conditions

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Engine Selection and Project Manual RT-flex96C

B. Considerations on engine selection

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RT-flex96C Engine Selection and Project Manual

C. Engine description

The Sulzer RT-flex96C engine is a camshaft-less


Overall sizes of engines 6 cyl. 14 cyl.
low-speed, direct-reversible, two-stroke engine,
fully electronically controlled. Length [m] 12.96 27.31
The Sulzer RT-flex96C is designed for running on
Height [m] 12.72 12.72
a wide range of fuels from marine diesel oil (MDO)
to heavy fuel oils (HFO) of different qualities. Dry weight [t] 1160 2300

Main features:
Bore 960 mm The design of the Sulzer RT-flex96C includes the
Stroke 2500 mm well-proven features of the RTA engines like the
Number of cylinders 6 to 12 and 14 bore-cooling principle for the pistons, cylinder
liners, cylinder covers and exhaust valve seats.
Main parameters (R1):
Power (MCR) 5720 kW/cyl
Speed (MCR) 102 rpm The RT-flex system (figure C1)
Mean effect. press. 18.6 bar
Mean piston speed 8.5 m/s The classic RTA configuration of fuel injection
pumps and valve drives with the camshaft and its
The Sulzer RT-flex96C is available with 6 to 12 and gear train is replaced by a compact set of supply
14 cylinders rated at 5720 kW/cyl to provide a pumps in the supply unit and the common rail with
maximum output of 80 080 kW for the 14-cylinder the integrated electronic Wärtsilä engine control
engine (primary engine data on table A1). system WECS-9520.

RT-flex engine RTA engine

Rail unit Fuel pump

Supply unit

Camshaft
Servomotor
Start air distr.

Supply unit
drive
Camshaft drive

Electronic
system control
(individually located)
F10.5252

Fig. C1 Significant difference between Sulzer RTA engines and RT-flex engines.

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Engine Selection and Project Manual RT-flex96C

C. Engine description

All engine key-functions like fuel injection, exhaust


valve drives, engine starting and cylinder lubrica-
tion are fully under electronic control. The timing of
the fuel injection, its volumetric and various injec-
tion patterns are regulated and controlled by the
WECS-9520 control system.

Engine installation and operation


Compared with the RTA engines, the RT-flex has
no additional or particular requirements for the en-
gine installation and shipboard operation.
The engine outline dimensions and foundation, the
installation, the engine key-parameters, the in-
tegration into ship automation and other interfaces
of the RT-flex are identical with the RTA engines.

The major benefits of the RT-flex system are:


• Adaptation to different operating modes.
• Adaptation to different fuels.
• Delta Tuning, as an optional application, for re-
duced brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC)
in the part load range below 90%.
• Optimised fuel consumption, especially at part
Remark: * Direction of rotation: clockwise as standard
load. (viewed from the propeller towards the engine).
• Precise speed regulation, in particular at slow Note: This cross section is considered as general
steaming down to about 15 to 12 rpm. information only
F10.5263
• Smokeless mode for slow steaming.
Fig. C2 Cross section of a typical Sulzer RT-flex engine
• Benefits in terms of operating costs, mainten-
ance requirement and compliance with
emissions regulations. 3. Semi-built crankshaft.

Common design features of RTA and 4. Main bearing jack bolts for easier assembly
RT-flex engines: and disassembly of white metal shell bearings.

1. Welded bedplate with integrated thrust bear- 5. Thin-shell white metal bottom-end bearings.
ings and main bearings designed as large thin-
shell white metal bearings. 6. Crosshead with crosshead pin and single-
piece white metal large surface bearings lubri-
2. Sturdy engine structure with stiff thin-wall box cated by a separate high-pressure oil supply
type columns and cast iron cylinder blocks for hydrostatic lift off.
attached to the bedplate by pre-tensioned
vertical tie rods. 7. Rigid cast iron cylinder monoblock.

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RT-flex96C Engine Selection and Project Manual

C. Engine description

8. Special grey cast iron cylinder liners with bore 11. Constant-pressure turbocharging system
cooling and load dependent cylinder lubrica- comprising high-efficiency turbochargers and
tion. auxiliary blowers for low-load operation.

9. Bore-cooled cylinder cover of high-grade ma- 12. TriboPack designed as a standard feature for
terial with a bolted-on exhaust valve cage con- excellent piston running and extended TBO up
taining a Nimonic 80A exhaust valve. to 3 years.

10. Piston with crown cooled by combined jet-


shaker oil cooling.

The RT-flex key parts:


WECS-9520
control
13. Supply unit: High-efficiency fuel pumps feed-
ing the 1000 bar fuel manifold. 15
Volumetric
injection
14. Rail unit (Common rail): Both, common rail in- control
jection and exhaust valve actuation are con-
trolled by quick acting solenoid valves (Sulzer
Rail Valve LP-1).

15. Electronic engine control WECS-9520 for


monitoring and controlling the engine’s key- 14
functions.
13

F10.5250

Fig. C3 Sulzer RT-flex system


comprising supply unit (13), common rail (14),
electronic engine control system WECS-9520
(15)

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C. Engine description

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RT-flex96C Engine Selection and Project Manual

D. Engine data

D1 Reference conditions D3 Ancillary system design


parameters
The engine can be operated in the ambient condi-
tion range between reference conditions and The layout of the ancillary systems of the engine
design (tropical) conditions, see section B4. bases on the performance of its specified rating
point Rx (CMCR). The given design parameters
The engine performance data, like BSFC, BSEF must be considered in the plant design to ensure
and tEaT and others are based on reference a proper function of the engine and its ancillary sys-
conditions. They are specified in ISO Standard tems.
15550 (core standard) and for marine application
in ISO Standard 3046 (satellite standard) as fol- • Cylinder water outlet temp. : 90°C
lows: • Oil temperature before engine : 45°C
• Air temperature before blower 25°C • Exhaust gas back pressure
• Engine room ambient air temp. 25°C at rated power (Rx) : 30 mbar.
• Coolant temp. before SAC 25°C for SW
• Coolant temp. before SAC 29°C for FW The engine power is independent from ambient
• Barometric pressure 1000 mbar conditions. The cylinder water outlet temperature
• Relative air humidity 30 % and the oil temperature before engine are system-
internally controlled and have to remain at the
The reference for the engine room air inlet tem- specified level.
perature is specified in ISO Standard 8861 with
35°C, taken from outboard.

Note: D4 Engine performance data


The lower calorific value (LCV) of the fuel refers to
an international marine convention. The specified The calculation of the performance data BSFC,
LCV of 42.7 MJ/kg differs from the ISO Standard BSEF and tEaT for any engine power will be done
which is specified at 42.0 MJ/kg. with the help of the winGTD program.

Data for Delta Tuning are available on the winGTD


program.
D2 Design conditions
If needed we offer a computerized information ser-
The capacities of ancillaries are specified accord- vice to analyze the engine’s heat balance and
ing to ISO Standard 3046-1 (clause 11.4) following determine main system data for any rating point
the International Association of Classification within the engine layout field.
Societies (IACS) and are defined as design condi- For details of this service please refer to section
tions: G1.3.1 and chapter J.
• Air temperature before blower 45°C The installation of the winGTD and the hardware
• Engine ambient air temp. 45°C specification are explained in chapter J.
• Coolant temp. before SAC 32°C for SW
• Coolant temp. before SAC 36°C for FW
• Barometric pressure 1000 mbar.
• Relative air humidity 60 %

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D. Engine data

D5 Vibration aspects

D5.1 Introduction

As a leading designer and licensor we are con- Figure D1 shows the external forces and moments
cerned that satisfactory vibration levels are ob- acting on the engine.
tained with our engine installations. The assess-
ment and reduction of vibration is subject to External forces and moments due to the recipro-
continuing research. Therefore, we have devel- cating and rotating masses (see table D1):
oped extensive computer software, analytical pro-
cedures and measuring techniques to deal with F1V: resulting first order vertical force.
this subject. F1H: resulting first order horizontal force.
F2V: resulting second order vertical force.
For successful design, the vibration behaviour F4V: resulting fourth order vertical force.
needs to be calculated over the whole operating M1V: first order vertical mass moment.
range of the engine and propulsion system. The M1H: first order horizontal mass moment.
following vibration types and their causes are to be M2V: second order vertical mass moment.
considered: M4V: fourth order vertical mass moment.

– External mass forces and moments.


– Lateral engine vibration.
– Longitudinal engine vibration.
– Torsional vibration of the shafting. F1V, F2V, F4V

– Axial vibration of the shafting.

F1H
D5.2 External forces and moments
M1V, M2V, M4V
In the design of the Sulzer RT-flex96C engine free
mass forces are eliminated and unbalanced exter- M1H
+ +
nal moments of first, second and fourth order are
minimized. However, six-cylinder engines gener- –

ate second order unbalanced moments of a


magnitude greater than those encountered with
higher numbers of cylinders.
Depending on the ship’s design, the moments of
fourth order have to be considered too. Forces and moments due to reciprocating
and rotating masses
F10.5173

Under unfavourable conditions, depending on hull Fig. D1 External forces and moments
structure, type, distribution of cargo and location of
the main engine, the unbalanced moments of first,
second and fourth order may cause unacceptable
vibrations throughout the ship and thus call for
countermeasures.

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RT-flex96C Engine Selection and Project Manual

D. Engine data

D5.2.1 Balancing free first order


moments
Electrically driven
Standard counterweights fitted to the ends of the 2nd-order balancer
crankshaft reduce the first order mass moments to
acceptable limits. However, in special cases non- F2V
standard counterweights can be used to reduce
either M1V or M1H, if needed.

D5.2.2 Balancing free second order M2V


moments

The second order vertical moment (M2V) is higher


on six-cylinder engines compared with 7–14-cylin- L
der engines; the second order vertical moment
being negligible for the 7–14-cylinder engines. M2V = F2V  L
Since no engine-fitted 2nd order balancer is avail- F10.5218

able, Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd. recommends for Fig. D2 Locating electrically driven balancer
six-cylinder engines to install an electrically driven
balancer on the ship’s structure (figure D2) to re-
duce the second order moments to acceptable
values.

If no experience is available from a sister ship, it is


advisable to establish at the design stage, what
form the ship’s vibration will be. Table NO TAG as-
sists in determining the effect of installing the
Sulzer 6RT-flex96C engine.

However, when the ship’s vibration pattern is not


known at the early stage, an external electrically
balancer can be installed later, should disturbing
vibrations occur; provision should be made for this
countermeasure.
Such a balancer is usually installed in the steering
compartment, as shown in figure D2. It is tuned to
the engine operating speed and controlled
accordingly.

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– Issue – Rev. 1 0
– Rev.
Engine Selection and Project Manual RT-flex96C

D. Engine data

D5.2.3 Power related unbalance (PRU)

The so-called Power Related Unbalance (PRU) values can be used to evaluate if there is a risk that free
external mass moments of 1st and 2nd order may cause unacceptable hull vibrations, see figure D3.

250
Free external mass moments
Power Related Unbalance (PRU) at R1 rating

200 M1V external moment [Nm]


PRU = = [Nm/kW]
M1H engine power [kW]
M2V

A
PRU [Nm/kW]

No engine-fitted 2nd order balancer available. If reduction of


150 M2v is needed, an external compensator has to be applied.

100

B
50

C
PRU = 0
0
6RT-flex96C 7RT-flex96C 8RT-flex96C 9RT-flex96C 10RT-flex96C 11RT-flex96C 12RT-flex96C 14RT-flex96C

A-range: balancing countermeasure is likely needed.


B-range: balancing countermeasure is unlikely needed.
F10.5245 C-range: balancing countermeasure is not relevant.
Fig. D3 Free external mass moments

The external moments M1 and M2 given in table NO TAG are related to R1 speed. For other engine speeds,
the corresponding external moments are calculated with the following formula:

MRx = MR1  (nRx/nR1)2

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– Issue X.04X.04 – Rev.
– Rev. 0 1 D–4 Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd
RT-flex96C Engine Selection and Project Manual

D. Engine data

D5.3 Lateral engine vibration (rocking)

The lateral components of the forces acting on the The ‘X-type’ lateral vibrations are caused by the
crosshead induce lateral rocking depending on the resulting lateral guide force moment MLX. The driv-
number of cylinders and firing order. These forces ing- and free-end side of the engine top vibrate in
may be transmitted to the engine-room bottom counterphase.
structure. From there hull resonance or local vibra-
tions in the engine room may be excited. Table D1 gives the values of resulting lateral guide
forces and moments of the relevant orders.
There are two different modes of lateral engine
vibration, the so-called ‘H-type’ and ‘X-type’, The amplitudes of the vibrations transmitted to the
please refer to figure D4. hull depend on the design of the engine seating,
frame stiffness and exhaust pipe connections. As
The ‘H-type’ lateral vibrations are characterized by the amplitude of the vibrations cannot be predicted
a deformation where the driving and free end side with absolute accuracy, the support to the ship’s
of the engine top vibrate in phase as a result of the structure and space for installation of lateral stays
lateral guide force FL and the lateral H-type should be considered in the early design stages of
moment. The torque variation (∆M) is the reaction the engine-room structure. Please refer to table
moment to MLH. D2, countermeasure for dynamic effects.

FL resulting guide force MLX resulting lateral X-type moment


MLH resulting lateral H-type moment
F10.5172

Fig. D4 External forces and moments

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Engine Selection and Project Manual RT-flex96C

D. Engine data

D5.3.1 Stays

Fitting of lateral stays between the upper platform


level and the hull reduces transmitted vibration and Free end
lateral rocking (see figures D5 and D6). Two stay lateral

types can be considered:


– Hydraulic stays: installed on the exhaust and
on the fuel side of the engine (lateral).
– Friction stays: installed on the engine exhaust
side (lateral).

Hydraulic stays

fuel side exhaust


side Driving end

F10.5278/2

Fig. D6 General arrangement of friction stays

D5.3.2 Electrically driven compensator

If for some reasons it is not possible to install lateral


Friction stays stays, an electrically driven compensator can be
installed which is able to reduce the lateral engine
vibrations and their effect on the ship’s superstruc-
ture. It is important to note, that only one harmonic
excitation can be compensated at a time. In the
case of an ‘X-type’ vibration mode, two compensa-
tors, one fitted at each end of the engine top, are
necessary.

F10.5278/1

Fig. D5 General arrangement of lateral stays

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D. Engine data

D5.4 Longitudinal engine vibration D5.6 Axial vibration


(pitching)
The shafting system is also able to vibrate in axial
In some cases with five-cylinder engines, direction. This vibration is due to axial excitations
specially those coupled to very stiff intermediate coming from the engine and the propeller and due
and propeller shafts, the engine foundation can be to the coupling effect with torsional vibrations. In
excited at a frequency close to the full load speed order to limit the influence of these excitations, and
range resonance. Thus leading to increased axial limit the level of axial vibration, an integrated axial
(longitudinal) vibration at the engine top and as a damper is fitted to the crankshaft of all Sulzer RTA
result of this to vibrations in the ship’s superstruc- and RT-flex engines.
ture. In order to prevent this vibration, stiffness of
the double-bottom structure should be as high as D5.7 Hull vibration
possible.
For the Sulzer RT-flex96C, as the minimum The hull and accommodation are susceptible to
number of cylinders is six, no longitudinal vibration caused by the propeller, machinery and
stays are needed. sea conditions. Controlling hull vibration is
achieved by a number of different means and may
require fitting longitudinal and lateral stays to the
D5.5 Torsional vibration main engine and installing second order balancer.

This involves the whole shafting system compris- Eliminating hull vibration requires co-operation be-
ing crankshaft, propulsion shafting, propeller, en- tween the propeller manufacturer, naval architect,
gine running gear, flexible couplings and power shipyard and engine builder.
take off. It is caused by gas and inertia forces, as
well as by variations of the propeller torque.
It is vitally important to limit torsional vibration in
order to avoid damage to the shafting. If the vibra-
tion at a critical speed reaches dangerous stress
levels, the corresponding speed range has to be
passed through rapidly (barred-speed range).
However, barred-speed ranges can be reduced,
shifted, and in some cases avoided by installing a
heavy flywheel at the driving end, and/or a tuning
wheel, or a torsional vibration damper at the free
end of the crankshaft.

Torsional vibration dampers of various designs are


available to reduce energy on different levels of
vibration.
Lower energy vibrations are absorbed by viscous
dampers.
Higher energy vibrations are absorbed by a spring
loaded damper type. In this case the damper is
supplied with oil from the engine’s lubricating sys-
tem, and depending on the the torsional vibration
energy to be absorbed can dissipate up to 100 kW.

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D. Engine data

D5.8 External forces and moments

Engine type: Sulzer RT-flex96C Number of cylinders 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 14


Rating R1: 5720 kW/cyl. at 102 rpm Engine power kW 34 320 40 040 45 760 51 480 57 200 62 920 68 640 80 080
Massmoments / Forces
Free forces
F1V [$kN] 0 0 0 0 43 0 0 15
F1H [$kN] 0 0 0 0 45 0 0 15
F2V [$kN] 0 0 0 0 26 0 0 21
F4V [$kN] 0 0 0 0 22 0 0 86
External moments *1)
M1V [$kNm] 0 562 628 1941 51 1347 0 45
M1H [$kNm] 0 580 698 1997 42 1388 0 45
M2V [$kNm] 6753 1960 0 2204 1612 1769 0 11
M4V [$kNm] 345 981 399 497 489 188 690 588
Lateral H-moments MLH *2) *3)
Order 1 [$kNm] 0 0 0 0 59 0 0 22
Order 2 [$kNm] 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 1
Order 3 [$kNm] 0 0 0 0 73 0 0 34
Order 4 [$kNm] 0 0 0 0 253 0 0 969
Order 5 [$kNm] 0 0 0 0 455 0 0 180
Order 6 [$kNm] 2088 0 0 0 203 0 0 75
Order 7 [$kNm] 0 1596 0 0 191 0 0 141
Order 8 [$kNm] 0 0 1082 0 32 0 0 69
Order 9 [$kNm] 0 0 0 672 8 0 0 41
Order 10 [$kNm] 0 0 0 0 420 0 0 156
Order 11 [$kNm] 0 0 0 0 15 279 0 22
Order 12 [$kNm] 107 0 0 0 1 0 214 3
Order 13 [$kNm] 0 0 0 0 23 0 0 10
Order 14 [$kNm] 0 128 0 0 22 0 0 219
Lateral X-moments MLX *3)
Order 1 [$kNm] 0 314 364 1082 13 751 0 24
Order 2 [$kNm] 1083 314 0 354 261 284 0 1
Order 3 [$kNm] 951 1041 1483 1799 2229 2695 3228 4234
Order 4 [$kNm] 1232 3501 1423 1774 1750 673 2464 2117
Order 5 [$kNm] 0 256 3570 1269 272 1687 0 751
Order 6 [$kNm] 0 35 0 2258 679 880 0 505
Order 7 [$kNm] 0 0 29 104 1983 174 0 674
Order 8 [$kNm] 183 14 0 49 200 1348 366 38
Order 9 [$kNm] 249 28 9 0 55 25 845 121
Order 10 [$kNm] 61 173 0 16 36 11 0 123
Order 11 [$kNm] 0 105 149 12 15 0 0 450
Order 12 [$kNm] 0 7 29 122 18 5 0 25
Order 13 [$kNm] 0 2 106 38 148 7 0 102
Order 14 [$kNm] 26 0 0 38 41 193 0 52
Torque variation (Synthesis value) [$kNm] 2155 1651 1119 681 1501 310 241 1596

Remarks: *1) The external moments M1 and M2 are related to R1 speed. For other engine speeds the corresponding external moments
are calculated with the relation: MRx = MR1  (nRx/nR1)2.
No engine-fitted 2nd order balancer available. If reduction on M2v is needed, an external compensator has to be applied.
*2) The resulting lateral guide force can be calculated as follows: FL = MLH  0.241 [kN].
*3) The values for other engine ratings are available on request.
— Crankshaft type: forged.
Table D1 External forces and moments

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– Issue X.04X.04 – Rev.
– Rev. 0 1 D–8 Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd
RT-flex96C Engine Selection and Project Manual

D. Engine data

D5.9 Summary of countermeasures for dynamic effects

The following tables indicate where special attention is to be given to dynamic effects and the counter-
measures required to reduce them.

External mass moments

Number of cylinders 2nd order balancer *2)


6 balancing countermeasure is likely needed *1) A
7–14 balancing countermeasure is not relevant C
Remarks: *1) No engine-fitted 2nd order balancer available.
If reduction on M2v is needed, an external compensator has to be applied.
*2) Refer also to figure D3.
Table D2 Countermeasures for external mass moments

Lateral and longitudinal rocking

Number of cylinders Lateral stays Longitudinal stays


6 B C
7 C C
8 A C
9 B C
10 B C
11 A C
12 B C
14 A C
Remarks: A: The countermeasure indicated is needed.
B: The countermeasure indicated may be needed and provision for the corresponding
countermeasure is recommended.
C: The countermeasure indicated is not needed.
Table D3 Countermeasures for lateral and longitudinal rocking

Torsional vibration & axial vibration


Where installations incorporate PTO arrangements further investigation is required and Wärtsilä
Switzerland Ltd, Winterthur, should be contacted.

