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Supervision and Management Seminar

Motivational Design Document

EDTEC 670: Team Duala Tracy Carroll Stephen Casmar Laura Jarman Eunjae Kim Nadia Zaid

Table of Contents
Introduction ................................................................................................................... 1 Course and Context ..................................................................................................... 2 Learning Outcomes ..................................................................................................... 2 Motivational Analysis ....................................................................................................... 6 Attention Getting and Sustaining Features .................................................................. 7 Relevance Generating Features .................................................................................. 8 Confidence Generating Features ................................................................................. 8 Satisfaction Generating Features ................................................................................ 8 Recommendations .......................................................................................................... 9 Evaluations.................................................................................................................... 13 References .................................................................................................................... 14 Appendix ....................................................................................................................... 15 Assessment for Instructors ........................................................................................ 15 Assessment for Students ........................................................................................... 17

Introduction
Team Duala has been tasked to analyze the Supervision and Management workshop by Nan McKay, Inc, with an emphasis on its motivational elements. Nan McKay is a successful training organization that has already implemented much training for the public housing sector. With this in mind, Team Duala will recommend revisions based on our analysis of learner motivation during the Supervision and Management workshop. Learner motivation will be observed in the following ways: 1. During the workshop, learners will be observed and asked questions such as the ones below. 2. When the workshop has been completed, learners will be asked to fill out a postseminar questionnaire. Our objectives follow the ARCS model: Attention Learners will report that the seminar was engaging and mentally stimulating from beginning to end. Relevance Learners will report that the seminar content was relevant specifically to their performance needs as a future supervisor or manager. They will report that all skills and knowledge presented in the workshop helped them to improve their own foundation of knowledge. Learners will report and continue to report a satisfactory level of confidence after completing the 3-day seminar. Learners will complete exercises and activities within the set amount of time that the instructor has determined. After completing the exercises, the learner will also report satisfactory levels of confidence. Learners will be able to report in detail three different concepts from the seminar and how these concepts will help them as a supervisor or manager.

Confidence

Satisfaction

Supervision and Management Motivational Design

Course and Context Supervision and Management is a three -day workshop for supervisors and managers of public, section 8, and choice voucher housing. More specifically, the target audience consists of: frontline supervisors, middle managers, and executive managers; learners new to supervising staff and seasoned managers seeking to improve target skills; managers seeking to establish a quality supervisory management environment at the public housing authority to achieve business objectives. There are no prerequisites for this course. This course is a stand-alone course for any level of supervision or management. There is an optional certification exam, costing $150, for learners at the end of the workshop. The audiences attitudes towards learning are split between positive and negative. Positive attitudes are from the fact that learning opportunities, such as this seminar, can advance their careers. However, many see school as boring and dislike the fact that it is mandatory in some cases. The course itself is structured around PowerPoint slides. Role playing, case studies, group discussions, question and answer sessions, and occasional assessments are mixed in.

Learning Outcomes Taken from the Nan McKay Supervision and Management training: DAY 1 Educate supervisors and managers of public, section 8, and choice voucher housing on their role, competencies, principles and best practices Develop their skills through discussion, learning activities, analysis, assessments, and exercises Develop a career map to learn about themselves as supervisors DAY 2 Supervisors and managers will understand their role in planning and recruiting the workforce Identify criteria for effective job descriptions and performance standards Recognize strategies and steps in selecting and hiring Understand team building, employee motivation, delegation, and conflict and crisis management DAY 3 Supervision and Management Motivational Design 4

Understand quality control systems and how to set them up Recognize laws and regulations to avoid discrimination Understand the process of considering reasonable accommodation requests and apply critical thinking skills to this process Understand ethics and recognize common ethical challenges Identify conflicts of interests Explore preventative internal controls

Supervision and Management Motivational Design

Motivational Analysis

Figure 1. Four Parameters of Student Motivation Four parameters of students motivation were analyzed; attention readiness, perceived relevance, confidence, and satisfaction potential. Attention readiness is a measure of the students likelihood of intellectual curiosity to the material presented. Perceived relevance is a measure of the students belief in the benefits they will gain from the course material. Confidence refers to the students perception of comfort and challenge with the course material. Satisfaction potential refers to the students beliefs of the of the benefits of the outcome of the course. The below information was compiled based on a presentation made by a Nan McKay representative and email correspondence. The findings are presented graphically in Figure 1. Ideally, all parameters would fall between the Acceptable portion of the X-axis. Parameters that fall outside this area are ones that can be improved. Attention Readiness: For those participants who have never had the class (group A1), attention readiness is expected to be satisfactory; possibly mitigated negatively by talking to students that have had the class prior. For students that have had the class previously (group A2), the repetition of the training and the density of the material would lead many of the learners to perceive the material to be boring.

