Вы находитесь на странице: 1из 21

Ahmed

 Al  Haddad    
TA:  Jared  Price    
Op  Amp  Design  Lab  
11/04/2012  
 
Task  1:  Basic  Inverting  Amplifier.  

Figure  1:  Schematic  of  Op  Amp  Design  1  &  Oscilloscope  screen  via  

Multisim®.  

Design  Objective:  In  this  task  we  were  given  an  input  and  an  output  

equation.  In  this  case  we  were  given  a  dynamic  microphone  whose  output  

is  a  mono  audio  signal  with  maximum  amplitude  of  200  mVpp.  The  goal  of  

1  
Ahmed  Al  Haddad    
TA:  Jared  Price    
Op  Amp  Design  Lab  
11/04/2012  
 
this  experiment  is  to  invert  and  amplify  the  signal  to  a  maximum  of  16  Vpp  

so  that  it  can  drive  audio  equipment.  The  assumption  was  that  this  audio  

equipment  would  be  damaged  if  the  voltage  amplitude  at  its  input  exceeds  

16  Vpp;  therefore  we  had  to  design  and  build  a  circuit  that  achieves  this  

maximum  possible  amplification  without  damaging  the  audio  equipment.    

Theory  of  Operation:  The  input  for  the  first  function  was  200  mVpp  and  the  

output  voltage  was  16  Vpp.  To  get  these  values  we  constructed  an  inverting  

op  amp  with  resistor  values  that  were  80  KΩ  and  1  KΩ.  We  picked  these  

! !!
values  because  we  used  the  equation   !!"#  =   ! ! .  This  equation  relates  to  the  
!" !

gain  of  the  function.  By  subbing  in  the  known  input  and  output  voltages  

you  can  see  that  R2  should  be  80  and  R1  should  be  1.  For  all  these  circuits  

you  need  to  power  the  op  amp  with  a  positive  and  negative  voltage  of  15  

Volts.  In  the  picture  channel  1  represents  the  input  and  channel  2  

represents  the  output  voltages.  A  representation  of  the  given  circuit  is  

shown  in  Figure  2.    

2  
Ahmed  Al  Haddad    
TA:  Jared  Price    
Op  Amp  Design  Lab  
11/04/2012  
 
 

Figure  2:  A  simplified  schematic  of  basic  Inverting  Op  Amp  circuit.    

             

Calculations:  In  order  to  achieve  the  desired  voltage  amplitude  we  had  to  

do  some  calculations  so  that  we  can  choose  the  resistor  values  in  order  for  

the  circuit  to  amplify  the  given  input  to  16  Vpp.    

Formula:  

!!"# !!!
 =            
!!" !!

Given:                  

Vout=16  Vpp,      Vin=.2Vpp    

!!"# !"
!!"
=   .!  =  80  Gain  

𝑴𝒆𝒂𝒔𝒖𝒓𝒆𝒅!𝑨𝒄𝒕𝒖𝒂𝒍 𝟏𝟔.𝟑𝑽!𝟏𝟔𝑽
Percent  error  Equation:        *  100                                      *  100=  
𝑨𝒄𝒕𝒖𝒂𝒍 𝟏𝟔𝑽

1.875%    

3  
Ahmed  Al  Haddad    
TA:  Jared  Price    
Op  Amp  Design  Lab  
11/04/2012  
 
Experimental  Results:  Our  data  can  be  seen  on  the  oscilloscope  in  Figure  1.  

Using  our  resistor  values  of  80kΩ  and  1kΩ  we  were  able  to  achieve  a  

maximum  gain  of  15.9  Vpp,  which  is  relatively  accurate  and  nearly  perfect.    

The  schematic  consists  of  our  two  resistors  an  input  and  output  and  +15V  &  

-­‐15V  supplied  through  the  function  generator  and  Channel  1  (in  yellow)  

shows  the  input  of  the  circuit  and  Channel  2  (in  blue)  shows  the  output  of  

the  circuit  and  on  the  right  we  can  see  the  Peak-­‐to-­‐Peak  voltage  amplitude  

and  we  can  see  that  we  have  successfully  built  the  desired  circuit  using  a  

basic  inverting  amplifier.    