Number of cylinders Torsional vibrations Axial vibrations


An integrated axial damper is fitted
Detailed calculations have to be
as standard to reduce the axial
carried out for every installation,
vibration in the crankshaft.
countermeasures to be selected ac-
6–14 However, the effect of the coupled
cordingly (shaft diameter, critical or
axial vibration to the propulsion
barred speed range, flywheel,
shafting components should be
tuning wheel, damper).
checked by calculation.
Table D4 Countermeasures for torsional & axial vibration

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– Issue – Rev. 1 0
– Rev.
Engine Selection and Project Manual RT-flex96C

D. Engine data

D6 Order forms for vibration calculations and simulation

For system dynamics and vibration analysis, Minimum required data needed for provisional
please send or fax a copy of the completed rel- calculation are highlighted in the forms (tables D5
evant forms to the following address: to D8) as follows:

Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd


Dept. 7055
‘Engine and System Dynamics’
PO Box 414
CH-8401 Winterthur
Switzerland
Fax: +41-52-262 07 25

25.74.07.40
25.74.07.40 – Issue
– Issue X.04X.04 – Rev.
– Rev. 0 1 D–10 Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd
RT-flex96C Engine Selection and Project Manual

D. Engine data

D6.1 Marine installation Torsional Vibration Calculation

Client Information Name: Phone:

Order Date: Order deadline:

Project Project name:

Shipyard: Hull No.:

Classification society:

Engine Engine type:

Engine power: kW Engine speed: rpm

Rotation: clockwise  anticlockwise  Engine tuning (RT-flex): Standard  DeltaTuning 

Barred speed range accepted: Y  N  if yes, in which speed range: rpm

Shafting

Intermediate shaft diameter: mm Propeller shaft diameter: mm

Intermediate shaft length: mm Propeller shaft length: mm

Intermediate shaft UTS: N/mm2 Propeller shaft UTS: N/mm2

If possible, a drawing or sketch of the propulsion shafting should be enclosed. In case the
installation consists of a CP-Propeller, a detailed drawing of the oil-distribution shaft is needed.

Propeller

Type: FP  CP  Number of blades: 4  5  6 

Diameter: m Mass: kg

Mean pitch: m Expanded area blade ratio:

Inertia in air: kgm2 Inertia with entr. water*: kgm2

*In case of a CP-Propeller, the inertia in water for full pitch has to be given and if possible,
the inertia of the entrained water depending on the pitch to be enclosed.

PTO Type: Free end gear (RTA)  Tunnel gear  Camshaft gear (RTA)  Shaft generator 

PTO-Gear Manufacturer:

Detailed drawings with the gearwheel inertias and gear ratios to be enclosed.

PTO-Clutches/Elastic couplings

The arrangement and the type of couplings to be enclosed.

PTO-Generator Manufacturer: Service speed range: rpm

Generator speed: rpm Rated voltage: V

Rated apparent power: kVA Grid frequency: Hz

Rotor inertia: kgm2 Power factor cos ϕ:

Frequency control system: No  Thyristor  Constant speed gear 

If possible, drawing of generator shaft to be enclosed

Minimum required data needed for provisional calculation.

Table D5 Vibration calculation form (ad-t1-tvc-marine-order-form)

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– Issue – Rev. 1 0
– Rev.
Engine Selection and Project Manual RT-flex96C

D. Engine data

D6.2 Testbed installation Torsional Vibration Calculation

Client Information Name: Phone:

Order Date: Order deadline:

Project Project name:

Shipyard: Hull No.:

Classification society:

Engine Engine type:

Engine power: kW Engine speed: rpm

Rotation: clockwise  anticlockwise  Engine tuning (RT-flex): Standard  DeltaTuning 

Flywheel inertia: kgm2 Front disc inertia: kgm2

TV damper type / designation: TV damper manufacturer:

Details of the dynamic characteristics of TV damper to be enclosed if already known.

Shafting

Intermediate shaft diameter: mm Intermediate shaft length: mm

Intermediate shaft UTS: N/mm2 Propeller shaft UTS: N/mm2

A drawing or sketch of the propulsion shafting should be enclosed.

Water brake

Type: Manufacturer:

Inertia of rotor with entr. water: kgm2 Drw.No.:

Elasticity of brake shaft: rad/Nm (between flange and rotor)

PTO Type: Free end gear  Camshaft gear 

PTO-Gear Manufacturer:

Detailed drawings with the gearwheel inertias and gear ratios to be enclosed.

PTO-Clutches/Elastic couplings

The arrangement and the type of couplings to be enclosed.

PT-Generator Manufacturer: Service speed range: rpm

Generator speed: rpm

Rotor inertia: kgm2 Rotor mass: kg

If possible, drawing of generator shaft to be enclosed

Minimum required data needed for provisional calculation.

Table D6 Vibration calculation form (ad-t1-tvc-testbed-order-form)

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– Issue X.04X.04 – Rev.
– Rev. 0 1 D–12 Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd
RT-flex96C Engine Selection and Project Manual

D. Engine data

D6.3 Marine installation Coupled Axial Vibration Calculation

Client Information Name: Phone:

Order Date: Order deadline:

Project Project name:

Shipyard: Hull No.:

Classification society:

Engine Engine type:

Engine power: kW Engine speed: rpm

Rotation: clockwise  anticlockwise  Engine tuning (RT-flex): Standard  DeltaTuning 

Flywheel inertia: kgm2 Flywheel mass: kg

Front disc inertia: kgm2 Front disc mass: kg

TV damper type / designation: TV damper manufacturer:

Details of the dynamic characteristics of TV damper to be enclosed if already known.

Shafting

Intermediate shaft diameter: mm Propeller shaft diameter: mm

Intermediate shaft length: mm Propeller shaft length: mm

Intermediate shaft UTS: N/mm2 Propeller shaft UTS: N/mm2

If possible, a drawing or sketch of the propulsion shafting should be enclosed. In case the
installation consists of a CP-Propeller, a detailed drawing of the oil-distribution shaft is needed

Propeller

Type: FP  CP  Number of blades: 4  5  6 

Diameter: m

Mean pitch: m Expanded area blade ratio:

Inertia in air: kgm2 Mass in air: kg

Inertia with entr. water*: kgm2 Mass with entrained water: kg

*In case of a CP-Propeller, the inertia in water for full pitch has to be given and if possible,
the inertia of the entrained water depending on the pitch to be enclosed.

PTO Type: Free end gear (RTA)  Tunnel gear  Camshaft gear (RTA)  Shaft generator 

PTO-Gear Manufacturer:

Detailed drawings with the gearwheel inertias and gear ratios to be enclosed.

PTO-Clutches/Elastic couplings

The arrangement and the type of couplings to be enclosed.

PTO-Generator Manufacturer: Service speed range: rpm

Generator speed: rpm

Rotor inertia: kgm2 Rotor mass: kg

If possible, drawing of generator shaft to be enclosed

Table D7 Vibration calculation form (ad-t1-avc-marine-order-form)

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– Issue – Rev. 1 0
– Rev.
Engine Selection and Project Manual RT-flex96C

D. Engine data

D6.4 Marine installation Bending Vibration & Alignment Calculation

Client Information Name: Phone:

Order Date: Order deadline:

Project Project name:

Shipyard: Hull No.:

Classification society:

Engine Engine type:

Engine power: kW Engine speed: rpm

Rotation: clockwise  anticlockwise  Engine tuning (RT-flex): Standard  DeltaTuning 

Flywheel inertia: kgm2 Flywheel mass: kg

Front disc inertia: kgm2 Front disc mass: kg

TV damper type / designation: TV damper manufacturer:

Details of the dynamic characteristics of TV damper to be enclosed if already known.

Shafting

Intermediate shaft diameter: mm Propeller shaft diameter: mm

Intermediate shaft length: mm Propeller shaft length: mm

Intermediate shaft UTS: N/mm2 Propeller shaft UTS: N/mm2

A drawing or sketch of the propulsion shafting should be enclosed. In case the installation
consists of a CP-Propeller, a detailed drawing of the oil-distribution shaft is needed

Propeller Type: FP  CP  Number of blades: 4  5  6 

Diameter: m

Mean pitch: m Expanded area blade ratio:

Inertia in air: kgm2 Mass in air: kg

Inertia with entr. water*: kgm2 Mass with entrained water: kg

PTO Type: Free end gear (RTA)  Tunnel gear  Camshaft gear (RTA)  Shaft generator 

PTO-Gear Manufacturer:

Detailed drawings with the gearwheel inertias, masses and gear ratios to be enclosed.

PTO-Clutches/Elastic couplings

The arrangement and the type of couplings to be enclosed.

PTO-Generator Manufacturer: Service speed range: rpm

Generator speed: rpm

Rotor inertia: kgm2 Rotor mass: Kg

Shaft bearings Type:

Stiffness horizontal: N/m Stiffness vertical: N/m

Sterntube stiffn. horiz.: N/m Sterntube stiffn. vertical: N/m

Table D8 Vibration calculation form (ad-t1-bending&alignment-order-form)

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– Issue X.04X.04 – Rev.
– Rev. 0 1 D–14 Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd
RT-flex96C Engine Selection and Project Manual

D. Engine data

D7 Turbocharger and scavenge air cooler

The selections of turbochargers covering the types The data can be calculated directly by the winGTD-
ABB TPL and MHI MET are shown in figures D8 program (see section J1.2). Parameters and de-
and D9. The selection of scavenge air coolers fol- tails of the scavenge air coolers (SAC) are shown
lows the demand of the selected turbochargers. in table D9 and figure D7, weights of turbochargers
in table D10.

Parameters for single-stage scavenge air coolers


Insert (WCH recommended cooler)
Cooler Water flow Design Pressure drop *1) Water Length Mass
air flow content (incl. conn. tubes) [tonnes]
small bundle large bundle
[m3/h] [kg/h] Water [bar] Air [mbar] [ dm3] [mm]
unit unit
SAC47F 330 195 000 0.55 t 20 600 2810 (3070) 1.0 3.6
Parameters for two-stage scavenge air coolers
SAC48F LT 220 195 000 0.55 490 2810 (3070) 1.0 3.6
t 20
SAC48F HT 110 195 000 0.27 110 2810 (3070) 1.0 3.5

Remarks: *1) At design flow


Table D9 Scavenge air cooler parameters

Single-stage cooler Two-stage cooler

water outlet (HT)

water inlet water inlet (LT)


Air flow Air flow

water outlet water outlet (LT)

water inlet (HT)


connecting tubes ”pre-stage” Remarks:
All data refer to cooler specification.
Singlestage SAC equipped with two on waterside interconnected cooler tube units ("pre
stage"). The smaller unit being placed upstream of air flow, facilitates cleaning procedure.
For twostage cooling application please contact Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd.
F10.5242

Fig. D7 Scavenge air cooler details (rated at R1)

Type TPL85-B11 TPL85-B12 ––


ABB
Mass [tonnes] 10.4 ––
Type MET83SD MET83SE MET83SEII ––
MHI (Mitsubishi)
Mass [tonnes] 10.5 ––

Table D10Turbocharger weights

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Engine Selection and Project Manual RT-flex96C

D. Engine data

D7.1 Turbocharger and scavenge air cooler selection

The SAC and TC selection for the engines RT-flex96C is given in the layout fields in figures D8 to D9.

Power [%] Power [%] Power [%]


R1 R1 R1
100 100 100
6RT-flex96C 7RT-flex96C 8RT-flex96C
95 95 95

R3 R3 R3
90 90 90
2 x TPL85-B12
2 x SAC47/48
85 85 85

2 x TPL85-B11 2 x TPL85-B11
80 2 x SAC47/48 80 2 x SAC47/48 80

75 75 75 2 x TPL85-B11
2 x SAC47/48

70 70 70
R4 R1: 34320 kW / 102 rpm R2 R4 R1: 40040 kW / 102 rpm R2 R4 R1: 45760 kW / 102 rpm R2

90 95 100 90 95 100 90 95 100


Speed [%] Speed [%] Speed [%]

Power [%] Power [%] Power [%]


R1 R1 R1
100 100 100
9RT-flex96C 10RT-flex96C 11RT-flex96C 3 x TPL85-B12
95 95 95
3 x SAC47/48
3 x TPL85-B11
R3 R3 R3
90 3 x SAC47/48 90 90

85 85 85

3 x TPL85-B11 3 x TPL85-B11
80 80 3 x SAC47/48 80
2 x TPL85-B12 3 x SAC47/48
2 x SAC47/48
75 75 75

70 70 70
R4 R1: 51480 kW / 102 rpm R2 R4 R1: 57200 kW / 102 rpm R2 R4 R1: 62920 kW / 102 rpm R2

90 95 100 90 95 100 90 95 100


Speed [%] Speed [%] Speed [%]

Power [%] Power [%]


R1 R1
100 100
12RT-flex96C 14RT-flex96C
95 95

R3 R3
90 90
4 x TPL85-B11
3 x TPL85-B12 4 x SAC47/48
85 3 x SAC47/48 85

80 80

3 x TPL85-B11 3 x TPL85-B12
75 75 3 x SAC47/48
3 x SAC47/48

70 70
R4 R1: 68640 kW / 102 rpm R2 R4 R1: 80080 kW / 102 rpm R2

90 95 100 90 95 100
Speed [%] Speed [%]

F10.52298

Fig. D8 Turbocharger and scavenge air cooler selection (ABB TPL type turbocharger)

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RT-flex96C Engine Selection and Project Manual

D. Engine data

Power [%] Power [%] Power [%]


R1 R1 R1
100 100 100
6RT-flex96C 7RT-flex96C 8RT-flex96C
95 95 95

R3 R3 R3
90 2 x MET83SE 90 2 x MET83SE 90
2 x SAC47/48 2 x SAC47/48
2 x MET83SEII
85 85 85 2 x SAC47/48

80 80 80

2 x MET83SD 2 x MET83SD 2 x MET83SD


75 75 75
2 x SAC47/48 2 x SAC47/48 2 x SAC47/48

70 70 70
R4 R1: 34320 kW / 102 rpm R2 R4 R1: 40040 kW / 102 rpm R2 R4 R1: 45760 kW / 102 rpm R2

90 95 100 90 95 100 90 95 100


Speed [%] Speed [%] Speed [%]

Power [%] Power [%] Power [%]


R1 R1 R1
100 100 100
9RT-flex96C 10RT-flex96C 11RT-flex96C
95 95 95 3 x MET83SEII
3 x SAC47/48
R3 R3 R3
90 3 x MET83SE 90 3 x MET83SE 90 3 x MET83SE
3 x SAC47/48 3 x SAC47/48 3 x SAC47/48

85 3 x MET83SD 85 85
3 x SAC47/48

80 80 80

2 x MET83SEII 3 x MET83SD 3 x MET83SD


75 75 75
2 x SAC47/48 3 x SAC47/48 3 x SAC47/48

70 70 70
R4 R1: 51480 kW / 102 rpm R2 R4 R1: 57200 kW / 102 rpm R2 R4 R1: 62920 kW / 102 rpm R2

90 95 100 90 95 100 90 95 100


Speed [%] Speed [%] Speed [%]

Power [%] Power [%]


R1 R1
100 100
12RT-flex96C 14RT-flex96C
95 95

R3 R3
90 90 4 x MET83SE
4 x SAC47/48
3 x MET83SEII
85 3 x SAC47/48 85
4 x MET83SD
4 x SAC47/48
80 80

3 x MET83SD
75 75 3 x MET83SEII
3 x SAC47/48
3 x SAC47/48

70 70
R4 R1: 68640 kW / 102 rpm R2 R4 R1: 80080 kW / 102 rpm R2

90 95 100 90 95 100
Speed [%] Speed [%]
F10.52299

Fig. D9 Turbocharger and scavenge air cooler selection (MHI MET type turbocharger)

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Engine Selection and Project Manual RT-flex96C

D. Engine data

D8 Auxiliary blower
For manoeuvring and operating at low powers,
electrically driven auxiliary blowers must be used
to provide sufficient combustion air.
Table D11 shows the number of blowers required.

Number of cylinders 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 14
Number of auxiliary air blowers required 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 4

Table D11 Number of auxiliary blowers per engine

D9 Electric power requirement in [kW]

Electrical power Power requirement [kW] referring to numbers of cylinders


Supply voltage
consumers 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 14

Auxiliary blowers *1) 380 VAC / 50 Hz 2 x 80 2 x 95 2 x 104 2 x 104 2 x 104 2 x 142 2 x 142 4 x 95
(shaft input, estimated values) 440 VAC / 60 Hz 2 x 80 2 x 95 2 x 115 2 x 115 2 x 115 2 x 145 2 x 145 4 x 95
380 VAC / 50 Hz 9 12.5 –
Turning gear
440 VAC / 60 Hz 11 15 22
Cylinder lubrication CLU-3 *2) 380/440 VAC / 50/60 Hz 1.5
380 VAC / 50 Hz 2 x (to be determined)
Control oil pumps
440 VAC / 60 Hz 2 x (to be determined)
Servo automatic filter *2) 380/440 VAC / 50/60 Hz 0.1
WECS power supply, box E85 220 VAC 50/60 Hz
1.6 1.8 2.0 2.2 2.4 2.6 2.8 3.2
*2) single phase
220 VAC 50/60 Hz 0.8 1.0 1.2
Servo oil pump control, box E87
single phase (for 4 pumps) (for 5 pumps) (for 6 pumps)
Propulsion control system 24 V DC UPS acc. to maker specifications
Additional monitoring devices acc. to
acc. to maker specifications
(e.g. oil mist detector etc.) maker specifications

Remark: *1) Power requirement of blower (shaft input) is indicated. The actual electric power requirement depends
on the size, type and voltage/frequency of the installed electric motor. The output of the installed motor should be
at least 10% higher than the maximum power demand at the shaft of the auxiliary blower.
Direct starting or Star-Delta starting to be specified when ordering.
*2) Two redundant power supplies from different feeder panels required; indicated power for each power supply.

Table D12 Electric power consumers

D10 Pressure and temperature ranges

Table D13 represents a summary of the required the pressure losses in the piping system, filters,
pressure and temperature ranges at continuous coolers, valves, etc., and the vertical level pres-
service rating (CSR). The gauge pressures are sure difference between pump suction and pres-
measured about 5 m above the crankshaft centre sure gauge to the values in the table on the next
line. The pump delivery head is obtained by adding page.

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– Issue X.04X.04 – Rev.
– Rev. 0 1 D–18 Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd
RT-flex96C Engine Selection and Project Manual

D. Engine data

Gauge pressure Temperature


Location of limit values [bar] limit values [°C]
Medium System measurement
Min Max Min Max Diff
Inlet 3.0 5.0 – –
Fresh water Cylinder cooling max 15
Outlet each cylinder – – 85 95

LT circuit Inlet cooler 1.0 4.0 25 36


* 1)
(single-stage SAC) Outlet cooler – – – –
Fresh water Inlet cooler 2.0 4.0 25 36
LT circuit
(Scavenge air * 1)
(two-stage SAC) Outlet cooler – – – –
cooling)
HT circuit Inlet cooler 3.0 5.0 70 80

(two-stage SAC) Outlet cooler – – – 120
Lubricating oil
Crosshead bearing oil Supply 10.0 12.0 40 50 –
(high pressure)
Servo oil Servo oil pump inlet 3.8 6.5 – – –
Supply 4.8 6.0 40 50 –
Main bearing oil
Outlet – – – – –
Inlet 4.8 6.0 40 50
Piston cooling oil max 30
Outlet – – – –
Thrust bearing Outlet – – – 65 –

Torsional vibration damper Supply – – – – –


(if steel spring damper is used) Inlet casing 1.0 – – – –
Lubricating oil
(low pressure) Supply 4.8 6.0 – – –
Integrated axial vibration damper (detuner)
Damp. chamber 1.7 – – – –

Turbocharger bearing oil Inlet 1.0 – – – –


(ABB TPL on engine lub. oil system) Outlet – – – 110 –

Turbocharger bearing oil Inlet 1.3 – – – –


(ABB TPL with separate lub. oil system) Outlet – – – 120 –
Inlet 0.7 – – – –
Turbocharger bearing oil (MHI MET)
Outlet – – – 85 –
Booster (supply unit) Inlet 7.0 *2) 10.0 *3) – 150 –
Fuel oil
After retaining valve (supply unit) Return 3.0 5.0 – – –
Intake from engine room (pressure drop, max) Air filter / Silencer max 10 mbar – – –
Intake from outside (pressure drop, max) Ducting and filter max 20 mbar – – –
Scavenge air
New SAC max 30 mbar – – –
Cooling (pressure drop)
Fouled SAC max 50 mbar – – –
Starting air Engine inlet 12 25 or 30 – – –
6.0 7.5
Control air Engine inlet – – –
Air normal 6.5
6.0 7.5 – – –
Air spring air for exhaust valve Main distributor
normal 6.5 – – –
Deviation
After each cylinder – – – 515
Exhaust gas "50

Exhaust gas Before each TC – – – 515 –


Design maximum 30 mbar – – –
Manifold after turbocharger
Fouled maximum 50 mbar – – –

Remark: *1) The water flow has to be within the prescribed limits.
*2) At 100 % engine power.
*3) At stand-by condition; during commissioning of the fuel oil
system the fuel oil pressure is adjusted to 10 bar.
–– See alarm setting values in tables H2 to H4.
Table D13 Pressure and temperature ranges

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D. Engine data

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RT-flex96C Engine Selection and Project Manual

E. Installation data

E1 Dimensions, masses and dismantling heights

Deck beam

X
E

F
D

C
G

M M1 N
K L I
A B
A’ F10.5297

Fig. E1 Engine dimensions

Number of cylinders 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 14
Dimensions in mm with a A 11564 13244 15834 17514 19194 20874 22554 25914
tolerance of approx. ± 10 mm A’ 12963 14643 17233 18913 20593 22273 23953 27313
B 4480
C 1800
D 10925
E 6020
F 12950/13000
G 2594
I 723
K 676
L 1944
M 1680
M1 2590
N 1220
R 750
X depending on crane height
Remarks: F: Minimum height to crane hook for vertical removal, arrangements with small/big hook
For removal with reduced minimum height, please contact WCH.
E: Dimension, when engine fitted with ABB TPL85. Other turbochargers cause other dimensions.
M, M1: M = Cylinder distance. M1 for engines with middle drive (8 to 14 cylinders).
R Housing with crank angle sensor; space for removal included.

