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PROPOSED BULK FUEL STORAGE FACILITY

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT FOR A PROPOSED BULK FUEL STORAGE FACILITY FOR NAMCOR WALVIS BAY - NAMIBIA

Assessed by:

In collaboration with:

Assessed for:

Tel.: +264-61 257411

Tel.: +264-61 223336

Tel.: +264-61-379000

Tel.: +264-61-2045000

Contact details: Note that all comments and queries during the evaluation of this document must be addressed to:
Geo Pollution Technologies Pty. Ltd. Pierre Botha P.O. Box 11073 Windhoek Tel.: (+264-61) 257411 Fax.: (+264-61) 257411 E-mail: wscc@namibnet.com

The Clearance Certificate must be issued to:


National Petroleum Corporation of Namibia (Pty) Ltd (NAMCOR) Private Bag 13196 Windhoek Namibia

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY An Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) has been commissioned by the National Petroleum Corporation of Namibia (Pty) Ltd (NAMCOR) for a proposed bulk fuel storage facility and associated pipeline route in Walvis Bay. NAMCOR, under the mandatorship of the Namibian Government, has entered into a process of establishing a bulk fuel storage facility at Walvis Bay. An internal, preliminary screening study was conducted on three sites in the Walvis Bay area, to select an appropriate site for the facility. One of the criteria for selecting the best site from the three was potential environmental issues. EnviroSolutions cc conducted the screening investigation on the three sites, to establish the environmentally least sensitive site, where the proposed project is to be located. Site B (See Figure A1, Appendix A) was found to be the most suitable site for the proposed bulk fuel storage facility. The proposed site is located east of the main entrance road into Walvis Bay, from Swakopmund (east of the weighbridge). The EIA is being undertaken in accordance with the requirements of Namibias Environmental Assessment Policy and the Environmental Management Act (2007), and other relevant legislation and regulations pertaining to Environmental Assessments and protection of the environment in the Republic of Namibia. A host of international policies and standards are also being taken into account. A public participation process was followed consisting of a public meeting in the suburb of Narraville, as well as a meeting with key authorities and stakeholders. Issues identified during this process have all been considered during the EIA. Feedback will be given to those on the stakeholders list (i.e. those who have registered as stakeholders and who attended the public meetings) during a follow-up meeting, to report on the outcome of the EIA. Potential impacts identified following the baseline studies and public participation meetings have been assessed making use of a comprehensive assessment methodology. This included considering impact significance in terms of its nature, extent, duration, probability and intensity of each impact. Identified impacts were assessed in each of the two stages of the project, namely the construction phase and the operation phase. Apart from the site specified impacts associated with the proposed facility, impacts associated with the pipeline and its proposed routes were assessed. Two different alternatives were presented for the pipeline route and these were presented to the Interested and Affected Parties (I&APs). Impacts associated with the proposed buffer tanks and pump station at NAMPORT are also put forward in this report. A brief description is also presented on existing infrastructure in Walvis Bay and those that need to be upgraded or introduced (e.g. a new rail link to the facility) to ensure the smooth operation of the bulk fuel storage facility. In general, the proposed bulk fuel storage facility would pose limited environmental and social risks. The proposed bulk fuel storage facility would contribute to the economy of Walvis Bay and the Region by creating jobs and diversifying the economic activity. The site is generally suitable for the proposed bulk fuel storage facility. All environmental risks can be minimised and managed through implementing preventative measures and sound management systems. It is recommended that environmental performance be monitored regularly to ensure compliance and that corrective measures be taken if necessary. It is also recommended that this information be made available to the Community at a regular basis.

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TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.
1.1.

BACKGROUND AND INTRODUCTION......................................................... 5


Assumptions and Limitations................................................................................................. 6

2.
2.1.

PROJECT SCOPE & OBJECTIVES................................................................. 6


Terms of Reference ............................................................................................................... 6

3. 4.
4.1. 4.2. 4.3. 4.4. 4.5. 4.6. 4.7. 4.8. 4.9.

METHODOLOGY .............................................................................................. 6 ADMINISTRATIVE, LEGAL AND POLICY REQUIREMENTS .................. 7

The Namibian Constitution .................................................................................................... 7 Environmental Assessment Policy of Namibia ....................................................................... 7 Environmental Management Act of Namibia (2007)............................................................... 8 Petroleum Products and Energy Act of Namibia (Act No. 13 of 1990) .................................... 8 Pollution Control and Waste Management Bill (guideline only).............................................. 9 Atmospheric Pollution Prevention Ordinance of Namibia (No. 11 of 1976)............................. 9 Hazardous Substances Ordinance (No. 14 of 1974) ................................................................ 9 Prevention and Combating of Pollution of the Sea by Oil Act (No. 6 of 1981) ........................ 9 Municipality of Walvis Bay (by-laws, guidelines and regulations) .......................................... 9 4.9.1. Environmental Impact Assessment procedure guidelines................................................ 9 4.9.2. Draft Structure Plan of the Municipality of Walvis Bay ................................................ 10 4.9.3. Integrated Environmental Policy of Walvis Bay (Agenda 21 Project)............................ 10 4.10. Relevant International Standards, Treaties and Conventions ................................................. 10 4.10.1. The International Finance Corporations (IFC) Policy on Social and Environmental Sustainability ............................................................................................................................... 10 4.10.2. The United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea ................................................. 11

5.
5.1. 5.2. 5.3. 5.4. 5.5.

PROJECT DETAILS ........................................................................................ 11


Proposed tank specifications for the Bulk Fuel Storage Facility ............................................ 12 Tank specifications for the booster pump and buffer tank site ............................................... 13 Pipeline Specifications......................................................................................................... 13 Installation and related activities .......................................................................................... 14 NAMCOR Social and Environmental Policies...................................................................... 15

6.
6.1.

THE BASELINE RECEIVING ENVIRONMENT.......................................... 15

SOCIO-ECONOMIC STATUS QUO .................................................................................. 15 6.1.1. Regional context.......................................................................................................... 15 6.1.2. Walvis Bay .................................................................................................................. 16 6.1.3. Surrounding Land Use ................................................................................................ 17 6.1.4. Structure Plans vision for the study area .................................................................... 18 6.2. BIO-PHYSICAL STATUS QUO......................................................................................... 18 6.2.1. Climate ....................................................................................................................... 18 6.2.2. Corrosion Environment ............................................................................................... 19 6.2.3. Topography and Surface water.................................................................................... 20 6.2.4. Geology and Hydrogeology ......................................................................................... 20 6.3. Fauna and Flora................................................................................................................... 20

7.
7.1. 7.2.

STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT ................................................................. 21


Meeting with key authorities and stakeholders...................................................................... 21 Public Meeting .................................................................................................................... 22

8.
8.1.

ASSESSMENT OF IMPACTS.......................................................................... 24

Overall socio-economic benefits and issues.......................................................................... 25 8.1.1. Socio-economic benefits .............................................................................................. 25 8.2. Development phases and associated issues ........................................................................... 26 8.2.1. Construction phase of the bulk fuel storage facility ...................................................... 26 8.2.2. Construction phase of the pipeline ............................................................................... 27 8.2.3. Operational phase of bulk fuel storage facility and pipeline ......................................... 28 8.2.4. Heritage Impacts......................................................................................................... 33 8.2.5. Ecological issues......................................................................................................... 33

9. ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT PLAN................................................ 33 10. CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS ............................................ 34 11. REFERENCES .................................................................................................. 35

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LIST OF TABLES
Table 1: Proposed Storage Details ....................................................................................... 12 Table 2. Tank specifications for the booster pump and buffer tank site ............................ 13 Table 3: Selected census indicators for the Walvis Bay Urban Constituency (NPC, 2003), except population projection (SPC,1999) ............................................................................ 17 Table 4: Summary Climate Data ......................................................................................... 19 Table 5. Material weight loss measured in mils/year after 20 years exposure (Contrarian Metal Resources) .................................................................................................................. 19 Table 6: General Regional Flora Data................................................................................. 21 Table 7: General Regional Fauna Data ............................................................................... 21 Table 8: Summary of issues raised at the meeting with key Authorities ............................ 22 Table 9: Key issues emanating from the Public Meeting .................................................... 23 Table 10: Criteria for Impact Evaluation (DEAT 2006)..................................................... 24 Table 11: Impact Evaluation Socio-economy ................................................................... 26 Table 12: Impact Evaluation Construction Phase of bulk fuel storage facility ............... 27 Table 13: Impact Evaluation Construction Phase of the pipeline.................................... 28 Table 14: Impact Evaluation Operational Phase ............................................................. 33

APPENDIX A
Figure A1. Regional map. .................................................................................................... 39 Figure A2. Location map. .................................................................................................... 40

APPENDIX B
Background Information Document (BID). ........................................................................ 42

APPENDIX C
Minutes of Stakeholder Meeting and the Attendance List.................................................. 47

APPENDIX D
Minutes of Public Meeting and the Attendance List. .......................................................... 56

LIST OF ACRONYMS
AGO ATM B&P BID DEAT DPK EIA EMP EMS EPZ HDI HPI HES HFO I&APs IFC ISO LRP NAMCOR NAMPORT Automotive gas oil (Diesel) Atmosphere (Pressure) Burmeister & Partners (Pty) Ltd Background Information Document Department of Environmental Affairs and Tourism (South Africa) Duel Purpose Kerosene Environmental Impact Assessment Environmental Management Plan Environmental Management System Export Processing Zone Human Development Index Human Poverty Index Health, Environment and Safety Heavy Fuel Oil Interested and Affected Parties International Finance Corporation International Organisation for Standardisation Lead Replacement Petrol National Petroleum Corporation of Namibia (Pty) Ltd Namibian Ports Authority

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MET NPC PPPPs RoD SANS TOR ULP VAT WM WOM

Ministry of Environmental and Tourism (Namibia) National Planning Commission Projects, Plans, Policies and Programmes Record of Decision South African National Standards (Replacing SABS) Terms of Reference Unleaded Petrol Value Added Tax With Mitigation (Significance of Impact) Without Mitigation (Significance of Impact)

GLOSSARY OF TERMS
Assessment - The process of collecting, organising, analysing, interpreting and communicating information relevant to decision making. Alternatives - A possible course of action, in place of another, that would meet the same purpose and need but which would avoid or minimize negative impacts or enhance project benefits. These can include alternative locations/sites, routes, layouts, processes, designs, schedules and/or inputs. The no-go alternative constitutes the without project option and provides a benchmark against which to evaluate changes; development should result in net benefit to society and should avoid undesirable negative impacts. Competent authority - means a body or person empowered under the local authorities act or a delegation made under the Pollution Prevention and Waste Management Bill to enforce the rule of law. Cumulative Impacts - in relation to an activity, means the impact of an activity that in itself may not be significant but may become significant when added to the existing and potential impacts eventuating from similar or diverse activities or undertakings in the area. Evaluation means the process of ascertaining the relative importance or significance of information, the light of peoples values, preference and judgements in order to make a decision. Environment - As defined in the Environmental Assessment Policy and Environmental Management Act - land, water and air; all organic and inorganic matter and living organisms as well as biological diversity; the interacting natural systems that include components referred to in sub-paragraphs, the human environment insofar as it represents archaeological, aesthetic, cultural, historic, economic, palaentological or social values. Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) - process of assessment of the effects of a development on the environment. Environmental Management Plan (EMP) - A working document on environmental and socio-economic mitigation measures, which must be implemented by several responsible parties during all the phases of the proposed project. Environmental Management System (EMS) - An Environment Management System, or EMS, is a comprehensive approach to managing environmental issues, integrating environment-oriented thinking into every aspect of business management. An EMS ensures environmental considerations are a priority, along with other concerns such as costs, product quality, investments, PR productivity and strategic planning. An EMS generally makes a positive impact on a companys bottom line. It increases efficiency and focuses on customer needs and marketplace conditions, improving both the companys financial and environmental performance. By using an EMS to convert environmental problems into commercial opportunities, companies usually become more competitive. Hazard - Anything that has the potential to cause damage to life, property and/or the environment. The hazard of a particular material or installation is constant; that is, it would present the same hazard wherever it was present.

