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2011

,661

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,
a dan dzo

68

10
14
18

72

20


60


64

96
Bank RBK
!
100


140

68
24



72

28
34
38


78

56

Forum
Global Energy Partnership
Connecting East and West
BASF
We Always Strive for Excellence
Park of Nuclear Technologies:
We Combine Science and Business

turkuaz machinery
!

Kazakhmys
Contribution, Worthy of a Leader
A DAN DZO
The Algorithm of Efficiency

Borusan Makina
We Believe in the Future
of Kazakhstan and Are
Willing to Invest in It!
Kokshetauminvody
Reputation Above All

90
52

Devoted to 20 th
Anniversary
of Independence
of the Republic
of Kazakhstan

Ranking from IMD:


Interrupted Climb of Kazkahstan

88
48

Government
Our Task of Priority Is to Build up
a Competitive and Stable Economy
Competitivenes
Life Buoy of Macroeconomics

84
44

2
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1
1
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6

74

82
40

English version

KazTransCom

Leaders2011
a n n u a l

b u s i n e s s

o v e r v i e w

| 103 page |

94

www.InvestKz.com


78

78

32

17, 85

53

93

16

41

88

24

32

70

44

32

91, 93

36

35

15, 91

35

70

14, 40

3435

53

32

96

8283

29

49

100

7071

69

85

16, 49, 98

10, 29, 41, 69, 85

3536

69

32

42

29, 32, 3435, 37

69, 72

37

53

58

31

41

74, 76

56

100
--
19

91

71

9192

37

94

70

37

31

32, 37

38

69

29

41

32

94

88

53

A DAN DZO
5658
AES 65
Aker Solutions
53
Amitech Astana
72
Argus Media
32
Ast Etalon Crown
73
Bank of America
41
Bank RBK
100
Barclays Capital
50
BG Group
29
BofA Merrill Lynch
41
Caterpillar 4446
CNH International
88
CNPC 41
CNPC- 68
Conocophillips
30, 41
EnBW 44
ENRC
42, 45, 49, 58
FBT ngeneering
79
Fintur Holdings B.V.
91
Fitch Ratings
42
Franklin Resources
42
Freeport McMoRan Copper & Gold
50
Glencore 49
Great Western Exploration
49
GSM
89
Halliburton 45
Henderson Global 42
HSBC Kazakhstan
69
Hundai Auto Truck & Bus
71
IHS Energy
37
IMD
12, 24, 2627
International Nickel Study Group
50
JP Morgan Asset Management
42
KASE
42, 75
kaspi bank
69, 9899
KAZENERGY
2829, 35
KazTransCom 9495
KEGOC 66
Krones 79
Lloyds Register Quality Assurance 9495
LME 50
Navigant Consulting
66
New Holland Agriculture
88
NCOC
41, 73
Prudential 42
RBS
99
Resmi 70
SBS Group
100
SNR Denton
36
Schlumberger 45
Standard & Poors
9698
Sumitomo Metal Mining Co.
50
Tele2
91
Telia Sonera
91
Turkuaz Machinery
88
Vostock Capital Partners
42

l 2011#4l

Kazakhstan


73
73
73
38

73

45
50
91


9899

50

61, 68
48
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71
9899

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9899
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73

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30, 35, 4142, 58

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7880

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70
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,
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Kazakhstan, 2011 6
:

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PR-:

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, , . 2011.

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WEF IMD. , ,
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2012 Kazakhstan, , , .
,
Kazakhstan
.
.
: kz@investkz.com

Owner:
Kazakhstanika Ltd
Publisher:
Kazakhstan Business Magazine Ltd
Editor-in-chief:
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Natalya Voloshina

C :


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No material in the Magazine marked with


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Copyright 2011 by Kazakhstanika


,
3000


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C. 5920- 27.04.2005

The magazine is published with 3,000 copies


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The magazine is registered in the Ministry
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Registration certificate # 5920- as of 27.04.2005

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56

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29

Kazakhstan 2011# 6

25


2.0.
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l 2011# 6 l

Kazakhstan

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2010

2011

43

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: IMD World Competitiveness Yearbook 2011

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: IMD World Competitiveness Yearbook 2011

2009

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34

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: IMD World Competitiveness Yearbook 2011

2009

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l 2011# 6 l

Kazakhstan

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l 2011# 6 l

Kazakhstan

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Kazakhstan

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Kazakhstan



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49


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l 2011# 6 l

Kazakhstan

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:

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050008, . , . , 29, . 204
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s t r e n g t h t h r o u g h c o o p e r at i o n


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52

l 2011# 6 l

Kazakhstan

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l 2011# 6 l

Kazakhstan

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l 2011# 6 l

Kazakhstan

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Kazakhstan 2011# 6

61

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Kazakhstan




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l 2011# 6 l

Kazakhstan


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Kazakhstan 2011# 6

65

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l 2011# 6 l

Kazakhstan


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Kazakhstan 2011# 6

67



: 2010
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68

l 2011# 6 l

Kazakhstan

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kaspi bank, 40%.

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Kazakhstan 2011# 6

71


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l 2011# 6 l

Kazakhstan

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Kazakhstan 2011# 6

75

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l 2011# 6 l

Kazakhstan

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l 2011# 6 l

Kazakhstan

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Kazakhstan 2011# 6

79


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80

l 2011# 6 l

Kazakhstan

2011
-
Samsung Electronics KZ and Central Asia
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1987 .
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l 2011# 6 l

Kazakhstan

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(Europe Business Assembly),
(Thames
Valley Chamber of Commerce Group), (Club of Leaders
international) (The Club of theRectors of
Europe)

.

Kazakhstan 2011# 6

83



,
, .
, 2009 ,
, .

,
.
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Kazakhstan 2011# 6

85

29,6


2001-20011 .,

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13,8

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86

l 2011# 6 l

Kazakhstan


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80% 2010- ( 50%), , , 23,4% 13,9%,
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92%.
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.

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( 2011-
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New Holland Agriculture
. urkuaz Machinery,
,
.

, Turkuaz Machinery
New Holland Agriculture , -, 27 2011
. Turkuaz Machinery
(Mehmet
Kemal Cetinnelli) -
CNH International
(Vincent de Lassagne).
New Holland
Agriculture ,
, , , 2000 . ,
Turkuaz Machinery.
New
Holland ,
, .
, , Turkuaz
Machinery :

88

l 2011# 6 l

Kazakhstan

, ,
.
,

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Machinery
, , ,
.
, ,

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.
Turkuaz Machinery ,
,
16 ,
, , 40
.
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, N e w Ho l l an d
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Fiat. CNH -
Fiat S.p.A.

, (, T9
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,
, CSX,
,
,
-,
.
,
, New Holland Agriculture
.
,
,
.

-
.
,
,
3G, 4G,
KazSat-2, -.
.

,
5% ( : 2009 8,3%,
2008-10,4%, 2007-33%).
, 2011 ,
, 10 . , , -

90

l 2011# 6 l

Kazakhstan


453,9 ,
17,8% 2010
.
37,48 ( 9,9% ,
10 ), 32,9

( 1,1%), 68,5
( 62,5%) 246,7
(+13,5%). ,
(54,5%), (15,1%), (8,3%)
(7,2%). , ,
,

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.
, , ,

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(49%) GSM ( Kcell, Activ Vegaline).
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EBITDA
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Kazakhstan 2011# 6

91


, , . ,
EBITDA. ,
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2011 1,122 ,
, , Tele2.
, Tele2 ,

.
2012 . Tele2
,
, -
, .
Tele2
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. ,
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.

77,5 , 4,3% , 2010 .
, 12 750 .

.
Kcell, Activ, Beeline,
, Tele2, Dalacom, Pathword.

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.
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, 2009
. Kcell
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. 3,8% 73,8
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.

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. , 2011 4,17 ,
22,47 , , 8,14 ,
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, . ,

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.
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,


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.


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.
, IT
.
,
-

94

l 2011# 6 l

Kazakhstan

. ,
.

.

ISO/IEC 27001:2005,
.
2008
.

.
ISO,

.
, KazTransCom,
Lloyds Register
Quality Assurance.

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,

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,


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www.kaztranscom.kz

Kazakhstan 2011# 6

95


,
, ,
, Standard & Poor's
.
.


, .
,
.

. -

96

l 2011# 6 l

Kazakhstan


, . ,
, 2011
6,5% . , -

,
.

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,
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( 90
),

Kazakhstan 2011# 6

97


, 30%.
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,
,
.

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.
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l 2011# 6 l

Kazakhstan

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) 65,1

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. ,

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(86,6 ),
(81,3 ) (71,6 ).
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1 ,

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. kaspi bank
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01.10.11
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Kazakhstan 2011# 6

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Kazakhstan 2011# 6

101

2
0
1
1
_
6

Government
Our Task of Priority Is to Build up
a Competitive and Stable Economy

Devoted to 20 th
Anniversary
of Independence
of the Republic
of Kazakhstan

Competitivenes
Life Buoy of Macroeconomics
Ranking from IMD:
Interrupted Climb of Kazkahstan
Forum
Global Energy Partnership
Connecting East and West
BASF
We Always Strive for Excellence
Park of Nuclear Technologies:
We Combine Science and Business
Kazakhmys
Contribution, Worthy of a Leader
A DAN DZO
The Algorithm of Efficiency
Borusan Makina
We Believe in the Future
of Kazakhstan and Are
Willing to Invest in It!
Kokshetauminvody
Reputation Above All

Leaders2011
a n n u a l

b u s i n e s s

o v e r v i e w

government

Our Task of Priority is to Build up


a Competitive and stable Economy

Prime Minister of Kazakhstan Karim Massimov answers questions from


the Kazakhstan business magazine.
Karim Kazhimkanovich, this year our
country celebrates thetwentieth
anniversary since its independence.
With what performance indicators has
thedomestic economy marked this
anniversary year?
ver thetwo decades of its independence,
Kazakhstan has implemented largescale economic reforms and has successfully
passed through a series of upheavals
including thepost-Sov iet economic
recession, inflationary, investment and
payment crises, as well as a few waves of
global financial instability.
At t h e d aw n o f t h e c o un t r y s
independence, both theimbal ances
inherited from theplanned economy and
those new, related to theacceleration of

104

l 2011# 6 l

Kazakhstan

market reforms affected all spheres of


public and social development.
Thus, in19911996 there was a decline
of more than 14% inindustrial production,
nearly 25% inagriculture, about 30%
intransport services, while theinflation
rate exceeded 1,000%. Today, such
figures seem unbelievable even for some
individual sector of theeconomy of
therepublic.
With thecoming of thenew millennium,
Kazakhstani people clearly gained a feeling
of thepositive results of theconducted
market reforms. After experiencing rapid
growth in20062007, we started to get
onthe path of sustainable development,
when Kazakhstan's economy grew ata rate
of at10% a year.

Along with that, thewave of instability


inthe global financial market inthe second
half of 2008 began a slowdown ineconomic
growth and led to falling prices of themain
export commodities of Kazakhstan. Since
our economy was an integral par t of
theworld economy, theglobal recession
had a negative impact onus, resulting
ineconomic growth slowdown to 3.3%
in2008. Especially thenegative effect was
reported inthe financial and real estate
markets thesectors of theeconomy mostly
dependent onthe economic situation.
Thetimely anti-recession measures
of theGovernment, aimed to preserve
thebusiness and investment activity, and
themost important thing theclearlysighted policy of our President and

his political will allowed to prevent


therecession inKazakhstan and even to
provide 1.2% economic growth in2009.
Moreover, inthe recession period there
were developed themechanisms and
solutions that made thedomestic economy
settle down to a course of post-recession
development.
Since 2010 thegovernment has been
implementing a new economic challenge
to create condit ions and maint ain
theannual economic growth rate at7%
inthe medium term prospect. All this isin
line with themain priority of thesocioeconomic policy of Kazakhstan, outlined
by thehead of therepublic to be among
thecountries with high-income economies
by increasing theGDP per capita to
$15 thousand in2015.
What are theinterim results of
theAccelerated Innovative and Industrial
Development Program as themajor
strategic document of thecountry inthe
economic area?
heaccelerated diversif icat ion of
theeconomy isthe main goal of
thestate program of accelerated industrial
and innovative development of Kazakhstan.
Thelatest statistical data indicates that
thedomestic economy gradually rises
inthe industrial track, mostly thanks
to theambitious industr ial program.
InJanuaryJune 2011, thecountrys GDP
incurrent prices amounted to 11 trillion
tenge, while real GDP grew by 7%, compared
to thesame period of 2010.
Thekey internal factor that added to
theeconomic growth isthe increased
demand inthe consumer market due to
thegrowth of thepublic and private
sectors. Theyear 2011, marking the20 th
anniversary of Kazakhstans independence,
isnotable, inthe opinion of experts,
for thesmooth and gradual recovery of
economic relations between themarket
participants, and Kazakhstans entry into a
phase of economic growth.
By theincrease inphysical volume of
production, among theleading sectors are
theprocessing industry, physical metallurgy,
chemical industry, machine building, and
production of clothing, furniture, machines,
equipment and vehicles.
Atthe moment, theestablished system
of state support of thepriority sectors
of theeconomy involves more than 60
support instruments. Among them are

13industrial and 9 functional programs to


support businesses that specify measures
of development by sectors of theeconomy
and industries, as well as thelayout
plan of production facilities, uniting all
thenecessary resources inthe national
scale. All this isconsolidated inthe
Industrialization Map, serving for us as a
target and practical guide to action.
At the current moment, the Industriali
zation Map includes 609 projects worth
9.6trillion tenge total. Moreover, itprovides
for thesetting of 205 thousand temporary
jobs and 179 thousand permanent jobs.
In2010, 152 projects, worth inaggre
ga t e ov er 8 0 0 b il l ion t enge and
involving thesetting of 23 thousand
permanent jobs, were commissioned
under theIndustrialization Map. During
thecur rent year, mark ing the20 t h
anniversary of Kazakhstans independence,
there will be launched 237 projects with
a total worth of 1 trillion tenge, with
thecreation of about 20 thousand new jobs.
Thus, follow ing thet wo years of
implement at ion of thepresident ial
industrialization program there will be
launched 389 projects totaling 1.8 trillion
tenge, and more than 42 thousand new
permanent jobs will be created.
Development of thenational innovation
system isin progress. Thepercentage of
innovative active enterprises isjust
4.3% so far, but their share increases
every year. Thegrowth of innovation
ismarked inall sectors of theeconomy,
except for theconstruction industry. Three
engineering offices and two international
centers for technological cooperation with
companies from France and South Korea
have been set up to date.
Int e gr a t e d supp or t t o dome s t ic
enterprises to promote their products inthe
external markets isprovided. There was
arranged about 30 special presentations
of Kazakhstani goods and brands; 20 trade
missions were set up, as well as a great
number of business meetings were held.
Asa result, export contracts were executed
to theamount of some $400 million.
Atthe same time, starting from thelast
year thestate covers half of theexporters
costs associated with entering theexternal
markets for products. Inthe last year, 43
domestic enterprises were compensated
thebelow-said costs.
To raise competitiveness of industrial
enterprises, measures are taken to upgrade

existing productions and develop new


ones. Atthe moment, 155 companies have
already expressed their desire to become
participants of theprogram Productivity
2020. However, thegreater number of them
represents theengineering industry and
production of building materials.
Ingeneral, over theone and a half years
of implementation of thenew industrial
program 227 projects were launched, worth
about 1 trillion tenge, and 30 thousand new
permanent jobs were created.
You are a supporter of theview that
theglobal economy islikely to face a
second wave of recession. Ina case of
themost negative scenario, what are
theimplications for theeconomy of
Kazakhstan, and what isthe government
going to do inthis regard?
is clear that today some current
imbalances inthe economies of
developed and developing countries are
likely to adversely affect thegrowth of
world production and to worsen theoverall
situation ona global scale.
With such current trends I would
distinguish thefollowing main risks to
theglobal economy.
First, itis a potential risk of theUnited
States default onits government debts,
despite therecent raising of theceiling to
increase borrowing. Thedevelopment of
this scenario isfraught with considerable
negative consequences for theglobal
economy, which can result insharp changes
inexchange rates, falling stock indices
and securities prices. For many countries,
italso threatens thedepreciation of U.S.
dollar-denominated international reserves.
Aconsiderable budget deficit, coupled with
a chronically negative balance of trade
of thelargest economy inthe world will
certainly slow down global economic growth
inthe medium-term prospect.
Theother risk isthe lack of clear plans
for fiscal consolidation, high levels of
sovereign debt and budget deficits inlarge
countries with advanced economies, first
of all, inthe Euro zone. No less important
isthe condition of Chinas economy,
theoverheating signs of which, along with
other factors, are also likely to slow down
theglobal economic growth and bring
theraw material prices to collapse.
Due to theopenness of Kazakhstan
and it s integration with theglobal
economy, this will negatively affect us.