Table E1 Engine dimensions

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Engine Selection and Project Manual RT-flex96C

E. Installation data

Number of cylinders 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 14
Net engine weight without oil/water [tonnes] 1160 1290 1470 1620 1760 1910 2050 2300
Minimum crane capacity [tonnes] 11.5
Remark: Weight: calculated according to nominal dimensions of drawings, including turbocharger and SAC, piping and platforms
There may be differences in weights, depending type of turbochargers.

Table E2 Engine masses

E1.1 Contents of fluid in the engine

Quantities referring to numbers of cylinders


System fluid
6 7 8 9 10 11 12 14
Cylinder cooling water [kg] 3350 3620 4050 4450 4670 5430 5600 6900

Lubricating oil [kg] 2410 2640 3080 3420 3740 4040 4350 4980

Water in scavenge [kg] 1240 1240 1240 1240 1880 1880 1880 2520
air cooler(s) *1)
Total of water and oil in
[kg] 7000 7500 8370 9110 10290 11350 11830 14400
engine *2)

Remark: *1) The given water content is approximate.


*2) These quantities include engine piping except piping of scavenge air cooling.

Table E3 Fluid quantities in the engine

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RT-flex96C Engine Selection and Project Manual

E. Installation data

E2 Engine outlines

The following engine outline illustrations are pro- This selection doesn’t cover all variations of the
duced to scale. They represent engine arrange- RT-flex96C engines. The drawings of other com-
ments with ABB TPL and MHI MET turbo- binations (number of cylinders, number and type
chargers. of turbochargers) are available on request.

Driving end

Free end

= Approx. centre of gravity

Scale in mm

336.770/338.733

Fig. E2 End elevation of Sulzer RT-flex96C engines with ABB TPL85-B turbochargers

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Engine Selection and Project Manual RT-flex96C

E. Installation data

Exhaust side elevation

Scale in mm
= Approx. centre of gravity

Plan view

336.287a

Fig. E3 Exhaust side elevation and plan view of Sulzer 7RT-flex96C engine with 2 x ABB TPL85-B turbochargers

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RT-flex96C Engine Selection and Project Manual

E. Installation data

Exhaust side elevation

Scale in mm
= Approx. centre of gravity

Plan view

337.924a

Fig. E4 Exhaust side elevation and plan view of Sulzer 8RT-flex96C engine with 2 x ABB TPL85-B turbochargers

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Engine Selection and Project Manual RT-flex96C

E. Installation data

Exhaust side elevation

Scale in mm
= Approx. centre of gravity

Plan view

338.733

Fig. E5 Exhaust side elevation and plan view of Sulzer 10RT-flex96C engine with 3 x ABB TPL85-B turbochargers

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RT-flex96C Engine Selection and Project Manual

E. Installation data

Exhaust side elevation

Scale in mm
= Approx. centre of gravity

Plan view

336.770

Fig. E6 Exhaust side elevation and plan view of Sulzer 12RT-flex96C engine with 3 x ABB TPL85-B turbochargers

Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd E–7 25.74.07.40 – Issue X.04 – Rev. 0


Exhaust side elevation

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Engine Selection and Project Manual

E–8
E.

Scale in mm
= Approx. centre of gravity

341.940

Fig. E7 Exhaust side elevation of Sulzer 14RT-flex96C engine with 4 x ABB TPL85-B turbochargers
RT-flex96C

Installation data

Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd


E.
Plan view

Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd


RT-flex96C

Installation data

E–9
Scale in mm
= Approx. centre of gravity

341.940

Fig. E8 Plan view of Sulzer 14RT-flex96C engine with 4 x ABB TPL85-B turbochargers

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Engine Selection and Project Manual
Engine Selection and Project Manual RT-flex96C

E. Installation data

Driving end

Free end

= Approx. centre of gravity

Scale in mm

336.064

Fig. E9 End elevation of Sulzer RT-flex96C engines with MHI MET83SE turbochargers

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RT-flex96C Engine Selection and Project Manual

E. Installation data

Exhaust side elevation

Scale in mm
= Approx. centre of gravity

Plan view

336.064

Fig. E10 Exhaust side elevation and plan view of Sulzer 8RT-flex96C engine with 2 x MHI MET83SE turbochargers

Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd E–11 25.74.07.40 – Issue X.04 – Rev. 0


Exhaust side elevation

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Engine Selection and Project Manual

E–12
E.

Scale in mm
= Approx. centre of gravity

336.281

Fig. E11 Exhaust side elevation of Sulzer 14RT-flex96C engine with 4 x MHI MET83SE turbochargers
RT-flex96C

Installation data

Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd


E.
Plan view

Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd


RT-flex96C

Installation data

E–13
Scale in mm
= Approx. centre of gravity

33.281

Fig. E12 Plan view of Sulzer 14RT-flex96C engine with 4 x MHI MET83SE turbochargers

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Engine Selection and Project Manual
Engine Selection and Project Manual RT-flex96C

E. Installation data

E2.1 Engine seating

Remarks:
*1) Final height h to be determined by shipyard.
*2) Chock thickness to be determined by the shipyard.
Note:
This is a typical example, other foundation arrangements may be possible.
246.401b

Fig. E13 Engine seating (foundation) with epoxy resin chocks

25.74.07.40 – Issue X.04 – Rev. 0 E–14 Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd


RT-flex96C Engine Selection and Project Manual

F. Auxiliary power generation

F1 General information

F1.1 Introduction

This chapter covers a number of auxiliary power The waste heat option is a practical proposition for
arrangements for consideration. However, if your high powered engines employed on long voyages.
requirements are not fulfilled, please contact our The electrical power required when loading and
representative or consult Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd, discharging cannot be met with a main-engine
Winterthur, directly. Our aim is to provide flexibility driven generator or with the waste heat recovery
in power management, reduce overall fuel con- system, and for vessels employed on compara-
sumption and maintain uni-fuel operation. tively short voyages the waste heat system is not
viable. Stand-by diesel generator sets (Wärtsilä
The sea load demand for refrigeration com- GenSets), burning heavy fuel oil or marine diesel
pressors, engine and deck ancillaries, machinery oil, available for use in port, when manoeuvring or
space auxiliaries and hotel load can be met by at anchor, provide the flexibility required when the
using a main-engine driven generator, by a steam- main engine power cannot be utilised.
turbine driven generator utilising waste heat from
the engine exhaust gas, or simply by auxiliary gen-
erator sets.

Ship service steam


Exhaust gas
econimiser

Steam turbine

Ship service power

Power turbine
G Aux. engine

G Aux. engine

M/G Main engine G Aux. engine

G Aux. engine

F10.5321

Fig. F1 Heat recovery, typical system layout

Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd F–1 25.74.07.40 – Issue X.04 – Rev. 0


Engine Selection and Project Manual RT-flex96C

F. Auxiliary power generation

F1.2 System description and layout F3.2 PTO power and speed

Although initial installation costs for a heat recov- PTO tunnel gear with generator
ery plant are relatively high, these are recovered
Generator speed
by fuel savings if maximum use is made of the 1000, 1200, 1500, 1800
[rpm]
steam output, i.e., electrical power and domestics, 700
space heating, heating of tank, fuel and water. 1200
Power [kWe]
1800
F2 Waste heat recovery *1)
Remark: *1) Higher powers on request
Before any decision can be made about installing
Table F1 PTO power and speed
a waste heat recovery system (see figure F1) the
steam and electrical power available from the ex-
haust gas is to be established. Another alternative is a shaft generator.

For more information see chapter J ‘winGTD – the


General Technical Data’.

F3 Power take off (PTO)

Main-engine driven generators are an attractive


option when consideration is given to simplicity of
operation and low maintenance costs. The gener-
ator is driven through a tunnel PTO gear with fre-
quency control provided by thyristor invertors or
constant-speed gears.

The tunnel gear is mounted at the intermediate


propeller shaft. Positioning the PTO gear in that
area of the ship depends upon the amount of
space available.

F3.1 Arrangements of PTO

Figure F2 illustrates various arrangements for


PTO with generator. If your particular requirements
are not covered, please do not hesitate to contact
our representative or Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd,
Winterthur, directly.

T1 T2 T3

T T

T1–T3 Tunnel gear Controllable-pitch propeller


T Thyristor bridge
Generator
F10.5231

Fig. F2 Tunnel PTO gear

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RT-flex96C Engine Selection and Project Manual

G. Ancillary systems

G1 General information

G1.1 Introduction

Sizing engine ancillary systems, i.e. for fresh


water, lubricating oil, fuel oil, etc., depends on the
contract maximum engine power. If the expected
system design is outside the scope of this book
please contact our representative or Wärtsilä Ltd,
Winterthur, directly.

G1.2 Part-load data

The engine part-load data can be determined with


the help of the winGTD-program.

G1.3 Engine system data

The data contained in tables G1 to G6 are appli-


cable to the nominal maximum continuous rating
(R1) of each six- to twelve- and fourteen-cylinder
engine at design (tropical) conditions. They are
suitable for estimating the size of ancillary equip-
ment.

The winGTD-program enables to obtain all engine


and system data at any Rx rating within the engine
rating field and of part-load, as mentioned above.

However, for convenience or final confirmation


when optimizing the plant, Wärtsilä Switzerland
Ltd provide a computerized calculation service.
Please complete in full the questionnaire on the
next page to enable us to supply the necessary
data.

Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd G–1 25.74.07.40 – Issue X.04 – Rev. 0


Engine Selection and Project Manual RT-flex96C

G. Ancillary systems

G1.3.1 Questionnaire for engine data

In order to obtain computerized engine performance data and optimized ancillary system data, please
send completed copy of this questionnaire to:

Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd, PO Box 414,


Dept. 4052, CH-8401 Winterthur, Switzerland.
or fax:
Fax No. +41 52 262 07 07

Client specification
Company:
Name:
Address:
Department:
Country:
Telephone:
Telefax:
e-mail:
Date of contact:

Project specification
Project number:
Shipowner, country:
Shipyard, country:
Project manager:
Wärtsilä representative:

Engine specification
Number of cylinders: RT-flex96C
PTO:  Yes  No (continue to ‘Rating point’ below)
(see PTO options, table F1)
Max. PTO [kW]  700  1200  1800 
Speed [rpm]:  1000  1200  1500  1800

Rating point (CMCR = Rx)


Power: kW
Speed: rpm

Cooling system specification


 Central fresh water cooling with single-stage scavenge air cooler and integrated HT circuit
 Central fresh water cooling with single-stage scavenge air cooler and separate HT circuit
 Central fresh water cooling with two-stage scavenge air cooler and integrated HT circuit

Calculations are based on an operating mode according to propeller law and design (tropical) conditions.

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RT-flex96C Engine Selection and Project Manual

G. Ancillary systems

G1.3.2 Engine system data for central fresh water cooling system (single-stage)
at nominal maximum continuous rating (R1)
Cooling with integrated HT circuit
HT circuit
LT
Engine equipped with Lubricating
oil cooler
ABB TPL turbochargers
Scavenge air
for Mitsubishi turbochargers cooler (LT)
use data from the winGTD program
(se chapter J). Recirculation
Central
cooler
F10.1907 Inlet Outlet

Fig. G1 Central fresh water cooling system with single-stage SAC and integrated HT circuit

General data Number of cylinders – 6 7 8 9


Speed 102 rpm Engine power kW 34 320 40 040 45 760 51 480
Number and type of turbochargers 2 x ABB TPL85-B11 2 x ABB TPL85-B11 2 x ABB TPL85-B12 3 x ABB TPL85-B11

Cylinder cooling (HT) heat dissipation kW 5109 6139 7189 7698


Fresh water flow m3/h 265 318 373 399
Fresh water temperature engine in/out °C 73.0/90.0 73.0/90.0 73.0/90.0 73.0/90.0

Scavenge air cooler (LT) heat dissipation kW 11740 13591 15411 17610
Fresh water flow (LT) m3/h 440 440 440 660
Fresh water temperature cooler in/out °C 36.0/59.1 36.0/62.8 36.0/66.3 36.0/59.1
Scavenge air mass flow kg/h 249781 291411 333041 374671

Lubricating oil cooler heat dissipation *1) kW 3682 4276 4881 5540
Oil flow *1) m3/h 553 628 703 787
Oil temperature cooler in/out °C 58.6/45.0 58.9/45.0 59.1/45.0 59.3/45.0
Fresh water flow m3/h 319 370 423 480
Fresh water temperature cooler in/out °C 36.0/46.0 36.0/46.0 36.0/46.0 36.0/46.0
Mean log. temperature difference °C 10.7 10.8 10.9 11.0

Central cooler heat dissipation kW 20531 24005 27481 30849


Fresh water flow (LT) m3/h 759 810 863 1140
Fresh water temperature cooler in/out °C 59.5/36.0 61.8/36.0 63.7/36.0 59.5/36.0
Sea-water flow m3/h 901 1054 1206 1354
Sea-water temperature cooler in/out °C 32.0/52.0 32.0/52.0 32.0/52.0 32.0/52.0
Mean log. temperature difference °C 5.6 6.5 7.2 5.6

Exhaust gas heat dissipation *2) kW 10393 12125 13857 15589


Mass flow kg/h 253255 295464 337673 379882
Temperature after turbine °C 314 314 314 314

Engine radiation kW 296 333 368 402

Starting air *3) at design pressure bar 25 30 25 30 25 30 25 30


Bottle (2 units) capacity each m3 9.9 8.5 11.5 9.9 13.4 11.5 14.9 12.9
Air compressor (2 units) capacity each m3/h 250 260 290 300 340 350 380 390

Pump capacities / delivery head *4) m3h bar m3/h bar m3/h bar m3/h bar
Lubricating oil 553 7.5 628 7.5 703 7.5 787 7.5
Crosshead lubricating oil 72 6.2 84 6.2 96 6.2 108 6.2
High temperature circuit (cylinder cooling) 265 3.0 318 3.0 373 3.0 399 3.0
Low temperature circuit 759 2.2 810 2.2 863 2.2 1140 2.2
Fuel oil booster 15.4 7.0 18.0 7.0 20.6 7.0 23.2 7.0
Fuel oil feed 8.6 5.0 10.0 5.0 11.4 5.0 12.9 5.0
Sea-water 901 2.2 1054 2.2 1206 2.2 1354 2.2

Remark: *1) Excluding heat and oil flow for balancer, damper and PTO gear.
*2) Available heat for boiler with gas outlet temperature 170°C and temperature drop 5°C from turbine to boiler.
*3) For 12 starts and refilling time 1 hour.
*4) Pressure difference across pump (final delivery head must be according to the actual piping layout).
Table G1 R1 data for central fresh water cooling system with single-stage SAC and integrated HT circuit

Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd G–3 25.74.07.40 – Issue X.04 – Rev. 0


Engine Selection and Project Manual RT-flex96C

G. Ancillary systems

General data Number of cylinders – 10 11 12 14


Speed 102 rpm Engine power kW 57 200 62 920 68 640 80 080
Number and type of turbochargers 3 x ABB TPL85-B11 3 x ABB TPL85-B12 3 x ABB TPL85-B12 4 x ABB TPL85-B11

Cylinder cooling (HT) heat dissipation kW 8728 9771 10828 12364


Fresh water flow m3/h 453 507 562 641
Fresh water temperature engine in/out °C 73.0/90.0 73.0/90.0 73.0/90.0 73.0/90.0

Scavenge air cooler (LT) heat dissipation kW 19466 21301 23116 27181
Fresh water flow (LT) m3/h 660 660 660 880
Fresh water temperature cooler in/out °C 36.0/61.6 36.0/64.0 36.0/66.3 36.0/62.8
Scavenge air mass flow kg/h 416302 457932 499562 582822

Lubricating oil cooler heat dissipation *1) kW 6133 6734 7343 8594
Oil flow *1) m3/h 862 937 1012 1171
Oil temperature cooler in/out °C 59.5/45.0 59.6/45.0 59.8/45.0 59.9/45.0
Fresh water flow m3/h 531 583 636 745
Fresh water temperature cooler in/out °C 36.0/46.0 36.0/46.0 36.0/46.0 36.0/46.0
Mean log. temperature difference °C 11.1 11.2 11.2 11.3

Central cooler heat dissipation kW 34327 37806 41287 48139


Fresh water flow (LT) m3/h 1191 1243 1296 1625
Fresh water temperature cooler in/out °C 61.1/36.0 62.5/36.0 63.7/36.0 61.8/36.0
Sea-water flow m3/h 1507 1660 1813 2113
Sea-water temperature cooler in/out °C 32.0/52.0 32.0/52.0 32.0/52.0 32.0/52.0
Mean log. temperature difference °C 6.2 6.7 7.2 6.5

Exhaust gas heat dissipation *2) kW 17321 19053 20785 24250


Mass flow kg/h 422091 464301 506510 590928
Temperature after turbine °C 314 314 314 314

Engine radiation kW 436 469 500 563

Starting air *3) at design pressure bar 25 30 25 30 25 30 25 30


Bottle (2 units) capacity each m3 16.5 14.2 18.1 15.5 19.7 16.8 22.9 19.5
Air compressor (2 units) capacity each m3/h 420 430 460 470 500 510 600 620

Pump capacities / delivery head *4) m3h bar m3/h bar m3/h bar m3/h bar
Lubricating oil 862 7.5 937 7.5 1012 7.5 1171 7.5
Crosshead lubricating oil 120 6.2 132 6.2 144 6.2 168 6.2
High temperature circuit (cylinder cooling) 453 3.0 507 3.0 562 3.0 641 3.0
Low temperature circuit 1191 2.2 1243 2.2 1296 2.2 1625 2.2
Fuel oil booster 25.7 7.0 28.3 7.0 30.9 7.0 36.0 7.0
Fuel oil feed 14.3 5.0 15.7 5.0 17.2 5.0 20.0 5.0
Sea-water 1507 2.2 1660 2.2 1813 2.2 2113 2.2

Remark: *1) Excluding heat and oil flow for balancer, damper and PTO gear.
*2) Available heat for boiler with gas outlet temperature 170°C and temperature drop 5°C from turbine to boiler.
*3) For 12 starts and refilling time 1 hour.
*4) Pressure difference across pump (final delivery head must be according to the actual piping layout).

