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(Cheevers Art of the Devastating Phrase magazine's article)

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-02069964-031001-06-12
031001 .

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2012


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Cheevers Art of the Devastating Phrase / http://www.newyorker.com/
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1. ......................................................................................................5
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2.1 ......................................................................................................15
Cheevers Art of the Devastating Phrase...................................................................................15
Cheevers Art of the Devastating Phrase...................................................................................17
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1.
1.1

.
:
1. .
2. .
3. ,
.
1.2 .
The
New Yorker . Brad Leithauser.
1.3 .
: , .
: , .
:

,
, .
.
:


. .
, , ,
5

.


.
, :
1.
:
1.1

( ):
1) A lifelong admirer of his work, I find myself again returning to one of
my least favorite Cheever stories, Boy in Rome.
2) Still, I dont think Ive ever read a story by Cheever that failed to offer
authentic rewards, large or small, and a paragraph toward the close of Boy in
Rome haunts me.

, :
1) The paragraph is a modest island, surrounded on either side by a sea of white
space and wholly contained within the gently curving shores of a pair of
parentheses.
2) This literary device may sound potentially tiresome.


():
writer, paragraph, parentheses, poetry, rectangle.
, , , :
John Cheever, Ossining, Rome, Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Flaubert, James.
1.2

:
6

,
:
1)

A lifelong admirer of his work, I find myself again returning

to one of my least favorite Cheever stories, Boy in Rome.


2)

A new voice has circumspectly, wistfully intruded on the young mans

narration.
:
:
1) This is no authorial surrogate; this is John Cheever, stepping off the page to
introduce himself.
2) The speaker identifies himself as a grown man in the old prison and river
town of Ossining, swatting hornets on this autumn afternoon with a rolled-up
newspaper.
:
1) Still, I dont think Ive ever read a story by Cheever that failed to offer
authentic rewards, large or small, and a paragraph toward the close of
Boy in Rome haunts me.

narration, dimensions, complexities, life, sense.


1.3

Still, I dont think Ive ever read a story by Cheever that failed to offer authentic
rewards, large or small, and a paragraph toward the close of Boy in Rome
haunts me.
2.
:
2.1

:
7

But those who love Cheevers fiction will recognize here a familiar,
defining trait: he was forever emerging from two dimensions into three from the
rectangle of the page into the cubic complexities of actual life.
, (
, ):
Had he lived, John Cheever would have turned a hundred this week.
:
:
1)Had he lived, John Cheever would have turned a hundred this week
2)A lifelong admirer of his work, I find myself again returning to one
of my least favorite Cheever stories, Boy in Rome.

- :
vapid, overlong, wastrel, masterly.
2.2

:
Had he lived, John Cheever would have turned a hundred this week.
2.3

:
But those who love Cheevers fiction will recognize here a familiar, defining trait:
he was forever emerging from two dimensions into three from the rectangle of the
page into the cubic complexities of actual life.
3. .
:
yarn of a wastrel writer, vivid immediacy, best work.

:
8

- .
1.4 .

.
I. ,

.
1)
:
parentheses- .
2) :

:
John Cheever , Hemingway - , Fitzgerald , Flaubert - , James .

:
Rome , Ossining .

:
Boy in Rome .
II.
, .
.
9

,
.
.
1) :
authorial- , number , device- , particularly-
.
2) :
sense - , accomplishment , speaker - .
III.

..

, ,

.
1) :
1

Had he lived, John Cheever ,


would have turned a hundred

this week
.
A lifelong admirer of his work, ,
I find myself again returning to ,
one

of

Cheever

my least favorite
stories,

Boy

Rome.

in ,
.

3) :
- :
4

Still, I dont think Ive ever


read a story by Cheever that ,
failed

to

offer

authentic ,

rewards, large or small, and a ;


paragraph toward the close of
Boy in Rome haunts me.

,
10

.
14

All four were masterly stylists


[...].

[...].

( ):
9

This is no authorial surrogate; this is ,


John Cheever, stepping off the page ,
to introduce himself.

:
4

Still, I dont think Ive ever read a


story by Cheever that failed to offer
authentic rewards, large or small, and

a paragraph toward the close of Boy ;


in Rome haunts me


,
.