It

Kazakhstan 2011# 6

105

government
Theexperience of the2009 recession
showed that inthe event of thenext wave
of recession all sectors of Kazakhstans
economy, regardless of their export market
orientation or domestic market orientation,
will be affected.
As itwas already stated, we have plan
B for this case. Itassumes as thebasic
condit ions thereduc t ion inglobal
demand for export commodities, including
thefalling prices of Brent crude to a level
of $40 per barrel in20122015.
Inthe event of an adverse development
scenar io int he e x t er nal mar ket s ,
stimulation of economic growth should
be provided by influencing thedomestic
factors and domestic demand. This will be
implemented by means of stimulation of
ultimate consumption and gross capital
formations.
Dur ing therecession theeconomic
policy of theGovernment will be focused
onintensif icat ion of consumpt ion
and investment act iv it ies ow ing to
theprev iously created reser ves and
maintenance of optimal proportions of
reproduction.
Consistency of instruments of thefiscal
and monetar y policies, coupled with
measures of structural and investment
policy will be themain option for achieving
sustainable growth.
Given thefact that Kazakhstan's economy
isalready operating inthe framework of
theCustoms Union, and from next year of
theSingle Economic Space (SES), are our
countries ready for coordinated action to
fight a possible recession?
December 2010 there was executed
an agreement oncoordinated
macroeconomic policy of theCustoms
Union member countries, which specifies
thedirections of thepolicy, principles of its
development, procedures and mechanisms
for joint decision-making.
This agreement involves thecreation
of favorable condit ions to increase
sustainability of theCustoms Union member
countries economies to external shocks. So,
every year we will negotiate a number of
scenarios each time for a three year period
to develop forecasts of socio-economic
development, and hence thenational
budgets. This will include oil prices,
pace of global economic growth, national
currencies exchange rates to thedollar and
euro, and so on.

In

106

l 2011# 6 l

Kazakhstan

Itis assumed that theef for t s of


thegovernments will focus onsustainable
economic development and macroeconomic
stability.
As you know, Russia completed bilateral
negotiations with theEU and ison
theverge of accession to theWTO. What
progress has Kazakhstan made inthis
direction so far and how, inyour opinion,
can membership of our countries inthe
WTO affect theintegration process
within theSES?
is clear that theaccession to theWTO
isone of theforeign economic
priorities of our country. We can say
already that thenegotiations onaccession
by Kazakhstan to thegiven international
organization isat their final stage bilateral
negotiations onentering theKazakhstani
market for thegoods and services of 26 WTO
member countries, including theEuropean
Union, are accomplished.
Moreover, we have a principal arrangement
with our partners onthe Customs Union
that theWTO rules concerning thematter
of regulation inthe framework of thegiven
integration association, become part of
theCustoms Unions legal system.
This means that all thecommitments
made by thecountry which was thefirst
who acceded to theWTO, become part of
thecontractual framework of theCustoms
Union. Infact, theexisting contractual
framework allows us to adapt future
obligations of our countries as members of
theWTO and Eurasian Economic Union.

It

Atthe moment, Kazakhstan ranks 36th


inthe IMD competitiveness rankings
and 72nd inthe WEF competitiveness
rankings. Inyour opinion, onwhat areas
should thegovernment and businesses
focus to improve these indicators?
ccording to thelatest rankings for
theGlobal Competitiveness Index of
theWorld Economic Forum, Kazakhstan
retained the72nd position, thesame as
inthe previous year, among 142 countries
inthe world. With this, there was marked
improvement inthe average score of
our country inoverall competitiveness
rankings.
By major macroeconomic indicators
K a z akhs t an isamong 50 60 mos t
competitive economies inthe world.
These are theindicators such as thegross
national savings and general government

debt (12 th position), government budget


balance (16th), wastefulness of government
spending (50th), national GDP inU.S. dollars
by purchasing power parity and its share
inthe world GDP (53rd), and GDP per capita
inU.S. dollars (59th).
Some social indicators were accessed
as high; these are access to education,
tax system, quality of thetransport and
communication infrastructure, protection
of investors, and themost important thing
public trust of politicians.
Ingeneral , theresult s of bet ter
known rat ings show that themain
competitive advantages of Kazakhstan are
themacroeconomic stability indicators.
International experts already said that
Kazakhstan isamong thethree fastest
growing economies inthe world. We are
behind Qatar and China only.
Inthe WEF rankings, Kazakhstan isa
leader inmacro-economic stability inthe
Central Asian region and ispractically ona
par with thedeveloping countries of Europe
and Asia.
Inthe IMF rankings by theEconomic
Performance factor Kazakhstan isahead of
developed countries such as Italy, Denmark
and Spain.
Both therankings indicate positive
results inthe field of taxation, aimed
atreducing thetax burden onthe nonoil sector of theeconomy, reduction of
administrative barriers, and improving
theefficiency of tax administration.
Ingeneral, Kazakhstan continues its
activities to improve competitiveness,
first of all, through social and economic
modernization and implementation of
thegovernment policy onindustrial and
innovative development.
We focus our attention ondevelopment
of business, financial institutions and
innovations, also onraising investments
inhigh-tech sectors of theeconomy.
Among theproblems thegovernment will
have to solve isinsufficient development
of thecompetitive environment, poor
culture of innovat ion management ,
underdevelopment of thestock market and
low accessibility of financial services.
We clearly understand that thebuilding
up of thecompetitive and sustainably
developing economy isa priority task
for thestate institutions and society.
Thesolving of this critical task, no doubt,
will provide long-term economic prosperity
of Kazakhstan.

COMPETITIVENESS

Life buoy of
Macroeconomics
In 2011, Kazakhstan has managed to retain its 72nd position in the
global competitiveness ranking by the World Economic Forum, having
overcome a protracted series of annual falls. With this, the improved
macroeconomic indicators of our country have leveled its deteriorated
position in technological readiness and financial market development.
On this background, the lag in innovations of our republic is becoming
of a more and more alarming scale.

In

2011, the number of the countries


covere d by t he WEF s Gl obal
Competitiveness Report has increased
by three participants, now totaling 142.
Switzerland is at the top of ranking, as
before. Then it follows Singapore, Sweden
and Finland (Table 1). The U.S.A., whose
competitiveness has been falling for the
third consecutive year, slipped to the
5th position. Some institutional factors,
such as low public trust in politicians and
government inefficiency raise the anxiety
of American businesses, in addition to the
deteriorating macroeconomic indicators.

108

l 2011# 6 l

Kazakhstan

Along with that, for the first time since the


beginning of the recession, the U.S. banks
and financial institutions are showing signs
of improvement. Such developed nations as
Germany, the Netherlands, Denmark, Japan,
and the United Kingdom are also among the
top ten, following the United States.
Rankings of one more worlds major
economies the economy of France is 3
ranks down to 18 th, while the economy of
Greece, which become the Achilles heel for
the EU, is 7 places down to 90 th. However,
according to the compilers of the report, the
carrying out of reforms aimed at improving

competitiveness can play a key role in


overcoming such problems in Europe, as the
need for fiscal consolidation and reduction
in the unemployment rate.
In general, the studies show that over
the past few years, on the background of
stagnating competitiveness of the developed
countries, the positions of many developing
countries in the ranking considerably
improved; these countries become new
places of growth in the world economic
activity. China is up one place to 26th, while
South Africa and Brazil moved up to 50th and
53rd position, respectively. Theremaining

two member countries of BRICS India and


Russia showed a negative trend. The first
one moved down from 51st to 56th, while the
second one from 63rd to 66th.
The greater part of the Middle East
countries continue to steadily increase
their competitiveness. Qatar (14 th) and
Saudi Arabia (17th) already rank among the
top twenty countries in the list. They are
followed by Israel (22nd), the UAE (27th),
Kuwait (34th), and Bahrain (37th). Concerning
Latin America, here the leading countries
are Chile (31st), Panama (49 th), Brazil and
Mexico (58th).
Speaking of the greatest ups and downs
in the 2011 rankings, among the obvious
outsiders one can call Egypt (13 places
down to 94th position), Slovenia (12 ranks
down to 57th position), Montenegro (-11 to
60 th), Romania (-10 to 77th), and Tunisia
(-8 to 40 th). On the contrary, Ethiopia
(13 ranks up to 106th), Cambodia (+12 to
97th), and Philippines (+10 to 75th) most
sharply rose in the global competitiveness
ranking.
Regarding the post-Soviet states, the
greater part of them has also managed
to improve their position. They include
Lithuania, which moved from 47th to 44th,
Azerbaijan from 57th to 55th , Latvia
from 70 th to 64 th , Ukraine from 89 th
to 82 nd , Georgia from 93 rd to 88 th ,
Armenia from 98 th to 92nd , Moldova
from 94th to 93rd, and Tajikistan, the latter
made a record leap, 11 places up to 105th
position. Russia, on the contrary, moved
3 places down to 66th. Competitiveness
of Kyrgyzstan has dropped from 121st to
126th. With this, Kazakhstan and Estonia
have managed to retain their positions,
72nd and 33rd, respectively.
Commenting on the rankings results,
the co-author of the report, Professor of

Economics at Columbia University Xavier


Sala-i-Martin told that despite the newly
emerging concerns about the immediate
prospects of the global economy, the
policy-makers should not forget the longrun fundamentals of competitiveness.
Inhis opinion, in order that recovery
would be more sustainable, the emerging
and developing economies should ensure
that their growth is based on increased
productivity. In its turn, the developed
economies, many of which are now
struggling with financial problems and
anemic growth, should focus on measures
to increase competitiveness in order to
create a new cycle of growth and ensure a
firm economic recovery.

Macroeconomic
competitiveness

In

2 011 w e h a v e r e t a in e d o u r
72 n d p o s i t io n in t h e G l o b a l
Competitiveness Index (GCI), under which
the WEF ranks the countries. Moreover, on
the seven point scale we even went up by
0.1 score from 4.1 to 4.2.
As it is seen from Table 2, this was due
to improvement of Kazakhstan's position
in Basic requirements subindex, where
Kazakhstan moved up from 69 th to 62nd.
Here, the continued reinstatement of
position by the Macroeconomic environment
aggregate indicator played a key role,
where Kazakhstan has won back 8 more
places rising to 18 th. Along with that, we
are three places down in the Institutions
indicator, now ranking 94th and one place
down in Infrastructure (82nd). With this,
Kazakhstans ranking in Healthcare and
primary education, which is also part of the
said subindex under review, has remained
unaltered (85th position).

Kazakhstan is five places down in the


Efficiency enhancers subindex, having
dropped from 71st to 76th, while two years
ago it took the 69 th position. Moreover, of
the six aggregate indicators of this subindex, Kazakhstans position on three of
them has remained stable, while on the
other three it went down. Financial market
development (4 places down to 121 st)
and Technological Readiness (-5 to 87th)
demonstrated the worst dynamics.
A continuing catastrophic decline in
competitiveness of our economy in the
Innovation subindex has dropped the
country from 102nd to 114th position. Thus,
over the last two years we have already lost
36 places in this pillar!
Never theless, due to the fact that
Kazakhstan is among the group of states
with the transition of economy from stage
1 to stage 2, the countrys position in
Basic requirements, which has the most
importance for competitiveness, made
possible to completely level the decline not
only in the Innovation and sophistication
factors subindex, but in the Efficiency
enhancers subindex as well.
On the other hand, by macroeconomic
indicators, we are already in the top twenty
in the ranking, and therefore the potential
for further growth here is relatively limited.
Moreover, our current macro-economic
well-being directly depends on a favorable
situation with world commodity prices;
therefore, in the event of deterioration of it,
that well-being can quickly come to naught.

Strengths and weaknesses

In

all fairness it should be noted that


the general dynamics of domestic
competitiveness, compared to the last year,
looks more optimistic. Of 111 indicators,

Kazakhstan 2011# 6

109

COMPETITIVENESS
Table 1. Global Competitiveness Index selective rankings (GCI) 20112012, 2010-2011 and 20092010
Country/Economy

GCI, 2011
2012 rank

GCI, 2010
2011 rank

GCI, 2009
2010 rank

GCI, 2011
2012 score
(1-7)

1
2
3
4
5
8
9
10
12
16
20
24
26
33
34
44
55
59
64
66
71
72
73
82
88
92
93
96
105
126
142

1
3
2
7
4
9
6
12
10
14
16
22
27
33
35
47
57
61
70
63
65
72
75
89
93
98
94
99
116
121
139

1
3
4
6
2
5
8
13
9
14
15
19
29
35
39
53
51
61
68
63
50
67
73
82
90
97
120
122
123
131

5.74
5.63
5.61
5.47
5.43
5.40
5.40
5.39
5.33
5.18
5.11
5.02
4.90
4.62
4.62
4.41
4.31
4.28
4.24
4.21
4.19
4.18
4.16
4.00
3.95
3.89
3.89
3.86
3.77
3.45
2.87

Switzerland
Singapore
Sweden
Finland
United States
Denmark
Japan
United Kingdom
Canada
Norway
Australia
Korea, Republic
China
Estonia
Kuwait
Lithuania
Azerbaijan
Turkey
Latvia
Russian Federation
Jordan
Kazakhstan
Morocco
Ukraine
Georgia
Armenia
Moldova
Mongolia
Tajikistan
Kyrgyz Republic
Chad

Subindexes GCI in 20112012


Basic
Efficiency
Innovations
requirements
enhancers
factors
3
2
1
1
1
11
4
7
2
5
10
4
36
3
6
8
9
8
28
11
3
21
5
12
13
6
15
9
14
19
14
12
26
19
22
18
30
26
31
27
36
37
34
67
66
49
48
50
59
77
67
64
52
58
66
54
64
63
55
97
61
78
70
62
76
114
54
83
79
98
74
93
86
89
117
94
91
110
102
103
127
101
105
112
106
118
100
131
115
138
142
139
130

(Top 5 leading countries and post-soviet countries are highlighted in different colours).
Source: Comparative table was composed on the basis of the last WEF Report on Global Competitiveness Index 20092010, 20102011, 20112012 and Subindexes data.