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Interested and Affected Party (I&AP) - any person, group of persons or organisation interested in, or affected by an activity; and any organ of state that may have jurisdiction over any aspect of the activity. Mitigate - The implementation of practical measures to reduce adverse impacts. Proponent (Applicant) - Any person who has submitted or intends to submit an application for an authorisation, as legislated by the National Environmental Assessment Policy, to undertake an activity or activities identified as a listed activity or listed activities; or in any other notice published by the Minister or Ministry of Environment & Tourism. Public - Citizens who have diverse cultural, educational, political and socio-economic characteristics. The public is not a homogeneous and unified group of people with a set of agreed common interests and aims. There is no single public. There are a number of publics, some of whom may emerge at any time during the process depending on their particular concerns and the issues involved. Scoping Process - process of identifying: issues that will be relevant for consideration of the application; the potential environmental impacts of the proposed activity; and alternatives to the proposed activity that are feasible and reasonable. Significant effect/Impact - means an impact that by its magnitude, duration, intensity or probability of occurrence may have a notable effect on one or more aspects of the environment Stakeholders - A sub-group of the public whose interests may be positively or negatively affected by a proposal or activity and/or who are concerned with a proposal or activity and its consequences. The term therefore includes the proponent, authorities (both the lead authority and other authorities) and all interested and affected parties (I&APs). The principle that environmental consultants and stakeholder engagement practitioners should be independent and unbiased excludes these groups from being considered stakeholders. Stakeholder engagement - The process of engagement between stakeholders (the proponent, authorities and I&APs) during the planning, assessment, implementation and/or management of proposals or activities. The level of stakeholder engagement varies depending on the nature of the proposal or activity as well as the level of commitment by stakeholders to the process. Stakeholder engagement can therefore be described by a spectrum or continuum of increasing levels of engagement in the decision-making process. The term is considered to be more appropriate than the term public participation. Sustainable Development - Development that meets the needs of the current generation without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs and aspirations the definition of the World Commission on Environment and Development (1987). Improving the quality of human life while living within the carrying capacity of supporting ecosystems the definition given in a publication called Caring for the Earth: A Strategy for Sustainable Living by the World Conservation Union (IUCN), the United Nations Environment Programme and the World Wide Fund for Nature (1991).

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1.

BACKGROUND AND INTRODUCTION

The Government of Namibia has mandated the National Petroleum Corporation of Namibia (Pty) Ltd (NAMCOR) to import 50% of all imported fuel products into Namibia. In order to optimise and streamline the activities of NAMCOR, and to enable the storage of strategic fuel reserves for Namibia, a bulk fuel storage facility is proposed by NAMCOR in Walvis Bay. This will also enable cost effective import, storage and distribution of fuel in Namibia. As part of the development, Geo Pollution Technologies (Pty) Ltd was appointed by B&P, on behalf of NAMCOR, to conduct the EIA for the proposed bulk fuel storage facility, pipeline route and associated infrastructure. The site is situated on a portion of Farm Wanderdunen No. 23 in Walvis Bay (22.9570S; 014.5289E). See Figure A2, (Appendix A). This bulk fuel storage facility will be designed to receive bulk shipments of gasoline, AGO, kerosene and heavy fuel oil from ships via a pipeline network from the existing Tanker Jetty. Booster pumps and buffer tanks will be constructed near the Tanker Jetty for pumping the received products from the Jetty to the bulk storage facility. The proposed bulk storage facility will entail several aboveground bulk storage tanks as well as bund areas, pipelines, pump stations, dispatch facilities (road and rail), a Customer Own Collection (COC) facility, control rooms and offices. As part of the development, the Municipality of Walvis Bay has proposed three (3) different sites for consideration during the site selection and preliminary screening phase. EnviroSolutions cc was appointed by Burmeister & Partners (Pty) Ltd (B&P), on behalf of NAMCOR, to conduct the Phase 1 site screening process. The final conclusions and recommendation by EnviroSolutions cc was presented to the Municipality of Walvis Bay and approved by Council in 2007. Subsequently the Municipality of Walvis Bay approved Site B, situated on a portion of Farm Wanderdunen No. 23 in Walvis Bay, south of Narraville and requested an Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) to be conducted on the selected site. This EIA focuses therefore on the selected site, recommended during the preliminary environmental screening. The EIA is to identify potential environmental impacts and to provide associated mitigation measures for the identified impacts, associated with the selected site. The aims and objectives of the EIA are: 6to establish and describe the known ecological baseline conditions for environmental, health and social conditions existing in the proposed project area; 6to conduct an environmental impact identification and assessment, and to provide a description of the likely environmental impacts of the proposed project during the construction and operational phases; 6to demonstrate that the EIA complies with current and/or expected Namibian legislative requirements for environmental, health and social performance as well as with the Clients respective environmental, social and health standards; 6to engage stakeholders, including the public, regarding the project and the various environmental, social and health aspects; 6to identify and document mitigation measures to minimise adverse environmental impacts; 6to draft and identify actions for the Environmental Management Plan (EMP) of the bulk fuel storage facility; and 6to identify fatal flaws and uncertainties encountered during the compilation of the EIA.

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1.1. Assumptions and Limitations


The following assumptions and limitations are applicable: 6All information received from sources contributing to this project is considered as accurate. This includes all information contained in the Phase 1 report initial location screening study conducted by EnviroSolutions cc. 6The Municipality of Walvis Bay provided three (3) alternative locations for the development, these were assessed during the initial screening process. It is not a Namibian legal requirement to conduct an EIA during the selection of a site from a list of potential sites. Despite of this Namcor opted to include environmental issues as part of their selection process. This EIA therefore considers no other alternative sites for the proposed project.

2.

PROJECT SCOPE & OBJECTIVES

The scope of this EIA is to determine the potential environmental impacts emanating from the construction and operation of the proposed NAMCOR Bulk fuel storage facility, the booster pumps and buffer tanks and the associated infrastructure and pipelines. The scope of the EIA study stretches from the flange on the existing Tanker Jetty to the proposed bulk fuel storage facility, which is included. The connection between the flange and tanker ships is excluded. Relevant environmental data have been compiled by making use of secondary data and reconnaissance site visits. Potential bio-physical and social impacts will also be identified and addressed in this report.

2.1. Terms of Reference


The Phase 2 section of the terms of reference stipulates that: 6An ecological baseline for the selected site and pipeline route be drafted. 6An environmental impact identification and assessment be made and to provide a description of the likely environmental impacts of the proposed project during the construction and the operational phases respectively. 6Interested and affected parties be consulted and that comments be solicited from them. 6Mitigating measures be identified and documented to keep adverse environmental impacts to a minimum. 6An interim meeting be held with NAMCOR to discuss the content of the draft EIA report. 6Revisions be made to the draft EIA report to incorporate potential comments from NAMCOR. The Phase 3 section of the terms of reference stipulates that: 6An environmental management plan (EMP) be drafted, including an outline for monitoring and management programs during construction and operational phases respectively, including possible plans for monitoring and penalties in case of noncompliance. 6Gaps and fatal flaws and uncertainties encountered be documented. 6The EMP must be drafted as such that it can be used as a separate document.

3.

METHODOLOGY

The following methods were used to investigate the potential impacts on the social and natural environment due to the proposed construction and operation of the bulk fuel storage facility:

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6Baseline information about the site and its surroundings was obtained from existing secondary information as well as from a reconnaissance site visit. 6As part of the scoping process to determine potential environmental impacts, Interested and Affected Parties (I&APs) were consulted and their views, comments and opinions are presented in this report.

4.

Administrative, Legal and Policy Requirements

To protect the environment and achieve sustainable development, all projects, plans, programmes and policies (PPPPs) deemed to have adverse impacts on the environment require an EIA according the Namibian legislation. The following legislation govern the EIA process in Namibia, pertaining to the proposed development.

4.1. The Namibian Constitution


Article 95 of Namibias constitution provides that: The State shall actively promote and maintain the welfare of the people by adopting, inter alia, policies aimed at the following: (l) management of ecosystems, essential ecological processes and biological diversity of Namibia and utilization of living natural resources on a sustainable basis for the benefit of all Namibians, both present and future; in particular the Government shall provide measures against the dumping or recycling of foreign nuclear and toxic waste on Namibian territory. This article recommends that a relatively high level of environmental protection is called for in respect of pollution control and waste management.

4.2. Environmental Assessment Policy of Namibia


The Environmental Assessment Policy of Namibia requires that all projects, policies, programmes, and plans that have detrimental effect on the environment must be accompanied by an EIA. The Environmental Assessment Procedure is depicted in Figure 1. It further provides a guideline list of all activities requiring an impact assessment. The proposed development is listed as a project requiring an impact assessment. The policy provides a definition to the term environment - broadly interpreted to include biophysical, social, economic, cultural, historical and political components and provides reference to the inclusion of alternatives in all projects, policies, programmes and plans. Cumulative impacts associated with proposed developments must be included as well as public consultation. The policy further requires all major industries and mines to prepare waste management plans and present these to the local authorities for approval. Apart from the requirements of the Environmental Assessment Policy, the following sustainability principles needs to be taken into consideration, particularly to achieve proper waste management and pollution control: 4.2.1.1. Cradle to Grave Responsibility This principle provides that those who manufacture potentially harmful products should be liable for their safe production, use and disposal and that those who initiate potentially polluting activities should be liable for their commissioning, operation and decommissioning. 4.2.1.2. Precautionary Principle There are numerous versions of the precautionary principle. At its simplest it provides that if there is any doubt about the effects of a potentially polluting activity, a cautious approach should be adopted.

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4.2.1.3. The Polluter Pays Principle A person who generates waste or causes pollution should, in theory, pay the full costs of its treatment or of the harm, which it causes to the environment. 4.2.1.4. Public Participation and Access to Information In the context of environmental management, citizens should have access to information and the right to participate in decisions making.

Figure 1: Environmental Assessment Procedure of Namibia (Environmental Assessment Policy of 1995)

4.3. Environmental Management Act of Namibia (2007)


The Act provides a broad definition to the term environment - land, water and air; all organic and inorganic matter and living organisms as well as biological diversity; the interacting natural systems that include components referred to in sub-paragraphs, the human environment insofar as it represents archaeological, aesthetic, cultural, historic, economic, palaentological or social values. NOTE: this definition of environment was used throughout this report. This Act provides a list of projects requiring an EIA. The proposed development is also listed as a project requiring an EIA under this Bill.

4.4. Petroleum Products and Energy Act of Namibia (Act No. 13 of 1990)
The Act makes provision for impact assessment for new proposed fuel facilities and petroleum products known to have detrimental effects on the environment.

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4.5. Pollution Control and Waste Management Bill (guideline only)


Of particular reference to the above, the stated project, Parts 2, 7 and 8 apply. Part 2 provides that no person shall discharge or cause to be discharged any pollutant to the air from a process except under and in accordance with the provisions of an air pollution licence issued under section 23. Part 2 also further provides for procedures to be followed in licence application, fees to be paid and required terms of conditions for air pollution licences. Part 7 states that any person who sells, stores, transports or uses any hazardous substances or products containing hazardous substances shall notify the competent authority, in accordance with sub-section (2), of the presence and quantity of those substances. The competent authority for the purposes of section 74 shall maintain a register of substances notified in accordance with that section and the register shall be maintained in accordance with the provisions. Part 8 provides for emergency preparedness by the person handling hazardous substances, through emergency response plans.

4.6. Atmospheric Pollution Prevention Ordinance of Namibia (No. 11 of 1976)


Part 2 of the Ordinance governs the control of noxious or offensive gases. The Ordinance prohibits anyone from carrying on a scheduled process without a registration certificate in a controlled area. The registration certificate must be issued if it can be demonstrated that the best practical means are being adopted for preventing or reducing the escape into the atmosphere of noxious or offensive gases produced by the scheduled process. Walvis Bay has been declared a controlled area for the purposes of the Ordinance.

4.7. Hazardous Substances Ordinance (No. 14 of 1974)


The Ordinance applies to the manufacture, sale, use, disposal and dumping of hazardous substances, as well as their import and export and is administered by the Minister of Health and Social Welfare. Its primary purpose is to prevent hazardous substances from causing injury, ill-health or the death of human beings.

4.8. Prevention and Combating of Pollution of the Sea by Oil Act (No. 6 of 1981)
Section 2 prohibits the discharge of oil. Section 3 introduces the obligation of reporting on discharge and damage causing discharge or likelihood of discharge by master of a discharging ship, tanker or offshore installation, or any member of the crew of such ship or tanker or of the staff employed in connection with such offshore installation, designated. Section 4 specifies powers of the Minister to take steps to prevent pollution of the sea where oil is being or is likely to be discharged. Section 5 provides for inspection of ship or tanker and of records, and taking of samples of oil. Remaining sections provide, inter alia, for liability for loss, damage or costs caused by discharge of oil and compulsory insurance against liability for loss, damage or costs.

4.9. Municipality of Walvis Bay (by-laws, guidelines and regulations)


4.9.1. Environmental Impact Assessment procedure guidelines Provides a procedure to be followed for new projects to be established within the jurisdiction of Walvis Bay. Requires the submission of project proposal to the office of the CEO, which in turn forwards the proposal to different departments within the Municipality for comments.