Table G2 R1 data for central fresh water cooling system with single-stage SAC and integrated HT circuit

25.74.07.40 – Issue X.04 – Rev. 0 G–4 Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd


RT-flex96C Engine Selection and Project Manual

G. Ancillary systems

Cooling with separate HT circuit


HT circuit
LT
Engine equipped with Lubricating Cylinder water
oil cooler cooler
ABB TPL turbochargers
Scavenge air
for Mitsubishi turbochargers cooler (LT)
use data from the winGTD program
(see chapter J). Recirculation
Central
cooler
F10.1907 Inlet Outlet

Fig. G2 Central fresh water cooling system with single-stage SAC and separate HT circuit

General data Number of cylinders – 6 7 8 9


Speed 102 rpm Engine power kW 34 320 40 040 45 760 51 480
Number and type of turbochargers 2 x ABB TPL85-B11 2 x ABB TPL85-B11 2 x ABB TPL85-B12 3 x ABB TPL85-B11

Cylinder water cooler (HT) heat dissipation kW 5109 6139 7189 7698
Fresh water flow (HT) m3/h 265 318 373 399
Fresh water temperature cooler in/out °C 90.0/73.0 90.0/73.0 90.0/73.0 90.0/73.0
Fresh water flow (LT) m3/h 319 370 423 480
Fresh water temperature (LT) cooler in/out °C 46.0/59.9 46.0/60.4 46.0/60.7 46.0/59.9
Mean log. temperature difference °C 28.5 28.3 28.1 28.5

Cylinder cooling (HT) heat dissipation kW 5109 6139 7189 7698


Fresh water flow m3/h 265 318 373 399
Fresh water temperature engine in/out °C 73.0/90.0 73.0/90.0 73.0/90.0 73.0/90.0

Scavenge air cooler (LT) heat dissipation kW 11740 13591 15411 17610
Fresh water flow (LT) m3/h 440 440 440 660
Fresh water temperature cooler in/out °C 36.0/59.1 36.0/62.8 36.0/66.3 36.0/59.1
Scavenge air mass flow kg/h 249781 291411 333041 374671

Lubricating oil cooler heat dissipation *1) kW 3682 4276 4881 5540
Oil flow *1) m3/h 553 628 703 787
Oil temperature cooler in/out °C 58.6/45.0 58.9/45.0 59.1/45.0 59.3/45.0
Fresh water flow m3/h 319 370 423 480
Fresh water temperature cooler in/out °C 36.0/46.0 36.0/46.0 36.0/46.0 36.0/46.0
Mean log. temperature difference °C 10.7 10.8 10.9 11.0

Central cooler heat dissipation kW 20531 24005 27481 30849


Fresh water flow (LT) m3/h 759 810 863 1140
Fresh water temperature cooler in/out °C 59.4/36.0 61.7/36.0 63.6/36.0 59.4/36.0
Sea-water flow m3/h 901 1054 1206 1354
Sea-water temperature cooler in/out °C 32.0/52.0 32.0/52.0 32.0/52.0 32.0/52.0
Mean log. temperature difference °C 5.5 6.4 7.1 5.5

Exhaust gas heat dissipation *2) kW 10393 12125 13857 15589


Mass flow kg/h 253255 295464 337673 379882
Temperature after turbine °C 314 314 314 314

Engine radiation kW 296 333 368 402

Starting air *3) at design pressure bar 25 30 25 30 25 30 25 30


Bottle (2 units) capacity each m3 9.9 8.5 11.5 9.9 13.4 11.5 14.9 12.9
Air compressor (2 units) capacity each m3/h 250 260 290 300 340 350 380 390

Pump capacities / delivery head *4) m3h bar m3/h bar m3/h bar m3/h bar
Lubricating oil 553 7.5 628 7.5 703 7.5 787 7.5
Crosshead lubricating oil 72 6.2 84 6.2 96 6.2 108 6.2
High temperature circuit (cylinder cooling) 265 3.0 318 3.0 373 3.0 399 3.0
Low temperature circuit 759 2.2 810 2.2 863 2.2 1140 2.2
Fuel oil booster 15.4 7.0 18.0 7.0 20.6 7.0 23.2 7.0
Fuel oil feed 8.6 5.0 10.0 5.0 11.4 5.0 12.9 5.0
Sea-water 901 2.2 1054 2.2 1206 2.2 1354 2.2

Remark: *1) Excluding heat and oil flow for balancer, damper and PTO gear.
*2) Available heat for boiler with gas outlet temperature 170°C and temperature drop 5°C from turbine to boiler.
*3) For 12 starts and refilling time 1 hour.
*4) Pressure difference across pump (final delivery head must be according to the actual piping layout).
Table G3 R1 data for central fresh water cooling system with single-stage SAC and separate HT circuit

Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd G–5 25.74.07.40 – Issue X.04 – Rev. 0


Engine Selection and Project Manual RT-flex96C

G. Ancillary systems

General data Number of cylinders – 10 11 12 14


Speed 102 rpm Engine power kW 57 200 62 920 68 640 80 080
Number and type of turbochargers 3 x ABB TPL85-B11 3 x ABB TPL85-B12 3 x ABB TPL85-B12 4 x ABB TPL85-B11

Cylinder water cooler (HT) heat dissipation kW 8728 9771 10828 12364
Fresh water flow (HT) m3/h 453 507 562 641
Fresh water temperature cooler in/out °C 90.0/73.0 90.0/73.0 90.0/73.0 90.0/73.0
Fresh water flow (LT) m3/h 531 583 636 745
Fresh water temperature (LT) cooler in/out °C 46.0/60.2 46.0/60.5 46.0/60.7 46.0/60.4
Mean log. temperature difference °C 28.4 28.2 28.1 28.3

Cylinder cooling (HT) heat dissipation kW 8728 9771 10828 12364


Fresh water flow m3/h 453 507 562 641
Fresh water temperature engine in/out °C 73.0/90.0 73.0/90.0 73.0/90.0 73.0/90.0

Scavenge air cooler (LT) heat dissipation kW 19466 21301 23116 27181
Fresh water flow (LT) m3/h 660 660 660 880
Fresh water temperature cooler in/out °C 36.0/61.6 36.0/64.0 36.0/66.3 36.0/62.8
Scavenge air mass flow kg/h 416302 457932 499562 582822

Lubricating oil cooler heat dissipation *1) kW 6133 6734 7343 8594
Oil flow *1) m3/h 862 937 1012 1171
Oil temperature cooler in/out °C 59.5/45.0 59.6/45.0 59.8/45.0 59.9/45.0
Fresh water flow m3/h 531 583 636 745
Fresh water temperature cooler in/out °C 36.0/46.0 36.0/46.0 36.0/46.0 36.0/46.0
Mean log. temperature difference °C 11.1 11.2 11.2 11.3

Central cooler heat dissipation kW 34327 37806 41287 48139


Fresh water flow (LT) m3/h 1191 1243 1296 1625
Fresh water temperature cooler in/out °C 61.0/36.0 62.3/36.0 63.6/36.0 61.7/36.0
Sea-water flow m3/h 1507 1660 1813 2113
Sea-water temperature cooler in/out °C 32.0/52.0 32.0/52.0 32.0/52.0 32.0/52.0
Mean log. temperature difference °C 6.2 6.7 7.1 6.4

Exhaust gas heat dissipation *2) kW 17321 19053 20785 24250


Mass flow kg/h 422091 464301 506510 590928
Temperature after turbine °C 314 314 314 314

Engine radiation kW 436 469 500 563

Starting air *3) at design pressure bar 25 30 25 30 25 30 25 30


Bottle (2 units) capacity each m3 16.5 14.2 18.1 15.5 19.7 16.8 22.9 19.5
Air compressor (2 units) capacity each m3/h 420 430 460 470 500 510 600 620

Pump capacities / delivery head *4) m3h bar m3/h bar m3/h bar m3/h bar
Lubricating oil 862 7.5 937 7.5 1012 7.5 1171 7.5
Crosshead lubricating oil 120 6.2 132 6.2 144 6.2 168 6.2
High temperature circuit (cylinder cooling) 453 3.0 507 3.0 562 3.0 641 3.0
Low temperature circuit 1191 2.2 1243 2.2 1296 2.2 1625 2.2
Fuel oil booster 25.7 7.0 28.3 7.0 30.9 7.0 36.0 7.0
Fuel oil feed 14.3 5.0 15.7 5.0 17.2 5.0 20.0 5.0
Sea-water 1507 2.2 1660 2.2 1813 2.2 2113 2.2

Remark: *1) Excluding heat and oil flow for balancer, damper and PTO gear.
*2) Available heat for boiler with gas outlet temperature 170°C and temperature drop 5°C from turbine to boiler.
*3) For 12 starts and refilling time 1 hour.
*4) Pressure difference across pump (final delivery head must be according to the actual piping layout).

Table G4 R1 data for central fresh water cooling system with single-stage SAC and separate HT circuit

25.74.07.40 – Issue X.04 – Rev. 0 G–6 Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd


RT-flex96C Engine Selection and Project Manual

G. Ancillary systems

G1.3.3 Engine system data for central fresh water cooling system (two-stage)
at nominal maximum continuous rating (R1)
Cooling with integrated HT circuit Engine cylinder cooling
LT
Engine equipped with Lubricating HT
oil cooler Scavenge air
ABB TPL turbochargers cooler (HT)
Scavenge air
for Mitsubishi turbochargers cooler (LT)
use data from the winGTD program Recirculation
(see chapter J).
Central
cooler
F10.1907 Inlet Outlet

Fig. G3 Central fresh water cooling system with two-stage SAC and integrated HT circuit

General data Number of cylinders – 6 7 8 9


Speed 102 rpm Engine power kW 34 320 40 040 45 760 51 480
Number and type of turbochargers 2 x ABB TPL85-B11 2 x ABB TPL85-B11 2 x ABB TPL85-B12 3 x ABB TPL85-B11

Cylinder cooling (HT) heat dissipation kW 5031 6064 7132 7582


Fresh water flow m3/h 261 315 370 393
Fresh water temperature engine in/out °C 73.0/90.0 73.0/90.0 73.0/90.0 73.0/90.0

Scavenge air cooler (HT heat dissipation kW 7149 7836 8379 10723
Fresh water flow (HT) m3/h 220 220 220 330
Fresh water temperature cooler in/out °C 73.0/101.7 73.0/104.4 73.0/106.6 73.0/101.7

Scavenge air cooler (LT) heat dissipation kW 4713 5872 7122 7069
Fresh water flow (LT) m3/h 440 440 440 660
Fresh water temperature cooler in/out °C 36.0/45.3 36.0/47.6 36.0/50.0 36.0/45.3
Scavenge air mass flow kg/h 249781 291411 333041 374671

Lubricating oil cooler heat dissipation *1) kW 3639 4234 4848 5475
Oil flow *1) m3/h 553 628 703 787
Oil temperature cooler in/out °C 58.4/45.0 58.7/45.0 59.0/45.0 59.2/45.0
Fresh water flow m3/h 315 367 420 474
Fresh water temperature cooler in/out °C 36.0/46.0 36.0/46.0 36.0/46.0 36.0/46.0
Mean log. temperature difference °C 10.6 10.8 10.9 11.0

Central cooler heat dissipation kW 20531 24005 27481 30849


Fresh water flow (LT) m3/h 755 807 860 1134
Fresh water temperature cooler in/out °C 59.8/36.0 62.0/36.0 64.0/36.0 59.8/36.0
Sea-water flow m3/h 901 1054 1206 1354
Sea-water temperature cooler in/out °C 32.0/52.0 32.0/52.0 32.0/52.0 32.0/52.0
Mean log. temperature difference °C 5.7 6.6 7.3 5.7

Exhaust gas heat dissipation *2) kW 10393 12125 13857 15589


Mass flow kg/h 253255 295464 337673 379882
Temperature after turbine °C 314 314 314 314

Engine radiation kW 296 333 368 402

Starting air *3) at design pressure bar 25 30 25 30 25 30 25 30


Bottle (2 units) capacity each m3 9.9 8.5 11.5 9.9 13.4 11.5 14.9 12.9
Air compressor (2 units) capacity each m3/h 250 260 290 300 340 350 380 390

Pump capacities / delivery head *4) m3h bar m3/h bar m3/h bar m3/h bar
Lubricating oil 553 7.5 628 7.5 703 7.5 787 7.5
Crosshead lubricating oil 72 6.2 84 6.2 96 6.2 108 6.2
High temperature circuit (cylinder cooling) 481 3.0 535 3.0 590 3.0 723 3.0
Low temperature circuit 755 2.2 807 2.2 860 2.2 1134 2.2
Fuel oil booster 15.4 7.0 18.0 7.0 20.6 7.0 23.2 7.0
Fuel oil feed 8.6 5.0 10.0 5.0 11.4 5.0 12.9 5.0
Sea-water 901 2.2 1054 2.2 1206 2.2 1354 2.2

Remark: *1) Excluding heat and oil flow for balancer, damper and PTO gear.
*2) Available heat for boiler with gas outlet temperature 170°C and temperature drop 5°C from turbine to boiler.
*3) For 12 starts and refilling time 1 hour.
*4) Pressure difference across pump (final delivery head must be according to the actual piping layout).
Table G5 R1 data for central fresh water cooling system with two-stage SAC and integrated HT circuit

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G. Ancillary systems

General data Number of cylinders – 10 11 12 14


Speed 102 rpm Engine power kW 57 200 62 920 68 640 80 080
Number and type of turbochargers 3 x ABB TPL85-B11 3 x ABB TPL85-B12 3 x ABB TPL85-B12 4 x ABB TPL85-B11

Cylinder cooling (HT) heat dissipation kW 8612 9664 10741 12214


Fresh water flow m3/h 447 501 557 634
Fresh water temperature engine in/out °C 73.0/90.0 73.0/90.0 73.0/90.0 73.0/90.0

Scavenge air cooler (HT) heat dissipation kW 11434 12049 12568 15672
Fresh water flow (HT) m3/h 330 330 330 440
Fresh water temperature cooler in/out °C 73.0/103.6 73.0/105.2 73.0/106.6 73.0/104.4

Scavenge air cooler (LT) heat dissipation kW 8213 9419 10683 11744
Fresh water flow (LT) m3/h 660 660 660 880
Fresh water temperature cooler in/out °C 36.0/46.8 36.0/48.4 36.0/50.0 36.0/47.6
Scavenge air mass flow kg/h 416302 457932 499562 582822

Lubricating oil cooler heat dissipation *1) kW 6068 6675 7294 8510
Oil flow *1) m3/h 862 937 1012 1171
Oil temperature cooler in/out °C 59.3/45.0 59.5/45.0 59.7/45.0 59.8/45.0
Fresh water flow m3/h 526 578 632 737
Fresh water temperature cooler in/out °C 36.0/46.0 36.0/46.0 36.0/46.0 36.0/46.0
Mean log. temperature difference °C 11.0 11.1 11.2 11.2

Central cooler heat dissipation kW 34328 37807 41287 48140


Fresh water flow (LT) m3/h 1186 1238 1292 1617
Fresh water temperature cooler in/out °C 61.3/36.0 62.7/36.0 64.0/36.0 62.1/36.0
Sea-water flow m3/h 1507 1660 1813 2113
Sea-water temperature cooler in/out °C 32.0/52.0 32.0/52.0 32.0/52.0 32.0/52.0
Mean log. temperature difference °C 6.3 6.8 7.3 6.6

Exhaust gas heat dissipation *2) kW 17321 19053 20785 24250


Mass flow kg/h 422091 464301 506510 590928
Temperature after turbine °C 314 314 314 314

Engine radiation kW 436 469 500 563

Starting air *3) at design pressure bar 25 30 25 30 25 30 25 30


Bottle (2 units) capacity each m3 16.5 14.2 18.1 15.5 19.7 16.8 22.9 19.5
Air compressor (2 units) capacity each m3/h 420 430 460 470 500 510 600 620

Pump capacities / delivery head *4) m3h bar m3/h bar m3/h bar m3/h bar
Lubricating oil 862 7.5 937 7.5 1012 7.5 1171 7.5
Crosshead lubricating oil 120 6.2 132 6.2 144 6.2 168 6.2
High temperature circuit (cylinder cooling) 777 3.0 831 3.0 887 3.0 1074 3.0
Low temperature circuit 1186 2.2 1238 2.2 1292 2.2 1617 2.2
Fuel oil booster 25.7 7.0 28.3 7.0 30.9 7.0 36.0 7.0
Fuel oil feed 14.3 5.0 15.7 5.0 17.2 5.0 20.0 5.0
Sea-water 1507 2.2 1660 2.2 1813 2.2 2113 2.2

Remark: *1) Excluding heat and oil flow for balancer, damper and PTO gear.
*2) Available heat for boiler with gas outlet temperature 170°C and temperature drop 5°C from turbine to boiler.
*3) For 12 starts and refilling time 1 hour.
*4) Pressure difference across pump (final delivery head must be according to the actual piping layout).

Table G6 R1 data for central fresh water cooling system with two-stage SAC and integrated HT circuit

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RT-flex96C Engine Selection and Project Manual

G. Ancillary systems

G2 Piping systems

G2.1 Cooling and pre-heating water systems

G2.1.1 Central fresh water cooling


system

The cooling system of the RT-flex96C engine runs The cylinder cooling water outlet from the engine
on either one of the following standard layout: is thermostatically controlled by an automatic
valve (012). A static pressure head is provided,
– Central fresh water cooling system with single-
thermal expansion allowed and water losses made
stage scavenge air cooler and integrated HT
up by the expansion tank (021, 022), to be installed
circuit (see figure G4) or separate HT circuit
as high as possible above the pump suction (014)
(see figure G5).
to prevent ingress of air into the cooling system
– Central fresh water cooling system with two- through the pump gland. The fresh water gener-
stage scavenge air cooler for heat recovery ator (020) is not to require more than 50 per cent
and integrated HT circuit (see fig. G6). of the heat dissipated from the cylinder cooling
water at CMCR and is to be used at engine loads
The scavenge air cooler consists of two cooler el- above 40 per cent only. In case more heat is re-
ements which either are connected in series as quired (up to 85%), an additional temperature con-
single-stage cooler or parallel as two-stage cooler, trol system is to be installed ensuring adequate
see illustration in fig D7. The cooler elements as control of the cylinder cooling water outlet tem-
well as the housing are similar for both cooling perature (information can be obtained from WCH).
systems.
Correct treatment of the fresh water is essential for
The central fresh water cooling system showed in safe engine operation. Only totally demineralized
figures G4 to G6 reduces the amount of sea-water water or condensate must be used as water and it
pipework and its attendant problems. This pro- must be treated with a suitable corrosion inhibitor
vides for improved cooling control. Optimizing cen- to prevent corrosive attack, sludge formation and
tral cooling results in lower overall running costs scale deposits in the system. No internally galvan-
when compared with the conventional sea-water ized steel pipes should be used in connection with
cooling system. treated fresh water, since most corrosion inhibitors
have a nitrite base. Nitrites attack the zinc lining of
The cooling medium for the cylinder water cooler galvanized piping and create sludge.
is fresh water as well as for the central cooling
system.

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G. Ancillary systems

Seawater pipes Remarks:


LT freshwater pipes *4) Only when pos. 015 is installed.
HT freshwater pipes *6) Depending on vibration, a flexible hose connection may be
Balance pipes recommendable.
Ancillary equipment pipes Air vent pipes and drain valves where necessary.
Drain / overflow pipes Air vent and drain pipes must be fully functional at all inclination
Air vent pipes angles of the ship at which the engine must be operational.
Control / feedback
Pipes on engine / pipe connections Note:
For legend see table G7
347.521

Fig. G4 Central fresh water cooling system with single-stage scavenge air cooler and integrated HT circuit

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RT-flex96C Engine Selection and Project Manual

G. Ancillary systems

001 Main engine RTflex96C


002 Low sea chest *1)
003 High sea chest
004 Seawater strainer
005 Air vent (air vent pipe or equal venting system acc. to shipyard's design)
006 Seawater circulating pump
007 Central seawater cooler
008 Automatic temperature control valve for LT circuit
009 Temperature sensor of regulating system, min. temp. of SAC inlet: 25 °C
010 Freshwater pump for LT circuit
011 Lubricating oil cooler
012 Automatic temperature control valve for HT circuit
013 Temperature sensor of regulating system, constant temp. at engine outlet
014 Cylinder cooling water pump for HT circuit
015 Preheating circulating pump (optional), capacity 10% from pump 014 *7)
016 Heater for main engine (HT circuit)
017 Air vent pipe (piping on engine, at free end or at driving end)
018 Throttling disc (adjustable on engine, at free end or at driving end)
019 Throttling disc *2)
020 Freshwater generator Remarks:
021 Cooling water expansion tank for LT circuit
022 Cooling water expansion tank for HT circuit *1) If requested, two low sea chests are applicable.
023 Filling pipe / inlet chemical treatment *3) *2) When using a valve, lock in proper position to avoid mis
025 Scavenge air cooler handling.
1 Cylinder cooling water inlet (at free end or at driving end) *3) Other designs like hinged covers, etc. are also possible.
2 Cylinder cooling water outlet (at free end or at driving end) *5) The inlet and outlet pipes to SAC have to be designed to
allow for engine thermal expansion, or expansion parts
5 Scavenge air cooler, cooling water inlet *5)
have to be fitted.
7 Scavenge air cooler, cooling water outlet and air vent *5)
*7) For guidance only, final layout according to actual engine
16 Cylinder cooling water air vent (at free end or at driving end) preheating requirements.
347.521

Table G7 Central fresh water cooling system with single-stage scavenge air cooler and integrated HT circuit

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Engine Selection and Project Manual RT-flex96C

G. Ancillary systems

Seawater pipes Remarks:


LT freshwater pipes *4) Only when pos. 015 is installed.
HT freshwater pipes *6) Depending on vibration, a flexible hose connection may be
Balance pipes recommendable.
Ancillary equipment pipes Air vent pipes and drain valves where necessary.
Drain / overflow pipes Air vent and drain pipes must be fully functional at all inclination
Air vent pipes angles of the ship at which the engine must be operational.
Control / feedback
Pipes on engine / pipe connections Note:
For legend see table G8
333.620c

Fig. G5 Central fresh water cooling system with single-stage scavenge air cooler and separate HT circuit

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RT-flex96C Engine Selection and Project Manual

G. Ancillary systems

001 Main engine RTflex96C


002 Low sea chest *1)
003 High sea chest
004 Seawater strainer
005 Air vent (air vent pipe or equal venting system acc. to shipyard's design)
006 Seawater circulating pump
007 Central seawater cooler
008 Automatic temperature control valve for LT circuit
009 Temperature sensor of regulating system, min. temp. of SAC inlet: 25 °C
010 Freshwater pump for LT circuit
011 Lubricating oil cooler
012 Automatic temperature control valve for HT circuit
013 Temperature sensor of regulating system, constant temp. at engine outlet
014 Cylinder cooling water pump for HT circuit
015 Preheating circulating pump (optional), capacity 10% from pump 014 *7)
016 Heater for main engine (HT circuit)
017 Air vent pipe (piping on engine, at free end or at driving end)
018 Throttling disc (adjustable on engine, at free end or at driving end)
019 Throttling disc *2)
020 Freshwater generator
021 Cooling water expansion tank for LT circuit Remarks:
022 Cooling water expansion tank for HT circuit
*1) If requested, two low sea chests are applicable.
023 Filling pipe / inlet chemical treatment *3)
025 Scavenge air cooler *2) When using a valve, lock in proper position to avoid mis
026 Cylinder cooling water cooler handling.
1 Cylinder cooling water inlet (at free end or at driving end) *3) Other designs like hinged covers, etc. are also possible.
2 Cylinder cooling water outlet (at free end or at driving end) *5) The inlet and outlet pipes to SAC have to be designed to
allow for engine thermal expansion, or expansion parts
5 Scavenge air cooler, cooling water inlet *5)
have to be fitted.
7 Scavenge air cooler, cooling water outlet and air vent *5)
*7) For guidance only, final layout according to actual engine
16 Cylinder cooling water air vent (at free end or at driving end) preheating requirements.
333.620c

Table G8 Central fresh water cooling system with single-stage scavenge air cooler and separate HT circuit

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Engine Selection and Project Manual RT-flex96C

G. Ancillary systems

Seawater pipes Remarks:


LT freshwater pipes *4) Only when pos. 015 is installed.
HT freshwater pipes *6) Depending on vibration, a flexible hose connection may be
Balance pipes recommendable.
Ancillary equipment pipes Air vent pipes and drain valves where necessary.
Drain / overflow pipes Air vent and drain pipes must be fully functional at all inclination
Air vent pipes angles of the ship at which the engine must be operational.
Control / feedback
Pipes on engine / pipe connections Note:
For legend see table G9
333.600