:
12

The more you read Cheever, the more ,


you feel his best work is often less ,
about plot than about language , , ,
11

about poetry in the broadest sense.

3) :
2

A lifelong admirer of his work, I find

myself again returning to one of , ,


my least favorite

Cheever

Boy in Rome.

stories,

4) :
:
6

But I am not a boy in Rome, it :


begins.

:
5

The paragraph is a modest island, - ,


surrounded on either side by a sea of
white space and wholly contained ,
within the gently curving shores of a
pair of parentheses.

5) :
:
9

This is no authorial surrogate; this is ,


John Cheever, stepping off the page
,

to introduce himself.
,
,
.

12

6) :
4

Still, I dont think Ive ever read a


story by Cheever that failed to offer ,
authentic rewards, large or small, ,

and a paragraph toward the close of ;


Boy in Rome haunts me.


,
.

IV. :
1.

: John Cheever , Hemingway -

, Fitzgerald - , Flaubert - , James ,


Rome , Ossining .
2. : admirer - , unconvincing , overlong .
3. : sense - , accomplishment , speaker
- .
4. : Cheevers fiction ,
literary device , masterly stylists .
5. :
11

But those who love Cheevers fiction


will

recognize

defining

trait:

here
he

a
was

familiar, ,
forever

emerging from two dimensions into


three from the rectangle of the page

into the cubic complexities of actual


life.


.
13

14

2.
2.1
Cheevers Art of the Devastating Phrase.
Had he lived, John Cheever would have turned a hundred this week. A
lifelong admirer of his work, I find myself returning to one of my least favorite
Cheever stories, Boy in Rome. Delivered through the unconvincing voice of a
teen-age American boy living with his vapid expatriate mother in a Roman villa, it
unfolds an overlong yarn of a wastrel writer. Still, I dont think Ive ever read a
story by Cheever that failed to offer authentic rewards, large or small, and a
paragraph toward the close of Boy in Rome haunts me.
The paragraph is a modest island, surrounded on either side by a sea of white
space and contained within the gently curving shores of a pair of parentheses. But
I am not a boy in Rome, it begins. A new voice has circumspectly, wistfully
intruded on the young mans narration. The speaker identifies himself as a grown
man in the old prison and river town of Ossining, swatting hornets on this autumn
afternoon with a rolled-up newspaper. This is no authorial surrogate; this is John
Cheever, stepping off the page to introduce himself.
This literary device may sound potentially tiresome. But those who love
Cheevers fiction will recognize here a familiar, defining trait: he was forever
emerging from two dimensions into three from the rectangle of the page into the
cubic complexities of actual life.
The more you read Cheever, the more you feel his best work is often less
about plot than about languageabout poetry in the broadest sense. You feel, too,
the vivid immediacy, and the benign influence of a number of authors
particularly Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Flaubert, and James. All four were masterly
stylists, and at the end of the day Cheevers prime accomplishment may be
stylistic: the construction of something readily identifiable as a Cheever paragraph,
a Cheever sentence, even a Cheever phrase.

15


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16

, ,
.
1

Cheevers

Art

of

Devastating Phrase.
2

the .1 2
.

Had he lived, John Cheever 3


would have turned a hundred 4,

this week.
5 .6
A lifelong admirer of his work, 8

I find myself returning to one of , 9 ,


my least favorite

Cheever14

stories, Boy in Rome.

10

11

13,

Delivered17

through

12

.
the

unconvincing18 voice of a teen- ,


age American boy21 living with
his vapid expatriate mother in a

Roman villa15, it unfolds19 an ,


overlong23 yarn of a wastrel
5

writer16.
22 20.
Still, I dont think30 Ive ever 24
read a story by Cheever that ,
failed

to

offer

authentic

25,

rewards26, large or small, and a

paragraph toward the close of ; 27


Boy in Rome haunts me.

28 ,
17

29.
6

The paragraph is37 a modest31

island, surrounded on either side

by a sea of white33 space34 and 32 ,


contained within the gently
curving shores35 of a pair36 of .
7

parentheses.
But I am39 not a boy in 38:
Rome, it begins. 40

A new voice has circumspectly,


wistfully41

intruded

on

the .

young mans narration.