Supervision and Management Motivational Design

Perceived Relevance: Relevance is mixed. Learners may see the material as dense and not see how all the information is directly relevant to their day-to-day jobs. There may be some anxiety felt in that if the training is not completed in a satisfactory manner they may lose that facet of their job. Relevance may be increased due to the fact that completion of the training is mandatory for promotion and retention of the position. Possible feelings of jeopardy- personal or professional- due to regret or remorse for making an incorrect decision, and also due to possibilities of personal legal liability, may increase relevance and therefore motivation to learn the material. Felt Confidence: Confidence may be weak due to the fact that people are completing the training but mistakes are still being made organization wide. There may be a lack of confidence in their own abilities due to limited education. Confidence may also be weak because of anxiety cause by fear of making mistakes and causing wrongful evictions or incorrect rent paid as well as knowledge that impending budget cuts may hinder future employment. Satisfaction Potential: Satisfaction potential is weak because intrinsic motivation is substandard. The training is mandatory and the material is perceived as boring.

Our analysis of the existing course revealed some positive motivational features, as well as some problematic areas:

Attention Getting and Sustaining Features Positive Features: o Questioning consistently used as a technique to pique curiosity ("How can this seminar make a difference?"). o Learning activities to engage the student: note taking to maintain interest during lecture sections, periodic self-assessments given. o Use of graphics to appeal to visual learners (PowerPoint slides). o Learning activity: use of discussions to vary the presentation. o Whole group and small group activities to vary the presentation style. o Optional kinesthetic learning activity to get participants out of their seats. o Acting out scenarios to nurture thinking challenges. Problematic Areas: o A lot of reading involved, which participants might find boring. o Three days of mostly seated activity. o A lot of dry, potentially boring material to be covered in a relatively short amount of time.

Supervision and Management Motivational Design

Relevance Generating Features Positive Features: o Certification exam at the end is connected to the trainees keeping their jobs. o Learning objectives are clearly explained. o Learning activity: "You: Now & Later," which serves as a career map geared to the individual participant. o Motive matching learning activity: "Mission and Vision for You," which connects the trainees' values with the mission and vision of the job. Problematic Areas: o A large volume of information can be overwhelming and cause participants to shut down.

Confidence Generating Features Positive Features: o Learning activity - "Leadership Skills Survey" to enhance participants' belief in their own leadership competence. o Self-graded quizzes provide feedback as to how well the participants are retaining the information. o Materials provided (a hard copy workbook) which allow the participants to control the amount of studying they do outside of the seminar. Problematic Areas: o Test anxiety because a large amount of material is being covered in a short amount of time.

Satisfaction Generating Features Positive Features: o Certificate of Completion is available at the end of the course if the participants attend each day. o Certificate plaque is given if they pass the exam. o The purchase of Continuing Education Units is available. o Participants prepare a brief self-presentation about their supervisory skills to the group (a "show and tell" activity). Problematic Areas: o The participants' satisfaction is largely dependent upon passing the course. 8

Supervision and Management Motivational Design

Recommendations
Dualas recommendations are intended to enhance the great activities that the NMA staff has developed, while not lengthening the workshop. You will see that the following tactics will fall into three categories. They will: 1. Provide learners with a gamified/group-based experience to engage all learners continuously. 2. Replace the content of some slides with role plays and multi-media (or enhance the slides with role plays and multi-media in the event that replacing slides is not an option). 3. Be learner-centered (instead of instructor-centered). Gamification is using game-like thinking and game mechanics to engage and motivate learners. We would like to recommend providing your learners with a team-based, gamified experience. Generally learners participate better when grouped together as they dont want to let the team down and studies show that 80% o f learners are motivated by social factors (Zichermann & Cunningham, 2011). Giving the learners a group will give them a social connection that will keep them motivated and engaged. Learners will participate in various activities as a group throughout the three day seminar such as: Role plays done in teams to demonstrate proficiencies and or skills (A). Team checklist to be filled out as topics have been covered or objectives achieved (C). Various competitions scattered throughout the seminar that will increase participation and understanding (A, R, C, S).