Fig. G6 Central fresh water cooling system with two-stage scavenge air cooler and integrated HT circuit

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RT-flex96C Engine Selection and Project Manual

G. Ancillary systems

001 Main engine RTflex96C


002 Low sea chest *1)
003 High sea chest
004 Seawater strainer
005 Air vent (air vent pipe or equal venting system acc. to shipyard's design)
006 Seawater circulating pump
007 Central seawater cooler
008 Automatic temperature control valve for LT circuit
009 Temperature sensor of regulating system, min. temp. of SAC inlet: 25 °C
010 Freshwater pump for LT circuit
011 Lubricating oil cooler
012 Automatic temperature control valve for HT circuit
013 Temperature sensor of regulating system, constant temp. at engine outlet
014 Cylinder cooling water pump for HT circuit
015 Preheating circulating pump (optional), capacity 5% from pump 014 *7)
016 Heater for main engine (HT circuit)
017 Air vent pipe (piping on engine, at free end or at driving end)
018 Throttling disc (adjustable on engine, at free end or at driving end)
019 Throttling disc *2)
020 Freshwater generator
021 Cooling water expansion tank for LT circuit
022 Cooling water expansion tank for HT circuit
023 Filling pipe / inlet chemical treatment *3)
024 Scavenge air cooler, LT Remarks:
025 Scavenge air cooler, HT *1) If requested, two low sea chests are applicable.
1 Cylinder cooling water inlet (at free end or at driving end) *2) When using a valve, lock in proper position to avoid mis
2 Cylinder cooling water outlet (at free end or at driving end) handling.
3 Scavenge air cooler, cooling water inlet. HT *5) *3) Other designs like hinged covers, etc. are also possible.
4 Scavenge air cooler, cooling water outlet and air vent, HT *5) *5) The inlet and outlet pipes to SAC have to be designed to
5 Scavenge air cooler, cooling water inlet, LT *5) allow for engine thermal expansion, or expansion parts
have to be fitted.
7 Scavenge air cooler, cooling water outlet and air vent, LT *5)
*7) For guidance only, final layout according to actual engine
16 Cylinder cooling water air vent (at free end or at driving end) preheating requirements.
333.600

Table G9 Central fresh water cooling system with two-stage scavenge air cooler and integrated HT circuit

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Engine Selection and Project Manual RT-flex96C

G. Ancillary systems

G2.1.2 Pre-heating system

To prevent corrosive liner wear when not in service Example for 8RT-flex96C
during short stays in port, it is important that the – Estimated heating-up time: 6 h.
main engine is kept warm. Warming-through can – Engine ambient temperature: 40 °C.
be provided by a dedicated heater (016) as shown – Required engine temperature: 60 °C.
in figures G4 to G6 ‘Central fresh water cooling From the graph in figure G7:
system’, using boiler raised steam, hot water from • the approximate amount of heat per cylin-
the diesel auxiliaries, or by direct circulation from der is 26 kW.
the diesel auxiliaries. If the requirement is for a • heater capacity required is
separate pre-heating pump, an additional non-re- 8  26 kW = 208 kW.
turn valve between the main pumps and the heater
is to be installed. The appropriate value of the pre- 300
heating pump’s capacity is indicated in tables G7 240

and G9. In addition, the pumps are to be electrically 180


Approx. heater capacity [kW/cyl]

interlocked to prevent both pumps running at the 140

Ambient air temperature [C°]


120
same time. The operation of the heater is con- 100 10
trolled by a separate temperature sensor installed 80

at the engine outlet and the flow rate is set by a 60 20


50
throttling disc. If the diesel auxiliaries are to be
40
used to provide warming-through directly, it is im- 30
30
portant at the design stage to ensure that there is
sufficient heat available and that cross-connecting 20 40

pipework and isolating non-return valves are in-


cluded. 10
50
1 1.5 2 3 4 5 6 8 10 12
Before starting and operating the engine, a tem- F10.3717
Heating up time [h]
perature of 60°C at the cylinder cooling water
Fig. G7 Engine pre-heating power
outlet of the main engine is recommended.

To estimate the heater power capacity required to


achieve 60°C, the heating-up time and the engine
ambient temperature are the most important para-
meters. They are plotted on the graph shown in fig-
ure G7. To reach the required capacity per cylin-
der; this figure is multiplied by the number of
cylinders to give the total heater capacity required.

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RT-flex96C Engine Selection and Project Manual

G. Ancillary systems

G2.2 Lubricating oil systems

G2.2.1 General The cylinders are lubricated by a separate system


working on the once-through principle, i.e. fresh
Lubrication of the main bearings, thrust bearings, lubricating oil is directly fed into the cylinders to
bottom-end bearings, camshaft bearings, cross- provide lubrication for the liners, pistons and piston
head bearings, together with the piston cooling, is rings.
carried out by the main lubricating oil system, see
figure G8 ‘Main lubricating oil system and cylinder For normal operating conditions, a high-alkaline
lubricating oil system’. The elevated lub. oil pres- marine cylinder oil of the SAE 50 viscosity grade
sure for the crosshead bearings is obtained using with a minimum kinematic viscosity of 18.5 cSt at
separate pumps. The cylinder liner lubrication is 100°C must be used. The alkalinity of the oil is indi-
carried out by a separate system as shown in the cated by its Base Number (BN).
upper part of figure G8. The consumption of sys-
tem oil and cylinder lubricating oil is indicated in Note:
table A1. The ‘Base Number’ or ‘BN’ was formerly known as
‘Total Base Number’ or ‘TBN’. Only the name has
The products listed in table G10 ‘Lubricating oils’ changed, values remain identical.
were selected in co-operation with the oil suppliers
and are considered appropriate for the application
indicated. G2.2.2 Optional lubricating oil systems
Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd does not accept any liabil- for turbochargers
ity for the quality of the supplied lubricants or their
performance in actual service. The ABB TPL and Mitsubishi MET turbochargers
feature journal bearings which are lubricated from
In addition to the oils shown in the mentioned list, the engine’s lubricating system.
there are other brands which might be suitable for As an option, a separate lubricating system (fig. G9
the use in Sulzer diesel engines. Information con- and G10) which only serves the turbochargers can
cerning such brands may be obtained on request be supplied. For more information please contact
from Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd, Winterthur. WCH.
For lubricating oil of turbochargers equipped with
For the Sulzer RT-flex96C engines which are de- separate lub. oil systems, the recommendations
signed with oil-cooled pistons, the crankcase oils given by the supplier must be observed.
typically used as system oil have the following
properties (see also table G10, ‘lubricating oils’):
• SAE 30.
• Minimum BN of 5 detergent properties.
• Load carrying performance of the FZG gear
machine method IP 334/90: FZG load stage
fail 11.
• Good thermal stability.
• Antifoam properties.
• Good demulsifying performance.

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Engine Selection and Project Manual RT-flex96C

G. Ancillary systems

G2.2.3 Lubricating oil maintenance and


treatment

Treatment of the system oil by self-cleaning separ-


ators is absolutely necessary to maintain the oil in
good condition over a long working period.
In order to remove any water from the lubricating
oil the separator has to operate as a purifier of the
full discharge type. Pre-heating of the oil between
90–95°C will increase the efficiency of the separ-
ation process.

The minimum throughput of the lubricating oil sep-


arator is determined by the contracted maximum
power (CMCR) of the engine as follows:
.
V separator(CMCR) + 0.14 dm 3ńkWh

Example:
Estimation of minimum throughput
of the lubricating oil separator for
Sulzer 8RT-flex96C with CMCR at 45 760 kW
.
V separator(CMCR) + 0.14 @ 45 760 + 6406 dm 3ńh

The separator throughput related to its nominal ca-


pacity has to conform to the recommendations of
the separator manufacturer. This separator should
never be used for fuel oil separation, to prevent
cross-contamination of the lubricating oil.

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RT-flex96C Engine Selection and Project Manual

G. Ancillary systems

Bearing lub. oil pipes


Crosshead lub. oil pipes
Cylinder lub. oil pipes
Transfer/dirty lub. oil pipes
Drain / overflow pipes
Air vent pipes
Pipes on engine / pipe connections

246.819a

22 Lubricating oil drain from bedplate


24 Lubricating oil inlet
001 Main engine RTflex96C
002 Lubricating oil drain tank 26 Cylinder lubricating oil inlet
003 Heating coil 27 Crosshead lub. oil inlet
004 Suction filter
005 Lubricating oil pump *1) Remarks:
006 Lubricating oil cooler *1) The lub. oil pumps (pos. 005) and the crosshead lub oil pumps (pos. 013) are
007 Automatic temperature control valve; to be interlocked so that the crosshead lub. oil pumps never can run alone.
constant temp. at engine inlet: 45 °C *2) Alternatively, the cylinder oil can be fed directly from the storage tank by grav
ity to the lubricators. If this arrangement is preferred, the storage tank is to be
008 Lubricating oil filter
located at the same height as requested for the daily tank and the feed pipe to
009 Reduction piece the lubricators is provided with a flow meter.
010 Deck connection
*4) The bypass line with the pressure control valve can be omitted if the main
011 Cylinder lubricating oil storage tank *2) lubricating oil pumps have a builtin pressure control and safety valve or if
012 Cylinder lubricating oil daily service tank centrifugal pumps are used.
013 Crosshead lubricating oil pump Air vent pipes and drain valves where necessary.
014 Pressure control valve Air vent and drain pipes must be fully functional at all inclination angles of the
015 Automatic oil filter (on engine) ship at which the engine must be operational.

Fig. G8 Main lubricating oil system

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Engine Selection and Project Manual RT-flex96C

G. Ancillary systems

001 Turbocharger ABB TPL85B


002 Lubricating oil drain tank
003 Heating coil
004 Suction filter
005 Lubricating oil pump
006 Lubricating oil cooler
007 Automatic temperature control valve
008 Lubricating oil filter
17 Lubricating oil inlet
18 Lubricating oil outlet
30 Air vent manifold

Bearing lub. oil pipes


Transfer/dirty lub. oil pipes
Overflow/drain pipes
Air vent pipes
Pipes on engine / pipe
connections

Remarks:
For pump capacity, temperatures and oil viscosity, please refer to the winGTD program.
Air vent and drain pipes must be fully functional at all inclination angles of the ship at
which the engine must be operational.
246.700a

Fig. G9 Lubricating oil system for 2 x ABB-TPL turbochargers

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RT-flex96C Engine Selection and Project Manual

G. Ancillary systems

001 Turbocharger ABB TPL85B


002 Lubricating oil drain tank
003 Heating coil
004 Suction filter
005 Lubricating oil pump
006 Lubricating oil cooler
007 Automatic temperature control valve
008 Lubricating oil filter
17 Lubricating oil inlet
18 Lubricating oil outlet
30 Air vent manifold

Bearing lub. oil pipes


Transfer/dirty lub. oil pipes
Overflow/drain pipes
Air vent pipes
Pipes on engine / pipe
connections

Remarks:
For pump capacity, temperatures and oil viscosity, please refer to the winGTD program.
Air vent and drain pipes must be fully functional at all inclination angles of the ship at
which the engine must be operational.
246.700a

Fig. G10 Lubricating oil system for 3 x ABB-TPL turbochargers

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G. Ancillary systems

Cylinder oil Cylinder oil


Oil Supplier System oil HFO HFO
more than 1% sulphur (BN 70–80) less than 1.5% sulphur (BN 40)

BP Energol OE-HT 30 Energol CLO 50M Energol CL-DX 405


Cyltech 80AW
Castrol CDX 30 Cyltech 70 Cyltech 40 SX

Mobilgard 300 Mobilgard 570


ExxonMobil Mobilgard L 540
EXXMAR XA EXXMAR X 70

ChevronTexaco Veritas 800 Marine Oil 30 Taro Special HT 70


(FAMM)

Melina S Oil 30
Shell Alexia Oil 50 Alexia LS
Melina Oil 30

Total Atlanta Marine D 3005 Talusia HR 70 Talusia LS40

Table G10 Lubricating oils

Note
The application must be in compliance with the
Wärtsilä general lubricating oil requirements and
recommendations. The supplying oil company un-
dertakes all responsibility for the performance of
the oil in service to the exclusion of any liability of
Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd.

25.74.07.40
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– Issue X.04X.04 – Rev.
– Rev. 0 1 G–22 Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd
RT-flex96C Engine Selection and Project Manual

G. Ancillary systems

G2.3 Fuel oil systems

G2.3.1 Fuel oil requirements

In Table G11 ‘Fuel oil requirements’ some heavy The CCAI (Calculated Carbon Aromaticity Index,
fuel oil specifications are given. The values in the ISO 8217: 1996) is a function of viscosity and den-
column ‘Bunker limit’ (RMK55) indicate the mini- sity, and is an indication of the ignition quality for
mum quality of heavy fuel as bunkered. Good op- medium and high-speed diesel engines. In low-
erating results have been achieved with commer- speed engines ignition delay as given by the CCAI
cially available fuels within these limits. The is of less importance. There is no rigidly applicable
column ‘Recommended fuel quality’ is an example limit for this quantity, but good results have been
of a good quality fuel of the type commonly used in obtained with commercially available fuels which
Sulzer diesel engines. The use of this variety of fuel have CCAI values up to 870.
can be expected to have a positive influence on
overhaul periods, by improving combustion, wear The maximum admissible viscosity of the fuel that
and exhaust gas composition. can be used in an installation depends on the heat-
The fuel oil as bunkered must be processed before ing and fuel preparation facilities available. As a
it enters the engine. The difference between the guidance, the necessary pre-heating temperature
recommended fuel quality of bunker and at engine for a given nominal viscosity can be taken from the
inlet is an approximate indication of the improve- viscosity/temperature chart in figure G11.
ment that must be achieved by fuel oil treatment. The recommended viscosity range of fuel entering
If catalyst fines are present they must be removed. the engine is: 13–17 mm2/s (cSt).
The fuel oil should contain no foreign substances
or chemical waste, hazardous to the safety of the
ship or detrimental to the performance of
machinery.

Parameter Unit Bunker limit Test method *1) Recommended fuel quality
ISO 8217:1996
Bunker Engine inlet
class F, RMK55
Density at 15°C [kg/m3] max. 1010 *2) ISO 3675: 1993 max. 1010 max. 1010
Kinematic viscosity [mm2/s(cSt)] – ISO 3104: 1994 – 13–17
• at 50°C [mm2/s(cSt)] – ISO 3104: 1994 max. 730 –
• at 100°C [mm2/s(cSt)] max. 55.0 ISO 3104: 1994 max. 55.0 –
Carbon residue [m/m (%)] max. 22 ISO 10370: 1993 max. 15 max. 15
Sulphur [m/m (%)] max. 5.0 ISO 8754: 1992 max. 3.5 max. 3.5
Ash [m/m (%)] max. 0.20 ISO 6245: 1993 max. 0.05 max. 0.05
Vanadium [mg/kg (ppm)] max. 600 ISO 14597: 1997 max. 100 max. 100
Sodium [mg/kg (ppm)] – AAS max. 50 max. 30
Aluminium plus Silicon [mg/kg (ppm)] max. 80 ISO 10478: 1994 max. 30 max. 15
Total sediment, potential [m/m (%)] max. 0.10 ISO 10307: 1993 max. 0.10 max. 0.10
Water [v/v (%)] max. 1.0 ISO 3733: 1976 max. 1.0 max. 0.3
Flash point [°C] min. 60 ISO 2719: 1988 min. 60 min. 60
Pour point [°C] max. 30 ISO 3016: 1994 max. 30 max. 30

Remark: *1) ISO standards can be obtained from the ISO Central Secretariat, Geneva, Switzerland (www.iso.ch).
*2) Limited to max. 991 kg/m3 (ISO-F-RMH55), if the fuel treatment plant cannot remove water from high density fuel oil.

Table G11 Fuel oil requirements

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Recommended viscosity range before fuel supply unit

Example:
To obtain the recommended viscosity before the fuel supply unit, fuel oil of 380mm2/s (cSt) at 50°C
must be heated up to 130-140°C.
F10.4779

Fig. G11 Fuel oil viscosity/temperature diagram

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G. Ancillary systems

G2.3.2 Fuel oil treatment

Figure G12 ‘Heavy fuel oil treatment layout’ is a To achieve a good separating effect, the through-
schematic diagram of a fuel oil treatment plant. put and the temperature of the fuel must be ad-
The following points should be considered before justed in relation to the viscosity. With high-viscos-
designing a system. ity fuels, the separating temperature must be
increased whereas the throughput must be de-
Gravitational settling of water and sediment in creased in relation to the nominal capacity of the
heavy fuel oils is an extremely slow process due to separator. For recommended operating data, refer
the small density difference between the oil and the also to the separator instruction manual.
sediment. To achieve the best settling results, the
surface area of the settling tank should be as large A mesh size of maximum 50 microns is the abso-
as possible, because the settling process is a func- lute minimum requirement for the fuel oil filter. This
tion of the fuel surface area of the tank, the viscos- specified filtration grade conforms to a high reliabil-
ity and the density difference. The purpose of the ity and optimal cleaning efficiency of the centrifugal
settling tank is to separate the sludge and water separators.
contained in the fuel oil, to act as a buffer tank and
to provide a suitable constant oil temperature of Cat fines may, for various reasons, be present in
60°C to 70°C. the fuel when entering the engine. Excessive pis-
ton ring and cylinder liner wear on all cylinders is
It is advisable to use separators without gravity often caused by cat fines in the fuel oil. It is obvious
disc to meet the requirements for heavy fuel separ- that other exposed parts e.g. fuel pumps, fuel in-
ation up to 730 mm2/s at 50°C and make the con- jection valves, piston rod and piston rod stuffing
tinuous and unattended onboard operation easier. boxes will be also damaged if a high content of cat
As it is usual to install a stand-by separator as a fines is present in the fuel oil.
back-up, it is of advantage to use it to improve the
separation. For the arrangement of separators, The use of an automatic self-cleaning filter with a
refer to the manufacturer’s instructions. The effec- mesh size of 10 microns installed on the low-tem-
tive separator throughput is to be in accordance perature side of the pressurized fuel oil system will
with the maximum consumption of the diesel additionally protect the engine from serious dam-
engine plus a margin of 15–20 per cent, which ages by removing cat fines which may have
ensures that separated fuel oil flows back from the passed through the separator(s). This filter will
daily tank to the settling tank. The separators are also indicate changes in the separator efficiency
to be in continuous operation from port to port. and/or in the fuel quality.
Such an additional investment should especially
Figure G12 ‘Heavy fuel oil treatment layout’ shows be considered where, due to the ship’s trading
individual positive displacement type pumps but it route, the risk of bunkering fuel with a high cat fines
is also acceptable to have these pumps integrated content is prevalent.
in the separator. It is important that the pumps op-
erate at constant capacity in order to achieve equal
results over the whole operating time.
The separation temperature is to be controlled
within ± 2°C by a preheater.

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G. Ancillary systems

Remarks:
001 HFO settling tank, heated and insulated *1) Pump may be omitted if integrated in separator.
002 HFO daily tank, heated and insulated *2) Separator capacity related to viscosity in accordance
003 MDO daily tank with instructions of separator manufacturer.
004 Suction filter *3) Vent chamber in funnel.
005 HFO separator supply pump, with safety valve *1) *4) Connection pipe optional.
006 HFO/MDO separator supply pump, safety valve *1) Air vent and drain pipes must be fully functional at all
007 HFO preheater inclination angles of the ship at which the engine must be
008 Selfcleaning HFO separator *2) operational.
009 Selfcleaning HFO/MDO separator *2)
010 Threeway valve, diaphragm operated
011 Sludge tank HFO pipes, heated and insulated
012 Fuel oil overflow tank
013 Air vent collector MDO pipes
014 Air vent manifold Air vent pipes
Drain & overflow pipes 333.729/2

Fig. G12 Heavy fuel oil treatment layout

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G. Ancillary systems

G2.3.3 Pressurized fuel oil system

The system shown in figure G13 is recommended


for use with engines burning heavy fuel oils. Fuel
oil from the heated daily tank (002, figure G12)
passes through the three-way valve (002, figure
G13), filter (003) and is transferred to the mixing
unit (006) by the low-pressure feed pump (004).
The high-pressure booster pump (007) transfers
the fuel through the heater (008), viscosimeter and
the filter (010) to the fuel supply unit (012).

Circulation is maintained via pipework back to the


mixing tank which equalizes the fuel oil tempera-
ture between the hot oil returning from the engine
and the cooler oil from the daily tank. The pressure
regulating valve (005) controls the delivery of the
low-pressure pump and ensures that the dis-
charge pressure is 1 bar above evaporation pres-
sure to prevent entrained water from flashing off
into steam.

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001 Main engine RTflex96C Remarks:


002 Threeway valve, manually or remotely operated *1) The return pipe may also be led to the HFO daily tank.
003 Fuel oil suction filter, heated (trace heating acceptable) Feed pumps (pos. 004) must be installed below MDO and
004 Low pressure feed pump daily tanks.
005 Pressure regulating valve All heaters to be fitted with thermometers, relief valves, drains
and drip trays.
006 Mixing unit, heated and insulated
Steam tracers on main engine are laid out for 7 bar saturated
007 High pressure booster pump
steam.
008 Fuel oil endheater Air vent and drain pipes must be fully functional at all inclina
009 Viscosimeter tion angles of the ship at which the engine must be oper
010 Fuel oil filter, heater (trace heating acceptable) ational.
011 Pressure retaining valve
012 Fuel supply unit HFO pipes, heated and insulated
013 Fuel rail unit
MDO pipes
31 Fuel oil inlet, supply unit
Heating pipes
32 Fuel oil outlet
Air vent pipes
33 Fuel leakage pipe rail unit
Drain & overflow pipes
34 Fuel leakage pipe
Pipes on engine / pipe connections
333.729/1
Fig. G13 Pressurized fuel oil system

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G. Ancillary systems

G2.4 Starting and control air system

004

Clean and dry instrument air


7-8 bar
supplied from board.