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The Environmental Management Section decides based on comments, EIA policy and EM Act as to whether the proposal requires an EIA or not. 4.9.2. Draft Structure Plan of the Municipality of Walvis Bay The main objective of the Structure Plan is to Set Guidelines that will ensure the best possible living conditions and environment for the residents of Walvis Bay. The secondary goals and objectives of the Structure Plan are as follows: 6Provide sufficient infrastructure to all erven; 6Lessen the shortage in housing and accommodation; and 6Establish and develop a diversified economic base by looking at tourism, manufacturing, fishing, services and sectors and the part/harbour for example The spatial elements of the Structure Plan, which are applicable to the study area, are discussed under Section 4. 4.9.3. Integrated Environmental Policy of Walvis Bay (Agenda 21 Project) The Integrated Environmental Policy indicates the directions that the Municipality of Walvis Bay will move towards in the forthcoming years to fulfil its responsibilities to manage the environment of Walvis Bay together with the towns residents and institutions. It is a statement of purpose that commits the municipality to certain principles, policy directions, and tools. It serves as an adaptive, flexible framework for a series of sectoral strategies and action plans, these inspired by visions of a better environmental future. The Policy is directed at assuring the longer-run management of Walvis Bays environment for the benefit of all its residents and its visitors. The policy has identified ten (10) priority areas that need to be tackled by the Municipality, these are: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. Managing Walvis Bays Ramsar Wetland Site Minimising the Consumption of Water Reducing Marine Pollution in Walvis Bay itself Improving Walvis Bays Air Quality Understanding and Solving Ground Pollution Issues Conserving Threatened Species and their Habitats Managing Off-Road Driving and other Recreational Activities Improving Sanitation Facilities for shackdwellers Eradicating Litter Hotspots in Walvis Bay and on the Seashore Educating Residents, particularly Learners, about Walvis Bays Environment and its Ecosystems.

4.10.

Relevant International Standards, Treaties and Conventions


4.10.1. The International Finance Corporations (IFC) Policy on Social and Environmental Sustainability The Developer is likely to seek funding from an international funding organisation such as the International Finance Corporation (IFC). The IFCs Environmental

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requirements for projects they fund are contained in the above document and the various Performance Standards. The following Standards are applicable: Performance Standard 1: Performance Standard 3: Performance Standard 4: Social and Environmental Assessment and Management Systems Pollution Prevention and Abatement Community Health, Safety and Security.

These Performance Standards have been considered and the applicable requirements incorporated into the EIA and EMP. 4.10.2. The United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea Article 207 of the Convention requires states to prevent, reduce and control pollution of the marine environment from land-based sources, including rivers, estuaries, pipelines and outfall structures.

5.

Project Details

The project site is situated on a portion of Farm Wanderdunen No. 23 in Walvis Bay (22.9570S; 014.5289E). See Figure A2 (Appendix A). The site is currently surrounded by undeveloped land in all directions (at least 300m), with the current municipal zoning classification as undeveloped land. To the north of the undeveloped land is the residential suburb of Narraville. To the east is more undeveloped land and to the south is the sewerage works, with the Diaz traffic circle and weighbridge to the west. The proposed bulk fuel storage facility will entail several aboveground bulk storage tanks as well as bund areas, pipelines, pump stations, dispatch facilities (road and rail), a Customer Own Collection Facility (COC), control rooms and offices, see Figure 2. Buffer pumps and buffer tanks will be constructed near the Tanker Jetty, with associated underground pipelines from the Tanker Jetty to the storage facility. This will form part of the development.

Not to Scale
Figure 2. Conceptual site layout (Burmeister & Partners (Pty) Ltd)

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5.1. Proposed tank specifications for the Bulk Fuel Storage Facility
The proposed bulk fuel storage facility will consist of ten (10) different storage tanks. The facility will be able to store 118,000m of 5 different products and provision is made to expand the storage capacity of the facility up to 238,000m. The facility will have a throughput capacity of at least 520,000m3/yr to either road loading or rail loading. The throughput capacity will be more if both road loading and rail loading are used simultaneously. Allowance is made to expand this capacity to 1,100,000m3/yr. This is 50% of the predicted market demand in the year 2028 according to the Desktop Market Demand Study (LSM Consulting South Africa. (2007)). The storage tanks will all be aboveground and will consist of fixed and floating rooftop tanks. Preliminary designs indicate that there will be eight (8) floating rooftops and two (2) fixed rooftops within the proposed bulk fuel storage facility. In addition, there will be other smaller fire fighting and safety tanks within the proposed facility. Table 1: Proposed Storage Details
Tank No Product
3

1 LRP

2 LRP 19.1 20 ATM 50 Steel

3 ULP 34.6 20 ATM 50 Steel

4 ULP 19.1 20 ATM 50 Steel

5 AGO 46.7 20 ATM 50 Steel

6 AGO 38.1 20 ATM 50 Steel

7 DPK 27 20 ATM 50 Steel

8 DPK 19.1 20 ATM 50 Steel

9 HFO 7500 22.7 20 ATM 50 Steel

10 HFO 2500 13.9 18 ATM 50 Above Steel Fixed

Capacity (m ) 16 500 5000 Diameter (m) 34.6 Height (m) Temp (C) Type Material Type of roof 20 50 Above Steel Pressure (kPa) ATM

16 500 5000

30 000 20 000 10 000 5000

Above Above Above

Above Above

Above Above Above

Floating Floating Floating Floating Floating Floating Floating Floating Fixed

Bulk fuel storage tanks may require an internal floating roof or a fixed rooftop. If a floating roof is used in the tank structure, the roof is floating on the liquid or fuel stored in the tank. The roof rises and falls with the level of liquid inside the tank, achieving a no vapour zone. The objective of the internal floating roof is to have minimal or eliminate completely the potential gaseous zone above the liquid. This is merely a safety feature required within the industry of storage tank systems. An advantage associated with internal floating rooftops is that by removing the gaseous zone above the liquid, chances of corrosion or oxidizing elements is reduces (Engineers Edge, 2007). Figure 3 illustrates a simplistic view of an internal floating roof. Fixed rooftops simply do not have the internal floating roof and air above the liquid is vented through installed venting outlets as liquid rises in the tanks.

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Figure 3: Floating rooftop (Engineers Edge, 2007)

5.2. Tank specifications for the booster pump and buffer tank site
Three (3) tanks are proposed for the booster pump station to be located near the existing Tanker Jetty. Table 2, below indicates the specifications for the proposed tanks. Although the ULP and LRP tanks are all fixed roof tanks, they will be equipped with an artificial inert atmosphere to prevent the release of vapours and to avoid explosive atmospheres inside tanks. Table 2. Tank specifications for the booster pump and buffer tank site Tank no Tank 1 Tank 2 Tank 3 Product (type of fuel) Capacity (m ) Diameter (m) Height (m) Pressure (kPa) (g) Temp (C) Type Material Type of rooftop
3

ULP/LRP 600 8.5 12 -0.25/1.0 50 Aboveground Steel Fixed

DPK/AGO 600 8.5 12 ATM 50 Aboveground Steel Fixed

HFO 50 3.5 12 ATM 50 Aboveground Steel Fixed

5.3. Pipeline Specifications


The proposed bulk fuel storage facility will be supplied with fuel via three (3) underground pipelines from the existing Tanker Jetty. These pipes will be installed along the identified route in a trench 1.5 meters below the surface, see Figure A2, Appendix A. Provision will be made in the trench for possible future insertion of a fourth pipeline. The pipes will be made of carbon steel and will consists of the following dimensions: Pipe 1: 18" (inches) steel according to SANS with necessary protection. Pipe 2: 18" (inches) steel according to SANS with necessary protection. Pipe 3: 12" (inches) steel according to SANS with necessary protection. Pipe 4: 18" (inches) - (Proposed fourth pipeline to be installed for future expansion of the bulk fuel storage facility)

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5.4. Installation and related activities  Construction activities will include: Booster Pump And Buffer Tank - Site
6Site preparation as required by geotechnical survey; 6Civil works required for three new tank bases, bund area, six pump bases and associated building near the existing Tanker Jetty; 6Electrical supply; 6Backup power generator; 6Nitrogen storage for tank blanketing and operating control valves; 6Installation of foam tank and foam eductor; 6Transport and installation of the storage tanks and relevant material and bunding; and 6new buildings required at the buffer tank, generator room and guard houses at gates.

Pipeline
6Construction of underground feeding pipelines from the existing Tanker Jetty to the bulk fuel storage facility; 6Delivery of pipes to be installed and placement along excavated pipeline route; 6Digging of pipeline trenches and installation of pipes into trenches; and 6Possible trench dewatering.

Bulk fuel storage facility


6Site preparation as required by geotechnical survey; 6Civil works required for bund area and bund walls; 6Tank bases for ten new product storage tanks, slop tank, firewater tank, two-AGO day tanks, two foam tanks and air receiver; 6New buildings required for offices, workshops, control room, generator room and guard houses at gates; 6Installation of fuel pipelines at the facility; 6Construction of COC facility; 6Construction of parking bays and fuel loading facilities; 6Construction of access roads and railway lines; 6Construction of overhead dispensing facilities (gantry); 6Construction of spill control measures; 6Installation of associated electrical, water and sewerage reticulation; and 6Installation of associated fire fighting equipment and water pipelines.

 Operational activities will include:


6Receiving and unloading of products from ships; 6Pumping of fuel from Tanker Jetty to the bulk fuel storage facility; 6Storage and handling of product in on-site tanks; 6Loading of products to transportation vehicles and other links, such as pipelines, rail tankers, trucks and ships, for distribution to customers; and
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6Supply of fuel in bulk to customers at the COC facility.

5.5. NAMCOR Social and Environmental Policies


NAMCOR has adopted the following policies with regard to recruitment, employee health and well-being and career advancement: 6Employee Assistance Programme Policy this policy recognises that the general wellbeing of employees is important to the Company. It provides the platform for assistance with marital/family problems, HIV/AIDS counselling, violence, trauma, debt, stress, family violence, alcohol addition, etc; 6Employee Study Assistance Policy - provides the platform for assistance for employees who wish to advance themselves academically; 6Recruitment and Selection Policy guidelines and procedures to the recruitment and selection of personnel; and 6Health, Safety, Security and Environmental (HSSE) Policy of NAMCOR. The employees to be appointed during this project will receive the same opportunities as existing NAMCOR employees in terms of the above policies.

6.

THE BASELINE RECEIVING ENVIRONMENT

This Section lists the most important environmental characteristics of the study area and provides a statement on the potential environmental impacts on each. The SANS 10089 standards for the Petroleum Industry were consulted for the baseline assessment (reported on in this section) and subsequent impact assessment (reported on in Section 7) to incorporate all required and pertinent issues in the investigation.

6.1. SOCIO-ECONOMIC STATUS QUO


This section provides an overview of socio-economic characteristics of the study area. It provides regional and local information on the, economic activities, population dynamics and social services currently available in the area. 6.1.1. Regional context The proposed bulk fuel storage facility is situated in the Erongo Region of Namibia for which the total current population (2007) is estimated to be 111,346 (57,694 males and 53,653 females) (NPC, 2003). Ninety three percent of the population of the Erongo Region over 15years of age is literate(1) while the estimated unemployment rate is 34%. According to the Namibia Human Development Report (1999), the Human Development Index (HDI)(2) for the Erongo Region was at a relatively high level of 0.67, compared to other parts of the country such as the four north-central Regions and the Caprivi where this index varies from 0.46 to 0.58. The Human Poverty Index(3) also used in the Namibia Human Development Report is a measure of deprivation: the proportion of the population being deprived of certain elements of human life. Approximately 15% of the population in the Erongo Region is poverty stricken, compared to more than one third of the population of the
1 2

The census considers this figure to be overestimated because no literacy tests were administered. HDI consists of three components: 1) life expectancy at birth (longevity); 2) knowledge, measured by the adult literacy rate and the school enrolment rate; and 3) access to resources measured by per capita income. A Gini coefficient of zero means perfect equality; a coefficient of one perfect inequality. HPI is measured by 1) proportion of the population expected to die before the age of 40; 2) illiteracy; and 3) percent without access to safe water and health services and the percentage of malnourished children.