Table 3. Kazakhstans competitive advantages in GCI


Advantages
1st pillar: Institutions
1.04 Public trust of politicians
1.08 Wastefulness of government
spending
1.21 Strength of investor protection*
2nd pillar: Infrastructure
2.03 Quality of railroad infrastructure
2.08 Fixed telephone lines/100 pop.*
2.09 Mobile telephone
subscriptions/100 pop.*

Rank/142
46

Advantages
6th pillar: Goods market efficiency
6.04 Extent and effect of taxation

50

6.05 Total tax rate, % profits*

31

36

6.06 No. procedures to start a business*


6.08 Agricultural policy costs
6.16 Buyer sophistication
7th pillar: Labor market efficiency

34
49
40

33
46
38

3rd pillar: Macroeconomic environment

41

7.02 Flexibility of wage determination

31

7.03 Rigidity of employment index,


0100 (worst)*

39

3.01 Government budget


balance, % GDP*
3.02 Gross national savings, % GDP*
3.05 General government debt, % GDP*
4th pillar: Health and primary
education

16

7.04 Hiring and firing practices

34

12
12

16
18

4.01 Business impact of malaria

4.02 Malaria cases/100,000 pop.*


4.06 HIV prevalence, % adult pop.*
5th pillar: Higher education and
training
5.01 Secondary education enrollment*

1
21

7.05 Redundancy costs, weeks of salary*


7.06 Pay and productivity
7.09 Women in labor force, ratio
to men*
8th pillar: Financial market
development
9th pillar: Technological readiness
10 th pillar: Market size
10.02 Foreign market size index,
17 (best)*
11th pillar: Business sophistication
12th pillar: Innovation

*hard data

110

Rank/142

l 2011# 6 l

Kazakhstan

18

19
None
None
47
None
None

forming the final GCI index, Kazakhstans


position has improved on 40 of them and
worsened on 62 others and remained
unchanged on 7 indicators. One more
indicator is new, and, therefore, it has no
basis for comparison. Besides, this year no
data on the average margin between the
interest rates on deposits and loans has
been provided.
The number of those areas which
Kazakhstan could consider its advantages
has also increased (Table 3). Today we are
among the 50 most competitive economies
by 25 indicators, while last year these were
by only 17 such indicators. In particular,
this year there were added the Wastefulness
of government spending (+15 to 50 th
position), Fixed telephone lines (+8 to 46th)
and Mobile telephone subscriptions (+28
to 38 th), as well as Secondary education
enrollment rate (+33 to 18 th). True, if to
compare the latter figure to our position

by the Tertiary education enrollment rate


(-8 to 59 th), it is clear that the higher
education in Kazakhstan is not becoming
more affordable.
The greatest number of improvements can
be noted in the indicators, characterizing
the competitiveness of our country in terms
of the Goods market efficiency. Thus, in
comparison with the other countries who
are forced to raise the budget deficit or
impose new taxes, Kazakhstan is looking
more attractive by the Total tax rate (+23
to 31st) and its Extent and effect of taxation
(+33 to 41 st). Joint work of business
associations and the state in facilitating
the conditions of running business also
brought its fruit: The Number of Procedures
required to start a business, we climbed
up to the 33rd position against 56th in the
last year. However, the Time required to
start a business in Kazakhstan is still much
more than in many other countries (-3 to
74 th position). Among our competitive
advantages are now the relatively low
agricultural policy costs (+13 to 49th).
The aggregate indicator Labor market
ef f iciency (21 st) continues to show a
good base for raising competitiveness.
Today, 6 of 9 indicators, comprising this
aggregate indicator, can be referred to our
advantages. Here the picture is darkened
by still low confidence in Reliance on
Professional management (116th), and Brain
drain tendency (-8 to 88th).
However, Kazakhstan remains having the
most powerful positions in Government
budget balance (+17 to 16 t h), Gross
national savings (+19 to 12 th), and General
government debt (12 th). Along with that,
the fall in 2011 of the latter indicator by 5
places evidences that the need for direct
government involvement in supporting
the stability of the economy continues
to grow.
Concerning our weaknesses, although
their number has slightly decreased,
in general, the list of the indicators by
which we are below the 100 th position has
increased during one year alone from 35 to
44 items (for comparison, in 2009 this list
comprised only 20 items).
The most critical indicators, in our view,
are presented in Table 4. The weakest
indicator of Kazakhstans competitiveness
is the condition of the domestic banking
system (Soundness of banks) 131 st
position of 142 possible ones. Moreover,
our domestic banks, burdened with non-

Table 2. The Global Competitiveness Index 2011-2012. Kazakhstan


GCI

Rank (out of 142)

Score (17)

20112012

72

4.2

Basic requirements
1. Institutions
2. Infrastructure
3. Macroeconomic environment
4. Health and primary education

62
94
82
18
85

4.6
3.5
3.7
5.9
5.5

Efficiency enhancers
5. Higher education and training
6. Goods market efficiency
7. Labor market efficiency
8. Financial market development
9. Technological readiness
10. Market size

76
65
87
21
121
87
55

4.0
4.2
4.1
4.9
3.3
3.4
4.2

Innovation and sophistication factors


11. Business sophistication
12. Innovation

114
109
116

3.0
3.4
2.7

Table 4. Kazakhstans competitive disadvantages in GCI


Disadvantages

Rank /142 Disadvantages

1st pillar: Institutions

Rank /142

6.11 Prevalence of foreign ownership

111

1.01 Property rights

107

6.13 Burden of customs procedures

102

1.06 Judicial independence

111

6.15 Degree of customer orientation

117

1.16 Reliability of police services

111

7th pillar: Labor market efficiency

1.19 Efficacy of corporate boards

113

7.07 Reliance on professional


management

2nd pillar: Infrastructure

116

8th pillar: Financial market


development

2.02 Quality of roads

125

8.03 Financing through local


equity market

107

2.04 Quality of port infrastructure

104

8.04 Ease of access to loans

120

8.06 Soundness of banks

131

8.07 Regulation of securities


exchanges

112

3rd pillar: Macroeconomic


environment
3.03 Inflation, annual % change*

117

4th pillar: Health and primary


education

9th pillar: Technological readiness

4.04 Tuberculosis
incidence/100,000 pop.*

102

9.01 Availability of latest


technologies

103

4.07 Infant mortality,


deaths/1,000 live births*

91

9.02 Firm-level technology


absorption

113

4.08 Life expectancy, years*

101

9.03 FDI and technology transfer

100

4.10 Primary education


enrollment, net %*

90

11th pillar: Business sophistication

5th pillar: Higher education and


training

11.01 Local supplier quantity

124

5.03 Quality of the


educational system

112

11.02 Local supplier quality

105

5.05 Quality of management


schools

109

11.04 Nature of competitive


advantage

129

6th pillar: Goods market efficiency

12th pillar: Innovation

6.01 Intensity of local competition

117

12.01 Capacity for innovation

101

6.03 Effectiveness
of anti-monopoly policy.

121

12.02 Quality of scientific research


institutions

121

6.09 Prevalence of trade barriers

112

12.04 University-industry
collaboration in R&D

119

6.10 Trade tariffs, % duty*

102

12.06 Availability of scientists and


engineers

106

*hard data

Kazakhstan 2011# 6

111

COMPETITIVENESS
performing loans, cannot provide adequate
access to the borrowings for businesses
(Ease of access to loans) (120 th). So, on this
background, Kazakhstan finally secured
a place for its economy as commoditybased one (-17 to 129 th). The progress of
development of the processing industries
vividly demonstrate such indicators, as the
number of Local supplier quantity (-11 to
124th) and Degree of Customer Orientation
(-8 to 117th). As a result, we observed a
high level of dependence on imports (116th
position).
Speaking of the indicators that showed
the most decline, here we should mention
Quality of the educational system (-19
to 112 th position), Favoritism in decisions
of Government officials (-19 to 100 th
position), Intellectual property protection
(-18 to 116th), as well as the ability of
companies adopt new technologies (Firmlevel technology absorption) (-18 to 113th).

112

l 2011# 6 l

Kazakhstan

Kazakhstan Vs Russia

In

conclusion, I would like to draw


the readers attention to two risk
factors, which, in our opinion, are very
closely connected with each other in the
new conditions of operation of the domestic
economy.
First of all, accession to the Customs Union
delivered a crushing blow to Kazakhstans
competitiveness ranking by weight average
customs tariff indicator (Trade tariffs, %
duty). During one year alone, it has turned
out from our advantage (50 th in 2010) to
the apparent drawback (102nd position), and
here we, quite naturally, became comparable
with Russia (109th position).
On the one hand, in exchange we got
access to a huge Russian market with its
9 th position against our 56th. On the other
hand, this does not save the domestic
businesses from the need to compete

strongly in this market with the Russian


companies themselves. It is clear that
introduction of new technologies and high
level of innovation of products and services
offered by our suppliers will play a key role
in this struggle. Here we do not look so
comparable. Judge for yourself: By Capacity
of innovations Kazakhstan ranks 101 st
(26 positions down) against Russias 38 th
position, by Quality of scientific research
Institutions 121 st rank (9 places down)
against Russias 60 th; by Company spending
on R&D 107th (23 places down) vs. Russias
61st , by University-industry collaboration in
R&D 119 th (8 places down) against 75th ,
by Availability of scientists and engineers
106th (15 places down) vs. 72nd. It seems that
if this gap continues to grow, the real role of
Kazakhstan in the single economic space will
be fixed quite clearly and for a long time.
Editorial

Competitiveness

competitiveness ranking from IMD:


Interrupted Climb of kazakhstan
In2011, for thefirst time inits four years participation inthe rankings
from IMD for national competitiveness, Kazakhstan showed a negative trend.
We fell back from last year's 33rd position to the2009 years level 36th.
Thelargest negative contribution to this decline was made by reduced
economic performance and infrastructure.
Competitiveness 2.0

In

2011, for the first time since 1989,


the two countries at once, Hong Kong
and the U.S.A., were ranked by international
Institute for Management Development
(Sw it zer l and) as the wor ld s mos t
competitive economies, which surpassed
last years winner Singapore (see Table 1.).
So, the U.S.A. which lost the palm in 2010
has won back its positions in the current
year that mainly occurred due to relatively
strong recovery of the financial markets.
Sweden was ranked 4 th , demonstrating
that the economic model of north Europe
can also be very competitive. Germanys
position in the rankings list owing to revival
of exports and a more flexible labor market
looks very good, 6 points up to 10 th. Also

114

l 2011# 6 l

Kazakhstan

Qatar (8 th), Korea (22nd) and Turkey (39 th)


consistently continue improving their
positions. Speaking of the situation with
the BRIC countries, Russia in the 2011
global rankings has been two positions up
from 59th position to 49th. True, it still lags
behind the other BRIC member countries
China (29th), India (32nd), and Brazil (44th).
Commenting on the results of the study,
Director of the World Competitiveness
Center, Professor at IMD Stephen Garelli,
noted that all those countries which have
demonstrated good results in the 2011
rankings can be divided into two groups.
The first involves those countries, such
as China, Switzerland (5th), and Poland
(34th), which demonstrated the ability to
remain competitive even in the period
of global recession. The second group

involves those who even though lost


their positions during the recession, are
now rapidly recovering their economies;
these are Singapore, Taiwan (6 th), and
Sweden.
According to Mr. Gar relli, we are
enter ing a new era , the so-called
compet it iveness 2.0. The world of
competitive economies is becoming more
and more national, when the countries
are focusing to a greater extent on the
capabilities inside the country. This is
facilitated by a return to the ideas of
industrialization, increased exports, and a
more critical view of the delocalization of
the economies. The states are beginning
to cultivate national champions, who will
play an increasingly important role in the
future. Thus, the global competitiveness

Kazakhstan Competitiveness Landscape


Economic Performance

Government Efficiency
10

14

Business Efficiency

14

15
24

26

25
31

33
39

Infrastructure

36

39

41

42

41
46

47

51

Education

55

Health and
Environment

Scientific
Infrastructure

Tech. Infrastructure

Basic Infrastructure

Attitudes and Values

Management
Practices

Finance

Labor Market

Productivity &
Efficiency

Social Framework

Business Legislation

Institutional
Framework

Fiscal Policy

Public Finance

Prices

Employment

International
Investment

International Trade

Domestic Economy

55

Table 1. The World Competitiveness 2011 Scoreboard


Country

2011
%

2011
rank

2010
rank

Country

2011
%

2011
rank

2010
rank

Hong Kong

100.000

Iceland

70.821

31

30

USA

100.000

India

70.649

32

31

Singapore

98.557

Estonia

68.264

33

34

Sweden

94.063

Poland

66.860

34

32

Switzerland

92.588

Spain

66.675

35

36

Taiwan

92.011

Kazakhstan

66.152

36

33

Canada

90.782

Indonesia

64.610

37

35

Qatar

90.219

15

Mexico

64.025

38

47

Australia

89.259

Turkey

63.787

39

48

Germany

87.824

10

16

Portugal

63.785

40

37

Luxembourg

86.475

11

11

Philippines

63.291

41

39

Denmark

86.418

12

13

Italy

62.748

42

40

Norway

86.313

13

Peru

62.651

43

41

Netherlands

85.707

14

12

Brazil

61.043

44

38

Finland

84.380

15

19

Lithuania

60.211

45

43

Malaysia

84.120

16

10

Colombia

59.744

46

45

Israel

81.629

17

17

Hungary

58.918

47

42

Austria

81.619

18

14

Slovak Republic

58.593

48

49

China mainland

81.100

19

18

Russia

58.376

49

51

United Kingdom

80.278

20

22

Romania

57.497

50

54

New Zealand

79.799

21

20

Slovenia

56.880

51

52

Korea

78.499

22

23

South Africa

56.856

52

44

Belgium

77.599

23

25

Jordan

55.184

53

50

Ireland

77.101

24

21

Argentina

54.671

54

55

Chile

76.827

25

28

Bulgaria

53.562

55

53

Japan

75.214

26

27

Greece

51.882

56

46

Thailand

74.886

27

26

Ukraine

51.454

57

57

UAE

73.188

28

Croatia

49.402

58

56

Venezuela

35.249

59

58

France

71.394

29

24

Czech Republic

70.990

30

29

Kazakhstan 2011# 6

115

Competitiveness
of 2.0 makes the governments go back to
the question of national priorities.