The speaker identifies himself ,
as a grown man in the old
prison45 and river town of
Ossining42, swatting hornets on

this43 autumn afternoon with a 44


10

rolled-up newspaper.
.
47
This is no authorial surrogate ; 46 ,
this is John Cheever, stepping

off49 the page50 to introduce 48,


himself.
11

This

literary

device

51,

52.
may

sound53 potentially54 tiresome.


12

.
But those who love Cheevers
fiction55 will recognize here a

familiar56, defining trait: he was :


18

forever61 emerging from two 57


dimensions into three from the 58
rectangle of the page into the ,

59

cubic complexities of actual


life.

60

.
13

The

more

you62

read ,

Cheever, the more you feel63 his , 65


best work is66 often67 less about , , ,
plot than about language
about poetry in the broadest 64.
sense.
14

You

feel,

too,

the

vivid 72

immediacy, and the benign


influence

of

number

authorsparticularly
Hemingway68,
15

of
,

Fitzgerald69, ,

Flaubert70, and James71.


.
All
four
were
masterly 73
stylists75, and at the end of the
day

Cheevers

accomplishment

prime
may

74.
76

be 77

stylistic: the construction of 78


something80 readily identifiable

79,

as a Cheever paragraph, a , 81
Cheever

sentence,

even

Cheever82 phrase.

19

2.2
1
1

. .

.
2
3

.
4

.
5

.
6

.
7

3
8

.
9

, .

10

.
11

+ ( ),

.
12

stories.

.
13

.
20

14

.
4
15

, ,
.
16

, .
17

delivered

, .
18

.
19

unfolds

,
.
20

.
21

boy,

.
22

writer

,
.
23

overlong +

( ),
.
5
24
25

to read, .

.
21

26

.
27

and ,

.
28

.
29

haunts (

) .
.
30

think.

.
6
31

.
32

.
33

white,

.
34

space

( ) .
35

(curving

shores)

).

curving

, shores -
). .
36

(a pair).

.
37

to be,

.
7
22

38

.
39

to be,

.
40

- .
8
41

wistfully.

9
42

.
43

this.

.
44

.
45

.
10
46

.
47

.
48

. .

49

stepping off .

.
50

page

.
.
51

..
23

52

.
11
53

. .

54

.
12
55

+ ,
, .
56

familiar.

57

( ),

.
58

, .

59

, .

60

.
61

forever.

.
13
62

you.

.
63

. .

64

+ ,

.
65

. best ( ).

66

to be,

.
67

often.

.
24

14
68

69

70

71

72

15
73

masterly

.
74

.
75

.
76
77

.
,

.
78
79

. .
stylistic .

.
80

the construction of something.

.
81

Cheever

. .
82

Cheever.

25

III
1 (John Cheever) - ,
,
,

The Stories of
John Cheever.
The
New Republic. 1935 The New Yorker
, 1938
.
1942 .
.
1953 .
1956
. 1964 -
, .
1964 The New Yorker ,
.
.
- 1969 .
1977 .
. 1978
, .

26

2 (Boy in Rome)
, . .
3 (Ossining) - - ()
38 , .
4 (Hemingway) (. 2 1961, , ,
)

1954 .

1926 ,

, 1920- .
1927
, 1933 .

. ,
.
, !
(1929)
,
.
.
5 (Fitzgerald) - ,

.

, 1925 ,
(.) . 1920- .


1930- .
27

(. Gustave

1821, 8

1880,

Flaubert)

(.

12

-, .
(1856) (1862).

(1856), 1851 .

,

, .
:

. (
) ,
.

(1857).

(1869)

. ,
1848 .
7 (. Henry James) (. 15 1843, 28

1916, ) ,

XIX XX . 51
20 , 112 12 .
-

, 1878;

, 1881; , 1903).

28


1. , . . / . . . .:
, 2004. 352 .
2. , . . / . . .
.: ; , 2002. 320 .
3. , .. : ./ ..

. . .. .- .: , 2001.- 421.
4. , . : . - -, 2006.- 160.
5. . . / . . . .:
, 2002. 416 .
6. http://www.newyorker.com/
7. www.wikipedia.com

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