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Ohangwena and Caprivi Regions. Approximately 26% of Namibians are poverty stricken. The Erongo Region is a relatively highly urbanised area for Namibia the 2001 Census shows that 80% of its population live in urban areas. People are mostly settled at the coastal towns of Walvis Bay and Swakopmund, presumably due to the employment opportunities found there. 6.1.2. Walvis Bay 6.1.2.1. Economic activities Walvis Bay, the principal port of Namibia, is an import / export facility for processed fish, mining products and beef. Mining products and raw material exports are on the rise with the present upheaval in the uranium industry. The area is linked to Namibias air, rail and road network, making its port well situated to service Zambia, Zimbabwe, Botswana, Southern Angola and South Africa. The fishing industry is the major employer of low skilled workers on a permanent and seasonal basis. The total employment of this sector is estimated at 2% of the total Namibian workforce. The major constraints of industrial development are the lack of sufficient water supply, the lack of a large enough local market and the excessive focus on the fishing industry. Most industries that exist at the coast are either secondary or tertiary suppliers to the fishing industry. Industrial activities in the town of Walvis Bay centres around port-related activities. More and more demand is, and will be, generated to obtain industrial and commercial land in close proximity to the port (as is the general nature of harbour towns). Most industries that are dependent on the port related activities need to limit operational costs by being located as close as possible to the port itself. NAMCOR is no exception. There is a zone for EPZ (Export Processing Zone) companies in Walvis Bay, situated to the west of the B2 road to Swakopmund, northwest of the proposed bulk fuel storage facility. These companies receive generous incentives from Government, geared towards the training of Namibians. In order to qualify for EPZ status a company must export to markets outside SACU, earn foreign currency and employ Namibians. Another EPZ zone (EPZ phase 2) is being planned due west of the proposed bulk fuel storage facility. Tourism is considered an important industry that will diversify the economy of the town and decrease the dependence on the natural fishing stocks. In the Municipality of Walvis Bays Draft Structure Plan it is admitted that tourism must still be developed to its full potential. 6.1.2.2. Demographics Selected census indicators (NPC, 2003) for the Walvis Bay Urban Constituency are provided in Table 3. It is difficult to determine the population size of Walvis Bay. By comparing figures from the 2001 census and previous town-specific surveys (TRP Associates Housing Demand and Affordability Study, 1997; projected by SPC, 1999), the latter figures are considerably higher. The most conservative projection places the Walvis Bay population (2008) at 69,465 assuming a growth rate of 6% since 1998.

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Table 3: Selected census indicators for the Walvis Bay Urban Constituency (NPC, 2003), except population projection (SPC,1999) Population Size (projected) 69,465 Sex ratio (males per 100 females) 149 Head of household % males 67 Literacy rate 15+ years % 93 Children 6-15 years attending school % 88 In labour force (economically active) 76 Labour force 15+ years % Employed 66 Unemployed 34 Households with safe water 99 Households with no toilet facility 0 Electricity for lighting 92 Main source of income wages and salaries 78 The abnormal male dominance in Walvis Bay, when compared to other towns in Namibia, is due to the influx of males from the north seeking jobs in the fishing industry and living in single quarters in the town. The literacy rate for the Walvis Bay population is high when compared to the rest of the country, even when compared only with the urban areas. The 1993/94 household and expenditure survey revealed, however, that there are great differences between the three main areas of Walvis Bay. In the Kuisebmond and Narraville populations, a maximum of 3% have some form of tertiary education, while 13% of the Walvis Bay Centres population have some form of tertiary education. SPC (1999) indicated that 31% of the labour force of Walvis Bay did unqualified work at that time. With an estimated unemployment rate of 34%, there is a definite need for projects that can lower the unemployment rate of the region. The bulk fuel storage facility has the potential to create a number of employment positions as well as the opportunity to create further employment opportunities in companies supplying various services to the proposed facility. 6.1.3. Surrounding Land Use 6.1.3.1. Immediate surrounds The land to the immediate northwest and southeast of the Project Site is presently vacant. A new light industrial area, which will comprise EPZ Phase 2, is being planned to the northwest. 6.1.3.2. Narraville The neighbourhood Narraville is a low to medium income residential neighbourhood situated >500m northeast of the outer boundaries of the proposed bulk fuel storage facility. Narraville is made up of four extensions, namely Narraville Proper and Extensions 1-3. The housing in this neighbourhood mostly comprise single residential dwellings. Buildings, open spaces and other facilities are relatively well kept. Photographs 1 and 2 below indicate the quality of the houses along the southwestern boundary of this neighbourhood, which are the closest to the proposed bulk fuel storage facility. Narraville is fully serviced with tarred streets, waterborne sewerage, electricity and overhead street lighting.

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Photo 1. Narraville neighbourhood

Photo 2. Narraville neighbourhood

6.1.3.3. The sewerage wetlands To the southwest of the study area is the sewerage works of the Municipality of Walvis Bay. The wetlands, even though a sensitive habitat for birds (see Section 5.3), pose a health risk for humans as some untreated sewerage is pumped into the system during breakdowns or when capacity is exceeded. The Municipality of Walvis Bays Draft Structure Plan nevertheless recommends that the sewerage ponds remain where they are (SPC, 1999). During the Public Meeting for this EIA, members of the Narraville community confirmed the facility to be a source of foul smells. Mosquito problems are also being experienced. 6.1.4. Structure Plans vision for the study area The Municipality of Walvis Bays Draft Structure Plan (SPC, 1999) identifies the area directly west of the proposed bulk fuel storage facility (see Figure A2, Appendix A) as a future light industrial area. This is a 32ha portion of land set aside for the expansion of the existing EPZ, i.e. EPZ Phase 2. The Draft Structure Plan (1999) indicates this industrial extension as an existing project, however it was already approved at the time when the Draft Structure Plan was devised. The current zoning of the land is Undetermined Land and this is now in a lengthy rezoning process to change the zoning to Industrial Land. The land on which the bulk fuel storage facility is being proposed would form the gateway or the edge of the town as one enters from Dune 7 and the airport, on the C14 road. It would be the interface between the town and the desert. Proposals are made in the Draft Structure Plan for treating this desert edge, which is problematic in terms of wind-borne sand, blown towards the built-up area. The Draft Structure Plan proposed that a reinforced sand dune be created on the outer edge, followed by a concrete filter and a vegetation filter in the inner zone closest to the developed area.

6.2. BIO-PHYSICAL STATUS QUO


6.2.1. Climate Walvis Bay is centrally located on the Namibian coastline in the arid Namib Desert. The arid conditions are a result of dry descending air and upwelling of the cold Benguela Current (EEU, 2000). Namibia is situated within an anti-cyclone belt of the Southern Hemispehere. Winds generated from the high-pressure cell over the Atlantic Ocean blow from a southerly direction when they reach the Namibian coastline. As the Namibian interior is warm (particularly in summer), localised low-pressure systems are created which draws the cold southerly winds towards the inland desert areas. These winds manifest themselves in the form of strong prevailing southwesterly winds, which range from

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an average of 20knots (37km/h) during winter months to as high as 60knots (110km/h) during the summer. Winds near Walvis Bay display two main trends; high velocity and frequency south to southwesterly winds in summer and high velocity, low frequency east to northeasterly winds during winter. During winter, the east winds generated over the hot Namib Desert have a strong effect on temperature, resulting in temperature in the upper 30s degrees Celsius and tend to transport plenty of sand (EEU, 2000). Thick fog or low stratus clouds are a regular occurrence in Walvis Bay. This is due to the influence of the Benguela Current and forms the major source of water for the succulent and lichen flora in the Namib Desert. A summary of climate conditions is presented below in Table 4. Table 4: Summary Climate Data Average annual rainfall (mm/a) Variation in annual rainfall (%) Average annual evaporation (mm/a) Water deficit (mm/a) Average annual temperatures (C)

0-50 < 100 2400-2600 1701-1900 >16

6.2.2. Corrosion Environment Walvis Bay is located in a very corrosive environment, which may be attributed to the frequent salt-laden fog, periodic winds and abundance of aggressive salts (dominantly NaCl and sulphates) in the soil. The periodic release of hydrogen sulphide (H2S) from the ocean is expected to contribute to corrosion. See Table 5 for corrosion comparison data with other centres. The combination of high moisture and salt content of the surface soil can lead to rapid deterioration of subsurface metal (e.g. pipelines) and concrete structures. Chemical weathering of concrete structures due to the abundant salts in the soil is a concern. Table 5. Material weight loss measured in mils/year after 20 years exposure (Contrarian Metal Resources)
City Material Weathering Steel Mild Steel Zinc Copper 96261 Aluminum 96082 Aluminum 96063 Aluminum 95251 Aluminum 93103 Aluminum T430 Stainless T304 Stainless T316 Stainless Walvis Pretoria Durban Cape Durban Sasolburg Bay Bay Town Bluff 45.28 0.9 8.35 3.6 31.89 4.21 33.31 1.7 14.61 10.12 86.22 5.91 0.13 0.91 1.14 4.37 0.6 1.51 0.22 0.037 0.28 0.97 0.55 0.15 0.93 0.12 0.23 0.01 0.14 0.13 1.09 0.19 0.01 0.12 0.14 0.79 0.16 0.01 0.14 0.15 0.66 0.18 0.01 0.021 0.17 0.77 0.11 0.02 0.001 0.02 0.01 0.07 0.004 0.004 0.001 0.003 0.005 0.02 0.004 0.001 0.001 0.001 0.01

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6.2.3. Topography and Surface water The topography is generally flat with a local gentle slope in a westerly direction (towards the harbour). Drainage is poorly developed due to the lack of rainfall (15mm/annum) received in the area. The Atlantic Ocean (lagoon and harbour) is the only surface water body near the site, with the sewerage ponds as an artificial water body, located to the southwest. A number of small sand dunes are present on the site and they will be removed during the construction phase. The site will further be elevated to approximately 1.2m above the current ground level. 6.2.4. Geology and Hydrogeology Deep unconsolidated sediments of Tertiary to Recent age underlie the Walvis Bay area. The deposits have been formed by a combination of fluvial, estuarine, coastal and aeolian processes. Bedrock is estimated to occur at depths of between 40 60m below surface. The site has generally a clayey soil consisting of petric Gypsisols, with some dune sand. Mobilization of sand in the Walvis Bay area is dominated by the southwest wind, while seasonally the northeast wind also contributes to the movement of sand. Transport process of sand causes the migration of sand to areas where dunes are formed, with a maximum angle of repose of 32, to heights of up to 100m. At the site itself only low-level dunes are present. In Walvis Bay sand migration is effectively controlled through the construction of sand trapping palisades and /or green belts. Groundwater flow would be mostly along primary porosity and through preferred pathways within the sediments. No potable groundwater source is known of in the vicinity of the site. Groundwater at the site is expected to be saline and the depth to watertable at the site is expected to be less than 2m below surface. This level is fluctuating and do rise to surface from time to time. It is conceptualise that the volume of semi treated sewerage effluent disposed off into the nearby sewerage ponds plays a major role in the fluctuation of the waterlevel at the proposed site. This might also lower the salinity of the groundwater in the area. Groundwater flow from the site can be expected to be in a western direction. Local groundwater drainage patterns may vary due to changes in waterlevels in the nearby sewerage ponds. Groundwater is utilized in the area, with 2 known boreholes (wells) within a 10km radius. The Municipality of Walvis Bay currently purchase fresh / potable water from Namwater which is sourced from the Kuiseb Water Supply Scheme.

6.3. Fauna and Flora


The proposed site is located within an urban set-up. There are therefore no fauna or flora present at the site. Table 6 and Table 7 below indicate the fauna and flora found in the biome in which Walvis Bay is situated. The study area including the vacant land surrounding the proposed bulk fuel storage facility is bounded by development on three sides. The habitat for fauna is therefore fragmented and expected to be degraded as a result. It is unlikely that all the species listed for this Biome occur in the vicinity of the proposed bulk fuel storage facility. The sewerage ponds, situated to the southwest of the study area, are regarded as a sensitive wetlands area, albeit a manmade fresh water source and attraction for pelicans and flamingos. These wetlands support 53% of the duck and geese population in the area. The wetland is formed by the constant inflow of semi-purified water and supports extensive stands of reeds. There is also a flight path for birds between the sewerage ponds and the offshore bird breeding platform (ghwano island) some 5km north of Walvis Bay.

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Table 6: General Regional Flora Data


Biome Vegetation type Vegetation structure type Diversity of higher plants Number of plant species Percentage tree cover Tree height (m) Percentage shrub cover Shrub height (m) Percentage dwarf shrub cover Dwarf shrub height (m) Percentage grass cover Grass height (m) Dominant plant species 1 Dominant plant species 2 Dominant plant species 3 Dominant plant species 4 Dominant plant species 5 Desert Southern desert Namib grassland Lowest (Diversity rank = 7 [1 to 7 representing highest to lowest diversity]) Less than 50 0 0 0 0 0.1-1 < 0.5 0.1-1 < 0.5 Brownanthus arenosus Othonna cylindrical Euphorbia gummifera Stipagrostis obtuse Stipagrostis ciliata

Table 7: General Regional Fauna Data


Mammal Diversity Rodent Diversity Bird Diversity Reptile Diversity Snake Diversity Lizard Diversity Frog Diversity Termite Diversity Scorpion Diversity 16 - 30 Species 8 - 11 Species 141 - 170 Species 31 - 40 Species 10 - 14 Species 24 - 27 Species 1 - 3 Species 1 - 6 Genera 12 - 13 Species

7.

STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT

The following tasks were performed as part of the stakeholder engagement process for this EIA. 6A stakeholders list was compiled from databases for the area and from contacts obtained from the Project Team, the Client and the Municipality of Walvis Bay. 6A Background Information Document (BID) explaining the key elements of the Project (Appendix B) was drafted and distributed to all contacts on the Stakeholders List. The BID also included an invitation to the Public Meeting. 6Two meetings were convened (see details below), the first which targeted input from key authorities and stakeholders. The second meeting targeted input from the public, nongovernmental organisations, local communities and other interested and affected parties.

7.1. Meeting with key authorities and stakeholders


A meeting with key authorities and stakeholders was held in Walvis Bay on the 24th of January 2008. The aim of this meeting was to solicit issues and concerns from the key authorities represented in Walvis Bay, regarding the proposed bulk fuel storage facility. To this meeting were invited the applicable officials of the Municipality of Walvis Bay,

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ERONGORED, Telecom, and NAMPORT. The participants were all invited via e-mail. A total of 24 people attended the meeting, with all key authorities represented. The minutes of the meeting and the attendance list are attached as Appendix C. Key issues raised at this meeting can be summarised as follows: Table 8: Summary of issues raised at the meeting with key Authorities THEME ISSUE Standards 6 Which standards to be implemented? Health and Safety 6 Will the bulk fuel storage facility be ISO 9000 and 14000 compliant? 6 Which Health and Safety Standards will be implemented? 6 Contingency/Disaster Management Plan required. 6 Fire Safety/Fighting arrangements. Traffic 6 Impacts of shunting on town traffic. 6 Road vs rail impacts on traffic. 6 Noise pollution from shunting activities. Pollution 6 Potential spilling during rail loading. Land Use: Effect on surrounding 6 Land use change from undetermined to heavy communities industrial. Habitat, Fauna & Flora 6 Potential fauna and flora affected. 6 Proximity to the sensitive sewerage wetland habitat Consultation 6 Consult NAMPORTs EMP. Impacts at Jetty 6 Existing Tanker Jetty vs new jetty. 6 Consider potential impacts at the existing Tanker Jetty. Impacts on the nearby Narraville 6 Increased noise from shunting. community 6 Economic effect from reduced property values.

7.2. Public Meeting


A public consultation meeting was held in Narraville, Walvis Bay on the 24th of January 2008. The Public were notified of the Public Meeting in the following ways: 6The invitation to the meeting and call for participation was published in The Namibian and Namib Times newspapers. 6Pamphlets were distributed to all Narraville residents who reside in the row of erven north of the study area, by delivering these personally at their homes. 6Posters were displayed at the Municipal Building in Narraville, at the library, the local shops and businesses and schools. Posters were also displayed at various businesses notice boards throughout Walvis Bay. A total of 31 people attended the Public Meeting, including representatives from local community groups, nearby residents, municipal officials and the press. The minutes of the meeting and the attendance list are attached as Appendix D. The key issues that emanated from the Public Meeting are summarised in Table 9. All relevant issues have been considered in the impact assessment of the proposed bulk fuel storage facility.

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Table 9: Key issues emanating from the Public Meeting THEME ISSUE Economic impact 6 Acknowledged as good investment; a positive boost for the economy. Health and Safety 6 Potential explosions and associated risks at site and along the pipeline. Noise 6 Impacts of increased noise from traffic and shunting. Traffic 6 Impacts of increased traffic and shunting. Pollution 6 Potential groundwater pollution. Land Use: Effect on surrounding 6 Minimum distances required from Narraville. communities 6 Increased smells, pollution, noise and health problems in Narraville. 6 Consider prevailing winds. 6 How did the Municipality approve the site without consultation with the Narraville community? 6 Consider an alternative site. 6 Written proof of impacts and later monitoring results required. 6 Following up baseline monitoring. 6 Future management, maintenance and monitoring. Impacts at Jetty 6 Which facilities to be used at the harbour? 6 Existing Tanker Jetty or new jetty? Miscellaneous 6 Aesthetic issues 6 Beyond implementation. 6 Access to information. 6 Compensation for health impacts. 6 Who are the Directors of NAMCOR?

Photo 3: Issue cards gathered at the meeting grouped into themes

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8.

ASSESSMENT OF IMPACTS

The purpose of this Section is to identify and consider the most pertinent environmental impacts and to provide possible mitigation measures that are expected from the development, services and maintenance activities. Two different phases are associated with the proposed development. Firstly, the construction and installation phase, and secondly the operational phase are being covered by this assessment. Should the facility close or expand in the future, an EIA will need to be conducted to deal with the associated changes to the bulk fuel storage facility. Mitigation measures for the identified impacts are also provided in this Section. The following assessment methodology was used to examine each impacts identified: Table 10: Criteria for Impact Evaluation (DEAT 2006) Assessment Evaluation Criteria Nature of impact Extent of impact being either Significance Rating Type of effect the proposed activity would have on the affected environment this either be positive (P) or negative (N) I - Immediate (the site and immediate surrounds) L - Local (Walvis Bay) R - Regional (Erongo Region) N - National (Namibia) I International ST - Short term (0-5 years) MT - Medium term (5-15 years) LT - Long term (lifetime of the development) L - Low (where natural, cultural and social functions and processes are not affected) M - Medium (where the affected environment is altered but natural, cultural and social functions and processes can continue) H - High (where the affected environment is altered to the extent that natural, cultural and social functions and processes will temporarily or permanently cease) LP - Low probability (possibility of impact occurring is low) P - Probable (where there is a distinct possibility that it will occur) HP - Highly probable (where the impact is most likely to occur) D - Definite (where the impact will occur) L - Low (where natural, cultural, social and economic functions and processes are not affected). In the case of adverse impacts, mitigation is either easily achieved or little will be required, or both. In the case of beneficial impacts, alternative means of achieving this benefit are likely to be easier, cheaper, more effective and less time-consuming M - Medium (where the affected environment is altered but natural, cultural, social and economic functions and processes can continue). An impact exists but is not substantial in relation to other impacts that might take effect within the bounds of those that could occur. In the case of beneficial impacts, other means of achieving this benefit are about equal in time, cost and effort. H - High (where the affected environment is altered to the extent that natural, cultural, social and economic functions and processes will temporarily or permanently cease). In the case of adverse impacts, there is no possible mitigation that could offset the impact, or mitigation is difficult, expensive, time consuming or a combination of these. In the case of beneficial impacts, the impact is of a Substantial order within the bounds of impacts that could occur.

Duration of impact being either Intensity of impact being either

Probability of impact being either

Significance of impact being either [Significance of impact with mitigation measures (WM) and significance without mitigation measures (WOM)]

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8.1. Overall socio-economic benefits and issues


8.1.1. Socio-economic benefits The overall capital investment is estimated to be N$757million. Through this investment, the overall revenue of the Country will increase through payment of income tax, Pay As You earn, (PAYE), VAT, and Import Tax. 8.1.1.1. Potential Direct Benefits 6 Direct capital investment; 6 Stimulation of skills transfer: Due to the nature of their operations, NAMCOR have no other option but to implement a training programme for all staff. Training programmes will be advanced and staff will permanently benefit from these training programmes. Many of the training programmes are targeting specifically semi-skilled Namibian workers 6 Stimulus for technology transfer to Namibia: The new plant includes state-ofthe-art technology (e.g. vapour recovery systems). These technologies are not presently in operation in Walvis Bay. The operation, maintenance and support of these new technologies will without doubt expose local artisans and industries to these. The net effect will be a workforce and supporting services, which is internationally more competitive than what it is at the moment 6 Stimulation of economic development (e.g. supply of materials and goods for construction purposes; new businesses, employment, housing, better markets and access to public services etc.). 6 Security of fuel supply: the new NAMCOR project aims to avert risks associated with volatile international fuel supplies. Fuel is regarded as a strategic commodity and the country as a whole depends on reliable fuel supplies. If Namibias economic growth targets (Vision 2030) are to be met, then fuel supply must never be in short supply or compromised. It is therefore in national interest for the nation to pursue a project of this nature as soon as possible. Recent events in 2006, when refineries in South Africa malfunctioned have impacted on Namibias economy. Similar, but larger breakdowns in future may have catastrophic impacts on the Namibian economy. 6 Job creation: approximately 46 new jobs will be created. It is estimated that 46 new jobs will ensure livelihood for at least 230 people (young and old) in Walvis Bay. Given the unemployment rate which exceeds 30% in Walvis Bay, this in itself is regarded as a significant benefit to the socio-economic situation in the town 8.1.1.2. Potential Indirect Benefits 6 More competitive conditions that could lower costs of consumer goods; 6 The need for more residential dwellings in Walvis Bay; 6 Expansion of trade and industrial activity in the town; 6 Inducement of additional investments; 6 Creation of new long-term employment opportunities outside the bulk fuel storage facility; and 6 General enhancement of the health conditions and quality of life in the town of Walvis Bay. Of significance is the prospect of diversification of the Walvis Bay economy, which is presently mainly focussed on fishing and related industry.

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8.1.1.3. General socio-economic concerns Notwithstanding the above benefits there are a few concerns that could reduce or counteract the above benefits related to the project, as follows: 6 Increased spread of HIV/AIDS particularly during construction; 6 Increased influx of people to Walvis Bay as people come in search of job opportunities during construction and operation of the proposed bulk fuel storage facility; and 6 Increased informal settlement and associated problems. Table 11: Impact Evaluation Socio-economy
Identified Impact Increased spread of HIV/ AIDS Increased influx to Walvis Bay Increased informal settlement and associated problems Extent N Duration LT Intensity M Probability P Significance WOM WM M L

ST

ST

8.2. Development phases and associated issues


8.2.1. Construction phase of the bulk fuel storage facility The following potential effects on the environment during the construction phase of the bulk fuel storage facility have been identified: 8.2.1.1. Dust Dust will be generated during the construction phase and might be aggravated during the winter months when strong winds occur. It is recommended that regular dust suppression be included in the construction phase, when dust becomes an issue. 8.2.1.2. Noise Noise pollution already exists near the site in the form of vehicles travelling on the C14 road to the Walvis Bay Airport and the weighbridge. The railway line also passes approximately 40m south of Narraville. It should be noted that the proposed bulk fuel storage facility would be situated adjacent to the EPZ Extension 2 development precinct in Walvis Bay. It is recommended that construction and traffic be limited to normal working hours (07h00 to 19h00) and that weekends should rather be avoided. 8.2.1.3. Safety and Security During construction, earthmoving equipment will be used on site. This increases the possibility of injuries and the responsible contractor must ensure that all staff members are briefed about the potential risks of injuries on site. The contractor is further advised to ensure that adequate emergency facilities, including first aid kits, are available on site. All Health and Safety standards specified in the Labour Act should be complied with, (NAMCOR 1996).

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Should a construction camp be necessary, it should be located in such a way that it does not pose a risk to the public. Equipment housed on site must be placed in a way that does not encourage criminal activities. For safety and security reasons it is recommended that the entire site be fenced-off and security personnel be employed to safeguard the premises and avert criminal activates. 8.2.1.4. Traffic The site is currently in an undeveloped area and it is not foreseen that day-to-day activities during the construction phase will significantly impact on the normal traffic. Construction materials will however have to be hauled to the site and it is recommended that the responsible contractor liase with the relevant traffic department to ensure that traffic flow along the affected route is accordingly channelled or diverted. 8.2.1.5. Visual Visual impact would pose one of the most significant impacts. Visual impacts could be limited through keeping the site clean and orderly at all times. Table 12: Impact Evaluation Construction Phase of bulk fuel storage facility
Identified Impact Dust Noise Safety and Security Traffic Visual Extent I I I I I Duration ST ST ST ST ST Intensity L M L L L Probability P D P D D Significance WOM WM L L M M L L L L L L

8.2.2. Construction phase of the pipeline A pipeline route consisting of three pipelines will be constructed approximately 1.5m below surface to transport product from tanker ships to the bulk fuel storage facility. The following potential environmental effects that are applicable to the construction phase of the pipeline have been identified: 8.2.2.1. Noise Noise pollution already exists along the pipeline route, as the pipeline will be constructed through a light industrial area. The noise impact should be of a limited duration due to the limited activities relating to the excavation of the trench, assembly of the pipeline and the covering of the trench. 8.2.2.2. Safety, security and convenience During construction, earthmoving equipment will be used. This increases the possibility of injuries and the responsible contractor must ensure that all staff members are briefed about the potential risks of injuries on site. The open trench made whilst the pipeline is being laid can be a safety hazard and a nuisance to the public and the workforce if mitigation is not strictly employed. The Contractor should be obliged to adhere to the following: 6Adhere to Health and Safety Regulations pertaining to personal protective clothing, first aid kits being available on site, warning signs, etc.;