Kazakhstans positions

Economic Performance

2011

44

43

35

Domestic Economy

38

39

International Trade

55

39

International Investment

27

26

Employment

23

14

Prices

49

47

Strengths
1.4.08

Youth unemployment

1.2.24

Exchange rates (S)

1.3.06

Direct investment flows inward (%)

1.3.02

Direct investment flows abroad (%)

1.3.13

Relocation threats of production (S)

Weaknesses
1.2.12

Exports of commercial services ($bn)

56

1.5.01

Consumer price inflation

54

1.2.23

Tourism receipts (%)

52

1.2.13

Exports of commercial services (%)

51

1.3.03

Direct investment stocks abroad ($bn)

49

Source: IMD World Competitiveness Yearbook 2011

Government Efficiency

2009

2010

2011

21

20

21

Public Finance

16

14

Fiscal Policy

12

10

Institutional Framework

39

41

Business Legislation

26

33

Social Framework

24

24

Sub-Factor Rankings:

Strengths
2.1.04

Total general government debt (%)

Government vs Business

2.5.05

Social cohesion (S)

2.2.12

Real personal taxes (S)

2.2.01

Collected total tax revenues (%)

2.2.11

Employers social security contribution rate

his year, apart from the overall rating,


IMD has also published results of its
first study, devoted to the Government
Ef f iciency Gap, aimed to determine
whether the countries always have the
governments they deserve.
With the coming of the recession,
the government spending to suppor t
the economies reached new heights,
making 47% of the GDP, on average, for
the developed countries, while in 12
European countries they already exceed

116

2010

Sub-Factor Rankings:

In

the current year our country has


been down to the 36 th position,
rank ing second among the f ive exSov iet states, included in the IMDs
r ank ings. Among them are Es tonia
(33 r d ), Lithuania (45 t h), Russia , and
Ukraine (57 th). The closest neighbors
to Kazakhstan in the rankings list are
Spain (35th) and Indonesia (37 th). Even
if we have lost point s in one pillar
by technical reasons due to the fact
that in the top of the competitiveness
scale a new par t icipant appeared
the United Arab Emirates (28 th), in the
other two pillars we lost our points due
to the pressure of objective factors.
In particular, Kazakhstan is down one
point to 21 st in government efficiency,
down seven points to 36 th in business
efficiency and also down seven points
to 46 th in infrastructure. Thus, among
t h e f o ur ke y f ac t or s , K a z ak hs t an
showed positive dynamics only in one
of them economic performance. Here,
Kazakhstan is 12 points up to 35th.
Overall, Kazakhstans competitiveness
today is ranked by IMD as 66.152% of the
Hong Kongs and U.S.A.s ones. In the list
of countries with the population of less
than 20 million people we are down from
19 th to 21st , and in our geographical block
of countries (Europe Middle East
Africa) from 19 th to 22nd.
Kazakhstans indicators on 20 sub
factors are presented in Figure 1, while
the list of strengths and weaknesses of
Kazakhstans competitiveness can be
found in the relevant graphic blocks.

2009

l 2011# 6 l

Kazakhstan

Weaknesses
2.3.03

Interest rate spread

54

2.3.07

Exchange rate stability

52

2.4.06

Capital markets (S)

52

2.3.04

Country credit rating

51

2.4.19

Immigration laws (S)

51

Source: IMD World Competitiveness Yearbook 2011

Business Efficiency

2009

2010

2011

34

29

36

Productivity & Efficiency

39

46

Labor Market

15

Finance

42

51

Management Practices

23

31

Attitudes and Values

18

25

Sub-Factor Rankings:

Strengths
3.2.15

Female labor force (%)

3.2.01

Compensation levels ($)

12

3.5.05

Need for economic and social reforms (S)

15

3.5.02

Image abroad (S)

15

3.2.21

Foreign high-skilled people (S)

17

Weaknesses
3.3.04

Investment risk

55

3.2.20

Brain drain (S)

52

3.3.01

Banking sector assets (%)

51

3.1.01

Overall productivity (PPP)

50

3.1.04

Labor productivity (PPP)

50

Source: IMD World Competitiveness Yearbook 2011

Infrastructure

2009

2010

2011

44

39

46

Sub-Factor Rankings:
Basic Infrastructure

33

36

Tech. Infrastructure

40

42

Scientific Infrastructure

44

55

Health and Environment

52

55

Education

40

41

Strengths
4.1.24

Electricity costs for industrial clients

4.4.23

Sustainable development (S)

4.2.03

Fixed telephone tariffs

4.2.11

Fixed broadband tariffs

4.2.22

High-tech exports (%)

Weaknesses
4.4.12

Energy intensity

58

4.4.05

Life expectancy at birth

57

4.4.11

Health problems (S)

57

4.2.10

Internet users

56

4.2.09

Computers per capita

56

the 50% threshold. In this regard, in the


new world of state capitalism, when
the governments took many economic
processes under tough control , the
ef fec t iveness of the author it ies is
becoming a key factor of competitiveness,
w hil e t he t im e l ag b e t w e en t he
governmental reforms and the needs of
the economies continues to grow.
As part of its studies, IMD compared
posit ions taken by each of the
countr ies by using two factors the
government ef f icienc y and business
ef f iciency. It was found that in most
developed countr ies the author it ies
s e em much l e s s comp e t i t iv e t han
b u s in e s s . F o r e x a mp l e , in Ja p a n ,
t h e gap b e t w e en t h e gov er nm en t
ef f iciency and business ef f iciency is
23 points 50 th against 27 th . Belgium
looks a little bit better than that (a 16
points gap), Ireland (a 12 points gap),
USA (8), and Germany (8). Regarding
the developing countries, many of them
have more ef fective governments than
business. This applies to Russia, South
Afr ica, Chile, Estonia, and Indonesia.
Hong Kong, Singapore and Australia
demons t r a t e an e xce l l en t b al ance
between these two factors.
Speaking of the results of our country,
the Kazakhstans government is ranked
21 st , while private business is only 36th.
Of course, such high assessment of our
executive branch ef f iciency is good
news; however, the current gap of 15
point s with the business ef f iciency
can hardly be called an achievement.
Especially if one takes into consideration
that experts from IMD understand under
competitiveness of a country, first of
all, the ability of the state to create
and maintain an environment in which
competitive business develops.
For more detailed information,
please refer to www.imd.ch/wcc

The editorship of the Kazakhstan


internat ional business magazine
expresses special thanks to IMD World
Competitiveness Center Deputy Director
Suzanne Rosselet-McCauley for providing
the combined data on the national
competitiveness of Kazakhstan.

Source: IMD World Competitiveness Yearbook 2011

Kazakhstan 2011# 6

117

global energy partnership


connecting east and west
The Sixth Eurasian Energy Forum, set up under the auspices of KAZENERGY
Association, was held in early October in Astana. Launched in 2006 as one
of the discussion platforms of the industry, the forum has already acquired
a global status by its importance and range of discussed issues. Taking into
account that the year 2011 is a jubilee year for Kazakhstan, special focus at
this forum was made on recognition of the progress achieved over the past
two decades by the domestic oil and gas sector.
118

l 2011# 6 l

Kazakhstan

pening theforum, Prime


Minister of Kazakhstan
Karim Massimov noted that
t heenerg y indu s t r y ha s
always played a key role inthe
development of thecountry.
This sector isexactly theone
w h e r e t h ef ir s t f o r e ig n
comp an ie s c am e t o an d
today still remain thelargest
investors inour countr y.
Although Kazakhstan and its
foreign partners have already
something to be proud of,
a lot of work isstill ahead.
Inthis regard, Mr. Massimov
said that theglobal energy
sector isstill inlimbo. Inearly
2011, following an increase
indemand, theenergy prices
significantly increased; there
w er e s om e in t er r up t ions
insupplies due to political
conf lic t s inNor th Af r ica.
Today themarket isunder
pressure from thedeteriorating
situation within theglobal
economy.
In recent months, theglobal
economy ha s again gone
through a dif f icult per iod.
Aslowdown ineconomic growth,
deterioration of thefinancial
situation inthe U.S.A., and an
escalating debt crisis inEurope
have destroyed theconfidence
and rev ived ther isk of a
recession Obstacles have
ar isen inthe developing
economies as well, which played
therole of thedriver inthe
global economic recover y.
External debts of thecountries
are increasing, equity markets
have collapsed, capital inflows
slowed down Put simply,
thepath to sustainable global
economic recover y will be
longer and more bumpy than
expected.
For theenergy industry, whose
developmentisimpossible
without significant investment
inf lows, this situat ion
isespec ially painf ul . So,
theGovernment of Kazakhstan
recognizes theneed to be
proactive inattracting and

retaining investments, and


therefore aims atimproving
thebusiness climate so as
to help theindustr y grow
and challenge ther isk s.
Among themeasures taken by
Kazakhstan, thePrime Minister
acknowledged funding inthe
development of human capital,
infrastructure and technologies,
as well as regulatory reforms to
remove administrative barriers
and reduce bureaucracy.
Thehead of thegovernment
also assured that, as a reliable
energy par tner, connecting
East and West, Kazakhstan
w il l con t inue pr omo t ing
thediversification of energy
transportation routes and endmarkets. Inthis concern, he
highlighted thebeginning of
thefirst stage of expansion
of theCPC pipeline, which
will increase its capacity by
more than 40 million tons,
and thestart of construction
of theBeineu Bozoy
Shymkent gas pipeline, which
eventually will be connected
to theChina Central Asia gas
pipeline.
Summing up his speech,
Mr. Massimov noted that our
country realizes thesignificant
role theenergy sector plays
inimp r ov in g t h el i v in g
s t andards and enhanc ing
economic development.
C ur r e n t ly, t h ein du s t r y
ha s f aced unprecedented
challenges. But I am confident
that working inthe Government,
Business and Society team
we will be able to withstand
theenerg y challenges of
the21st century.

Oil alignment

inister of Oil and Gas


Sauat Mynbayev outlined a
complete picture of thecurrent
situat ion inKazakhst ans
oil and gas industry and its
development prospects. He
stated that Kazakhstan by
proved oil reser ves, as of

June 2011, ranks 9 th inthe


world. Inthis regard, taking
into account thegeological
reserves estimates and largescale exploration programs,
there isevery reason to expect
thereserves will increase.
Concerning production levels,
Kazakhstan ranks just 16 th
inthe world. During theyears
of independence, oil production
grew from 20 million tons
in1994 to 80 million tons
in2010. By 2020, thelevel
of production isexpected to
exceed 132 million tons, making
therepublic be among thetop
ten largest oil producing states.
In addition, Kazakhstan isone
of just a few hydrocarbons
producing countr ies which
have not reached their peak of
production.
Speaking of theparticular
projects, due to which itis
planned to make a breakthrough
to be among thetop ten, Mr.
Mynbayev, called theTengiz
oilfield, above all. Theso-called
project of future development
iscurrently under development,
w ith a possible increa se
inannual output from current
26 million tons to 36 million
tonnes. I suppose this project
inthe near future will be
submitted for consideration to
theauthorized body.
As for themain of fshore
hopes of Kazakhstan,
theMinister confirmed that
thecommencement of com
mercial production atKashagan
isstill scheduled for December
2012 June 2013. Thefirst
phase of theproject involves
theoutput of 370 thousand
barrels of oil per day with
a possible increase to 450
thousand b/d. However, he did
not hide thefact that itfeels
s o m e un c e r t a in t y a b o u t
thesecond phase of Kashagan.
I think with close interaction
b et we en t hecont r ac t ing
companies and author ized
body, and with compliance of
theproposed solutions with

theworlds best practices and


respect for mutual interests,
theproject can become much
more successful.
Itis noteworthy that inhis
speech Mr. Mynbayev did not
mention thethird largest oil
and gas project inKazakhstan
K ar achaganak. However,
follow ing thelack of any
certainty about theprogress
of ne got iat ions b e t we en
thegovernment and partners
onthe consortium, itwas not
a surprise. Later on, during
a press conference for mass
media, Executive Vice President
and Managing Director for
Europe and Central Asia of BG
Group, Chris Finlayson, as well
as Chairman of Samruk-Kazyna
and KAZENERGY Association
Timur Kulibayev made some
cl ar it y t o t hes i t ua t ion
onKarachaganak.
Thef irst one stated that
t hep ar t ner s hav e p l ans
before theend of this year
to close thequestion they
ar e c ur r e n t ly d is c u s s in g
with thegovernment. Also,
Mr. Finlayson added that for
BG Group Kazakhstan isan
extremely important and longterm portion of theportfolio.
This isan asset , inwhich
thecompany has invested a lot
of efforts, an asset with great
potential. Therefore, BG intends
to cooperate atthe highest
level for thenext 5060 years.
Inhis turn, Mr. Kulibayev
explained that thenegotiations
have two phases: thef irst
one involves thesettlement
of tax issues atdispute, and
thesecond one commercial
negotiations for thepurchase.
Returning to thestatement
of Mr. Mynbayev, itshould
be noted that announcing
future product ion grow th,
K azakhs t an l argely relies
onthe successful development
of of fshore projects inthe
Caspian Sea. According to him,
they already have positive
results. Inparticular, following

Kazakhstan 2011# 6

119

forum

theresults of drilling, they


got f irst conf ir mat ion of
theoccurrence of hydrocarbons
inthe Rakushechnoye Sea
structure, which theNational
Company KazMunayGas
isdeveloping inpartnership
w i t h C ono coPh il l ip s an d
Mubadala. Theoil and gas
bearing capacity of theKhazar
and Auezov geological
structures atthe Zhemchuzina
site (KMG, Shell and Oman Oil)
was proved. Work continues
onother sites as well.

120

l 2011# 6 l

Kazakhstan

Thetotal number of
exploration contracts currently
inthe Ministry of Oil and Gass
registr y is61. Of course,
there are some geological
risks. Dry wells of theTubK ar agan and Kur manga z y
sites are theev idence to
this. Nevertheless, you see,
we certainly have grounds to
expect a substantial increase
inthe reser ves and, as a
result, increased production
of hydrocarbons, theOil and
Gas Minister emphasized.

Speaking of thesystem of
transportation of extracted
hydrocarbons, he noted
that atthe current moment
al l r ou t e s ar e cov er e d ,
inpr inciple. Theexisting
expor t pipeline system
consist s of theAt yrau
Samara oil pipeline which goes
as transit through Russia to
themarkets of Eastern Europe,
theCPC pipeline with access
to theBlack Sea ports, and
theAtyrau Kenkiyak and
Kumkol Atasu Alashankou
oil pipelines , direc ted to
China. There isalso a route
through thepor t of Aktau
to Makhachkala and Baku
with access to theBlack Sea,
while theBaku Tbilisi
Ceyhan pipeline has access
to theMediterranean Sea.
There isa possibility to carry
Kazakhstans oil via Baku to
Iranian Nekka, from where
through swap operations theoil
can be carried to thePersian
Gulf. With thecommissioning of
thesecond phase of Kashagan
itis planned to launch a
new logistics route, known
as theKazakhstan-Caspian
Transportation System.
Concerning theprospects of
further expansion of export
capacity, here thefocus will be

onthe CPC and Kazakhstan


China pipelines. TheCPC
expansion project isalready
commenced, and itis expected
that by thefirst quarter of
2015 itwill become possible
to annually pump 52 million
tons of Kazakhstans oil via it.
Regarding theKazakhstan
China pipeline, theincrease
inits capacity to 20 million tons
isonly a matter of construction
of additional pumping stations,
while theproject itself will be
implemented with thegrowth of
theresource base. Thus, taking
into account thepotential
use of theKKTS, we believe
theissue of expor t routes
isquite clear for us. Of course,
there are questions of strategic
and technical nature oneach
of theprojects which we and
our partners are ready to solve
ontime, theMinister said.
Al so, he told about
thespecifics of operation of
theoil and gas industry of
Kazakhstan inthe condition of
theCustoms Union and Common
Economic Space. Firstly, Russia,
Belarus and Kazakhstan agreed
that after 2014 Kazakhstan will
provide thedomestic market
with its domestic oil only. This
isdue to retaining of various tax
regimes inthe three countries,
inparticular, that thepayment
and theexport duties rates will
not be unified. Secondly, we will
be trading oil freely, without any
duties. Thirdly, a transition to
common technical regulations
and standards inthis area
isprovided for. Fourth, we
agreed onthe national tariffs
onoil transportation, including
o n e x p o r t s . A c c o r d i n g
to theMinister, thelatter
i se s p e c ia l l y imp o r t a n t ,
because Kazakhstan isan oil
exporting country, depending
ontransit. Therefore, this isa
stabilizing factor for supplies
of Kazakhstans hydrocarbons
to e x ter nal mar ket s and ,
especially, outside theCustoms
Union area.