001

003 003

005

Remarks:
Drain plugs and drain cocks where necessary.

002 002
41 Starting air inlet
42 Control air inlet, in case of board supply failure
43 Control air inlet (for control system and air spring)
001 Main engine RTflex96C
002 Starting air compressor, 25/30 bar
003 Starting air receiver, 25/30 bar Starting air feed pipes
004 Distribution pipe with automatic starting air shutoff valve Control air pipes
005 Pressure reducing valve, from 25/30 to 7-8 bar Ancillary equipment pipes
Drain pipes

333.320a
Pipes on engine / pipe connections

Fig. G14 Starting and control air system

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G. Ancillary systems

Figure G14 is a typical layout for the starting and Control air inlet (42): The air piping system is ar-
control air system. ranged in such way that, upon failure of the ship-
Control air inlet (43): The compressed air required board system supply, compressed air will be taken
for the pneumatic control system of the engine and from the starting air system.
for the air springs of the exhaust valves is primarily
taken from the shipboard system. The air must be
clean and dry in order to prevent blockages occur-
ring in the control units.

Starting air Air receivers Air compressors JEng *2)


Number of starts requested by the classi-
12 *1) 12 *1)
fication societies for reversible engines
Max. air pressure Free air delivery at
Pressure range
25 [bar] 30 [bar] 25 [bar] 30 [bar]
No. of cylinders Number x volume [m3] Number x capacity [Nm3/h] [kgm2]
6 2 x 9.9 2 x 8.5 2 x 250 2 x 260 258 500
7 2 x 11.5 2 x 9.9 2 x 290 2 x 300 298 200
8 2 x 13.4 2 x 11.5 2 x 340 2 x 350 340 400
9 2 x 14.9 2 x 12.9 2 x 380 2 x 390 382 400
10 2 x 16.5 2 x 14.2 2 x 420 2 x 430 418 900
11 2 x 18.1 2 x 15.5 2 x 460 2 x 470 455 100
12 2 x 19.7 2 x 16.8 2 x 500 2 x 510 489 300
14 2 x 22.9 2 x 19.5 2 x 600 2 x 620 565 000

Remark: *1) 12 consecutive starts of the main engine, alternating between ahead and astern.
*2) Data given for engines without damper and front disc on crankshaft but included smallest flywheel.
Table G12Air receiver and air compressor capacities

The capacity of the air compressor and receiver The air receiver and compressor capacities of
depends on the total inertia (JTot) of the rotating table G12 refer to a relative inertia (JRel = 2.0).
parts of the propulsion system too. For other values than 2.0, the air receiver and com-
pressor capacities have to be calculated with the
• Total inertia = engine inertia + shafting and pro- winGTD program.
peller inertia => (JTot) = (JEng) + (JS+P). Table G12 outlines the basic requirements for a
• Propeller inertia includes the part of entrained system similar to figure G14 ‘Starting and control
water. air system’ for maximum engine rating.
• Engine inertia (JEng) see table G12. The enclosed CD-ROM with the winGTD program
• Relative inertia JRel = JTot / JEng enables to optimize the capacities of the com-
pressors and air receivers for the contract maxi-
mum continuous rating (CMCR).

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G. Ancillary systems

G2.5 Leakage collection system and washing devices

337.945a Note: Refer to table G13 for additional information and legend to this layout.

Fig. G15 Leakage collection and washing layout

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001 Main engine RTflex96C


002 Sludge oil trap
Remarks:
003 Throttling disc
*1) One unit per turbocharger
004 Sludge or appropriate tank *5)
*2) Depending on the relative air humidity and temperature
005 Throttling disc
before and after the scavenge air cooler condensate
006 Air vent manifold may be knocked out. Under extreme ambient conditions
007 Scavenge air cooler washing plant *1) a maximum condensate quantity of up to 0.16 kg/kW/h
008 Turbocharger compressor washing plant *1) may be produced.
009 Turbocharger turbine washing plant *1) *3) At free end or at driving end
010 Turbocharger turbine dry cleaning plant (optional) *1) *4) Air vent (optional)
011 Condensate drain units *5) Available capacity approx. 2m3
012 Venting unit Please note:
For MitsubishiMET turbochargers only DRY CLEANING
11 Oily water drain from charge air receiver
method applies.
12 Cylinder and scavnge air cooler, cooling water drain pipe
14 Washing water inlet TC/SAC *3)
19 Condensate water from water separator and SAC *2)
20 Washing water outlet from SAC
21 Venting pipe TC outlet oil system TC
Washing water pipes
23 Common dirty oil drain from engine
Dirty oil drain pipes
25 Dirty oil from piston underside Compressed air pipes
28 Dirty oil from piston rod stuffing box Air vent pipes
30 Venting pipe TC outlet *1) Drain & overflow pipes
Pipes on engine / pipe connections
40 Working air inlet SAC washing plant *3)
337.945a

Table G13 Leakage collection and washing layout: legend to layout

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G. Ancillary systems

G3 Tank capacities

Capacities referring to number of cylinders


Unit
6 7 8 9 10 11 12 14

Cylinder cooling water expansion tank (HT) –


[m3] 1 1 1.5 1.5 2 2 2 3
Cylinder cooling water system (fig. G4 to G6, item 022)

Cylinder cooling water expansion tank (LT) –


[m3] depending on ancillary plants
Cylinder cooling water system (fig. G4 to G6, item 021)

Cylinder lubricating oil daily service tank – *1)


[m3] 1.5 1.7 2.0 2.2 2.5 2.7 3.0 3.5
Cylinder lub. oil system (fig. G8, item 012)

Lubricating oil drain tank (initial filling) –


[m3] 43 50 57 64 71 78 85 99
Main lub. oil system (fig. G8, item 002)

HFO daily tank – *2)


[m3] 0.20  CMCR  t1) / 1000
Heavy fuel oil treatment system (fig. G12, item 002)

MDO daily tank – *3)


[m3] 0.20  CMCR  t2) / 1000
Heavy fuel oil treatment system (fig. G12, item 003)

Remark: *1) The capacity indicated is valid for R1 rating, it can be proportionally reduced to actual CMCR
*2) t1 = value in hours for required running time with HFO at CMCR [kW]. This figure can be reduced from 24 to 8 hours
depending on the operational requirements and efficiency of the fuel treatment plant.
*3) t2 = value in hours for required running time with MDO at CMCR [kW]. This figure depends on the operational
requirements.
Table G14 Tank capacities

G4 Fire protection

Extinguishing Piston underside at bottom Bottle Recommended total number of


medium dead centre including common fire extinguishing bottles
section of cylinder jacket
Number of cylinders
Volume Mass Size
6 7 8 9 10 11 12 14
[m3/cyl.] [kg/cyl.] [kg]
Carbon-
8 30 45 4 5 6 6 7 8 8 10
dioxide

Table G15 Recommended quantities of fire extinguishing medium

All the engine spaces (air receiver) in which fire can As far as the fire protection of the main engine is
develop are provided with screwed connections for concerned, carbon dioxide or steam can be used.
the injection of a fire-extinguishing medium if re-
quired. Steam as an alternative fire-extinguishing medium
Number of extinguishing bottles when using car- for the scavenge air spaces of the piston underside
bon dioxide are shown in table G15. may result in corrosion if adequate countermea-
sures are not taken immediately after use.
Different extinguishing agents can be considered
for fire fighting purposes. Their selection is made
either by shipbuilder or shipowner in compliance
with the rules of the classification society involved.

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G5 Exhaust gas system based on figure G16 ‘Determination of exhaust


pipe diameter’, figure G17 ‘Estimation of exhaust
To optimize the exhaust gas systems, please refer gas density’ and figure G18 ‘Estimation of exhaust
to the following calculations. The calculations pipe diameter’ are given as an example only:

F10.4061

Fig. G16 Determination of exhaust pipe diameter

Example:
Estimation of exhaust gas pipe diameters for 2) Exhaust gas temperature: 314 °C
Sulzer 8RT-flex96C, CMCR (R1) specified and (acc. to tables G1 to G6)
for design (tropical) conditions:
Power (R1) = 45 760 kW 3) Exhaust gas density
Speed (R1) = 102 rpm (assumed back pressure on turbine outlet
Dp = 30 mbar (figure G17):
Recommended gas velocities:
Pipe A: WA = 40 m/s ò EXH + 0.611 kgńm 3
Pipe B: WB = 25 m/s
Pipe C: WC = 35 m/s 4) Number of turbochargers (according to
figure D8):
1) Exhaust gas mass flow: 337 673 kg/h nTC = 2
(according to table G1)

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pEXH [kg/m3]
0.740

0.720

0.700

0.680

0.660

0.640

0.620

0.600

0.580 ∆p
[mbar]
30
0.560 20
10
0
0.540 tEaT [C]
F10.4682 220 230 240 250 260 270 280 290 300 310 320 330 340 350 360

Fig. G17 Estimation of exhaust gas density

qV
[m3/h]
50 40 30 20
600 000

500 000
450 000 10
400 000
350 000 w
300 000 [m/sec]

250 000

200 000
180 000
160 000
140 000
120 000

100 000
90 000
80 000
70 000
dpipe
60 000
500 600 700 800 900 1000 1200 1400 2000 2500 3000 4000 [mm]
F10.4683 dA dC dB
Fig. G18 Estimation of exhaust pipe diameters

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5) Exhaust gas volume flow:

Pipe A:

qm 337 673
q VA + ò @ n TC + + 276 328 m 3ńh
EXH 0.611 @ 2

Pipes B and C:

qm
q VB + q VC + ò + 337 673 + 552 656 m 3ńh
EXH 0.611

6) Exhaust pipe diameters:

Pipe diameters are approx. (according to


figure G18):

dA = 1550 mm

dB = 2800 mm

dC = 2350 mm

or calculated:

d pipe + 18.81 @ Ǹ wq V
pipe
[mm]

7) Select the calculated or the next larger


diameter available, for example:

dA = 1600 mm

dB = 2800 mm

dC = 2400 mm

Check the back pressure drop of the whole ex-


haust gas system (not to exceed 30 mbar).

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G. Ancillary systems

G6 Engine air supply / Engine room ventilation

The air supply to the engine room can be calcu- CMCR-power. If auxiliary engines are in the same
lated according to ISO 8861 ‘Shipbuilding engine room, their air consumption must be added to the
room ventilation in diesel engined ships’. air consumption of the main engine. A portion of
As an approximation, the amount of air supplied to the air must be ducted to the vicinity of the turbo-
the engine room by ventilators should be twice the charger air inlet filters.
amount of air consumed by the main engine at

Atmospheric dust concentration


Normal Alternatives necessary for
Normal shipboard requirement
very special circumstances
Short period < 5 % of
Most frequent particle sizes running time, frequently to permanently permanently
< 0.5 mg/m3 ≥ 0.5 mg/m3 > 0.5 mg/m3
Standard Oil wetted Inertial separator
> 5 µm turbocharger filter or and
sufficient roller screen filter oil wetted filter
Standard Oil wetted Inertial separator
< 5 µm turbocharger filter or and
sufficient panel filter oil wetted filter
These may likely apply to only a very few extreme cases.
the vast majority
Valid for For example: ships carrying bauxite or similar dusty cargoes
of installations
or ships routinely trading along desert coasts.

Table G16 Guidance for air filtration

In case the air supply to the machinery spaces has Marine installations have seldom had special air
a high dust content in excess of 0.5 mg/m3 which filters installed until now. Stationary plants on the
can be the case on ships trading in coastal waters, other hand, very often have air filters fitted to pro-
desert areas or transporting dust creating cargoes, tect the diesel engine. The installation of a filtration
there is a greater risk of increased wear to the pis- unit for the air supply to the diesel engines and gen-
ton rings and cylinder liners. eral machinery spaces on vessels regularly trans-
porting dust-creating cargoes such as iron ore and
The normal air filters fitted to the turbochargers are bauxite, is highly recommended.
intended mainly as silencers and not to protect the
engine against dust. The necessity for the installa- Table G16 and figure G19 ‘Air filter size’ show how
tion of a dust filter and the choice of filter type de- the various types of filter are to be applied.
pends mainly on the concentration and composi-
tion of the dust in the suction air.

Where the suction air is expected to have a dust


content of 0.5 mg/m3 or more, the engine must be
protected by filtering this air before entering the
engine, e.g. also on coastal vessels or vessels fre-
quenting ports having high atmospheric dust or
sand content.

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Filter surface
Oil wetted and panel filters in series
[m2]
140
Panel filter
120
Oil wetted filter
100
90
Required filteration area for pressure drop < 20 mbar

80

70 Roller screen filter

60

50

40

30

20 Inertial separator

16

12

10
10 12 16 20 25 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 Installed
engine power
8RT-flex96C: PR1 = 45.76 MW
F10.5296
[MW]

Fig. G19 Air filter size

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H. Engine management system

H1 Introduction

Developments in engine management systems All those systems provide data bus connection to
(EMS) at Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd are focussed on the ship automation to make specific data avail-
the latest trends in ship automation that tends to al- able wherever required and facilitate installation.
ways higher integration levels.
Complete ship automation systems provided by
The standard electrical interface, designated one of the leading suppliers approved by Wärtsilä
DENIS-9520 (Diesel Engine CoNtrol and optImiz- Switzerland offer the degree of integration de-
ing Specification), assures a perfect match with manded in modern shipbuilding while being per-
approved remote control systems, while the fectly adapted to the engine’s requirements.
WECS-9520 (Wärtsilä Engine Control System)
takes care of all RT-flex specific control functions. Applying a single supplier strategy for the entire
Computer based tools under the designation of the ship automation shows many other advantages in
product family MAPEX (Monitoring and mAinten- terms of full responsibility, ease in operation and
ance Performance Enhancement with eXpert maintenance.
knowledge) enable ship-owners and operators to
improve the operating economy of their diesel
engines.

Spares &
Engine Engine Maintenance
Remote Alarm Safety Optimizing Engine
Fitness Operation Management
Control System System Functions Control
Systems Support Support &
Tools

DENIS Family MAPEX Engine Fitness Family

Operation MAPEX-SM
DENIS-1 SIPWA-TP Manual
Engine
DENIS-5 MAPEX-PR Service Parts
RT-flex Bulletin
Dataset
DENIS-6 WECS-9520 MAPEX-TV Code Book CBM
DENIS-9520 MAPEX-AV Maintenance Service
Video Agreement

F10.4893

Fig. H1 EMS concept comprising DENIS, WECS and MAPEX modules

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H. Engine management system

RT-flex automation layout

Propulsion Control System Alarm and Monitoring


System

DENIS-9520 remote control specification

Alarm
signals
Independent sub-systems: Alarms
Slow-downs

Alarm and
Telegraph system
Electronic speed
Remote control

service access
control system
Safety system

Connector for
ECR Manual slow-down
control panel signals
system

2 x CANopen 2 x Modbus
Command orders from RCS/spd ctrl.

CANopen to ECR manual control

or Modbus
Feedback signals from WECS

Signals for alarm and slow-down


CANopen for service access

WECS alarm signals


Signals for control

Signals for safety

Signals for alarm


Indications

D E N I S - 9 5 2 0 E n g i n e S p e c i f i c a t i o n

CANopen
to LCP

E10, E20, etc. E90 E110, E120, etc.


Control terminal boxes E25 WECS shipyard interface box Alarm terminal boxes
Local control
panel
Sensors and actuators WECS-9520 Alarm sensors

Local WECS sensors and actuators


indications

RT-flex diesel engine


F10.5322

Fig. H2 RT-flex automation layout

25.74.07.40
25.74.07.40 – Issue
– Issue X.04X.04 – Rev.
– Rev. 0 1 H–2 Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd
RT-flex96C Engine Selection and Project Manual

H. Engine management system

H1.1 DENIS H2 DENIS-9520

The DENIS family contains specifications for the H2.1 General


engine management systems of all modern types
of Sulzer diesel engines. The diesel engine inter- The concept of DENIS-9520 meets the require-
face specification applicable for all current types of ments of increased flexibility and higher integration
RT-flex engines is DENIS-9520. in modern ship automation and provides the fol-
lowing advantages for ship-owners, shipyards and
H1.2 WECS engine builders:
• Clear interface definition
Under the designation of WECS-9520 Wärtsilä
The well defined and documented interface re-
Switzerland provides a computerised control sys-
sults in a clear separation of the responsibi-
tem for all RT-flex functions. As such it is a compo-
lities between engine builder and automation
nent of the RT-flex system and includes all necess-
supplier.
ary interfaces to the engine as well as to the remote
It allows that authorised suppliers adapt their
control and electronic speed control system.
systems to Sulzer RT-flex engines with re-
duced engineering effort.
With the same well proven engine control functions
The clear signal exchange simplifies trouble-
like the previous WECS-9500 it enhances the in-
shooting.
tegration into the ship management system by pro-
viding data bus communication to all external sys- • Approved propulsion control systems
tems. Propulsion control systems including remote
control, speed control, safety and telegraph
H1.3 MAPEX systems are available from suppliers ap-
proved by Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd. This
The products of the MAPEX family are designed to cooperation ensures that these systems fully
improve the engine’s efficiency through better comply with the specifications of the engine
management and planning and save money by designer.
making available the knowledge of our engine • Easy integration in ship management
management specialists. system
Providing data bus communication between
For the further description of the MAPEX products WECS, the propulsion control and the vessel’s
please refer to section H4. alarm and monitoring system facilitates an
easy integration of the various systems. The
existing man–machine interface (MMI) of the
vessel’s automation can therefore handle also
the additional MMI functions attributed to the
WECS.
• Ship automation from one supplier –
Integrated solution
Automation suppliers approved by Wärtsilä
Switzerland Ltd can handle all ship board au-
tomation tasks. Complete automation sys-
tems from one supplier show advantages like
easier engineering, standardisation, easier
operation, less training, fewer spare parts, etc.

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Engine Selection and Project Manual RT-flex96C

H. Engine management system

The WECS-9520 is well suited to support this With the replacement of previous camshaft-
integrated automation concept by providing controlled function by the WECS-9520, the en-
redundant data bus lines that deliver all neces- gine built control components are reduced to
sary information for propulsion control, alarm a minimum.
/ monitoring system and man–machine inter- Instrumentation is based on the conventional
face. The MMI of the WECS-9520 can provide RTA engine with RT-flex-specific components
additional features when using such an inte- added.
grated solution.
• DENIS remote control specification
• Ship automation from different suppliers – This file contains the detailed functional speci-
Split solution fication of the remote control system.
In the case that propulsion control and alarm The intellectual property on this remote control
/ monitoring systems are from different suppli- specification remains with Wärtsilä Switzer-
ers the WECS-9520 supports also such a split land Ltd. Therefore this file is licensed to
solution by providing two separate redundant Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd’s remote control part-
data bus lines one each for propulsion control ners only. These companies offer systems,
and alarm / monitoring system. MMI functions built completely according to the engine de-
are then also split within propulsion control and signer’s specifications, tested and approved
alarm / monitoring system. by Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd.

DENIS-9520 describes the signal interface be- H2.2 Propulsion control system
tween the RT-flex engine including its flex engine
control system (WECS) and the ship automation. The propulsion control system is divided into the
following sub-systems:
The DENIS specification does not include any
• Remote control system.
hardware. It summarises all the data exchanged
• Safety system.
and defines the control functions required by the
• Electronic speed control system.
engine.
• Telegraph system.
The DENIS specification is presented in
Safety system and telegraph system work inde-
two sets of documents:
pendently and are fully operative even with the re-
• DENIS engine specification mote control system out of order.
This file contains the specification of the signal
interface on the engine and is made access-
ible to engine builders and shipyards. It con-
sists basically of the control diagram of the en-
gine, the signal list including a minimum of
functional requirements and gives all informa-
tion related to the electrical wiring on the en-
gine. It lists also the necessary alarm and dis-
play functions to be realised in the vessel’s
alarm and monitoring system.
The DENIS-9520 engine specification covers
the engine-built components for control, alarm
and indication.

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RT-flex96C Engine Selection and Project Manual

H. Engine management system

H2.2.1 Approved propulsion control systems

Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd has an agreement con- trol and safety systems for their Sulzer RT-flex en-
cerning the development, production, sales and gines with each of the following leading marine au-
servicing of remote control, electronic speed con- tomation suppliers:

Electronic
Supplier / Company Remote Control System
Speed Control System

Kongsberg Marine
Kongsberg Maritime AS
P.O. Box 1009 AutoChief C20 DGS C20
N-3191 Horten Tel. +47-330 41 436
Norway Fax +47-330 42 250

Nabtesco Corporation
Nabtesco corp., Control Systems Division
2-2-21 Isogami dori Chuo-ku M-800-III MG-800 FLEX
Kobe Tel. +81-78 251 8109
Japan Fax +81-78 251 8090

SAM Electronics GmbH / Lyngsø Marine


SAM Electronics GmbH
Behringstrasse 120
D-22763 Hamburg Tel. +49-40 88 25 0
Germany Fax +49-40 88 25 4116 DMS2100i EGS2000RTf
Lyngsø Marine AS
2, Lyngsø Allé
DK-2970 Hrøsholm Tel. +45 45 16 62 00
Denmark Fax +45 45 16 62 62

Table H1 Suppliers of remote control systems and electronic speed control systrems

Modern remote control systems consist of elec- on the main engine. In this case the electronic
tronic modules and operator panels for display and modules for remote control, safety and speed con-
order input for engine control room and bridge. The trol system are located in the same boxes used as
different items normally communicate via serial terminal boxes for any other propulsion control
bus connections. The engine signals described in system.
the DENIS-9520 specification are usually con-
This facilitates to commission and test the com-
nected via the terminal boxes on the engine to the
plete propulsion control system already at the en-
electronic modules placed in the engine control
gine maker’s testbed. The wiring at the shipyard is
room.
then limited to a few power cables and bus commu-
These electronic modules are in most cases built nication wires whereas the conventional arrange-
to be located either inside the ECR console or in a ment requires more cables between the terminal
separate cabinet to be located in the ECR. The op- boxes on the engine and the electronic modules of
erator panels are to be inserted in the ECR con- the remote control system in the engine control
sole’s surface. room.
Kongsberg Maritime has designed the electronic These boxes with the electronic modules are part
modules of the AutoChief C20 propulsion control of the propulsion control system scope of supply
system in a way that they can be mounted directly and shall be delivered to the engine builder for
mounting on the engine.