Conclusion:  We  were  successful  in  amplifying  the  amplitude  by  using  our  

formula  to  calculate  the  gain  and  determine  our  resistor  values.  Our  

schematic  shows  that  we  simply  used  a  basic  inverting  amplifier,  which  

scales  and  inverts  the  input  signal.  We  were  not  100%  accurate  but  we  

were  actually  able  to  build  this  circuit  and  got  it  to  function  and  showed  it  

to  our  TA.    

4  
Ahmed  Al  Haddad    
TA:  Jared  Price    
Op  Amp  Design  Lab  
11/04/2012  
 
 

Task  2:  Weighted  Summing  Amplifier    

Figure  3:  Schematic  of  Op  Amp  Design  2  &  Oscilloscope  screen  via  

Multisim®.      

Design  Objective:  In  this  task  we  used  an  input  from  an  audio  signal  that  

we  got  from  the  computer.  The  output  of  the  right  channel  is  500  mVpp  

and  the  output  of  the  left  channel  is  200  mVpp.  The  objective  of  this  task  

was  to  produce  a  16  Vpp  output  that  is  balanced  and  that  is  an  inverted  

sum  of  the  two  outputs  of  the  audio  signal.   A  simplified  circuit  is  shown  in  

Figure  4  below.    

5  
Ahmed  Al  Haddad    
TA:  Jared  Price    
Op  Amp  Design  Lab  
11/04/2012  
 
 

Theory  of  Operation:  To  find  the  resistor  values  we  broke  the  design  up  

into  two  parts.    Each  of  the  inputs  would  have  to  have  half  of  the  total  

desirable  gain.  To  find  this  gain  you  can  use  the  equation  from  the  first  task.  

You  would  need  to  set  one  of  the  inputs  to  zero  (also  known  as  super  

position)  to  determine  the  resistor  value  for  that  input.  Once  you  found  

that  resistor  you  would  use  the  same  feedback  resistor  to  solve  for  the  

second  unknown  resistance.  You  can  also  use  nodal  analysis  to  figure  out  

what  the  resistors  should  be.    

Figure  4:  A  simplified  schematic  of  Weighted  Summing  Amplifier.  

6  
Ahmed  Al  Haddad    
TA:  Jared  Price    
Op  Amp  Design  Lab  
11/04/2012  
 
 

Calculations:      

Formula:  

!!"# !!!
 =          Vout=  16  Vpp          Vin=  .5  Vpp  or  .2  Vpp    
!!" !!

Break  the  problem  up  using  super  position.  

! !
 =  16              =  40                            Since  .5Vpp  has  a  lower  gain  that  that  of  the  .2Vpp  
.! .!

input  you  can  say  that  you  will  need  a  higher  resistor  value  at  that  input  

source  so  that  they  would  be  equalized  and  have  the  same  output  of  8  Vpp  

and  then  summed  together  at  the  end  to  get  a  total  of  16  Vpp.    

The  resistor  values  that  we  chose  were  400k  for  the  feedback  resistor,  25k  

right  after  the  .5  Vpp  input,  and  10k  right  after  the  .2  Vpp  input.    

Percent  Error:  

𝟏𝟔𝐕!𝟏𝟔𝐕
𝟏𝟔𝐕
 *  100=  0%  

Experimental  Results:  Our  data  can  be  seen  on  the  oscilloscope  in  Figure  3.  

Using  the  values  we  got  from  our  calculations  of  400k,  25k  and  10k  for  

7  
Ahmed  Al  Haddad    
TA:  Jared  Price    
Op  Amp  Design  Lab  
11/04/2012  
 
resistors  R1,  R2  and  R3  respectively  we  were  able  to  get  an  input  of  200  

mVpp  in  Channel  1  and  499  mVpp  in  Channel  2.  Channel  3  (in  purple)  is  the  

sum  of  both  of  the  frequencies  and  we  can  see  that  we  got  amplitude  of  

15.8  Vpp.    

Conclusion:    In  conclusion,  we  did  not  have  any  %error  and  were  100%  

accurate,  and  we  were  able  to  construct  this  circuit  on  the  breadboard  in  

class  using  our  Gain  formula  and  the  concept  of  superposition  to  calculate  

our  resistor  values  and  successfully  build  a  weighted  summing  amplifier.    