Wont be any gas?

eanwhile, international
forums, such as KAZENERGY,
are not just a good occasion to
tell about our own achievements,
but, above all, an opportunity
to learn what foreign partners
are expecting from us. Here,
themat ter concerns, f irst
of all , theEuropean Union,
which prov ides more than
half of thetotal foreign direct
investments and isthe largest,
united investor inKazakhstan.
Two-thirds of these investments
were made inthe energy and
mining sectors of thedomestic
economy.
T h e E u r o p e a n U n i o n s
vision of prospects of further
cooperation was presented
by European Commissioner
for Energy Gnther Oettinger.
According to him, theEU isthe
largest unified regional energy
market inthe world, which with
time will cover thenetwork of
energy supplies from Eurasia
inthe east, theArctic inthe
north, Sahara inthe south and
theAtlantic Ocean inthe west.
All of this creates enormous
business oppor tunities and
a great common interes t
to suppor t and cultivate a
favorable investment climate,
as well as to ensure a stable
and predictable energy supply
base. Today, theEU imports
more than 80% of oil and 60%
of gas. Moreover, production of
their own fossil fuels inEurope
isreducing. However, despite
thecurrent economic recession,
and regardless of to what extent
theEU countries will turn out
to be successful inpromoting
therenewable energy
development, their dependence
onimports will be increasing
inthe coming decades.
Mr. Oettinger noted that
energy cooperation of theEU
with Kazakhstan isbased ona
solid foundation. However,
inhis opinion, much more
can be done inthis direction.

Inpar ticular, he suggested


that our countr y will join
theTrans-Caspian gas pipeline
project , which w ill ensure
thetranspor tat ion of gas
from Central Asia to Europe.
Afew weeks ago, all members
of theEuropean Union gave
thegreen light to theEuropean
Commission to create necessary
conditions for theagreement
between theEuropean Union,
Azerbaijan and Turkmenistan
onconstruction of theTransCaspian gas pipeline. For theEU,
such a pipeline would be a very
important contribution inthe
development of theSouthern
Gas Cor r idor. Itis not a
commonly known fact that
this isthe f irst case when
theEU proposed to conclude an
international treaty to support
theinfrastructure project.
This shows how this project
isimportant for theEU and all its
27 member states. We are also
assured that theTrans-Caspian
pipeline will add to stability
and prosperity inthe region.
We welcomed theparticipation
of Kazakhstan inthe Budapest
Summit onNabucco and inthe
Prague summit onthe Southern
Corr idor, and therefore we
welcome therelevant parti

cipation of Kazakhstan inthe


future.
Thefocus of Mr. Oettinger
oncooperation inthe gas
sphere isquite understandable.
According to theforecasts
presented by theMinister of
Economy, Energy and Tourism
of Bulgaria Traycho Traykov,
in20252030 gas consumption
int h e EU , e v en t ak ing
into account theimpact of
theeconomic recession, will be
600 billion m3. Atthe moment,
theEU heavily depends ongas

supplies from Russia; thelatter


accounts for 23% of theworlds
natural gas proven reserves.
Meanwhile, about 47% of
theworlds gas reserves are
located inthe Caspian region,
Central Asia, and Middle East.
And yet, specifically with
regard to our country, theEU
can rather expect political
support only. Although, onthe
one hand, theproven gas
reser ves of Kazakhstan are
3.3 trillion m 3 , while inthe
next ten years it s output

Kazakhstan 2011# 6

121

forum
isexpected to grow f rom
thecurrent 40.5 billion m 3
to 92.2 billion m 3. However,
onthe other hand, production
of marketable gas, according
t o t hepr e dic t ions f rom
theOil and Gas Ministry, will
increase during this period
just slightly from 26 billion m3
to 28.6 billion m3.
Sauat Mynbayev explained
that thereason for this isthat
our gas ismostly associated
petroleum gas. This means that
for thecomplete extraction
of liquids, thegreater part of
this gas isinjected back into
thereservoir. We should not
forget that during theyears
of Kazakhstans independence,
theinternal gas consumption
has doubled. Moreover, this
figure could rise inthe near
future. Onthis background,
theassurances of Mr. Mynbayev
that incase of changes inthe
commercial terms of selling
of gas, or theintroduction of
technological innovat ions,
allowing giving up thegas
injection method, theoutput
of gas will easily increase,
hardly seem to be consolation
f or t heWe s t , e sp e c ial ly
consider ing that last
year theTur kmenis t an
Uzbekistan Kazakhstan
C h in a g a s p ip e l in e w a s
commissioned into operation.

Problems and
prospects

In

our opinion, speeches


of other par ticipant s
of theforum did not seem of
less importance. Inparticular,
thegood news was
thestatement by theManaging
Director of theEurasia Strategic
Business Unit of Chevron Scott
Davis, who announced that,
according to IEA, theupward
trend inthe worlds population
and rising living standards will
spur global demand for energy
resources. By 2035, itwill grow
by almost 40%. Moreover,

122

l 2011# 6 l

Kazakhstan

according to themost optimistic


predictions of renewable energy
development , 75% of this
demand will still be met due to
oil, natural gas and coal.
Inhis turn, President of
theWorld Petroleum Council
Randall Gossen emphasized
theincreasing role of
Kazakhst an among theoil
supplying countr ies: Given
thegeopolitical shift ingas
production, themain dr ive
forward for hydrocarbons islarge,
huge investments inenergy
infrastructure, which should

oil blocks for development,


which are very interesting, but
they need additional funding.
Large transnational players can
borrow atthe international rates,
but thecomplexity we have
faced ishow to make thedebt
financing and equity investments
accessible for themedium and
small Kazakhstani projects.
V y ache sl av Mishchenko,
Director for Business
Development for theC I S
countr ies of Argus Media
agency, recalled that theglobal
exploration and production

As was aptly noted by Larry King,


while speaking as a moderator
of a few sessions of theForum,
themain thing for Kazakhstan
isto be self-sufficient and do not
let anyone control this process.
meet this growing demand.
According to theIEA estimates,
theinvestments to be made
inthe global system of energy
during theperiod of up to 2035
have to be about $33 trillion.
Inv iew of t heabove ,
according to S enior Vice
P r e s id en t of E x xonMob il
Mark Albers, Kazakhstan can
and should make maximum
use of theglobal trends
inorder to pave theway for
economic growth, job creation,
technological advance, and
increase inexport potential.
Michael Wil son, Managing
Direc tor of theconsult ing
company Michael Wil son &
Par tners, drew attention to
another aspec t rel ated to
thetopic of financing of oil
and gas projects. I think one
of thereasons inthe condition
of debt crisis, given theglobal
financial turmoil for theoil
industry, isthat we need to shift
to small- and medium-scale
projects. Kazakhstani companies
often apply to us, as they have

isincreasingly moving toward


heav y conditions, and this
increases costs for companies
to produce and deliver energy
to thekey markets. Theera of
cheap energy isreally coming to
an end. Therefore, a speculative
component will undoubtedly be
part of theoil price.
Inhis speech, theSecretary
General of theInternational
Energy Forum, Noe Van Hulst,
told how to reduce theimpact
of that speculative component
of oil pr ices. According to
him, today oil isnot only a raw
material, but a financial asset,
such as gold or securities. The
bad news isthat we have not
reached a consensus onwhat
actually isthe drive that moves
oil prices. Isit thefinancial
market or oil itself as a product?
However, t hegoo d new s
isthat there isa consensus
onmeasures that will help avoid
substantial volatility.
F ir s t ly, itis necess ar y
to strengthen cooperation
b e t w e e n t h econsum e r s ,

producers and transit countries.


Secondly, thecountries need
to share theanalysis of future
trends and data ontheir
own markets, to cooperate
and analyze them, and then
follow ing theconclusions
made, to build up a uniform
c o o r d i n a t e d p o l i c y. I f
themarkets do not know whats
going on, for example, with
thedemand inChina and India,
they are lost inconjecture;
this makes theground for
sp ecul at ions and great er
volatility. Today as never
before we need transparency
of thefinancial and commodity
markets and harmonization of
theregulatory standards for
trading inoil derivatives.
Thef irst step has been
already made inthis direction.
InF ebr uar y 2011 , under
theauspices of theWorld
Economic Forum, 86 countries
became signatories to thenew
charter. There was achieved a
90% coverage of theproducers,
transporters and consumers of
hydrocarbons inthe world.
Unfortunately, our country did
not enter that list. Therefore,
Mr. Hulst urged Kazakhstan,
as quickly as possible, to join
thenew global energy dialogue
atthe governmental level.
His speech like many other
s t at ement s made att he
KAZENERGY forum demonstrated
that theglobalizat ion of
economic processes iscovering
more and more new horizons.
Kazakhstan will always be
thefocus of theworlds major
players. Inthis regard, as was
aptly noted by thelegendary
Amer ican telev ision hos t
Larry King, while speaking as
a moderator of a few sessions
of theForum, themain thing
for Kazakhstan isto be selfsufficient and do not let anyone
control this process. So far we
have been coping with this
challenge quite well.
Editorial

We Always Strive
for Excellence
How Kazakhstans market is
prospective today for BASF
and what industries are
placed stake on?
ince almost 20 years we
are active in Central Asia
and in Kazakhstan. We started
with a Representative Office
and later on we founded BASF
Central Asia LLP, a 100%
group company of BASF
T h e C h em ic al C omp an y.
That shows our commitment
especially towards Kazakhstan
and in turn it tells you that
we see steadily growth of
the local market and of
the diversif ication of the
industr ies. Cur rently our
main focus is on construction,
agricultural, mining and gas
treatment industries.

Please tell in detail how you


have come to this business
and how you have appeared
in the chemical industry?
ASF T he Chemic al
Company of fers great
job oppor tunit ies for it s
employees around the world.
Espec ially in the region
of the group headquar ter
BASF is well known and
attracts many people as an
employer; so did it happen
with me. It is great working
for our company as we create
solutions and products you
use every day. So it is really
an inv isible contr ibution,
but a visible success. Since
almost 15 years I am working
for BASF and I had lots of
really exciting assignments.
The latest offer was to get
my current assignment here
in Central Asia and I am very
proud to manage a company
which offers all in once: big
challenges and a growth track
above the GDP growth in once.

Managing Director of BASF Central Asia, Mr. Krueckl Florian,


answers the questions from the Kazakhstan Magazine.
What task is set by the
companys
management?
oubl e t he s al e s unt il
2020, fully comply with
env ironmental , health and
safety rules of the country and
our company as well as fully
respect our compliance rules.

How do you plan to develop the


company?
or the existing business we
have a super ior position
in the market already our
ambition to be always one
step ahead of competition
will remain and we will grow
above market growth rates in
a profitable manner. We will
certainly increase our efforts
to grow businesses according
to our strategy where we
underst and the indiv idual
markets already.
Talking about new business
fields, we first of all need to
understand which industries at
which steps of the value chain
will be settled in our region.
Having gained these insights
we cer tainly will der ive in
collaboration with our valued
customers their needs in terms
of produc t s , ser v ices and
complete solutions. We always
strive for excellence so this
is also valid for our customer
relationships. We want to make
our customers more successful.

What products in your opinion


will become most popular in
the near future in Kazakhstan?
lso in Kazakhstan we will
certainly see the need to
follow the global trends such
as: growing & aging population,

urbanization, energy demand&


climate protection as well as
globalization and developing
markets. These trends are leading
to the need for solutions in the
areas of health & nutrition,
construction & housing, energy&
resources as well as mobility &
communication. All products that
are supporting these solutions
will become attractive. BASF
The Chemical Company will
certainly always find a solution
for the customers working in
these fields of the future.
How do you evaluate the level
of competition among chemical
enterprises in Kazakhstan?
very much depends on the
individual segments. As an
example we perceive a tough
competition in the construction
chemical area where some
competitors do choose a route
to market strategy which is
obviously based on extremely
low prices in order to gain
market share. The future might
tell us if that is a sustainable
business approach or not.

It

What changes are possible


in this sector of the country
due to creation of the
Customs Union?
see that the overall
implement at ion is
managed better and better by
every day. From a strategic
point of view one could argue
that the chemical industry will
invest in assets within the
Russian Federation and can
sell the products very easy to
Kazakhstan. An investment in
the Russian Federation might be
for some companies of a higher

We

attractiveness due to the higher


local demand.
For our company Customs
Union did not change much.
Products we need to import are
pre-dominantly from Turkey,
Germany and Switzerland
so this Customs Union is not
supporting us here. Our export
business is going mainly to
Kirghizstan and Uzbekistan, also
here no support.
How do you build and control
the employees work?
have a well working
target agreement
and appraisal system in place
for each employees of the
company from production to
sales. That makes our goals very
transparent for the individuals.
More important is the frequent
personal contact and discussion
with the employees. The people
need to feel that they contribute
to the overall success of the
company, independently what
job they are doing everyone
counts at BASF.

We

What is your recipe for success?


ay what you think and do
what you say. Furthermore
I am always passionated about
my jobs which leads me to keep
a certain discipline to work on
improving the company and
become even more successful
than we are already. Another
a sp ec t is t he t eam t hat
surrounds me hav ing an
excellent and diverse team in
place is of utmost importance
to achieve the goals.

www.basf-cc.kz
www.basf.ru

We Combine Science and Business

Abzal Kusainov, President of thePark of Nuclear Technologies JSC answers our questions.
Abzal Tursynbaevich, ithas been two years
since your last interview to our magazine.
What progress has been achieved inthe
development of thenuclear technologies
park infrastructure during this period?
uring this period thetechnopark
underwent considerable changes.
First of all, a great deal of work was
done to create infrastructure and to
commercialize scientific developments. So,
in2010, we accomplished theconstruction
of a complex of buildings, intended for
administrative and production purposes.
This complex passed through state
inspection and consists of a business
center, business incubator, laboratory,
industrial premises, offices, and exhibition
and conference halls.
Equipped w ith a moder n dat a
communication and telecommunication
network, thecomplex offers premises for
rent and provides related services. We
provide services indevelopment and support
of business, such as business planning,
marketing research, searching for funding
sources, etc., as well as commercialization
of scientif ic developments, legal and
consulting services, setting up of scienceintensive productions, and information and

124

l 2011# 6 l

Kazakhstan

exhibition services. Theintegrated network


of telecommunication and ITinfrastructure
allows theemployees and customers of
thetechnopark to use IP-telephony services
and provides access to Internet and Wi-Fi.
InSeptember 2010, thetechnopark
premises hosted theFirst International
Conference, called Innovative Technologies:
Reality and Prospects. Delegates from
theCIS countries Russia, Ukraine, and
Uzbekistan, and from abroad theUK
and Germany, as well as representatives
of theClosed Nuclear Centers Programme
attended this event. Total, 126 scientists
and experts from seven countries inthe
world took part inthe conference. They made
33 speeches and 8 poster presentations;
this marks thehigh intellectual nature of
theconference.
One more important event was thefact
of issuing to theNuclear Technologies Park
a certificate of compliance with thequality
management system I SO 9001:2008
inDecember 2010. Also, inthe current
year our company has successfully passed
through thefirst QMS audit.
This certificate confirms that works
carried out inthe below-mentioned areas
comply with international standards. These

areas involve thesearch, examination and


selection of innovative projects, carrying
out market research and developing
business plans, investment ininnovation
projects, search for grantors and coinvestors, irradiation of materials with
a directed flux of electrons with theset
parameters to give them new physical
and chemical properties or to carry out
biological sterilization.
Could you tell indetail about thenuclear
units of theNuclear Technologies Park
and opportunities they open for research
and production?
ne of theunique ser v ices
thetechnopark offers isthe irradiation
atthe industrial electron accelerator ELV-4,
and from theyear 2012 atthe electron
accelerator ILU-10. Theaccelerators ELV-4
and ILU-10 are widely used as a source of
ionizing radiation inradiation-thermal
technologies to solve assignments of
scientific and applied nature. Irradiation
atthe accelerators makes itpossible to
significantly improve thecharacteristics of
materials: to increase their operating time
and factor of resistance to physical and
chemical influences.