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Engine Selection and Project Manual RT-flex96C

H. Engine management system

Remote control system

Bridge wing (option) Bridge Bridge wing (option)

Control Remote control, Safety


room and Electronic speed control

Ship alarm
system

Engine
room
WECS-9520 Local
flex engine control system panel

RT-flex engine

F10.5065

Fig. H3 DENIS-9520 remote control system layout

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RT-flex96C Engine Selection and Project Manual

H. Engine management system

H2.2.2 Functions of the propulsion Electronic speed control system


control system • Keeps engine speed at the set point given by
the remote control system.
Approved propulsion control systems comprise • Sends fuel command to the WECS-9520.
the following independent sub-systems: • Limits fuel amount in function of charge air and
measured speed for proper engine protection.
Remote control system
Main functions: Wärtsilä Switzerland has always requested that re-
mote control systems and speed control systems
• Start, stop, reversing. of the same supplier are applied, in order to avoid
• Cylinder pre-/post-lubrication. compatibility problems and increased engineering
• Automatic slow turning. efforts.
• Auxiliary blower control.
• Control transfer. Traditionally the electronic speed control system
• Speed setting. was considered as a part of the main engine and
• Automatic speed programme. was therefore usually delivered together with the
• Load-dependent cylinder lubrication CLU-3. engine.

Indications: With the introduction of WECS-9520 and


The remote control system is delivered with control DENIS-9520, the electronic speed control system
panels for local, control room and bridge control, is assigned to the propulsion control system and
including all necessary order input elements and therefore shall be delivered together with the
indications e.g. push buttons/switches and indica- corresponding remote control system and further
tion lamps or alternatively a respective display. components of the propulsion control package by
the party responsible for the complete propulsion
The following instruments for remote indication in control system, i.e. in most cases the shipyard.
the control room are specified in the DENIS-9520
standard as a minimum: The details regarding system layout, mechanical
dimensions of components as well as the informa-
• Starting air pressure. tion regarding electrical connections has to be
• Engine speed. taken from the technical documentation of the re-
• Revolution counter. spective supplier.
• Running hour counter.
• Load indicator. Safety system
• Turbocharger speed. Main functions:
• Scavenge air pressure in air receiver.
• Emergency stop functions.
The following instruments for remote indication on • Overspeed protection.
the bridge are specified in the DENIS-9520 stan- • Automatic shut-down functions.
dard as a minimum: • Automatic slow-down functions.
• Starting air pressure.
• Engine speed. Telegraph system
In addition to those indications, common for RTA • Order communication between different con-
and RT-flex engines, the remote control system trol locations.
applied to the RT-flex engine includes display of
the most important values of the flex engine control ECR manual control panel
system (WECS) like fuel pressure, servo oil pres- A manual control panel delivered together with the
sure etc. propulsion control system and fitted in the ECR
console allows to operate the engine manually and

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Engine Selection and Project Manual RT-flex96C

H. Engine management system

independently from the remote control system. and indication for safety system, telegraph system
The functions of the ECR manual control are equal and WECS-9520.
to the control function on the local control panel at
The local control box with the local manual control
the engine side.
panel is included in the package delivered by ap-
proved remote control system suppliers.
Local manual control
Local manual control of the engine is performed Options
from a control panel located on the engine. This
• Bridge wing control.
panel includes elements for manual order input
• Order recorder.

H2.2.3 Recommended manoeuvring characteristics

Recommended values for the


manoeuvring positions are given
in figure H4.

F10.1972
Fig. H4 Recommended manoeuvring characteristics

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RT-flex96C Engine Selection and Project Manual

H. Engine management system

H2.3 Interface to alarm and monitoring systems

H2.3.1 General layout – operator inter- have to be delivered to the engine builder for
face OPI mounting to the engine and connection of the sen-
sors.
On a conventional RTA engine, hardwired signals Commissioning and testing of the complete set of
from alarm sensors mounted to the engine had to alarm signals already at the engine maker’s
be connected to the vessel’s alarm and monitoring testbed is thus facilitated and the wiring at the ship-
system. yard is limited to a few power cables and bus com-
On a RT-flex engine, basically the same alarm sen- munication.
sors are available. Additional sensors with hard-
wired connection are fitted to monitor RT-flex spe- Split solution
cific circuits of the engine. Propulsion control system and alarm / monitoring
In addition to that, the flex engine control system system from different suppliers:
(WECS) provides alarm values and analogue indi- The propulsion control system is connected
cations via data bus connection to the ship’s alarm through one redundant bus line (CANopen or Mod-
and monitoring system as part of the operator in- bus, depending on automation maker) to the
terface of the RT-flex engine. WECS.
Connection from the WECS-9520 to the engine For the separate alarm and monitoring system an
automation can be made in two ways (refer to fig- additional redundant Modbus connection is avail-
ure H5). able.
Also the operator interface is then split in this case:
Integrated solution • Changing of parameters accessible to the op-
Propulsion control system and alarm / monitoring erator and display of parameters relevant for
system from same supplier: the engine operation is included in the remote
This allows to connect both propulsion control sys- control system.
tem and alarm / monitoring system through one re- • The alarm / monitoring system has to include:
dundant bus line only (CANopen or Modbus, de- – Display of some flex system indications,
pending on automation maker) to the WECS-9520. like e.g. fuel pressure, servo oil pressure
etc.
With this integrated solution an extended pres-
– Display of the flex system alarms provided
entation of relevant parameters is possible as well
by the WECS.
as a comfortable access to changeable user para-
• WCH provides modbus lists specifying the dis-
meters taking full profit of the graphical user inter-
play values and alarm conditions as part of the
face functions available in the alarm and monitor-
DENIS engine specification.
ing system.
Requirements for any alarm and monitoring sys-
A further step in integration is possible when using
tem to be applied in a split solution:
a DataChief C20 alarm and monitoring system of
• Possibility to read values from a redundant
Kongsberg Maritime. In this case also all the con-
Modbus line according to standard Modbus
ventional sensors and the additional flex sensors
RTU protocol.
can be connected via data bus lines. The design al-
• Ability to display analogue flex system values
lows that the data acquisition units are mounted di-
(typically 20 values) and add alarm values pro-
rectly on the engine in the same boxes used as ter-
vided from WECS to the standard alarm list
minal boxes for any other alarm and monitoring
(100–200 alarms depending on engine type
system.
and number of cylinders).
These boxes which are part of the alarm and moni-
toring system usually provided by the shipyard

Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd H–9 25.74.07.40 – Issue X.04 – Rev. 0


Engine Selection and Project Manual RT-flex96C

H. Engine management system

Integrated solution
Propulsion Control and Alarm and Monitoring System from same suppliers
E10
Sensors and
actuators E20
for control Propulsion
E25
Control System
2 x CANopen or Modbus

WECS-9520 E90

Flex sensors E130


for alarm Alarm and Monitoring
System
Standard E110
sensors
for alarm E120

Integrated solution
Propulsion Control and Alarm and Monitoring System from Kongsberg

Sensors and E10


actuators E20
for control 2 x CANopen Propulsion
E25
Control System

WECS-9520 E90

Flex sensors E130


for alarm Alarm and Monitoring
System
2 x CANopen
Standard E110
sensors E120.1
for alarm E120.2

Split solution
Propulsion Control and Alarm and Monitoring System from different suppliers
E10
Sensors and
actuators E20
for control Propulsion
E25 Control System
2 x CANopen or Modbus

WECS-9520 E90
2 x Modbus

Flex sensors E130 Alarm and Monitoring


for alarm System
Standard E110
sensors
for alarm E120
F10.5323

Fig. H5 Integrated/split solution

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RT-flex96C Engine Selection and Project Manual

H. Engine management system

H2.3.2 Alarm sensors and safety functions

The classification societies require different alarm The exact extent of delivery of alarm and safety
and safety functions, depending on the class of the sensors has to cover the requirements of the re-
vessel and its degree of automation. spective classification society, Wärtsilä Switzer-
These requirements are listed together with a set land Ltd, the shipyard and the owner.
of sensors defined by Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd in
tables H2 to H4 “Alarm and safety functions of Sul- The sensors delivered with the engine are basi-
zer RT-flex96C marine diesel engines”. cally connected to terminal boxes mounted on the
engine. Signal processing has to be performed in
The time delays for the slow-down and shut-down a separate alarm and monitoring system usually
functions given in tables H2 to H4 are maximum provided by the shipyard.
values. They may be reduced at any time accord-
ing to operational requirements. When decreasing
the values for the slow-down delay times, the delay
times for the respective shut-down functions are to
be adjusted accordingly.
The delay values are not to be increased without
written consent of Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd.

Included in the standard scope of supply are the


minimum of safety sensors as required by WCH for
attended machinery space (AMS). If the option of
unattended machinery space (UMS) has been se-
lected the respective sensors according to
Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd’s requirement have to be
added. There are also some additional sensors de-
fined for the monitoring of flex system specific en-
gine circuits.

Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd H–11 25.74.07.40 – Issue X.04 – Rev. 0


Engine Selection and Project Manual RT-flex96C

H. Engine management system

min. WCH
Alarm and safety functions for RT-flex96C engines Values requirements Request of classification societies for UMS

add. to AMS for UMS


time delay [sec.]
Function

Setting
Level

MRS
Physical unit

IACS
ABS
BV

GL

LR
CCS
DNV

KR

NK
PRS
RINA
max. allowable
Medium Location Signal No.

add. flex signals


for AMS
Cylinder cooling water Pressure Engine inlet PT1101A ALM L 3.0 bar 0
SLD L 2.8 bar 60
PS1101S SHD L 2.5 bar 60
Temp. Engine inlet TE1111A ALM L 70 °C 0
Outlet each TE1121-34A ALM H 95 °C 0
cylinder
SLD H 97 °C 60
Scavenge air cooling water Pressure Inlet cooler PT1301A ALM L 3.0 bar 0
fresh water, two-stage SLD L 2.5 bar 60
*1) HT circuit Temp. Outlet cooler TE1331-34A ALM H 120 °C 0
SLD H 125 °C 60
Pressure Inlet cooler PT1361A ALM L 2.0 bar 0
LT circuit Temp. Inlet cooler TE1371A ALM L 25 °C 0
Outlet cooler TE1381-84A ALM H 57 °C 0
Scavenge air cooling water Pressure Inlet cooler PT1361A ALM L 1.0 bar 0
fresh water, single-stage Temp. Inlet cooler TE1371A ALM L 25 °C 0
*1) Outlet cooler TE1381-84A ALM H 76 °C 0
Main bearing oil Pressure Supply PT2001A ALM L 4.8 bar 0
SLD L 4.6 bar 60
PS2001S SHD L 4.4 bar 60
PS2002S SHD LL 4.1 bar 10
Temp. Supply TE2011A ALM H 50 °C 0
SLD H 55 °C 60
Crosshead bearing oil Pressure Supply PT2021A ALM L 10 bar *2) 0
SLD L 9 bar *2) 60
Servo oil Pressure Pump inlet PT2051A ALM L 3.8 bar 0
ALM H 6.5 bar 0
Failure Automat. filter XS2053A ALM F – 0
Oil leakage monitoring Level Supply unit LS2055A ALM H max. 0
Control oil Pressure Supply unit PT2083A ALM H 50 bar 0
leakage monitoring
Level Supply unit LS2085A ALM H max. 0
Main bearing oil Temp. Outlet TE2101-17A ALM H 65 °C 0 A A A A A A A A A A A
Thrust bearing oil Temp. Outlet TE2121A ALM H 65 °C 0
SLD H 70 °C 60
TS2121S SHD H 85 °C 60
Crank bearing oil Temp. Outlet TE2201-14A ALM H 65 °C 0 A A A A A A A A A A A
Crosshead bearing oil Temp. Outlet TE2301-14A ALM H 65 °C 0 A A A A A A A A A A A
Oil mist concentration Concen- Crankcase AS2401A ALM H – 0 B B B B B B B B B B B
tration
AS2401S SLD H – 60 B B B B B B B B B B B
Failure Detection unit XS2411A ALM F – 0
Piston cooling oil Temp. Outlet each TE2501-14A ALM H 80 °C 0
cylinder
*3) TE2501-14S SLD H 85 °C 60
Flow Inlet each cyl. FS2521-34S SHD L no flow 15
Diff.press. Inlet each cyl. PS2541-54S SHD H 0.6 bar 15
Flow Outlet each ALM L no flow –
cylinder *4)
SLD L no flow –

Table H2 Alarm and safety functions of Sulzer RT-flex96C marine diesel engines

25.74.07.40 – Issue X.04 – Rev. 0 H–12 Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd


RT-flex96C Engine Selection and Project Manual

H. Engine management system

min. WCH
Alarm and safety functions for RT-flex96C engines Values requirements Request of classification societies for UMS

add. to AMS for UMS


time delay [sec.]
Function

Setting
Level

MRS
Physical unit

IACS
ABS
BV

GL

LR
CCS
DNV

KR

NK
PRS
RINA
max. allowable
Medium Location Signal No.

add. flex signals


for AMS
Turbocharger bearing oil Pressure Inlet each TC PT2611-14A ALM L 1.0 bar 5
*8) SLD L 0.8 bar 60
*7)
ABB TPL Inlet each TC PS2611-14S SHD L 0.6 bar 5
Temp. Outlet TC TE2601-04A ALM H 110 °C 0
*7) SLD H 120 °C 60
Pressure Inlet each TC PT2611-14A ALM L 0.7 bar 5
SLD L 0.6 bar 60
MHI MET Inlet each TC PS2611-14S SHD L 0.4 bar 5
Temp. Outlet TC TE2601-04A ALM H 85 °C 0
SLD H 95 °C 60
additional requirement Temp. Inlet TC TE2621A ALM H 80 °C 0
when separate oil supply
SLD H 85 °C 60
Geislinger damper oil Pressure Casing inlet PT2711A ALM L 1.0 bar 0
Axial damper (detuner) oil Pressure aft side PT2721A ALM L 1.7 bar 60
Damp. chamber
fore side PT2722A ALM L 1.7 bar 60
Cylinder lubricating oil Flow Cylinder inlet FS3101-14A ALM L no flow 30
FE3101-14A ALM L no flow 30
FS3100S SLD L no flow 60
Level Cyl.lub.oil pump LS3125A ALM L min. –
Fuel oil Temp. Fuel pump outlet TE3431-38A ALM D –15 °C 30
Viscosity before ALM H 17 cST 0 D D D D D D D D D D D D
supply unit
ALM L 12 cST 0
Leakage Level Supply unit LS3426A ALM H max. 0
Rail unit LS3444-45A ALM H max. 0
Fuel pipe LS3446A ALM H max. 0
Fuel pipe LS3447A ALM H max. 0
Pressure before PT3421A ALM L 7 bar 0
supply unit
Temp. TE3411A ALM L 60–120°C 0 C C C C C C C C C C C C
Exhaust gas Temp. after each TT3701-14A ALM H 515 °C 0 E E E
cylinder $ 50 °C
ALM D 0 F F F
SLD H 530 °C 60 G G
SLD D $ 70 °C 60 H
before each TT3721-24A ALM H 515 °C 0
turbocharger
SLD H 530 °C 60 H
after each TT3731-34A ALM H 480 °C 0
turbocharger
SLD H 500 °C 60
Scavenge air Temp. after each TE4031-34A ALM L 25 °C 0 I I I
cooler *6)
ALM H 60 °C 0 I
SLD H 70 °C 60 I
Temp. each piston TE4081-94A ALM H 80 °C 0 K
underside
SLD H 120 °C 60 K
Water separ- LS4071-74A ALM H max. 0 K K K
ator
*5) Condensation Level SLD H max. 60
water
before each LS4075-78A ALM H max. 0 K K K
water separ.
SLD H max. 60

Table H3 Alarm and safety functions of Sulzer RT-flex96C marine diesel engines

Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd H–13 25.74.07.40 – Issue X.04 – Rev. 0


Engine Selection and Project Manual RT-flex96C

H. Engine management system

min. WCH
Alarm and safety functions for RT-flex96C engines Values requirements Request of classification societies for UMS

add. to AMSfor UMS


time delay [sec.]
Function

Setting
Level

MRS
Physical unit

IACS
ABS
BV

GL

LR
CCS
DNV

KR

NK
PRS
RINA
max. allowable
Medium Location Signal No.

add. flex signals


for AMS
Starting air Pressure Engine inlet PT4301C ALM L 12.0 bar 0
Air spring air Pressure Distributor PT4341A ALM H 7.5 bar 0
ALM L 5.5 bar 0
SLD L 5.0 bar 60
PS4341S SHD LL 4.5 bar 0
Leakage oil Level Exh.valve air LS4351-52A ALM H max. 0
Control air normal supply Pressure Engine inlet PT4401A ALM L 6.0 bar 0
stand-by supply Pressure Engine inlet PT4411A ALM L 5.5 bar 0
Pressure Engine inlet PT4421A ALM L 5.0 bar 0
Fuel actuator Failure Supply unit XS5046-49A ALM F – –
WECS-9520 control system Pwr. fail Pwr. sup. box XS5056A ALM F – –
Engine Overspeed Speed Crankshaft ST5111-12S SHD H 110 % 0

Classification societies: *1) Only one of these cooling systems is necessary at a time for an engine.
IACS International Association *2) ALM & SLD are suppressed below part-load.
of Classification Societies *3) Sensor (TE2501-14S) only necessary if ABS is applied.
ABS American Bureau of Shipping *4) For technical reasons, WCH uses FS2521-34S and PS2541-54S at the piston cooling
BV Bureau Veritas oil inlet for flow monitoring instead. FS25xxS and PS25xxS are combined to one binary
CCS Chinese Classification Society input to the safety system.
DNV Det Norske Veritas WCH strongly requests shut down for “piston cooling no flow”!
GL Germanischer Lloyd
*5) Alternatively, low temperature alarm or condensation water high level alarm.
KR Korean Register
*6) For water separators made from plastic material the sensor must be placed right after
LR Lloyd’s Register
the separator.
MRS Maritime Register of Shipping
*7) The indicated setting values are valid for TC lubrication by main bearing oil system.
(Russia)
For TC lubrication by separate lubrication system the following values apply:
NK Nippon Kaiji Kyokai
Pressure: ALM: 1.3 bar, SLD: 1.1 bar, SHD: 0.9 bar.
PRS Polski Rejestr Statkow
Temperature: ALM: 120 °C, SLD 130 °C.
RINA Registro Italiano Navale
*8) The indicated alarm and slow-down values and the values indicated in *7) are minimum
Signals for two-stage scavenge air settings allowed by the TC maker. In order to achieve an earlier warning, the ALM and
cooling, Geislinger damper, PTO SLD values may be increased up to 0.4 bar below the minimum effective pressure
coupling, electric speed control and measured within the entire engine operation range. The final ALM/SLD setting shall be
turbocharger vibration apply only if determined during commissioning / sea trial of the vessel.
respective equipment is used.