8  
Ahmed  Al  Haddad    
TA:  Jared  Price    
Op  Amp  Design  Lab  
11/04/2012  
 
Task  3:  Two  Channel  Mixer  with  Balanced  Inputs.    

Figure  5:  Schematic  of  Op  Amp  Design  3  &  Oscilloscope  screen  via  

Multisim®(.4  Vpp).    

9  
Ahmed  Al  Haddad    
TA:  Jared  Price    
Op  Amp  Design  Lab  
11/04/2012  
 
 

Figure  6:  Schematic  of  Op  Amp  Design  3  &  Oscilloscope  screen  via  

Multisim®(16  Vpp  for  Vout).  

Design  Objective:  For  this  circuit  we  have  a  balanced  stereo  signal  in  which  

both  the  right  and  left  channels  have  equivalent  amplitude  of  0.5  Vpp.  But  

in  this  scenario  we  had  to  mix  these  two  channels  into  a  single  inverted  

output  while  independently  varying  the  gain  of  the  two  channels.  Therefore  

10  
Ahmed  Al  Haddad    
TA:  Jared  Price    
Op  Amp  Design  Lab  
11/04/2012  
 
we  were  asked  to  use  potentiometers  so  that  we  could  modify  the  gain.  A  

simplified  representation  of  the  circuit  can  be  seen  in  Figure  7.    

Theory  of  Operation:  To  get  a  variable  gain  we  used  20k  potentiometers  

that  can  change  resistances  with  ease.  You  would  do  the  same  process  as  

task  2  but  now  when  you  measure  the  gain  from  either  the  right  or  the  left  

channel  you  will  need  to  use  half  of  the  variable  gain  to  determine  your  

other  resistor  values.  When  your  gain  is  at  its  maximum  you  will  have  all  of  

the  20k  potentiometer  in  your  equation  and  when  the  gain  is  at  its  

minimum  value  you  will  turn  the  potentiometer  so  that  it  will  have  no  

resistance  in  the  system.    

We  can  see  that  Channel  1  represents  the  right  channel  with  a  frequency  of  

440  Hz  and  Channel  2  is  the  output  of  the  function.  The  frequencies  are  

different  but  it  doesn’t  change  your  calculations  for  determining  your  

resistor  values  it  just  alters  the  output  graph  on  the  oscilloscope  when  you  

sum  the  two  input  functions  together.  

11  
Ahmed  Al  Haddad    
TA:  Jared  Price    
Op  Amp  Design  Lab  
11/04/2012  
 

Figure  7:  A  simplified  schematic  of  Two  Channel  Mixer.  

Calculations:      

For  .4  Vpp  output  with  .5  Vpp  input  for  at  both  the  left  and  right  channels  

we  will  use  100%  of  the  20kΩ  potentiometer.  

!!"# !!
 =   ! !                        Vin  =  .5  Vpp          Vout  =  .2                    just  for  half  the  circuit  using  
!!" !

super  position  

.! !!! !"""
.!
 =  0.4      for  both  ! !!"!
           R2=  8kΩ          R1=  500Ω                        !""!!""""=  0.39024  
!

For  16  Vpp  output  with  .5  Vpp  input  for  both  the  left  and  right  channels  we  

will  use  0%  of  the  potentiometer.    

12  
Ahmed  Al  Haddad    
TA:  Jared  Price    
Op  Amp  Design  Lab  
11/04/2012  
 
 

Conclusion:  Unfortunately  we  were  not  able  to  successfully  build  this  circuit  

in  class  but  were  able  to  simulate  it  on  Multisim  and  we  successfully  got  our  

varying  gains  as  shown  in  Figures  5  &  6.  We  reached  our  resistor  values  

using  the  gain  formula  and  super  positionThis  circuit  has  many  applications  

in  the  real  world  and  could  be  used  to  change  the  volume  of  an  audio  

device.    