Moreover, thecommissioning into


operation of theaccelerator ILU-10 will
allow to attract enterprises of themedical
cluster to thetechnopark and to provide
theoutput and highest sterilization of
radiation-crosslinked pharmaceuticals,
disinfectants, medical products and medical
clothing. Apart from this, theunit will
allow to carry out radiation cross-linking
and processing of wire and cable products,
as well as sterilization of food products.
Ingeneral , theelectron irradiat ion
technology can be applied invarious fields
of production.
Thus, by using our electron accelerators,
domestic companies will not only improve
thetechnical features of their products;
they will increase competitiveness of their
products inthe market.
What kind of work iscurrently inprogress
to further strengthen thematerial and
technical basis of thetechnopark?
pr inciple, all thetechnopark s
activities onimplementation of
innovative projects are aimed atcreating and
strengthening theexisting infrastructure
of nuclear facilities of theKurchatov town
and creating new industrial complexes. For
example, theconstruction of a building
for radiation sterilization onthe basis of
theindustrial electron accelerator ILU-10
started in2010. Now theinstallation of
technological equipment and accelerator
itself isin full swing. Itis planned to
launch theaccelerator into operation by
the20 th anniversary date of Kazakhstans
independence.

In

Itis known that theNuclear Technologies


Parks mission isto be a platform for
nurturing high-tech companies.
How successful isthis process? What
companies are already operating inthe
technopark area?
date, thetechnoparks infrastructure
hosts eleven enterprises, established
ona public-private partnership basis. All of
them are focused onoutput of high-tech
products and innovative services.
For example, theKaz-Kor NuTech
C omp any L L P pr o duce s r ad ia t ion crosslinked waterproof roofing, Merusar
and Co. LLP medical work clothes, and
InTehnos LLP together with theInstitute
of Atomic Energy, thelatter a structural
division of theRepublican State Enterprise
TheNational Nuclear Center of theRepublic

To

of Kazakhstan, radiant heating systems.


Three joint Kazakhstan-Russian ventures
operate onthe territory of theNuclear
Technologies Park. They are LLP Kazfoam,
producing radiat ion-crosslinked
polyethylene foam, LLP Xsenon, producing
radiation-synthesized pharmaceuticals
and therapeutic mineral water, and LLP
MunayGazIzolyat siya, manuf ac tur ing
shrunk-on rings and straps for theoil and
gas industry and communal utilities. One
more Kazakhstan-Ukrainian joint venture
LLC Dempurg-PNT engages inoutput of
train-stop equipment for rolling stock of rail
transport, including radiation-crosslinked
coupling hose pipes.
Some companies , located onthe
terr itor y of thetechnopark, engage
inprovision of services. Among them are
LLP EnergoAuditKazahstan, offering energy
audit services to public and industrial
facilities, LLP Open Kazakhstan Education,
providing educational and consulting
ser v ices , LLP Atomprojec t , engaged
inconsulting services, and LLP IT-Link,
providing marketing services related to
communications equipment and Wi-Fi
installation services.
Under theNuclear Technologies Park
development strategy, we are planning by
theyear 2020 to incubate over 20 successful
high-tech companies inthe field of nuclear,
radiation and related technologies. I can
assure that thetechnoparks activities will
add to creation of a favorable business
climate for development of small and
medium businesses, as well as contribute
to theprogress of soc io- economic
development of theKurchatov town and
theregion as a whole.
What new innovative projects are inthe
technoparks plans for implementation
inthe near future?
prospect, we are planning a number
of innovative projects, which will be
implemented onthe territory of theNuclear
Technologies Park. These projects involve
services incleaning and decontamination
of radioactively contaminated tubing
and oilf ield equipment, production of
radioisotope produc t s, and ser v ices
inirradiation of materials with neutrons
and protons, as well as themanufacture of
medical vascular stents by using radiation
sterilization technology.
Thesetting up of regional radiation
and technology centers will open great

In

opportunities for promotion of radiation


technolog ies inv ar ious sec tor s of
theeconomy, as well as for provision
of services insterilization of medical
products and food, grain disinfestation,
wastewater treatment , medical waste
disposal, etc.
One more promising project isthe
setting of a production line for radiation
modification of thepolymer coating of cable
products. Among priority projects isalso
thesetting up of a venture for processing
of ore and mining dumps to extract therare
earth metals and for production of nuclear
fuel for safe subcritical reactors.
What role, inyour opinion, isgiven to
theNuclear Technologies Park inthe
state-run Program of Accelerated
Industrial and Innovative Development
of Kazakhstan for 20102014?
nder theProgram of Accelerated
Industr ial and Innovative
Development, a modern infrastructure
has to be created inKazakhstan for
implementation of innovative projects.
Among thesuccessful examples of such
innovative system creation isthe Nuclear
Technologies Park. Today, we can say
with confidence that thegreater part of
theobjectives set before us has been
successfully fulfilled. Theevidence of
that isthe currently existing and created
infrastructure of our Technologies Park,
adjusted production and commercialization
of innovative technologies, ideas and
projects.

www.pnt.kz

Kazakhstan 2011# 6

125

Contribution,
worthy of a leader

Kazakhmys Group of Companies, theflagship of theKazakhstans non-ferrous


metallurgy, iscelebrating the20th anniversary of thecountrys independence
with thecompanys new achievements. Thegroup of companies has something
to present to theKazakhstans citizens to this memorable date. This isthe launch
of theBozshakol field development project, thelargest investment project
inthe history of Kazakhmys, also thesuccessfully continued modernization
of Ekibastuz GRES-1, thelisting of thecompanys securities onthe Hong Kong
Stock Exchange, and new agreements with strategic partners.
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l 2011# 6 l

Kazakhstan

he giant of theSoviet industry inthe past


and now a global leader of thesector,
Kazakhmys Corporation can be considered
by right one of thebackbone enterprises of
thenational economy. Asthelargest copper
producer inthe country, Kazakhmys owns
17 mines, 10 concentrating mills, and two
copper smelters. Mining production isfully
integrated, starting from ore mining to
output of finished products such as copper
cathodes and copper wire rods. Inthe
2010 year alone, Kazakhmys produced
303 thousand tons of copper cathodes from
its own ore.
Along with that, copper production
isnot theonly activities of thecompany.
Thecompanys division Kazakhmys Mining
extracts considerable volumes of other
metals, including zinc, silver, and gold.
For example, 167 tons of zinc concentrate
was delivered for themarket in2010.
Inaddition, thesaid group of companies
isamong thetop ten world producers of
silver: last year theoutput of this metal by
thecompany reached 14 million ounces.
Thetotal revenues of Kazakhmys from
sales in2010 were $3.2 billion, while EBITDA
(excluding special items of thebudget) $2.8
billion. Thegroup of companies employs more
than 61 thousand people, mostly Kazakhstani
nationals, that makes Kazakhmys thelargest
domestic private employer.
Significant progress was achieved by
thegroup of companies inexternal markets.
Kazakhmys Group of Companies isin
theFTSE-100 list that comprises thelargest
companies listed onthe London Stock
Exchange. Moreover, Kazakhmyss securities
are listed onthe Kazakhstan Stock Exchange
and Hong Kong Stock Exchange.
InJune 2011 thecompanys securities
were put inthe list onthe Hong Kong Stock
Exchange, which became a landmark event for
thecompany and increases theinvestment
attractiveness of Kazakhstan, ingeneral.
According to Kazakhmyss Council of
theDirectors Chairman Vladimir Kim,
coupled with thequite successful listing
onthe London Stock Exchange, conducted
six years ago, thecurrent breakthrough to
Hong Kong has become a new milestone
inthe companys development. Thehead
of theHong Kong Stock Exchange Ronald
Arkulli also welcomed theemergence of
thef irst Kazakhstani company among
theissuers. Inthis regard, Kazakhmys not
only surpassed other domestic companies,
but became a second issuer onthe HKEx,

thelatter represents theworlds copper


industry.
Entering theAsian stock markets by
thecompany isindeed a strategic move,
allowing strengthening mutually beneficial
relations with major investors and gaining
ex tra investment oppor tunit ies for
production expansion projects.
One of themost important projects to
Kazakhmys and therelated industry was
put into implementation inthe jubilee
year 2011. Thecompany begun developing
thelarge copper deposit Bozshakol ,
located near Astana. Studies carried out by
theworld known company Aker Solutions
showed that theproved ore reserves of
Bozshakol exceed 1.1 billion tons.
Theore that can be extracted inthe
central part of thedeposit isestimated
at845 million tons, and some 326 million
tons more can be extracted inthe eastern
mine. According to thecompanys schedule,
first ore isto be extracted in2015. Itis
expected that over thenext three years
theore mining complex will reach its full
mining capacity of 30 million tons of ore
a year with subsequent annual output of
to 100 tons of copper concentrate. Atthis
level of mining, themine will operate for
over 40 years. Itshould be noted as well
that significant reserves of associated
metals, including 3.5 million ounces of gold
and 33million ounces of silver, are bedded
inthe depths of theBozshakol deposit.
Theinnovative aspect of theproject
isremarkable, and thecompany itself
regards itthe reason for pride. There
themost advanced technologies will be
applied. Thenew mining complex will
involve a high capacity ore concentrating
mill, significantly surpassing by technical
parameters thealready existing mining
capacities of thecompany. Theproject was
initially focused onmeeting thehighest
industrial safety standards and maximizing
automation. That iswhy theconstruction
of theBozshakol ore concentrating mill
became part of the20102014 Kazkahstans
Industrialization Map program.
Thesocial aspect should not be forgotten
as well. With thebeginning of an active
phase of Kazakhmys operation, money will
be heavily invested intransport, communal
ser vices and social infrastructure of
theregion; inflows to therepublican and
local budgets will increase.
Along with theother project theAktogai
field development Bozshakol will add to

increasing thecompanys aggregate annual


output of copper concentrate by some 200
thousand tons. Due to this, inthe coming
years Kazakhmys will exceed themining
level of 500 thousand tons of copper a year.
Concerning Aktogai one of therichest
and most promising copper deposits
inEast Kazakhstan, here inthe current
year thecompany has made a notable
step forward as well. OnJune 13, General
Managing Director of Kazakhmys Group
of Companies, Oleg Novachuk, and Vice
President of China Development Bank,
Gao Jian, executed a Memorandum of
Understanding to extend a line of credit of
to $1.5 billion. These funds will be spent to
develop Aktogai, thelatter has thecopper
reserves of about 5 million tons. Atthe
ore concentrating mill design capacity of
100 thousand tons of copper concentrate
a year, thelife of theore mine will endure
for 43 years, while thenumber of employees
during theperiod of themine operation will
exceed one thousand people. Moreover, this
project does not yield to Bozshakol both
interms of innovation and anticipated
development of infrastructure.
An impor tant factor that adds to
Kazakhmyss competitiveness isthat its
operation isensured by a developed railway
and high capacity power infrastructure.
Thelatter isEkibastuz GRES-1, thelargest
power plant inthe countr y, inwhich
Kazakhmys holds a 50% stake. Infact,
thegroup of companies manages more
than 20% of electric power generation
inKazakhstan. Thelast fact imposes
additional social responsibility onthe
company.
With regard to theabove-said, atthe given
moment Kazakhmys isimplementing an
investment program worth of $1 billion that
will result inrestoring theEkibastuz GRES-1
capacity to 4,000 MW and a considerable
reduction of emissions. Funding of this
ambitious project iscarried out owing to
reinvesting theprofits from electric power
supply. Thecompany has plans by theyear
2017 to restore and upgrade thepower
units #8, 2 and 1 to meet thegrowing demand
for electricity not only inKazakhstan but
also inneighboring Russia.
As part of theoverall modernization
program, theupgrading of power unit #8
atEkibastuz GRES-1, launched in2009,
isstill inprogress. By now, 40% of thetotal
scope of operations onmodernization has
been completed, and in2012 thepower

Kazakhstan 2011# 6

127

leaders

unit isexpected to be commissioned into


operation. Theproject worth over 23 billion
tenge covers replacement of theboilers
and turbine, as well as installation of
electrical equipment, modern equipment
for automatic control, and an electrostatic
filter. Theexpectations are that with
thelaunch of thepower unit into operation
thecompany will be capable to generate to
18 billion kilowatt of electric power an hour
in2013. Thecapacity of thepower station
will increase to 3,000 MW, which is75% of
theplanned level.
Moreover, this fall thefirst conduit for
ash discharge outlet was put into operation
atEkibastuz GRES-1. Theunit was subjected
to modernization under theenvironmental
projec t wor t h of 4 bil lion tenge.
Modernization was carried out inline with

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Kazakhstan

theleading international safety standards.


Thecompany introduced and successfully
applies three international standards
ISO 9001:2000, OHSAS 18001:2007, and
ISO 14001:2004.
A project of installation of an electric
f ilter of new generation iscurrently
inprogress atelectric power unit #6 with
theproject value exceeding 2 billion tenge.
Theapplication of new technologies atthe
operating power unit will add to increase
thelevel of ash collection, which will reduce
emissions to 15 tons per year. Thecleaning
efficiency of theelectric filters of new
generation reaches 99.8%, which reduces
harmful emissions into theatmosphere
by four times. Such f ilters are to be
installed by theyear 2013 atsix power
units inoperation that will ensure extra

reliability and thesafety of theelectric


power plant.
Itshould be noted that themodernization
of Ekibastuz GRES-1 coupled with solving
theproblem of thegrowing demand for
electric power and preventive measures
to prevent its shortage are of great social
signif icance as well. Here Kazakhmys
secures jobs to thousand of people, and
thenumber of jobs steadily continues due to
newly established divisions of thecompany.
If we talk about corporate social
responsibility of Kazakhmys Group of
Companies as a whole, todays amount of
deductions paid by thecorporation exceed
those paid by other major mining companies,
both domestically and abroad. Every year,
thecompany invests tens of millions of
dollars inbuilding and repairing of schools,
hospitals and roads, provides support to
sportsmen, artists and environmentalists,
and actively involves incharity and supports
socially important initiatives.
Kazakhmys isalso an active participant
of theprogram We choose things produced
inKazakhstan, which was developed by
thecompany jointly with Kazakhstans
government and isaimed atsupporting
and increasing competitiveness of domestic
small and medium businesses. Today,
Kazakhmyss share of purchased goods and
services from domestic producers ismuch
higher than theaverage indicator within
theindustry.
All this evidences that Kazakhmys isnot
only a successful player inthe mining
and metals markets, but also one of
thedrivers of thenational economy. High
capacity mining and processing facilities,
professional management, and successful
interaction with theinvestors ensures
theleading positions inthe breakthrough
industrial projects for.the company. Suffice
itto say that thetotal investments by
Kazakhmys inthe industrial and innovative
development program of Kazakhstan inthe
coming 34 years will be about $6 billion.
These funds will be primarily used to finance
energy facilities, mining enterprises and
to upgrade themetals industry facilities.
That fact that todays annual income of
thecompany provides about 2.5% of
thedomestic GDP isa vivid demonstration
of theKazakhmyss role inthe domestic
economy.
This isthe contribution worthy of a
leader, and inthe future itwill be only
growing!