Another facet to this gamified/team-based approach is a level system that recognizes people who have completed the training in the past and calls upon their experience and expertise. The idea is that the veterans will feel honored and thus be more engaged as they take on a mentorship type role (S). New learners will feel more confident because they are grouped with more experienced veterans (C). Role plays already appear to be a part of the curriculum; however, the twist that we recommend is that the role play content be learner-generated based on the topic (A, R). It was obvious that much time and effort was put into the development of the activities for this workshop. One thing we noticed, however, was that the majority of activities

Supervision and Management Motivational Design

were done in their seats. We recommend getting the learners up out of their seats as much as possible to shake things up and increase attention. Shifting the focus from the instructor to the learner will increase four key motivational attributes: attention, relevance, confidence, and satisfaction. Here is an example day plan: Beginning: Start the day with an engaging activity. This will get the learners attention. Once you have their attention, immediately segue into relevant content. Starting with the history of and information about NMA will cause the learners to tune out before the seminar has even begun as they may not see this information as relevant. Perhaps the information about NMA could be presented around slide 15, though you run the risk of losing the learners. Show clips from The Office of effective and ineffective boss tactics and discuss what makes a supervisor effective (A). These clips can be referred back to as examples throughout the workshop. Break the teams into groups, point out that each team has several veterans who are distinguished by a special name badge. (This can be as simple as them wearing a green name badge when everyone elses is black.) (S) Introduce Stories of Success activity that will be ongoing throughout the seminar. (Ask any veteran that has a success story that is related to a skill or knowledge acquired in the class to write their name on a slip of paper and put it in a hat.) (R, C) State future value: what specifically will the learners be able to do when they finish. (R) The above learning objectives (what the learner will be able to do) can be made into a checklist and given to each team. As each objective is achieved, the team will check it off the list, building a sense of accomplishment. (C) Give a quick overview of the days highlights or fun things that will take place throughout the day so that learners have activities to look forward to. (S)

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Introduce time and stress management techniques that will be seen throughout the seminar. (S)

During: Now that you have their attention, the goal of these tactics is to maintain motivation throughout the meat of the workshop. Stories of Success - During the seminar, anytime a short change of scenery seems to be in order, pull a veterans name out of the hat and have him or her share a success story. (A, R, C, S) Veterans share their stress management and organizational techniques (less focus on slides and more on personal experience, with instructor filling in gaps as needed) such as apps, specialized calendars, etc.). (S) Practice meditation exercises done at desk. (S) Teams will compete in various competitions. The winning team will be awarded points or a poker chip. The team with the most points or chips at the end of the three days wins a prize. Team rank could be displayed on a leader board to fuel competition. (A, R, C, S) Play Compliance Trivia between sections: learners will play as teams. (A) Authentic role play scenarios. Some should be learner-developed. Teams can create scenarios for other teams to role play. Questions new learners have can be integrated into role plays. (R) Role play each skill as it is learned. (C) After role plays, have a quick vote by round of applause for best role play. Give points or poker chips to the winning team. (A) Use videos to highlight key points. (ex. Lynda.com has a great free series on effective meetings) (A, R, S)

End: Use these tactics to end the day on a high note. This will generate momentum that will carry into the next day and at the end of the seminar hopefully generate enthusiasm as they head back to their respective offices. Individuals debrief their career maps with their team, giving each other feedback. (C, S) Recognize that days winning team. (A, S) On the last day award the winning team with a prize of some sort. (A, C, S)

Specific Activity Idea: Ideally managed housing unit Supervision and Management Motivational Design 11

Supply each team with a grid that has all components that are managed. Have learners create a sample of an ideally managed housing unit. Share the ideally managed unit with the greater group. Combine same topics and add to list. Reject topics that are not workable. A final grid will be designed showing the components of an ideal housing unit. Discuss how to achieve each of the ideal housing components.