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6Devise and submit a traffic management programme with sections of the roads to be closed or diverted during the construction of the pipeline in consultation with the Traffic Department of the Municipality of Walvis Bay; 6Submit a public communication plan indicating how and when, during the programme, the public will be informed of the construction project, the construction hours, the proposed route and schedules; 6Employ security personnel to prevent the Public from entering or approaching the construction site; and 6Sections of the trench to be closed continuously and immediately as work is completed. 8.2.2.3. Traffic The pipeline will mostly be constructed along Circumferential Road and will have an impact on the traffic for the duration of construction, especially when crossing intersections with other roads. It is recommended that the responsible contractor liase with the relevant traffic department to ensure that traffic flow along the affected route is accordingly channelled or diverted. 8.2.2.4. Trench dewatering If trench dewatering becomes necessary, the contractor must ensure that the water is disposed off in an acceptable manner and that the disposal procedures be cleared with the Municipality of Walvis Bay. If abstracted water is found to be polluted, then the water must be disposed off according to Municipal regulations. 8.2.2.5. Visual Impact Visual impact would pose a noteworthy impact during construction, which should be of a limited duration. Visual impacts could be limited through the use of visual barriers and careful planning. It should however be noted that once the construction of the pipeline is complete, this visual impact will discontinue as the pipeline will be underground. Table 13: Impact Evaluation Construction Phase of the pipeline
Identified Impact Noise Safety and Security Traffic Trench dewatering Visual Extent I I I I I Duration ST ST ST ST ST Intensity L L L L L Probability D D D D D Significance WOM WM L L L L L L L L L L

8.2.3. Operational phase of bulk fuel storage facility and pipeline During the operation phase of the bulk fuel storage facility, fuel products will be offloaded from tanker ships and transported via the underground pipeline to the aboveground storage tanks. 8.2.3.1. Air Quality In terms of air quality, hydrocarbon vapours will normally be released during delivery as liquid displaces the gaseous mixture in the tanks. This would however be minimised, due to the proposed floating roof tanks. The floating roof floats on top of the liquid and therefore prevents vapours from escaping from underneath the

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roof. As fuel is pumped into the tanks, the floating roof is pushed up, which then displaces the air above the floating roof. Vapours can also be released during the filling of road and rail tankers. Special vapour recovery systems to be installed, will recover vapours during the filling of these tanks and will therefore minimise the potential impact on the environment. It is recommended that regular air quality monitoring be conducted on the facility. 8.2.3.2. Fire and Explosion Hazard Hydrocarbons are volatile under certain conditions and their vapours in specific concentrations are flammable. If precautions are not taken to prevent their ignition, fire and subsequent safety risks may arise. Various international occupational health and safety performances have been consulted during this EIA. Examples include the Threshold Limit Value (TLV) occupational exposure guidelines and Biological Exposure Indices (BEIs) published by the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH), the Pocket Guide to Chemical Hazards published by the United States National Institute for Occupational Health and Safety (NIOSH), Permissible Exposure Limits (PELs) published by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration of the United States (OSHA) and the Indicative Occupational Exposure Limit Values published by European Union member states. It is very important to take public safety into account when locating bulk fuel storage facilities, as the public can be at risk from potential spills, vapour emissions and fires. Risks from these can be minimized through implementation of buffer zones. Different types of developments may be located within specified distance from these facilities, as well as different industries having different quantities of workers working in them. This is not a legal requirement in Namibia and NAMCOR would have no control on the future placement of facilities around the proposed facility. All fuel storage and handling facilities in Namibia must however comply with strict safety distances as prescribed by SANS 10089. SANS 10089 is adopted by the Ministry of Mines and Energy as the national standard. The NAMCOR facility exceeds the SANS safety distances. Safety distances given by SANS work on the premises that if the setting-out of the site and the safety distances to the nearest adjacent property are adhered to, then any development can be safely built on the neighbouring property. It is specifically appropriate to comply with these standards, as NAMCOR would have no control on the future placement of facilities around the proposed facility Although Namibian legislation only requires that the SANS standards with regard to barrier distances be implemented, the standards for bulk fuel storage of the United Kingdom (Revised Land Use Planning Arrangements Around Large-Scale Petroleum Depots; alias RR511) and the National Fire Protection Agency of America (Flammable and Combustive Liquids Code; alias NFPA 30) have also been consulted during this EIA. The US standard NFPA 30 it is very similar to the SANS safety distances. The RR511 and RR512 propose three zones around a bulk fuel storage facility (See Figure A2, Appendix A). These three zones have different classification according to the activities taking place in them. The RR511, RR512 and NFPA 30 should be consulted regarding the various activities proposed for the three different zones. According to recommendations in the RR511 and RR512, residential developments must be located outside the outer zone (>400m) for optimal safety, see Figure A2, Appendix A. This also applies to developments where a large number of people are

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expected to gather e.g. shopping malls, factories. For a detailed description of these zones and associated developments, reference to the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) titled: Revised land use planning arrangements around large-scale petroleum depots, compiled by Environmental Resource Management Ltd of The United Kingdom, is made. It should be noted that the RR511 and RR512 is very conservative research recommendation, that is not yet endorsed, but is here utilised to evaluate potential impacts on the nearest, existing residential suburb, which is well outside the proposed 400m outer limit. It must further be assured that sufficient water is available for fire fighting purposes. In addition to this, all personnel have to be sensitised about responsible fire protection measures and good housekeeping such as the removal of flammable materials including rubbish, dry vegetation, and hydrocarbon-soaked soil from the vicinity of the bulk fuel storage facility. Regular inspections should be carried out to inspect and test fire fighting equipment and pollution control materials at the bulk fuel storage facility. All fire precautions and fire control at the bulk fuel storage facility must be in accordance with SANS 10089-1:1999, or better. A holistic fire protection and prevention plan is needed. Experience has shown that the best chance to rapidly put out a major fire, is in the first 5 minutes. It is important to recognise that a responsive fire prevention plan does not solely include the availability of fire fighting equipment, but more importantly, it involves premeditated measures and activities to timeously prevent, curb and avoid conditions that may result in fires. An integrated fire prevention plan should be drafted before start-up of the facilities. Special note must be taken of the regulations stipulated in sections 47 and 48 of the Petroleum Products and Energy Act, 1990 (Act No. 13 of 1990). 8.2.3.3. Generation of Waste Waste in the form of contaminated soil due to spillage might occur, but should be prevented through the use of containment areas as provided. Tank sludge and spill cleanup materials should be managed via re-processing for product recovery or as a waste at a facility licensed to handle this type of material in an environmentally sound manner. Oil water / separator effluent originating from storm water runoff, tank bottoms and washing activities should be separated before disposal of the water. Regular monitoring of the oil water separator outflow is required. Water containing soaps and other detergents must not enter the oil water / separator as it will place the hydrocarbons in suspension, rendering the oil water separator ineffective. Care should be taken when handling contaminated material. The cradle to grave principal should be kept in mind during waste disposal. 8.2.3.4. Groundwater Contamination Spillages might occur during delivery to road transport tanker trucks and train carriages and at the COC facility. All operational surfaces within the bulk fuel storage facility must be installed with spill containment areas as per the relevant SANS standards. The risk can be lowered further through proper training of staff and the installation of suitable containment structures. Overfilling of the tanks may also take place and proper monitoring of the product levels in the tanks must take place to eliminate overfilling. Regular tank and pipeline tightness inspections are advised to eliminate the risk of impact on the environment due to leakage.
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Additional guidelines to the prevention of potential leakages and/or spillages that could lead to groundwater pollution, include: 6All fuelling should only be conducted on surfaces provided for this purpose; 6Spillage control procedures must be in place according to SANS 10089-1:1999 and SANS 100131-2 standards, or better, including impounding around the loading areas by bunding with appropriate slopes of 1:100, construction of bundwalls and floors that are liquid tight and that are not prone to deterioration under the effects of any petroleum product; 6The procedures followed to prevent environmental damage during service and maintenance, and compliance with these procedures, including the correct use of sumps and regular reporting of spillages must be audited and corrections made where necessary; 6The condition of the fuel reticulation system will have to be checked regularly and repaired to prevent leakages; 6Proper training of operators must be conducted on a regular basis; 6Any spillage of more than 200litres must be reported to the relevant authorities and remediation instituted (refer to section 49 of the Petroleum Products and Energy Act, 1990 (Act No. 13 of 1990)); and 6Equipment and materials to deal with spill cleanup must be readily available on site and staff must be trained in the usage of these products. 8.2.3.5. Handling of Bulk Product The handling of bulk product during operation also deserves consideration and regulations related to receiving bulk cargo from sea vessels should be adhered to at all times (Refer to section 40 of the Petroleum Products and Energy Act, 1990 (Act No. 13 of 1990)). Staff of the proposed bulk fuel storage facility should at all times be aware of the precautions associated with the handling of petroleum products as described in the relevant Material Safety Data Sheets. Regulations with regard to the handling of petroleum products delivered by sea vessels include: all regulations in the International Safety Guide for Oil Tankers and Terminals, as well as those regulations required by the local fire authorities. No marine off-loading procedures or off-loading equipment will be changed as part of this project. NAMCOR plans to tie-in into the existing pipelines on-shore and the existing Tanker Jetty and all equipment remains intact. For the purposes of this study, it is presumed that existing Oil Mayors comply with EIA regulations, since marine off-loading occurs almost on a weekly basis. It falls outside the scope of this study to assess existing marine off-loading operations handled by other Parties. 8.2.3.6. Health and Safety The operations of a bulk fuel storage facility can cause serious health and safety risks to workers on site. Occupational exposures are normally related to the dermal contact with fuels and inhalation of fuel vapours during handling of such products. For this reason adequate measures must be brought in place to ensure safety of staff on site, and includes: 6Proper training of operators; 6First aid treatment; 6Medical assistance; 6Emergency treatment;

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6Prevention of inhalation of fumes; 6Protective clothing, footwear, gloves and belts; safety goggles and shields; 6Manuals and training regarding the correct handling of materials and packages should be in place and updated as new or updated material safety data sheets becomes available; and 6Monitoring should be carried out on a regular basis, including accident reports. 8.2.3.7. Sand Movement and Accumulation Sand movement and accumulation might pose a potential impact at the proposed bulk fuel storage facility. To counteract this impact, the following recommendations are made: 6Dune stabilization and control techniques should be implemented, which includes sand deflective instruments; or the planting of appropriate vegetation to stabilize the sand and to acts as windbreaks. This would also form part of the town edge concept recommended in the Draft Structure Plan. The recommendation in the Draft Structure Plan should be used as guideline for the creation of the buffer screen; and 6Regularly removing of sand accumulated on rooftops, inside buildings, bunded areas and ventilation systems; Appropriate design can effectively assist in reducing sand accumulation on the outside of buildings and boundary fences, particularly concrete walls and slatted fences. In terms of the abrasiveness of sand more resistant paints and regular inspection is recommended. 8.2.3.8. Vapour Emissions Vapour emissions are expected to be site specific and may pose a limited threat to personnel on site. All venting systems and procedures have to be designed according to SANS standards. This should include Vapour Recovery Systems and carbon filters on vents. Walvis Bay is notorious for bad air quality due to air emissions from the fishery industry and from the nearby sewerage ponds, thus the proposed facility will have a minimal impact on the overall air quality. 8.2.3.9. Visual Impact The highest tanks to be constructed on the facility will be 20m high and will cause some change in the landscape, which is presently dominated by vacant flat land, the Diaz circle with its palm trees, the greenery created by the reeds at the sewerage works and the residential buildings in Narraville towards the northeast. The proposed development is however part of a broader industrial area being planned, and it will eventually blend in well with proposed industries. The proposed bulk fuel storage facility will also form part of the edge of Walvis Bay and will be the first buildings encountered as one enters from the airport, on the C14 road. This entrance is a rather strategic one as it is the gateway for tourists and business visitors, arriving from the airport. It should however be kept in mind that Namibias major port is located in Walvis Bay and that industrial activities would therefore be associated with the town. The buffer screen proposed to address sand movement and accumulation (See 8.2.3.7) will also effectively create a visually pleasing faade for the proposed bulk fuel storage facility and a gateway when entering Walvis Bay from the southeast.