Function: Level: Request of classification societies for UMS:


ALM: alarm D: deviation Request A or B are requested alternatively
SLD: slow down F: failure Recommendation C or D are requested alternatively
SHD: shut down H: high AMS Attended machinery space E or F are requested alternatively
HH: very high UMS Unattended machinery space G or H are requested alternatively
L: low I or K are requested alternatively
LL: very low

Table H4 Alarm and safety functions of Sulzer RT-flex96C marine diesel engines

25.74.07.40 – Issue X.04 – Rev. 0 H–14 Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd


RT-flex96C Engine Selection and Project Manual

H. Engine management system

H3 WECS-9520 – flex engine control system

H3.1 WECS-9520 – system layout When installing an new FCM-20 into a


WECS-9520 it will be automatically detected as a
WECS-9520 covers RT-flex functions related to new module and receive all necessary application
the engine as a whole (e.g. common rail pressure data from the other modules of the WECS-9520.
control, servo oil pressure control) as well as the As the download of the respective data may take
cylinder specific RT-flex functions (e.g. control of some time WCH has found an ultimate arrange-
volumetric injection, exhaust valve and start ment to provide immediate functioning of an
valves). FCM-20 after replacement: The online spare mod-
ule FCM-20. An additional FCM-20 numbered #00
The WECS-9520 consists of the following compo- is always fitted in the shipyard interface box E90
nents (refer to figure H6): ready to be used as spare with all application data
• 1 control box E95.n per cylinder, including one already loaded. In case that a FCM-20 needs to be
FCM-20 each, perfoming cylinder control and replaced this FCM20 #00 spare is taken as spare
common control functions. and allows full functionality immediately after re-
• 1 shipyard interface box (SIB) E90 providing placement. An additional FCM-20 from the stock is
all external connections. E90 includes one then to be placed in the E90 as new online spare
FCM-20 “online spare module”. module. This module will download all necessary
• 1 Power supply box E85 data from the other modules within a certain time
without compromising engine operation.
For the RT-flex96C the control of the servo oil
pumps is provided in an additional control box E87. H3.3 WECS-9520 – communication to
The control boxes E95.n and the shipyard inter- external systems
face box E90 are incorporated in the rail unit. The
power supply boxes E85 and the servo oil control With WECS-9520, direct hard wired connection to
box E87 are supplied loose for mounting in the en- external systems is limited to a minimum.
gine room.
WECS-9520 provides data bus connections to
propulsion control system and ship alarm / moni-
H3.2 WECS-9520 – online spare
toring system. It also provides data bus connection
module
to the local manual control panel on the engine and
to the ECR manual control panel of the RT-flex en-
With WECS-9520 WCH introduces an unique fea-
gine.
ture for automatic loading application software and
parameter settings when replacing a flex control
With the WECS-9520 the man–machine interface
module (FCM-20). This includes the mounting of a
(MMI) also referred to as operator interface (OPI)
so called “online spare module” in the shipyard in-
of the main engine and the WECS-9520 engine
terface box E90.
control system is integrated in the ship automation
in either the integrated or split solution an de-
With the automatic software loading procedure
scribed in section H2.3.1.
built into the WECS-9520 it is possible to replace
any FCM-20 by any spare module available on
board without prior downloading of any data.

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Engine Selection and Project Manual RT-flex96C

H. Engine management system

In the standard configuration the WECS-9520 pro- SAM Electronic / Lyngsø Marine
vides the following external connections:
• Integrated solution
• 2 redundant CANopen lines intended for the Propulsion control system DMS2100i and
connection of the remote control system. alarm / monitoring system UMS2100:
• 2 redundant Modbus lines as an alternative Connection of two Modbus lines only. The pro-
connection of the remote control system. pulsion control system with remote control,
• 2 redundant Modbus connections for the safety system and electronic speed control
ship’s alarm and monitoring system in the split system is connected directly to the Modbus
solution. lines while the data to the alarm and monitor-
• 1 CANopen line for connection of the local ing system is routed through the propulsion
manual control panel. control system.
• 1 CANopen line for connection of the ECR
• Split solution
manual control panel.
Propulsion control system DMS2100i with an
• 1 CAN bus connection to a plug on the backup
alarm and monitoring system of any other
panel of the remote control system foreseen
maker:
for the connection of a notebook of a service
The propulsion control system with remote
engineer.
control, safety system and electronic speed
control system is connected to the two redun-
The use of the bus connection on the WECS-9520
dant Modbus lines provided for remote control.
with the different approved system makers is as
The alarm and monitoring system is to be con-
follows:
nected to the additionally provided two redun-
dant Modbus lines.
Kongsberg Maritime
• Integrated solution Nabtesco
Propulsion control system AutoChief C20 and
• Split solution
alarm / monitoring system DataChief C20:
Nabtesco propulsion control system M-800-III
Connection of two CANopen lines only. The
with an alarm and monitoring system of any
propulsion control system with remote control,
other maker:
safety system and electronic speed control
The propulsion control system with remote
system is connected directly to the CANopen
control, safety system and electronic speed
lines while the data to the alarm and monitor-
control system is connected to the two redun-
ing system is routed through CAN couplers
dant CANopen lines provided for remote con-
from the same two CANopen lines.
trol.
• Split solution The alarm and monitoring system is to be con-
Propulsion control system AutoChief C20 with nected to the additionally provided two redun-
an alarm and monitoring system of any other dant Modbus lines.
maker:
The propulsion control system with remote
control, safety system and electronic speed
control system is connected to the two redun-
dant CANopen lines.
The alarm and monitoring system is to be con-
nected to the additionally provided two redun-
dant Modbus lines.

25.74.07.40 – Issue X.04 – Rev. 0 H–16 Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd


H.
General system layout of WECS-9520

Propulsion control system Service connector

Electr. speed Main engine Telegraph Remote control ECR manual


Ship alarm and
Engine control room control system safety system system system control panel monitoring system

Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd


Engine room
RT-flex96C

RT-flex engine

Local manual
ctrl. panel

Rail unit Rail unit


free end drive end
E95.12 E95.11 E95.10 E95.09 E95.08 E95.07 E90 SIB E95.06 E95.05 E95.04 E95.03 E95.02 E95.01
Engine management system

FCM-20 FCM-20 FCM-20 FCM-20 FCM-20 FCM-20 FCM-20 FCM-20 FCM-20 FCM-20 FCM-20 FCM-20 FCM-20
online
Cyl. 12 Cyl. 11 Cyl. 10 Cyl. 09 Cyl. 08 Cyl. 07 spare Cyl. 06 Cyl. 05 Cyl. 04 Cyl. 03 Cyl. 02 Cyl. 01

2 x CANopen System bus


2 x Modbus
2 x Modbus
2 x CANopen

H–17
2 x SSI Crank angle bus

CA unit Fuel pressure


Supply unit
Shaft encoder E96 E91 actuator # A1
Fuel pressure
actuator # B1
Fuel pressure
actuator # A2 Fuel pressure
actuator # B2
Servo oil pump
E94

E20
Engine TDC signal

Power Ctrl oil pump #1


Starter unit
24 VDC power supply
Ctrl oil pump #2
Power

25.74.07.40
Starter unit
Power supply Servo oil pump control signals
WECS E85 6 x CANopen

25.74.07.40
2 x 220 VAC
(single phase) Power supply Power supply

– Issue
2 x 220 VAC Servo oil E87
(single phase) pump control
WECS-9520

– Issue
X.04X.04
– Rev.
Fig. H6 General system layout of WECS-9520

– Rev.
1 0
Engine Selection and Project Manual
Engine Selection and Project Manual RT-flex96C

H. Engine management system

H4 MAPEX Engine Fitness Family

An intelligent engine management system also The MAPEX Engine Fitness Family currently com-
needs to include functions such as the monitoring prises six systems: SIPWA-TP, MAPEX-PR,
of specific engine parameters, analysing data, and MAPEX-TV / AV and MAPEX-SM.
managing maintenance and spare parts purchas-
ing activities. Many of these functions involve spe- Further members of the MAPEX Engine Fitness
cific and complex engine knowledge and are most Family are also envisaged.
appropriately handled directly by the engine de-
signer. In each case special emphasis has been placed on
user friendliness and ease of installation.
Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd provides a full range of
equipment for carrying out these functions, called
For further information regarding products of the
the MAPEX Engine Fitness Family. MAPEX, or
MAPEX Engine Fitness Family contact your WCH
‘Monitoring and mAintenance Performance En-
sales representative.
hancement with eXpert knowledge’, encompasses
the following principles:
• Improved engine performance through re-
duced down time.
• Monitoring of critical engine data, and intelli-
gent analysis of that data.
• Advanced planning of maintenance work.
• Management support for spare parts and for
maintenance.
• Access on board ship to the knowledge of
experts.
• Full support of data storage and transmission
by floppy disc and by satellite communication.
• Reduced costs and improved efficiency.

25.74.07.40 – Issue X.04 – Rev. 0 H–18 Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd


RT-flex96C Engine Selection and Project Manual

H. Engine management system

H4.1 SIPWA-TP (Piston-ring Wear)

The Sulzer Integrated Piston-ring Wear-detecting Customer benefit of SIPWA-TP


Arrangement with Trend Processing is a powerful
Supplied with this information you are able to per-
tool for online monitoring the piston-ring wear and
form your maintenance based on the actual condi-
rotation on Sulzer large-bore two stroke engines.
tion of your piston-rings, i.e. condition based main-
With the newly developed Sensor 96, SIPWA-TP
tenance, in case to extend TBO of your piston
is avoiding all the shortcomings of the past design:
overhauls.
• No electrical plug.
Thanks to the SIPWA-TP alarming system you are
• The measuring coil is shifted away from the hot
able to detect an abnormal piston-ring wear with-
cylinder liner running surface.
out opening the engine – and enforce early
• Easy installation procedure.
countermeasures.
• Compatible to all Sulzer RT-flex and RTA
engines.
Each single SIPWA-TP piston-ring is checked by
ultra sonic means to supply you with the best possi-
The new sensor delivers more stable measuring
ble quality.
signals and all electrical contacts are fully pro-
The newly developed SIPWA-TP Sensor 96 is also
tected in casting resin. The contact between con-
compatible to all old installations, but more reliable
verter and adapter is made through an electromag-
and available at lower costs.
netic contact surface, the patent is still pending.
SIPWA-TP allows you to monitor the condition of
The SIPWA-TP Sensor 96 is located in each cylin- the piston-rings on-line.
der liner just above the scavenge air port in order
to measure the width of the triangular-shaped SIPWA-TP
brass insert in the SIPWA-TP piston-ring. The re-
• Reduces your operating and maintenance
duction in the width of this triangular section direct-
costs.
ly corresponds to the wear of the piston-ring.
• Helps to keep your vessel on schedule.
The following data are monitored and graphically • Monitors piston-ring wear on-line and allows a
displayed over periods of 400, 1000 and 3000 en- trend processing.
gine running hours: • Displays the rotation of your piston-rings.
• Enables you to extend the TBO of your piston
• Average piston-ring wear.
overhauls.
• Piston-ring segment wear.
• Allows condition based maintenance.
• Piston-ring wear distribution.
• Is your round-the-clock watchful eye.
• Piston-ring rotation.
• Gives the best protection of your engine, in
combination with MAPEX-PR,
All this data (incl. rpm) are continuously stored for
• Allows adjustment of cylinder lubricating oil to
the entire engine lifetime.
the optimum level.

Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd H–19 25.74.07.40 – Issue X.04 – Rev. 0


Engine Selection and Project Manual RT-flex96C

H. Engine management system

Demo-Plant – Average Ring Wear – SIPWA-TP Demo-Plant – Ring Rotation – SIPWA-TP

F10.3614

Fig. H7 SIPWA-TP

25.74.07.40 – Issue X.04 – Rev. 0 H–20 Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd


RT-flex96C Engine Selection and Project Manual

H. Engine management system

H4.2 Mapex-PR (Piston-running Reliability)

MAPEX-PR continuously monitors the piston-run- Customers benefit of MAPEX-PR


ning behaviour on large-bore Sulzer two-stroke
Thanks to the MAPEX-PR alarming system you
diesel engines with an alarm if adverse conditions
are able to detect an abnormal behaviour of the
should appear. It complements SIPWA-TP by pro-
piston-running without opening the engine. So you
viding a shorter response and alarm function.
can save your engine from major damage and
For example, an alarm is signalled if, among other
therefore increase the availability of your vessel’s
criteria, the local temperature on the liner is abnor-
main propulsion system.
mally high due to piston-ring scuffing or inad-
equate ring sealing. Thanks to the compatibility with SIPWA-TP, you
can install both systems on your engine, using the
The measured data are stored in an electronic unit
same electronic unit and the same software.
and can be viewed on a personal computer. Pre-
Together with SIPWA-TP you get a powerful tool to
ferably an industrial-PC installed in a ideally suited
rely on the condition of piston-rings and liner.
cabinet. All data and charts can be printed and co-
pied to floppy discs or other media. MAPEX-PR is the tool to check the piston-running
behaviour.
The following data are monitored over periods of 1,
4.5, 24 or 400 engine running hours and displayed MAPEX-PR
graphically: • Alarms if the liner wall temperature shows high
• Liner wall temperature (two sensor per piston-ring friction.
cylinder). • Works ideally together with SIPWA-TP for kee-
• Cylinder cooling water temperature inlet and ping piston-running behaviour under control.
outlet. • Checks the hot spots of the diesel engine.
• Scavenge air temperature after each cooler. • Is an on-line display for piston-ring and nozzle
• Engine speed. performance.
• Engine load indicator position. • Is capable to detect malfunctions such as blow
• Alarms. by and adhesive wear.
• Informs if thermal overload should occur on
The following alarms can be connected to the the cylinder liner.
ship’s alarm system to inform the engineers about • Is your round-the-clock watchful eye.
any unexpected situation:
• High-High alarm for: High friction on one or
both side of the cylinder liner.
• High alarms for: Deviation of temperature of
one cylinder.
• Average temperature of the engine.
• Cooling water fluctuation.
• Scavenge air temperature.
• System alarm for: System failure.

Together with the ”normal” Manual, Wärtsilä


Switzerland Ltd delivers also a digital version,
which will be installed together with the software
MAPEX-PR / SIPWA-TP.

Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd H–21 25.74.07.40 – Issue X.04 – Rev. 0


Engine Selection and Project Manual RT-flex96C

H. Engine management system

Demo-Plant – LWT Graphic Display – MAPEX-PR Demo-Plant – Sat Cwt Load Speed – MAPEX-PR

F10.3615

Fig. H8 MAPEX-PR

25.74.07.40 – Issue X.04 – Rev. 0 H–22 Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd


RT-flex96C Engine Selection and Project Manual

H. Engine management system

H4.3 Mapex-TV / AV (Torsional Vibration / Axial Vibration Detection)


MAPEX-TV continuously calculates the amplitude There is a quick reference guide in English fixed on
of the 1st and 2nd order of torsional vibrations of the system cover. This gives you the possibility to
your engine. handle the most used functions without looking
MAPEX-AV permanently measures the absolute into the manual. Nevertheless, we will deliver a full
value of axial vibrations of your engine. manual either in English, German or French.
You have also the possibility to use an already
MAPEX-TV used engine-speed pickup or install a separate
• Detects misfiring. pickup for MAPEX-TV. The signal for MAPEX-AV
• Measures torsional vibrations. is always produced by an inductive proximity
• Prevents you from wrong alarms during rough sensor.
sea or when manoeuvring. The size of the MAPEX-TV / AV system per engine
is about 32 cm x 40 cm x 16 cm (12.6 in x 15.8 in
MAPEX-AV x 6.3 in). It can be installed everywhere in your con-
• Measures axial vibrations of two-stroke trol or engine room as long as the ambient tem-
engines. perature is not higher than 50°C and the humidity
does not exceed 95%, but it should not be installed
With MAPEX-TV / AV you are alarmed in case of directly on your engine.
any irregularities and you can observe the results MAPEX-TV / AV is the tool to keep an eye on your
of all measurements on your panel in detail. engine vibrations.
The alarm values can be dependent on the load or
on the engine speed. There are two alarm levels. MAPEX-TV / AV
The HH-level is used, if the torsional or axial vibra- • Prevents your engine from major damage due
tions reach a limit, that demands sudden activities to unacceptable high torsional or axial
to prevent your engine from major damages. The vibrations.
H-level can be used as an information, e. g. if a mis- • Is easy to handle due to a quick reference
firing occurred on your engine, but the torsional guide, which is directly fixed on the system
vibrations are still in a safe range. There is a certain cover.
delay of these alarms, which is also adjustable. • Perfectly suited for propulsion systems with
PTO gears.

F10.4913

Fig. H9 MAPEX-AV / TV

Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd H–23 25.74.07.40 – Issue X.04 – Rev. 0


Engine Selection and Project Manual RT-flex96C

H. Engine management system

H4.4 MAPEX-SM (Spare parts and Maintenance)

MAPEX-SM is an advanced management tool for By installing MAPEX-SM at the head office as well
the administration and planning of Spare parts and as on board ship, the owner can centralize requisi-
Maintenance. It comes complete with the original tioning and purchasing operations for the entire
Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd data for the shipowner’s fleet on a single system. This also allows planning
specific engines. The system is user friendly and of major maintenance work and recording of main-
operates on windows compatible computers. Fea- tenance histories for each vessel. Statistical fea-
tures include purchasing of engine spare parts, in- tures provide an overview of fleet maintenance
ventory control, statistical reporting, issuing of and purchasing, and assist in corporate strategic
work orders, maintenance history recording, and planning. MAPEX-SM is modular, so that it can be
much more. installed in phases if desired, beginning with the
head office and later expanding to include vessels
as the shipowner’s budget permits.

Satcom

Ship Wärtsilä Switzerland

DATABASE MAINTENANCE TRANSFER


Export to NSD
Import
Ship owner’s
MAPEX-SM
MAPEX-SM Headquarter

PC Modem Modem PC

F10.5179

Fig. H10 MAPEX-communication

25.74.07.40 – Issue X.04 – Rev. 0 H–24 Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd


RT-flex96C Engine Selection and Project Manual

I. Engine emissions

I1 Exhaust gas emissions bsNO x


[g/kWh]

I1.1 IMO-2000 regulations 25

I1.1.1 IMO
20
The International Maritime Organisation (IMO) is
the specialized agency of the United Nations (UN)
dealing with technical aspects of shipping. For 15
more information see http://www.imo.org.

I1.1.2 Establishment of emission limits 10


for ships

In 1973 an agreement on the International Con- 5


vention for the Prevention of Pollution from ships
was reached. It was modified in 1978 and is now
known as MARPOL 73/78. Annex VI to Marpol 0
73/78 contains regulations limiting the allowed air 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 900 1000
Engine speed [rpm]
pollution produced by ships. In this new annex re- F10.3278

gulations have been introduced to reduce or pro- Fig. I1 Speed dependent maximum average NOx
hibit certain types of emissions from ships. One of emissions by engines
these regulations prescribes the maximum allow-
able emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx) by en- I1.1.4 Date of application of Annex VI
gines installed on ships. This regulation is the only
one being of direct concern for propulsion engine Date of application of Annex VIDuring the
design. Conference of Parties to MARPOL 73/78 in Sep-
tember 1997 the Annex VI was adopted and its
I1.1.3 Regulation regarding NOx ratification criteria habe been met by May 18,
emissions of diesel engines 2004; thus defining its entry into force date as May
19, 2005.
The following speed-dependent curve in figure I1 Irrespective of this actual date of entry into force,
shows the maximum allowed average emissions the regulations on NOx emissions are applicable
when running with marine diesel oil (MDO). (with exceptions stated in the regulations) to all en-
The emission value for an engine is calculated ac- gines with a power output of more than 130 kW
cording to the Technical Code which is part of An- which are installed on ships constructed on or after
nex VI and is almost identical with ISO 8178. As 1st January 2000. The date of construction is the
this is an average value it does not imply that the date of keel laying of the ship. Engines in older
engine emits nitrogen oxides (NOx) below the ships do not need to be certified unless they are
given limit over the whole load range. subjected to major modifications which would sig-
nificantly alter their NOx emission characteristics.

Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd I–1 25.74.07.40 – Issue


25.74.07.40 X.04X.04
– Issue – Rev. 1 0
– Rev.
Engine Selection and Project Manual RT-flex96C

I. Engine emissions

I1.1.5 Procedure for certification


Engine power
of engines [% R1] R1
100

The compliance of an engine with IMO emission RT-flex96C engines


95 Low NOx
limit usually has to be proven by emission tuning
R3
measurements during the shop trial. If it can be 90
shown that the subject engine has exactly the
same design as an already certified engine, a so- 85
called parent engine, no testing is required. The
certification will be surveyed by the administrations 80
Extended
or delegated organisation. measures
75
I1.2 Measures for compliance with the
IMO regulation 70
R4 R2
The rating field of the Sulzer RT-flex96C is divided Engine speed
65
into two areas as shown in figure I2 and comprises [% R1]
70 75 80 85 90 95 100
the following measures:
Fig. I2 Sulzer RT-flex96C: compliance with IMO
I1.2.1 Low NOx Tuning regulations

In the upper part of the rating field the IMO regula-


tion is fulfilled by the use of the Low NOx Tuning
concept. Low NOx Tuning includes well tested
measures, which lead to lowest disadvantage in
engine costs and fuel consumption maintaining
today’s high engine reliability.

I1.2.2 Extended measures

In the lower part of the rating field, fulfilling the IMO


NOx regulation requires the application of ex-
tended measures. For further information please
do not hesitate to contact one of our offices.

Note:
Further engine developments and field experience will aim at
reducing the area of extended measures.

25.74.07.40
25.74.07.40 – Issue
– Issue X.04X.04 – Rev.
– Rev. 0 1 I–2 Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd
RT-flex96C Engine Selection and Project Manual

I. Engine emissions

I2 Engine noise
It is very important to protect the ship’s crew/pass- and gas inlet of turbocharger) should be equipped
engers from the effects of machinery space noise. with the standard insulation, and the turbocharger
Therefore the scavenge air ducts and the exhaust with the standard intake silencer.
duct system (both expansion joints of gas outlet

I2.1 Engine surface sound pressure level

Figure I3 shows the average air borne noise level, measured noise level will normally be about 3–5
measured at 1m distance and at nominal MCR. dB(A) higher than the average noise level of the
Near to the turbocharger (air intake) the maximum engine.

Overall
Lp [dB] average LpA in dB(A)
130
130

120
120

110
110
14RT-flex96C
100
100 6RT-flex96C

90
14RT-flex96C
6RT-flex96C
80
80

70
70

60
20 30 40 50 NR60

50
31.5 63 125 250 500 1k 2k 4k 8k
Octave band centre frequency in [Hz]
Average values Lp in dB in comparison with ISO’s NR-curves and overall average values LpA
F105292 in dB(A), at nominal MCR.
Fig. I3 Engine sound pressure level at 1 m distance

Wärtsilä Switzerland Ltd I–3 25.74.07.40 – Issue X.04 – Rev. 0


Engine Selection and Project Manual RT-flex96C

I. Engine emissions

I2.2 Engine exhaust sound pressure level at funnel top


The sound pressure level from the