13  
Ahmed  Al  Haddad    
TA:  Jared  Price    
Op  Amp  Design  Lab  
11/04/2012  
 
Task  4:  Level-­‐shifting  Amplifier  

Figure  8:  Schematic  of  Op  Amp  Design  4  &  Oscilloscope  screen  via  

Multisim®.  

Design  Objective:  In  this  design  problem,  the  input  signal  was  a  mono  

audio  signal  that  is  the  output  of  an  electret  condenser  microphone.  An  

electret  microphone  is  a  type  of  condenser  microphone,  which  eliminates  

the  need  for  a  polarizing  power  supply  by  using  a  permanently  charged  

material.  An  electret  condenser  microphone  output  always  includes  a  DC  

offset  in  addition  to  the  signal  itself.  Assuming  that  this  microphone  

14  
Ahmed  Al  Haddad    
TA:  Jared  Price    
Op  Amp  Design  Lab  
11/04/2012  
 
outputs  a  signal  with  a  voltage  swing  of  600  mVpp  plus  a  DC  offset  of  2.5  V.  

The  microphone  output  signal  needs  to  be  changed  before  being  input  to  a  

sensitive  audio  circuit.  Specifically,  it  needs  to  be  inverted,  amplified,  and  

the  DC  offset  needs  to  be  removed.  We  were  asked  to  design  and  build  a  

circuit  that  will  cancel  out  the  DC  offset  and  achieve  maximum  signal  

amplification  without  exceeding  the  16  Vpp  input  limit  of  the  audio  

equipment.  A  simplified  representation  of  the  circuit  is  shown  in  Figure  9.    

Theory  of  Operation:  There  is  a  DC  offset  of  2.5V  within  the  input  signal  of  

the  audio  signal.  To  counter  this  DC  offset  so  that  there  is  no  offset  in  the  

output  of  the  function  you  must  first  construct  an  inverting  op  amp.  At  the  

positive  terminal  you  want  to  have  a  voltage  of  2.5V  to  counter  the  DC  

offset.  You  must  use  the  positive  15V  power  supply  that  is  powering  the  op  

amp  so  we  used  a  voltage  divider  to  get  our  desired  voltage  of  2.5V.  Results  

are  shown  in  Figure  8.    

15  
Ahmed  Al  Haddad    
TA:  Jared  Price    
Op  Amp  Design  Lab  
11/04/2012  
 

Figure  9:  A  simplified  schematic  of  a  Level-­‐shifting  amplifier.  

Calculations:      

!!"# !!!
For  the  resistor  values  use  the  inverting  op  amp  formula:    =        Vout=  
!!" !!

16Vpp            Vin=  .6Vpp  

!!"# !"
!!"
= .! =26.6  gain                                  so  the  resistor  values  that  we  chose  were  

R1=8kΩ  and  R2=300Ω  

To  get  2.5V  at  the  positive  terminal  we  used  a  voltage  divider.  

! !!"
=   *15V=2.5V  
!!"!!!"!!!"

Percent  Error:  No  percent  error  all  values  were  exactly  the  same  as  the  

intended  values.  

16  
Ahmed  Al  Haddad    
TA:  Jared  Price    
Op  Amp  Design  Lab  
11/04/2012  
 
Conclusion:  In  conclusion  we  got  our  desired  voltage  of  16Vpp.  In  our  

calculations  we  did  not  get  any  percent  errors  and  the  oscilloscope  caption  

via  Multisim®  can  validate  this.  We  got  exact  values  for  the  input  and  

output  of  the  circuit.  The  DC  offset  can  be  shown  by  the  mean  in  the  

caption.  It  starts  off  as  being  negative  2.5  and  then  switches  to  positive  2.5.  

This  will  get  rid  of  the  offset  and  essentially  be  zero.  

Task  5:  Variable  Level-­‐Shifting  Amplifier  

17  
Ahmed  Al  Haddad    
TA:  Jared  Price    
Op  Amp  Design  Lab  
11/04/2012  
 
Figure  10:    Schematic  of  Op  Amp  Design  5  &  Oscilloscope  screen  via  

Multisim®.  