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8.2.3.10. Potential reduced property values During the Public Meeting the question was raised whether property values would decrease as a result of the proposed bulk fuel storage facility. The bulk fuel storage facility will be at least 500m away from the nearest properties in Narraville and in future there will be light industrial buildings developed between the proposed bulk fuel storage facility and Narraville. Reduced property prices have proven to go hand-in-hand with negative perceptions. The foul smells from the sewerage plant and the fishing industry create unpleasant conditions and frustrations for the Narraville community. It is understandable that more problems would be expected from the residents of Narraville as a result of the proposed bulk fuel storage facility. However, once the bulk fuel storage facility is operational and proves to be nuisance free, the negative perceptions would disappear and it is expected that property prices would therefore not be affected by the proposed bulk fuel storage facility. Table 14: Impact Evaluation Operational Phase
Identified Impact Air Quality Fire and Explosion Hazard Generation of waste Groundwater Contamination Health and Safety Vapour Emissions Visual Impact Potential reduced property values Extent I I I I I I I I Duration LT LT LT LT LT LT LT LT Intensity M M L L L H M L Probability HP LP D P P D D LP Significance WOM WM M L H M M H H M L L L L L L L L

8.2.4. Heritage Impacts The Consultant is not aware of any archaeological remains present on the site, however there are significant archaeological sites present to the southwest of the sewerage ponds. In order to fulfil the requirements of the National Heritage Act, an archaeologicalist must confirm the non-existence of archaeological sites before construction commences. During the geotechnical investigation it was noted that dunes on the site were reshaped in places by human activity through earthworks. This was done prior to NAMCOR taking possession of the site. 8.2.5. Ecological issues The proposed bulk fuel storage facility is free of conservation worthy vegetation and fauna, due to its urban environment. Although there is a bird flight path in the vicinity of the proposed bulk fuel storage facility, the structures to be erected are considered safe for birds.

9.

ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT PLAN

The Environmental Management Plan (EMP) provides management options to ensure impacts of the proposed development are minimised. The EMP is to take pro-active action by addressing potential problems before they occur. This should limit the corrective measures needed, although additional mitigation measures might be included if necessary. The EMP acts as a stand-alone document, which can be used during the various phases (construction and operational) of the proposed bulk fuel storage facility. All contractors and sub-contractors

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taking part in the construction of the facility should be made aware of the contents of the EMP, so as to plan the relevant activities accordingly in an environmentally sound manner. An EMP for the construction and operational phases of the proposed bulk fuel storage facility has been developed and is available as a separate document. The objectives of the EMP are: 6to include all components of the development; 6to prescribe the best practicable control methods to lesson the environmental impacts associated with the construction of the development; 6to monitor and audit the performance of construction personnel in applying such controls; and 6to ensure that appropriate environmental training is provided to responsible construction personnel. Once the facility has been constructed, it is highly recommended that NAMCOR implement an ISO 14001(or other) Environmental Management System (EMS). An EMS is an internationally recognized and certified management system that will ensure ongoing incorporation of environmental constraints. At the heart of an ISO 14001 EMS is the concept of continual improvement of environmental performance with resulting increases in operational efficiency, financial savings and reduction in environmental, health and safety risks. An effective EMS would need to include the following elements: 6A stated environmental policy which sets the desired level of environmental performance; 6An environmental legal register; 6An institutional structure which sets out the responsibility, authority, lines of communication and resources needed to implement the EMS; 6Identification of environmental, safety and health training needs; 6An environmental program(s) stipulating environmental objectives and targets to be met, and work instructions and controls to be applied in order to achieve compliance with the environmental policy; and 6Periodic (internal and external) audits and reviews of environmental performance and the effectiveness of the EMS.

10.

CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS

In general, the proposed bulk fuel storage facility would pose limited environmental and social risks. The proposed bulk fuel storage facility would contribute to the economy of Walvis Bay and the Region by creating jobs and diversifying the economic activity. The site is generally suitable for the proposed bulk fuel storage facility. All environmental risks can be minimised and managed through implementing preventative measures and sound management systems. It is recommended that environmental performance be monitored regularly to ensure compliance and that corrective measures be taken if necessary. It is also recommended that this information be made available to the Community at a regular basis. Fire prevention should be adequate, as specified by the SANS 10089 standards. Health and safety regulations should be adhered to in accordance with the Regulations pertaining to Health and Safety. The Environmental Management Plan should be used as an on-site reference document during all phases (Planning, Construction and Operation) of the proposed bulk fuel storage facility, and auditing should take place in order to determine compliance with the EMP. Parties responsible for transgression of the EMP should be held responsible for any rehabilitation that may need to be undertaken.

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With future expansion of the proposed bulk fuel storage facility, compliance with environmental, health and safety issues must again be checked and improved where necessary during an EIA. It is advised that baseline data be gathered before any construction activities takes place. Special attention should be given to air quality, soil quality and groundwater quality. The baseline should include the length of the underground fuel pipeline for soil quality and groundwater quality. This is especially important in the section where the new pipelines will be in close proximity to the existing fuel pipelines to the current Fuel Depots operated by the Oil Industry in Walvis Bay. Regular monitoring of the parameters analysed during the baseline study should be conducted to evaluate the impact of the facility on the environment. Any polluted soil or groundwater encountered during the baseline survey and during the construction process must be reported to the relevant authorities and the contaminated soil and or groundwater must then be disposed off in an applicable manner. Geo Pollution Technologies

Pierre Botha B.Sc. (Hons.) Hydrogeology March 2008

11.

REFERENCES

Arbor, A. (2001) Environmental Management Systems: An Implementation guide for Small and Medium-Sized Organisations. NSF International, Michigan. Atkins Consultants Limited. (2007) Revised land use planning arrangements around large scale petroleum depots (RR511). Health and Safety Executive, Birchwood, Warrington, United Kingdom. Atkins Consultants Limited. (2007) Review of significance of societal risk for proposed revision to land use planning arrangements for large scale petroleum storage sites (RR512). Health and Safety Executive, Manchester, United Kingdom. LSM Consulting South Africa. (2007) Burmeister Desktop Market Demand Study Department of Environmental Affairs and Tourism. (2006) Guideline 4: Public Participation in support of the Environmental Impact Assessment Regulations, 2006. Integrated Environmental Management Guideline Series, Department of Environmental Affairs and Tourism, Pretoria. Department of Environmental Affairs and Tourism. (2006) Guideline 5: Assessment of Alternatives and Impacts in support of the Environmental Impact Assessment Regulations, 2006. Integrated Environmental Management Guideline Series, Department of Environmental Affairs and Tourism, Pretoria. Department of Environmental Affairs and Tourism. (2006) EIA Regulations. Integrated Environmental Management Guideline Series, Department of Environmental Affairs and Tourism, Pretoria. Directorate of Environmental Affairs, Ministry of Environment & Tourism. (2002) Atlas of Namibia Project. EnAct International Limited in association with Ministry of Environment and Tourism & NORAD. Consultation Paper: Strengthening Namibias Legal Framework for Pollution Control and Waste Management. Engineers Edge. (2007) Internal Floating tanks. Available from the following URL: http://www.engineersedge.com/hydraulic/tank_internal_floating_roofs.htm

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Environmental Evaluation Unit (EEU). (2000) EIA for the Naval Facilities in Walvis Bay. EEU Report No. 5/99/186. University of Cape Town. Geiss, W. (1971) n Voorlopige plantegroeikaart van SWA. Dintera. Volume 4. Scientific Society. Institute of Petroleum. (2002) Guidelines for soil, groundwater and surface water protection and vapour emission control at petrol filling stations, London. Machenzie Gas Project. (2004) Information sheet: Pipeline Construction. Accessed on 13 September 2007. Available from URL: http://www.mackenziegasproject.com/theProject/constructionOperation/gatheringPipeline/pipeli neConstruction/pipelineConstruction.html Ministry of Environment and Tourism & Ministry of Local Governance and Housing. (2005) Environmental Management Plan for Namib Coast Biodiversity Conservation and Management (NACOMA) Project. Ministry of Environment and Tourism. (1994) National Environmental Assessment Policy. Ministry of Environment and Tourism. (2002) National Environmental Management Bill. Mohan Das, S.K. Bhargava, A. Kumar, A.Khan, R.S. Bharti, B.S. Pangtey, G.S. Rao and K.P. Pandya. (1991) Occupational Health Centre - Industrial Toxicology Research Centre. The Annals of Occupational Hygiene, Volume 35, no 3, pp 347-352. An investigation of Environmental Impact of Health of workers at retail petrol pumps, University of Oxford, Oxford University Press. Available from URL: http://annhyg.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/35/3/347. NAMCOR (1996) SECTION 2 - 5.0 CONTRACTOR MANAGEMENT National Fire Prevention Agency. (1996). Flammable and Combustive Liquids Code (NFPA 30), Boston, United States of America. National Planning Commission. (2003) 2001 Population and Housing Census, Erongo Region: Basic Analysis with Highlights. Central Bureau of Statistics, Windhoek. Ministry of Environment and Tourism. Northern Namibia Environment Project (NNEP). SANS 100131:1977: The storage and Handling of Liquid fuel. Part 1: Small Consumer Installations. SANS 100131:1979: The storage and Handling of Liquid fuel. Part 11: Larger Consumer Installations. SANS 100131:1982: The storage and Handling of Liquid fuel. Part 111: Bulkflash-point fuel storage and allied facilities at large consumer installations. SANS 100131:1999: The petroleum industry. Part 3: The installation of underground storage tanks, pumps/dispensers and pipework at service stations and consumer installations. SANS 10089 1:1999; The Petroleum Industry. Part 1: Storage and distribution of petroleum products in aboveground bulk installations. SANS 10089 3:1999; The Petroleum Industry. Part 3: The installation of underground storage tanks, pumps/dispensers and pipework at service station and consumer installations. Stubenrauch Planning Consultants cc et al. (1999) A Structure Plan for Walvis Bay. Volumes 1 and 2. Prepared for Municipality of Walvis Bay. Unpublished Report. The Southern African Institute for Environmental Assessment. (2006) Guidance document on Biodiversity, Impact Assessment and Decision Making in Southern Africa. CBBIA IAIA. The World Bank Group in collaboration with the United Nations Environment Programme and the United Nations Industrial Development Organization. (1999) Pollution Prevention and Abatement Handbook Toward cleaner production, Washington DC.

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TRP Associates. (1997) Housing Demand and Affordability Study. Prepared for Municipality of Walvis Bay. Unpublished Report. UNDP. (1999) Namibia Human Development Report. Alcohol and Human Development in Namibia, United Nations Development Programme Namibia, Windhoek.

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APPENDIX A

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Figure A1. Regional map

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Figure A2. Location map

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APPENDIX B

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BACKGROUN D INFORMATION DOCUMENT (BI D)

PROPO SED BULK FUE L ST ORAGE TER MINA L AT WA LVIS BAY

Introduc tio n and storage of products in on-site tanks and loading products to road tanker trucks and train carriages. Facilities at the BFST will include several above-ground storage tanks, bund areas, pipelines, pump stations, dispatch facilities to road and rail, control rooms and offices. The target completion date for construction of the BFST is mid 2010, following an anticipated construction period of approximately 24 months. Scope of Work of the EA The EA will cover all aspects relating to the construction and operation of the BFST including activities on site, as well as those associated with the pipeline leading to the site. The scope of this EA would end at the connection point (flange) on shore at the current jetty and at the terminal boundaries on site. Screening The Walvis Bay Municipality initially agreed to three alternative sites for the location of the proposed facility (See Figure 2). NAMCOR conducted a screening exercise, including consideration to environmental aspects. Site B was selected for its relative close proximity to the harbour and low environmental sensitivity (i.e. no show-stoppers were identified and environmental risks can be readily eliminated or mitigated.

BFSF NAMCOR WALVIS BAY EIA - MARCH 2008 - DRAFT

Government mandated the National Petroleum Corporation of Namibia (NAMCOR) to import 50% of all fuel products of Namibia. NAMCOR proposes the establishment of a fuel storage terminal at Walvis Bay from where they will receive, store and distribute bulk fuel shipments further downstream.

An Environmental Assessment (EA) is to be conducted in close collaboration with the Feasibility Study Team led by Burmeister and Partners (Pty) Ltd. Burmeister and Partners (Pty) Ltd, on behalf of NAMCOR, appointed Geo Pollution Technologies (Pty) Ltd to conduct the EA for the proposed Bulk Fuel Storage Terminal (BFST).

With this BID, we aim to interact with Stakeholders about the Project so that all social and ecological issues may be identified and addressed.

The P roject

Figure 1 shows the proposed locality of the BFST and its two alternative pipeline routes from the harbour to the proposed site.

Geo Pollution Technologies (Pty) Ltd.

Bulk shipments of gasoline, diesel, kerosene and heavy fuel oil will be received via pipelines from the harbour. Typical activities associated with the proposed BFST include receiving and unloading of products from ships, handling

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BACKGROUND I NFORMATION DOCUMENT: EI A AND EMP NAMCOR BULK FUEL STOR AGE FACILITY

J ANU ARY 2008

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BACKGROUND I NFORMATION DOCUMENT: EI A AND EMP NAMCOR BULK FUEL STOR AGE FACILITY

BFSF NAMCOR WALVIS BAY EIA - MARCH 2008 - DRAFT

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J ANU ARY 2008

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Figure 1: L ocality o f the proposed facili ty.