The algorithm

of efficiency
In thenew economic conditions, theKazakhstani top managers started more often
resorting to assistance of independent consultants to increase theefficiency of
their businesses. Along with that, thelocal consulting companies announce their
readiness to compete with their well-known Western counterparts, since thefirst of
thetwo mentioned isnot inferior to themethodology and experience of thelatter.
Thus, inthe relatively short period of operation of theKazakhstan-based branch of
theRussian company A DAN DZO, both domestic businesses and governmental agencies
were given a good chance to make certain theprofessionalism and effectiveness
of theRussian companys team. According to theHead of theA DAN DZO Alexander
Portnov, theknowledge of specifics and mental similarity help our consultants not
only to make recommendations, but introduce them into industrial practice as well.
Alexander Sergeyevich, consulting
isquite a specific kind of business. What
thing pushed you to set up this business?
his idea came to my mind when I worked
as a technologist atSheremetyevoCargo, JSC , one of thel argest air
terminals inRussia where I was engaged
inoptimization of business. This involved
handling techniques, cargo movement, and
resources management. Exactly atthat
time I acquired an understanding that

130

l 2011# 6 l

Kazakhstan

thedevelopments and skills we gained


there can be useful for other Russias
companies as well. One of our first clients
was theProduction and Distr ibution
Comple x Moscow-McDonald s , which
provided its products to all restaurants
of theMcDonalds network inMoscow
and adjacent areas. Ina few years we
had significantly raised our competence,
acquired considerable intellectual capital,
created a strong management team and

successful projects portfolio, and from 2005


thecompany began working inthe market
with thebrand name A DAN DZO.
A DAN DZO isthe name of themedieval
Japanese samurai warrior, themythological
hero, who was loyal to his last breath to
his sovereign, defending theinterests of
thelatter, irrespective of thedifficulties
he experienced. Exactly these principles
theloyalty to thecustomer and its goals
we strive to bring this to our business

philosophy. A DAN DZO our company


ispermeated with all that spirit. A welldeveloped system of project management,
which proved itself inpractice, allows
controlling therisks of theclients. Atthe
same time, we try to anticipate risks and
take relevant measures to prevent them,
rather than to eliminate theconsequences.
Initially, we offer a few options as solutions
to our customers: expensive, but with very
good quality; with relatively good quality
and relatively expensive; not expensive,
effective, but with some risks. Whatever
option theclient chooses, we always bring
theproject to its logical end and get a
positive result.
In2004 there were four of us inthe
company; today, thestaff numbers four
dozen people, while according to usual
pract ice, a consult ing company has
thestaff of 10 people, inaverage. Since
itoften happens that we simultaneously
implement 5 to 7 projects, this requires
constant selection and rotation of relevant
specialists. Theapplicants for jobs inour
company sometimes wait for a year or two
to be invited for interviewing. We try to
immediately engage new staffers inthe
atmosphere of A DAN DZO. TheCorporate
Management Code, which establishes
therules for building up relations with
thecustomers, interac t ion bet ween
themanager s and employees , and
thecomplicate system of introductory
and post-project seminars allows our team
to grow fast and become more and more
effective.
What isthe area your company specializes
inand what industries are inthe range of
its interests?
engage inconsulting services
inthe area of production and
logistics, i.e., f iguratively speaking,
theconsulting which you can touch with
your hands. Manufacturing, supplies,
storage, delivery, and even management
all these are thelogistics processes, since
inproduction thestreams of raw materials,
in t er m e d ia t e go o d s , commo d i t ie s
and physical valuables move between
theproduction centers. Inmanagement,
theflows of documents and information
move b et we en t hemanager s and
employees. What isespecially good isthat
theresult of our work can be seen without
words thenew warehouses, convenient
shops, economical transport.

We

When in2000 I was developing


thestrategy of our company, I supposed
that consulting would be an analytical
center, thebasis for development of other
types of business. Gradually, we created a
comprehensive range of services, allowing
us to work with projects from A to Z. Today,
this includes consulting, outsourcing,
automation, and monitoring.
Inview of theabove-said, itis not by
chance that we specialize inadvising large
industrial enterprises insuch sectors as
metallurgy, chemical, food, oil production
and petrochemical. Thematter isthat
for theretailers, logistics and transport
companies thelogistics processes atthe
core of their business, and they constantly
work to optimize these processes, while
themanufacturing companies inthese
matters are often inneed of assistance from
outside companies. When we come to such
an enterprise, inthe short run we manage
to find points where to increase efficiency,
where even theold managers do not guess.
I would like to give just one example. Now
we are starting actively introducing projects
to comprehensively enhance enterprises.
These projects are based onthe Theory of
constraining systems. This methodology
aims to identify theweakest link inthe
production processes chain. Figuratively
speaking, one malfunctioning machine
causes disruptions across theenterprise.
We find such bottlenecks and develop
actions to fix that. By increasing thecosts
onsuch a problematic link, thecompany
gains an increase inincome by 3040%
during theyear.
What was thereason that made
thecompany make a decision to set up a
branch inKazakhstan? What project was
thestarting point for A DAN DZO inour
country?
2006 I was invited for thef irst
time to Kazakhstan for a transport
conference, and even atthat time I saw
great potential here. This isa country with
huge freight traffic and transit potential.
There are a large number of industrial
companies here, where theoptimization
possibilities literally lie under our feet.
In2007, we got acquainted w ith
t herepre s ent at ive s of K a z akhmy s
Corporation, and inthe following year
launched a large-scale joint project
to improve logistics, warehousing and
transpor t activities, also information

In

suppor t of logist ics processes. Our


approach to this task was comprehensive:
We covered all regional offices, engaged
a large staff of experts from Moscow,
studied indetail thecompanys operation,
determined thepoints for optimization,
and developed theconcept of logistics for
two years ahead. After this, theKazakhmys
Corporation management offered us to
carry out this task, because we differ
from other consulting companies, since
we implement our recommendat ions
inpractice. Usually, thepractice shows that
if recommendations of theconsultants are
just given to thecompanys management
for implementation, and theconsultants
themselves do not see them to an end,
theresult isusually 1520% maximum.
As a result , under our super v ision
t h ecor p or a t e supp ly s y s t em w a s
completely rebuilt, and labor productivity
rose by 2030%, while thegeneral costs
per transaction decreased. Thestaff and
management of theCorporation played
a great role inall that. We introduced a
corporate information logistics system
atKazakhmys. I cannot give any other
similar example of implementation of
such a large project inthe CIS. Scheduled
for a period of two years, this project was
completed exactly by theset deadline,
while its initial budget reduced by 20%.
We also helped to transfer to outsourcing
theentire transport of thecorporation
by establishing a separate company.
InSeptember 2010, onthe initiative of
Kazakhmys management , without any

Kazakhstan 2011# 6

131

consultant
complexities we transferred that company
incontrol to theother team.
Onour initiative and with our active
assistance, there was set up a department
to develop a produc t dist r ibut ion
system a team of office consultants,
formed from theKazakhmys staf fers
and trained by our coaches. Today, this
department continues operating infull
compliance with theprinciples we laid.
Owing to this, Kazakhmys will continue
to remain atthe peak of technologies
inthe use of thecorporations internal
resources.
While working inRussia and Kazakhstan,
have you faced thespecifics of thelocal
market?
is v er y in t er e s t ing t o wor k
inKazakhstan. Onthe one hand,
unlike Russia with its huge territory,
everything here inKazakhstan ismore
compact and tangible. Itis quite clear
how we should act to benefit a particular
enterprise. Onthe other hand, there isvery
flexible and dynamic leadership here, which
iscommitted to efficiency and isinterested
intransformation. InRussia, business isalso
relatively progressive, but less nimble. There
we often faced a shifting of responsibility,
while inKazakhstan managers are open
to experiments; decisions are made and
implemented quickly. This concerns not only
thetop management, but linear workers
as well.
Moreover, here inKazakhstan for
thefirst time we faced thepractice of
engaging our consultants indeveloping
state-run programs. Inparticular, onthe
init iat ive of Kazakhmys Corporat ion
Chairman of theBoard Eduard Ogai and
under theauspices of theNur Otan
party, our company took an active part
indevelopment of theindividual program of
small and medium businesses development
inthe field production with theassistance
of thebackbone companies. Today,
Kazakhstans government isexamining
thepossibility to include this program
ina number of state programs under
implementation.
Itshould be noted that our approach
inmethodology did not differ from a project
of logistics audit of a large company a
slight difference was that we just applied
all this to theentire country. I should
mention also that inthe course of analysis
of thecurrent situation with theprograms

It

132

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Kazakhstan

of support of small and medium businesses,


we were surprised to find out that they
were profoundly developed and thoroughly
described indetails inthe paper. Theonly
drawback isthat thedocuments are
poorly coordinated with each other, while
thepotential of backbone enterprises has
not been fully utilized.
When implement ing this projec t ,
we met with dozens of entrepreneurs,
representatives of theministries and
departments, Damu Fund, banks and large
companies, such as Kazakhmys, ENRC,
Bogatyr Komir, Kazzinc, Kazatomprom,
Kazakhstan Temir Zholy, KazMunayGas,
etc. We gave our recommendations and
were given a very good response. This is,
indeed, an economically justified and,
infact, operating scheme, which simply
needs to be adopted and implemented.
Here, thekey point isthe role of
independent advisers-operators, which will
be tracking transformation inthe course
of implementation of this program. This
issomething new; I never have faced such
an approach inany other country.
Theproposed approach to implementation
of state programs isthe analogue of our
own technology MPRF (Monitoring and
Prompt Response to Failures). Inour
projects theapplication of thegiven
technology always follows thedevelopment
and start of introduction into practice.
Theconsultants-operators of thekey points
and positions track certain events which
had to occur ata particular time and place,
incompliance with theregulations. If they
do not occur, this means that soon this will
badly affect theoperation of theentire
company. Theweekly newsletters as to
theprogress of theprocess are distributed
among thechiefs of thekey departments,
and recommendations are immediately
given. Such control from outside allows
thenew technology to set tle down
in23 months. Iam sure if monitoring
of this kind iscarried out with regards
to a state program, theresult will exceed
expectations.
We regard this project very carefully,
since itinvolves both government and
pr ivate business. Itis one thing to
optimize thework of a warehouse ata
private enterprise: however itis another
thing to advise thestructures, whose work
will affect theeconomic development of
theentire country. Such scales are exciting
and inspiring

They inspire you for future growth? What


kind of goals do you set before yourself for
thefuture inKazakhstan?
are planning a major expansion of
theoffice, bringing itto thelevel
of our office inRussia, with theability to
not only implement projects, but also to
incubate local staff. Thetalks we are now
carrying onwith potential clients make
us confident to announce this with a high
degree of certainty.
If we talk about particular services, then,
inmy opinion, theservices outsourcing
and consulting inoutsourcing look very
promising for Kazakhstan. Theprocess of
painless separation of non-core activities
into an individual business isassociated with
high risks; so, itis very important to engage
experienced consultants.
We also see that small and medium businesses
are ingreat need of consulting onhow to
organize their production. Theintroduction
of themethodology Theory of Constraining
Systems has a great future; this will allow
without considerable investments infixed
assets, sometimes due to organizational
solutions only, to achieve fantastic results
inincreasing theefficiency of theenterprise.
Ingener al , we want to develop
theconsulting of A DAN DZO atsuch a level,
enabling us to compete with Western brands,
but theconsulting which will be coupled with
our comprehension and taking into account
thementality of our people. Our people are not
lazy, as iscommonly believed. We just simply
want to see essence inany matter. When this
essence isunderstood by theemployees,
you would find ithard to get more efficient
workers. Today inRussia and Kazakhstan
there are large industrial enterprises which
are able to take leading positions inthe
global market, but there isno national
consulting firm of theanalogous level which
could operate effectively not only inthe CIS
countries, but abroad. With theobjectives of
massive growth of production set before our
countries, we need an adequate system of
consulting support. After all, theconsultants
are a sort of production growth accelerators,
even thegrease to this mechanism, enabling
itto work with great efficiency.
With our professionalism and experience,
we are ready to create a powerful national
consulting center, where both theprivate
businesses and governmental agencies could
apply to for consulting.

We

www.adandzo.com

breakthrough of the year

We Believe in Kazakhstan's Future


and Are Willing to Invest in It!

For Borusan Makina Kazakhstan that offers machinery and equipment of theworld
famous brand Caterpillar inthe local market, theyear 2011 has truly turned out to
be a breakthrough year, since thecompany launched into operation a Components
Rebuild Centre inKaraganda. This project isunique, as itis thelargest investments
theBorusan Group has ever made inthe economy of Kazakhstan, and this project
has no analogues inthe CIS countries. So, Ozgur Gunaydin, General Director of
theBorusan Makina Kazakhstan LLP FE, agrees to share these and other plans of
thecompany for thefuture with our magazine.
Borusan Makina Kazakhstan
is part of the Borusan
Group, which is now one of
the fastest growing holding
companies in Turkey. What
is Borusans business on a
global scale today?
ounded in 1944, Borusan is
among the top ten leading
companies in Turkey. Today,
the holding company employs
more than 6,000 people, and
has a long and successful
history of operation in the

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Kazakhstan

Middle East, Europe, and CIS


countries. The Borusan Groups
business covers areas such as
steel production, dealership,
logistics, telecommunications,
and energy.
For example, Borusan
Mannesmann Boru, manu
facturing steel pipes, ranks first
among European companies.
Cooperating with the holding
company ArcelorMittal, the
Borelik Company is regarded
a l e a d in g m a n u f a c t u r e r

of sheet steel in Turkey.


TheBorusan Mannesmann
Boru Group, after acquisition
of the Italian factory Structo
Vobarno, was given a status of
the European manufacturer.
Borusan Logistics provides
comprehensive ser v ices in
the area of transpor tation
and seapor t management
technologies, while Borusan
Telekom is a leading operator
of telecom services in the
telecommunication market. In

the field of hydraulic power and


wind energy the Borusan Group
cooperates with German EnBW.
C oncer n ing our d eal er
activities, the Borusan Group
has been for many years the
exclusive representative of
some companies such as BMW,
Land Rover, Rolls-Royce, and
Mini Cooper in Turkey.
Of course, we act as an
official dealer of Caterpillar
in Turkey, Azerbaijan, Georgia,
Kazakhstan, and Kyrgyzstan.