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Evaluation
Success will be measured through a series of assessments: Attention Learners will be asked about the level of interest they had for each day of the seminar and for the workshop as a whole, at the end of the seminar. Relevance Learners will be asked to about how relevant each of the topics covered in the seminar were. Additionally, they will be asked to rate the relevancy of seminar to their life and current profession. Confidence Learners will be asked about the confidence level they had while working on the seminar material. Learners will be asked to fill out a postseminar questionnaire to define answers quantitatively. Satisfaction After the completion of the workshop, learners will be asked to list the different concepts that were covered in the seminar and how these concepts will assist them in the future. These questions will also be asked in the post-seminar questionnaire. All assessments will be given in the form of online surveys. Example survey questions available in the appendix.

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References
Keller, J. M. (2010). Motivational design for learning and performance: The ARCS model approach. New York, NY: Springer. Nan McKay, Inc. (2010). Supervision and Management Workshop. Retrieved from: http://www.nanmckay.com/s-289-supervision-and-management.aspx. Zichermann, G., Cunningham, C. (2011). Gamification by design: Implementing game mechanics. Sausalito, CA: O'Reilly.

Motivational Design Document Worksheets Right-click the link below for the completed MDD Worksheets: Team Duala_MDD Worksheets 1-8

This document was prepared as a course requirement for EDTEC 670: Exploratory Learning through Simulation and Games at San Diego State University. All opinions expressed are solely those of the author(s). Last modified on October 3, 2011.

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Appendix 1: Assessment for Instructors


The following list will acquaint you with techniques that may be useful to you in teaching your students. Additionally, it is good to review it after your seminar, to assess the success of your classes. During the introduction to the class: 1. Were you able to use a hook to interest the student? This can be in the form of a problem or paradox. 2. Are you able to relate the course material to your students interests? 3. Was an icebreaker incorporated to engage students who are taking the class for the first time vs. those who are being recertified? 4. Did you relate the class objectives to the students jobs? 5. Did you show the students a roadmap of the material that would be covered? 6. Were class rules explained in a parsimonious manner? Throughout the class: 1. Were you able to incorporate: Energetic movements Use of language, eye contact, and facial expressions that conveyed enthusiasm Intonation, pace of speech, and volume of voice are appropriate to keep students attention 2. Did you allow students questions and comments? 3. Were you able to use examples related to the students job? 4. Did you use terminology appropriate to your students ability and contextual knowledge? 5. Did you use the students names? 6. Did you: Actively listen and respond to students questions or comments? Use open and positive body language, eye contact, and facial expression when interacting with students? Provide feedback to students which included: Positive feedback, recognition and credit for correct responses Neutral feedback to correct students incorrect responses 7. Allow the corrected student to seek further clarification 8. Acknowledge the students and class when appropriate 9. Were you able to offer tangible rewards, such as a refreshment break, at the end of a particularly long or boring section

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Occasionally throughout the class: 1. Were you able to incorporate: Questions to pose problems or elicit responses from students and keep them engaged Incorporate experiences, goals, and problems from students 2. Did you request feedback and clarification if students seemed confused, bored, angry or disinterested? 3. Make positive remarks, attributing students success to their eff ort? At the end of the class: 1. Did you recognize the accomplishments of the students? 2. Thank any students that were a great help throughout the class? 3. Express appreciation of students effort?

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Appendix 2: Assessment for Students


During the introduction to the class: 1. Were you hooked at the beginning of the class? 2. Is the course material relatable to your interests? To your job? 3. Was there an icebreaker incorporated that engaged you? 4. Did the instructor show you a roadmap of the material that would be covered? 5. Were class rules explained in a parsimonious manner? Throughout the class: 1. Was the instructor using: Energetic movements Language, eye contact, and facial expressions that conveyed enthusiasm Intonation, pace of speech, and volume of voice that kept your attention 2. Did the instructor allow you to ask questions and comments? 3. Were you able to use examples related to the your job? 4. Did you: Actively listen and respond to other students questions or comments? Use open and positive body language, eye contact, and facial expression when interacting with other students? At the end of the class: 1. Did you feel accomplished at the end of the class? 2. Did you feel confident about your role as a supervisor or manager?

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