Design  Objective:  For  our  final  design,  we  have  a  similar  set  up  as  Task  4  

however,  now  we  don’t  know  the  DC  offset.  But  we  do  know  that  the  offset  

ranges  from  1V-­‐3V.  The  signal  needs  to  be  inverted,  amplified  and  the  DC  

offset  needs  to  be  removed  before  being  input  into  the  audio  circuit  as  

before.  We  were  asked  to  build  a  level-­‐shifting  amplifier  that  can  be  

adjusted  to  cancel  any  DC  offset  between  1  VDC  and  3  VDC.  Again,  we  need  

to  design  our  circuit  so  that  it  does  not  exceed  the  maximum  amplitude  of  

16Vpp.  A  simplified  schematic  of  the  circuit  is  shown  in  Figure  11.    

Theory  of  Operation:  This  circuit  is  similar  to  the  previous  circuit  but  to  

construct  this  circuit  the  only  thing  that  we  need  to  change  will  be  the  

resistor  values.  For  the  feedback  resistor  we  will  need  to  have  13.3kΩ  and  a  

500Ω  resistor  right  after  the  input.  Results  are  shown  in  Figure  10.    

18  
Ahmed  Al  Haddad    
TA:  Jared  Price    
Op  Amp  Design  Lab  
11/04/2012  
 

Figure  11:  A  simplified  schematic  of  Variable  Level-­‐Shifting  Amplifier.    

Calculations:    

! !!
For  the  resistor  values  use  the  inverting  op  amp  formula:   !!"#  =   ! !      Vout=  
!" !

16Vpp            Vin=  .6Vpp  

!!"# !"
= =26.6  gain                                  so  the  resistor  values  that  we  chose  were  
!!" .!

R1=8kΩ  and  R2=300Ω  

To  get  2.5V  at  the  positive  terminal  we  used  a  voltage  divider.  

!!"
𝑉 ! =  !!"!!!"!!!"*15V=2.5V  

Percent  Error:  No  percent  error  all  values  were  exactly  the  same  as  the  

intended  values.  

Conclusion:  This  circuit  was  more  complex  than  the  other  circuits  but  is  

similar  to  the  circuit  in  task  4  but  we  used  a  different  voltage  divider  and    

19  
Ahmed  Al  Haddad    
TA:  Jared  Price    
Op  Amp  Design  Lab  
11/04/2012  
 
were  able  to  build  a  level-­‐shifting  amplifier  circuit  and  get  a  very  accurate  

amplitude  at  the  output  because  we  ran  this  on  Multisim  and  were  not  able  

to  complete  the  task  in  class  due  to  time  constraints.    

Post  lab  Questions  

1) If  you  wanted  a  variable-­‐gain  between  8  Vpp  and  16  Vpp  you  would  

add  a  1kΩ  potentiometer  to  the  circuit  right  after  the  input  comes  in.    

!!! !"!
!! !!!
   ,  R2=  80kΩ,  R1=  1kΩ,  !!!!!  =  40*.2Vpp=  8Vpp  

2) You  would  construct  a  non-­‐inverting  amplifier  with  the  ground  at  the  

terminal  and  the  input  at  the  inputs  at  the  positive  terminal  to  get  a  

circuit  that  does  not  invert  the  signal.  

3) You  would  add  a  potentiometer  value  that  had  a  large  resistance  

value  that  when  active  will  decrease  the  voltage  so  much  that  

essentially  it  will  appear  to  be  zero.  

4) You  can  add  potentiometers  in  task  4  and  5  just  like  what  was  done  

in  task  3  with  variable  gain.  

20  
Ahmed  Al  Haddad    
TA:  Jared  Price    
Op  Amp  Design  Lab  
11/04/2012  
 
5) You  can  tie  a  voltage  divider  that  is  tied  to  a  negative  source  on  one  

side  and  a  positive  source  on  the  other.  You  can  put  a  potentiometer  

in  the  middle  of  the  voltage  divider  to  choose  whether  you  would  

want  a  negative  or  positive  voltage  to  counter  the  DC  offset  

whatever  it  may  be.  

21