More than 1,000 employees


total are engaged in these
activities in the CIS countries,
including 500 employees
here in Kazakhstan, which is
a testament to the viability
and importance of the local
market.
Machinery and equipment
of the Caterpillar trademark
have proved themselves as
a model of efficiency and
quality. Which products
of Caterpillar does your
company offer to Kazakhstani
consumers?
Kazakhstan, the company
has been operating as a
Caterpillar dealer since July
1999, of fer ing equipment
and machinery for the mining
sec tor and industr ial and
infrastructure construction,
power generators, mobile power
stations and pumps (including
those for the oil industry), as
well as combine harvesters,
tractors and other agricultural
machinery.
The head office of Borusan
Makina Kazakhstan is located
in Almaty, while a network of
the companys branches with
repair shops and warehouses
covers 22 cities of the republic,
including Astana, Karaganda,
Atyrau, Aktau, Uralsk, Kostanai,
Ust-Kamenogorsk, Kokshetau,
and others.
In essence, the main scope of
Borusan Makina Kazakhstans
activities involves both the
selling of machiner y and
it s f ur ther maintenance.
Theequipment provided by us
can operate 24 hours a day, 365
days a year. Thats our motto,
and we are proud this motto
comes true in day-to-day life.
400 people in our company
engage in maintenance of the
machinery, allowing servicing
it without actually stopping the
production processes, which is
very convenient for customers.
Since Caterpillar machinery
is equipped in line with the

In

latest scientific achievements


and technologies, we can
control the operat ion of
the equipment , diagnose
and f ix problems with the
help of satellite space
communications.
Caterpillar is among the
leading manufacturers in this
field, and the demand for its
products is huge. Therefore,
we are pleased to satisf y
the needs of Kazakhstani
companies in this machinery.
The list of our clients, involving
the giants of the mining sector
such as Kazakhmys, Kazzinc,
ENRC Group, the Aktobe Copper
Company, and RusAl, is the
best letter of recommendation
to us. In the oil and gas
industr y these giant s are
Halliburton and Schlumberger.
Among our customers there are
Coca-Cola, Pepsi, Efes, Ankara
Hotel, construction companies,
and many others.
Industry experts call your
last project, the Components
Rebuild
Centre
(CRC),
which is the first one of
such kind in the CIS, an
unprecedented innovation.
What opportunities does
this centre open for your
customers?
he established venture,
launched in May of this year
in Karaganda, covers an area
of 50,000 m2 and employs a
staff of 190 people. Currently,
its the largest investment by
Borusan Makina in the economy
of Kazakhstan. We have already
invested $15 million in the
said venture and are planning
further investments.
The goal of the investments
is to set up a production
line, representing the latest
t e chnol o g ic al e quipmen t
for machining, assembly and
testing. Thanks to this, the
owners of vehicles of the
Caterpillar brand will now be
able to significantly reduce
cos t s f or acquis it ion of

new units and parts due to


obtaining of the machinery
components, being in use, with
the restored and extended
service life. Moreover, through
functional diagnostics and
testing, the CRC will provide an
opportunity to avert potential
damage to the machinery that
will substantially reduce the
customers costs for repair
and restoration. With this
purpose, the CRC operates a
SOS laboratory, which makes
analysis of oil for oxidation,
nitration, presence of sulfur,
purity, and water content.
The scheduled oil sampling,
sp ec if ical ly de s igned by
Caterpillar for the engines and
machines of this company is
an integral part of preventive
maintenance. Periodic analysis
of samples allows our experts
to detect increased wear prior
to the emergence of serious
problems.
Along with that, the CRC
is equipped w ith spec ial

equipment to test engines,


t r an sm is s io n s , h y d r a u l ic
components and fuel pumps,
and has a special area for
disassembling and assembling
of hydraulic cylinders. In
addit ion, in the auxiliar y
workshop work is carried out
to restore the block and heads
of cylinders, valves, etc.
Also, a training department
was set up within the CRCs
structure, where the highlyskilled specialists exchange
their knowledge w ith the
trainees. Classes are fully
computerized and equipped
with training simulators.
I want to emphasize that this
is our most important project,
especially, in view of the fact
that similar level centers are
just about a dozen around
the world. The Caterpillar
Company regularly monitors
these centers, and we are
very proud that our CRC after
examination was given five
stars the highest rating of

Kazakhstan 2011# 6

135

breakthrough of the year

quality. We believe the right


use of human resources and
innovations helped us achieve
these results.
The years of recession were
difficult for everyone,
however, in this difficult time
Borusan made considerable
investments. How did you
manage that?
ur success story during the
recession and in previous
good times is nothing else, but
the emphasis both on sales and
post-sales service. Moreover,

our system of management,


which is based on the Lean
6 Sigma methodology, played
an impor tant role in that.
This system that is based
on statistical indicators is
aimed to sharply increase the
efficiency of the companys
operation.
The introduction of this
me t ho dol og y at Bor u s an
Makina Kazakhstan star ted
in September 2005. Owing
to this, during the recession
per iod , we were able to
correctly assess the risks, cut

some costs without laying off


staff, and not close branches.
In addition, we invested the
funds so saved in development
of production, particularly, in
the Karaganda CRC.
One of the main advantages
of Lean 6 Sigma application
by our company is that it
supposes teamwork. One way
or another, practically all the
companys employees engage
in projects; this allows to
exchange views and ideas, and
to make the most constructive
decisions. In the Kazakhstanbased company s div ision
150 p eople are involved
in implementation of this
methodology. We call the
leading experts in this area
the black belts; these are the
highly-skilled managers, who
are able to reveal and resolve
any problem. As a result, during
the recession, we have not only
surrendered our positions,
but were given the 2010
Excellence in Innovation
Award f rom the Amer ican
Chamber of Commerce for our
investments in the Product
Link system and innovative
contribution of the region.
As far as we know, Borusan
Makina pays great attention
to staff training, is this true?
is
quite
true.
Development, training,
and so-called cultivation of
talents, especially in the area
of the servicing of customers
machinery is our top priority.
In fact, major investments by
Borusan are the investment in
human potential. In Almaty
and Karaganda we have our
own training centers, and a
separate department engages
in training of the employees.
We actively cooperate with
technical institutions of higher
education in Almaty and with
t he K ar aganda Technic al
University. We also entered
into an agreement with KIMEP
and launched a joint program

It

136

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Kazakhstan

The Leadership Facult y,


financed by the company. We
also have arrangements with
universities in Turkey, where we
direct our employees, including
managerial staff. So, we keep
developing the future leaders
of Kazakhstani business by
focusing on uncovering their
personal potential.
The comp any re gul ar ly
monitors the level of
e m p l o y e e s s a t i s f a c t i o n ,
which is now reaching 75%,
that is far above the average
indicator within the industry;
the latter is about 60%. It is
worth mentioning that the joy
the employees get from work
is very closely related to the
customers satisfaction.
And finally, what are the
future plans of Borusan
Makina?
hen thinking globally,
after Caterpillar launched
a take-over of Bucyrus one
of the largest U.S. producers,
we, as the companys dealer,
will offer in Kazakhstan in the
near future the widest range
of machinery of the Bucyrus
brand, including ground and
underground equipment for the
coal mining industry. This will
allow to an even greater extent
for us to meet the demand of
our clients. Also, Borusan is
going to more actively promote
its products and services for
the oil and gas sector, mainly
in the west of the country in
Uralsk, Aktau, and Aktobe.
In general, Kazakhstan is a
very good market for long-term
investments. The dynamically
developing population and
natural resources the country is
endowed with add to building
up effective and successfully
devel oping bu s ine s s. We
believe in the f uture of
Kazakhstan and are ready to
support it with our investments
and active work.

www.borusanmakina.kz

Reputation Above All

A lot of businesses was set up inKazakhstan twenty years ago inthe wake of
economic reforms. Many of them were not able to cope with thedifficulties of
thetransition period, so they closed. Those who survived turned into competitive
and social-oriented companies, and our country can be proud of them. Among these
companies isthe flagship of theAkmola regions economy Kokshetauminvody
JSC, which isbeing run for already 20 years by Askar Kaznaviyevich Aliyev.

oday, Kokshetauminvody is a unique plant


producing alcoholic and soft drinks with a
more than a thousand workers, working for it.
Five modern bottling lines produce 70 thousand
liters of alcoholic drinks and 170 thousand
liters of soft drinks a day. More than 30,000
retail outlets throughout Kazakhstan offer
high-class products to millions of Kazakhstan
people. Being a backbone enterprise of the
Kokshetau town and among the three largest
taxpayers of the Akmola region, the company
pays more than 15 million tenge of taxes and
other mandatory payments a day to the state
budget.
The time preceeding the establishment of
the company was marked by an acute shortage
of all types of goods. There was the deficit
for almost everything, especially for mineral
water in northern Kazakhstan. At that time,
a decision was made to search for mineral
springs in the vicinity of Kokshetau the land
of a thousand of lakes, to meet the demand for
water of the local population and country, in
general. The solution was found. The company
explored the area of the Burabai conservation
and discovered mineral springs underground,

138

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Kazakhstan

so it developed wells to extract the mineral


water. Soon, the production of the first mineral
water Kulager Arasan started, named after the
legendary racer Kulager, about whom Akan
Sera, who lived in the Akmola region and
was the Kazakh akyn, an improvising poet
and singer in the Kazakh culture, sang in his
song. In parallel, the production of carbonated
soft drinks started. In 1996, the Kentekol
underground water deposits were discovered
on the territory of the Kokshetau national
park, and after a while the company launched
the production of the first table water in
Kazakhstan, named Turan.
In 1997 the company set a goal to start
producing alcoholic beverages with the purest
natural water and malt spirit as a basis. This
is how a 100% Kazakhstani brand Haoma
appeared, named so on the suggestion of the
great Kazakh archaeologist Kemal Akishev,
the man who uncovered the greatness of the
steppe civilization to the modern generation.
At the core of the brand name interpretation
there is a legend about the Saks-Haomovargs,
the ancestors of the Kazakhs, known for their
abilities to cook the divine drink Haoma.

In1999, the products of Kokshetauminvody


were given the first appraisal from experts.
A Special sor t of vodka Haoma was
awarded a Gold Medal at the International
Tasting Competition for Distilled Beverages
INTERDRINKS 99 in Moscow.
In 20012007 the company began a largescale trade expansion. During this period,
in addition to the already operating branch
office in in Karaganda, there were opened
branch offices in the cities of Astana, Kostanai,
Petropavlovsk, Almaty, Pavlodar, Ekibastuz,
Semei, and Ust-Kamenogorsk.
The last five years for Kokshetauminvody
were marked by modernization in the area of
technology, management and technical areas.
Starting from the year 2008, the company
underwent systemic changes in order to
improve management; also, the automated
process of production of soft drinks and
mineral water was introduced. The laboratory
of the plant is upgraded with modern
equipment. All the process manufacturing
line, from the raw material to the end product,
is subjected to continuous quality control.
In 2010 the company completed in record

time a project of construction of a new soft


drink producing plant, implemented under
the Program of Accelerated Industrial and
Innovative Development of Kazakhstan.
Atthat plant, the company set a bottling line
from Krones AG, one of the worlds leading
manufacturers of equipment for the food
industry, with a capacity of 12 thousand
bottles an hour. The innovative aspect of
the project was that for the first time in
Kazakhstan there was introduced the newest
system of microbiological water filtration
Pall. The system is equipped with a cascade
of nanopolymeric cartridges, allowing cleaning
water without altering its natural properties
and chemical composition.
The launch of the new production line into
operation made it possible to expand the range
of soft drinks to meet the growing consumers
demand. So, new products appeared such as
the Ice Tea Turan and juice drinks Turan. Today,
Kokshetauminvody produces 61 nonalcoholic
brands and 43 alcoholic brands.
Kokshetauminvody is a fully vertically
integrated company. The company has its own
deposits of underground water and mineral
springs, own branch network, covering ten
regions in Northern and Central Kazakhstan,
also distribution networks in nine regions
of Western and Southern Kazakhstan, and
sales offices in the Russian Federation. Also,
the company applies modern technologies of
production.
The quality control system, operating
at the plant, deserves special attention.
Back in 2007, Kokshetauminvody introduced
the international food safety management
standard ISO 22000, and in 2011 the company
was given the diploma The best food safety
management system in Kazakhstan by
the Association for Certification Russian
Register.
As a result , the Kokshetauminvody
beverages were given many awards for
their high quality and unique taste at the
international tasting competitions. Of 75
awards given, the most significant are the gold
medals given at the international competition
The Best Vodka of the Year to the brands
Original Haoma, special vodka Haoma
Baksy, and Haoma Miras.
According to tra
dition, the awardw inner s of t he
competition exhi
bit their products
in the museum of
the history of vodka

at the unique historical and architectural


complex Izmailovsky Kremlin. Today, beneath
the arches of the museum 5 types of Haoma
vodka are exhibited.
It is symbolic that exactly in the year of the
20 th anniversary of the company Kazakhstani
people highly assessed the quality of the
companys products. Due to their assessment,
Kokshetauminvody won in two categories
of the prestigious contest "Choice of the
Year in Kazakhstan". The trademark "Haoma
Original" was given the award "Vodka of
the Premium Class (domestic) #1 2011 in
Kazakhstan", while "Haoma Anniversary"
"The People's Vodka (domestic) #1 2011 in
Kazakhstan" award.
The solid team of people who work well
together at Kokshetauminvody plays an
important role in the companys success. The
plant workers are confident in the future, they
feel part of a large happy family. The basis of
stability is a collective agreement. Itprovides
for various salaries and emoluments schemes
that are aimed at improving the productivity
and financial incentives of the personnel.
Allowances are provided for professionalism
and sound performance of duties, while the
organizational structure is built in such a way
as to boost the professional growth and career
development of the employees. Aspecial
focus in the contract is the promotion of
those workers who decided to devote their
life to working for Kokshetauminvody. Those
employees, who have been working in the
company for 7 years and have achieved
certain results, are given the status of a
Kokshetauminvody veteran and are encouraged
by extra financial incentives paid to them.

At the moment, more than 200 veterans are


working in the company. This is a quarter
of the total number of people working for
Kokshetauminvody.
A special focus for Kokshetauminvody
is the participation in projects of national
importance, positively affecting the quality
of life of all Kazakhstani people. From the
beginning of its operation, the company has
been actively involved in clinical studies of
mineral water. Some important state standards
as to the techniques and methodology applied
in the production of mineral and table water
were developed with the direct participation
of Kokshetauminvody. The company is a regular
participant of meetings devoted to issues of
the related industry in the framework of the
Customs Union. The results of years of studies
formed the basis of the program Healthy Water
for Children, whichs implementation was
initiated and is funded by Kokshetauminvody.
Under this program, the company supplies
table biogenic water Turan to schools and
kindergartens in the city of Astana. The project
is implemented jointly with the authorities of
Astana, Institute for Nutrition Problems under
the Kazakh Academy of Nutrition, ministries
of healthcare and education, committee for
protection of childrens rights and committee
for technical regulation and metrology of the
Republic of Kazakhstan.
Having proved the status as a socially
responsible enterprise in Kazakhstan, the
company has been donating for many years
to hundreds of public organizations in the
Akmola region of Kazakhstan. Among them is
Public Association for Mercy and Health in the
Republic of Kazakhstan, PA Council of Veterans,
PA branch Alliance of Veterans of the Akmola
Region in Kazakhstan, PA Union of Afghan War
Veterans in Kokshetau, Private Foundation
Kosagaly Batyr, and many others.
Continuous development of the company,
production of high qualit y product s,
introduction of innovative technologies, and
implementation of social programs all this
makes the company focus on keeping the
competitiveness bar high and maintaining
the reputation of a social-oriented
enterprise. These are exactly the principles
the company has been based on
in its work for over 20
years, contributing to
the economic develop
ment of independent
Kazakhstan.
www.kmw.kz

Kazakhstan 2011# 6

139



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.: (727) 27 28333, 27 27444
E-mail: info@naptour.kz

Kazakhstan 2011# 6

143