PAGE 2/4

BFSF NAMCOR WALVIS BAY EIA - MARCH 2008 - DRAFT

Figure 2: S ite s iden tified during s creeni ng.

Issues iden tif ied

The EA Team has identified the following key issues related to the proposed facility and invite Stakeholders to add other considerations:

Geo Pollution Technologies (Pty) Ltd.

Potential surface and groundwater pollution. Although the groundwater quality in the vicinity of the site is expected to be of a low standard, relevant legislation determines that groundwater quality may not be altered. Potential contamination sources are sewerage and process

wastewater and potential leaks and spills of hazardous substances and oil. Air emissions. Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) during fuel terminal storage activities may result from evaporative losses during storage, operational activities such as filling, loading/unloading of transport links, leaks from equipment connections, etc. Recommendations to minimize these emissions will be provided as governed by the Petroleum Act (1993) of Namibia, as well as international standards such as the SABS and NFPA. Waste management issues. Waste generated at terminals may include tank bottom sludge, spill cleanup materials, soils contaminated with oil and general waste. Sound waste management practices will be recommended. Occupational and community health and safety issues include chemical hazards, fire and explosions, and risks associated with confined spaces. The Project will be obliged to implement applicable Health and Safety Regulations. The BFST will be designed to honour industry standards for the prevention and control of fire and explosion hazards. An emergency preparedness response plan is a requirement for bulk fuel storage terminals. Visual impact. The bulk storage tanks will be of significant size and therefore highly visible at the entrance to the town of Walvis Bay. The Design and EA Teams will consider options to soften the appearance of the facility.

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BACKGROUND I NFORMATION DOCUMENT: EI A AND EMP NAMCOR BULK FUEL STOR AGE FACILITY

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Public Participation

The EA process involves interaction with people who are interested in or who could be affected by the proposed BFST.

To register as Interested and Affected Parties, please send requests/responses to:

BFSF NAMCOR WALVIS BAY EIA - MARCH 2008 - DRAFT

Ms Jeanne DEmiljo:

Tel: +264 61 223336 (mornings only) Fax: +264 61 307437 P.O. Box 20837, Windhoek E-mail: jeanene@uda.com.na

Technical queries and responses can be directed to:

Ms Stephanie van Zyl:

Tel: +264 61 223336 Fax: +264 61 307437 P.O. 20837, Windhoek E-mail: envirod@africaonline.com.na

The due date for submission of comments is 07 February 2008.

Geo Pollution Technologies (Pty) Ltd.

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APPENDIX C

BFSF NAMCOR WALVIS BAY EIA - MARCH 2008 - DRAFT

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PROPOSED BULK FUEL STORAGE FACILITY AT WALVIS BAY ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT (EA) SCOPING
MINUTES: CONSULTATION MEETING WITH AUTHORITIES 24 JANUARY 2008, 15H00, NAMIB CONFERENCE ROOM, MUNICIPALITY OF WALVISBAY, WALVISBAY Agenda: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 6. Introduction and welcome Mrs. Stephanie van Zyl Introduction by NamCor Ms. Patty Olivier Project Details Mr. Cronje Loftie-Eaton EA Process Mrs. Stephanie van Zyl Issues identified so far Mr. Pierre Botha Additional issues Mrs. Stephanie van Zyl Wrap up Mrs. Stephanie van Zyl

Attendance See Attached Attendance List.

1.

Introduct ion an d Welcome

Mrs. van Zyl introduced the Project and explained the reason for the meeting, namely to engage with the applicable authorities to hear their concerns and answer their questions. Each participant was given the chance to introduce him/herself.

2.

Introduct ion by NamCor

Ms. Patty Olivier introduced NamCor (Pty) Ltd who they are and what they do, including upstream and downstream activities and NamCors future. See the attached Presentation.

3.

Project D etails
Site Location Analysis Safety standards and design parameters Basic design details of the scheme

Mr. Cronj Loftie-Eaton presented the details of the project, namely:

See the attached presentation.


Information Sharing Meeting: Municipality of Windhoek Proposed Bulk Fuel Storage Facility at Walvisbay EA Scoping Phase
BFSF NAMCOR WALVIS BAY EIA - MARCH 2008 - DRAFT

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4.

EA Proces s Ms . Step hanie v an Zyl

Mrs. van Zyl defined an Environmental Assessment (EA) and its process. She explained that this EA Process is in its Scoping Phase and that input from authorities and Interested and Affected Parties are now required to help determine what needs to be investigated. See the attached presentation showing the EA process applicable to the Project.

5.

Issues id entifi ed so far

Mr. Pierre Botha ran the meeting through the key issues related to the construction and operational phases of the Bulk Fuel Storage Facility that have been identified so far, as follows. Construction Phase Pipeline from Harbor to Depot Traffic issues Trench dewatering Aesthetic issues from open trench and excavated sand Noise Issues Safety Issues Traffic Issues Aesthetic issues from construction site Noise Issues Safety Issues

Depot Construction

Operational Phase Traffic Issues Aesthetic Issues Noise Issues Safety Issues Nuisance Pollution Groundwater Pollution Vapour Emissions Aeolian Sand Movement

Information Sharing Meeting: Municipality of Windhoek Proposed Bulk Fuel Storage Facility at Walvisbay
BFSF NAMCOR WALVIS BAY EIA - MARCH 2008 - DRAFT

Geo Pollution Technologies (Pty) Ltd.

6.
Respondent
Noted.

Issues/questions posed duri ng the meeting


Response

Participant

Issues/comments/questions

Tony Raw NamPort Noted.

The IMO standards applicable to products C Loftie Eaton on vessels will also be applicable to this Project.

BFSF NAMCOR WALVIS BAY EIA - MARCH 2008 - DRAFT

The shunting to take place across 13th road will be in conflict with existing traffic flow. Namcor will have to decide whether ISO9000 and ISO14000 will be implemented.

Will operational Standards ISO 9000 and Hendrik Boshoff 14000 be followed for this project?

Using road tankers vs. rail were the safety factors between road vs. rail traffic taken into consideration particularly with reference to truck accidents. Alfred Hainuca What about Health and Safety issues Hendrik Boshoff which standards will be implemented? contingency/disaster

Noted. The traffic flow is being redistributed- there will be no additional traffic on the roads. The design is 100% flexible towards road vs. rail transport i.e. 100% of the products can be either dispatched via road or rail. The plan is however to dispatch 70% of product via rail. All product is collected on site and taken back to Walvis Bay station. SANS 10089 cover Health and Safety aspects in great detail and these will be followed. Yes, it is part of the work of the Feasibility Study to compile a contingency plan, also with respect to the neighbouring properties. The Plan will be an integrated one including all aspects of disaster management. The Team has introduced a vapour recovery system which will greatly assist to prevent pollution and health and safety incidents. Noted

Will there be a management plan?

NamPorts EMP must please be consulted.

Geo Pollution Technologies (Pty) Ltd.

Information Sharing Meeting: Municipality of Windhoek

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Proposed Bulk Fuel Storage Facility at Walvisbay

EA Scoping Phase

24 January 2008

Participant
Patty Olivier

Issues/comments/questions

Respondent

Response
NamCor is committed to implement Best Practice Health and Safety practices. The site is zoned undetermined and NamCor is applying for its re-zoning to Industrial with consent for noxious industries. They are following the normal procedures (there is no heavy industrial zone in the Walvis Bay Town Planning Scheme). Noted Noted Fauna and Flora is not expected to be an issue; but the potential impact will be documented. Noted. Public and worker safety is very strictly considered and the site will exceed all norms in this regard. Narraville residents can be empowered and trained for fire safety. Noted It was confirmed that it is unlikely that an external reviewer will be required and the EIA documents will be reviewed by the Walvis Bay Municipality. All noted.

David Ushona Walvis Bay Municipality

Is the project a light or heavy industrial land Ms Asino use?

BFSF NAMCOR WALVIS BAY EIA - MARCH 2008 - DRAFT

Consider seawater pollution issues in the EIA.

There is an artificial wetland at the S van Zyl sewerage plant consider the effects on this wetland and on fauna and flora.

Consider also safety for workers on site and Hendrik Boshoff for Narraville residents.

Consider the economic impact of potential reduced property values in Narraville.

Alfred Hainuca The following issues were put forward for and general consideration: discussion Impact of service lines in front of residential areas. Shunting in town during office hours impact on traffic. Impacts associated with operational

Areas at rail loading will be bunded. An oil water separator has been allowed for to ensure no product spillages can end up in the effluent water.

Geo Pollution Technologies (Pty) Ltd.

Information Sharing Meeting: Municipality of Windhoek

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Proposed Bulk Fuel Storage Facility at Walvisbay

EA Scoping Phase

24 January 2008

Participant

Issues/comments/questions

Respondent

Response
Automatic monitoring on both ends of pipeline will compare flow rates and detect any catastrophic failures of the pipe line. Minor leaks can be detected by regular testing of standpipes along pipe route. SANS code requires pressure testing to detect loss and leaks.

activities at the Jetty. Mitigation at existing facilities? Potential spilling during rail loading.

BFSF NAMCOR WALVIS BAY EIA - MARCH 2008 - DRAFT

What are the fire fighting arrangements?

Hendrik Boshoff

All tanks will be fitted with automatic activated foam systems  foam is poured automatically onto tanks, valves, pumps, etc. in case of a fire.  The foam can also be activated manually as a precautionary measure in the bund during a serious spillage.  A manually activated firewater deluge system to protect the integrity of tanks during a fire is also provided.  There will be 2 firewater tanks on site one in operation and one for a back-up.  The municipal fire fighting department will be called during an emergency, but the on-site system is of such standard that the fire should be extinguished before the fire brigade arrives (can be on site in 30min).  A contingency plan for fire will be recommended.  The design far exceeds relevant standards.  Everybody on site will be trained to handle fire emergencies.

Geo Pollution Technologies (Pty) Ltd.

Information Sharing Meeting: Municipality of Windhoek

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Proposed Bulk Fuel Storage Facility at Walvisbay

EA Scoping Phase

24 January 2008

7.

Wrap up

BFSF NAMCOR WALVIS BAY EIA - MARCH 2008 - DRAFT

Mrs. Van Zyl adjourned the meeting by inviting further comments and providing relevant contact details.

Geo Pollution Technologies (Pty) Ltd.

Information Sharing Meeting: Municipality of Windhoek

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Proposed Bulk Fuel Storage Facility at Walvisbay

EA Scoping Phase

24 January 2008

NAME
Project Manager Windhoek Industrial Engineer Windhoek Public Participation Manager EIA Manager Windhoek Legal Advisor Windhoek Trader Windhoek HSSE (061) 204-5021 (061) 204-5061 Private Bag 13196, Windhoek Petroleum Down Stream Manager Port Engineer 081-128-3275 (064) 208-2333 (061) 204-5006 (061) 204-5092 Private Bag 13196, Windhoek P.O. Box 361, Walvisbay Environmental Officer (064) 214-306 (064) 214-310 Private Bag 5017, Walvisbay Commercial Manager 083-228-5306 (031) 466-2771 P.O. Box 149, Durban Terminal Manager 081-128-2589 (064) 203-3696 P.O. Box 31, Walvisbay Gunter.krauer@enginoil.com dawn@ivstorage.co.za omakuti@walvisbaycc.org.na tony@namport.com.na patty@namcor.com.na mkavandjii@namcor.com.na (061) 204-5038 (061) 204-5092 Private Bag 13196, lkapingana@namcor.com.na (061) 204-5052 (061) 204-5092 Private Bag 13196, Toni.beukes@namcor.com.na (061) 257-411 (061) 257-411 P.O. Box 11073, Windhoek Pierre@imlt.com.na 081-128-7002 (061) 307-437 P.O. Box 20837, envirod@africaonline.com.na 081-124-3652 (061) 379-001 P.O. Box 1496, cronje@burmeister.com.na (061) 379-000 (061) 379-001 P.O. Box 1496, hboshoff@burmeister.com.na

ORGANISATION/ POSITION TELEPHONE FAX POSTAL ADDRESS E-MAIL ADDRESS

AFFILIATION

H. Boshoff

Burmeister & Partners

H.C. Loftie-Eaton

Burmeister & Partners

S. van Zyl

Enviro Dynamics

P. Botha

Geo Pollution

Technologies

BFSF NAMCOR WALVIS BAY EIA - MARCH 2008 - DRAFT

P. Beukes

NAMCOR

L. Kapingana

NAMCOR

M. Kavendjii

NAMCOR

P. Olivier

NAMCOR

T. Raw

Namport

O. Makuti

Municipality of

Walvisbay

D. Benyi

Island View Storage

G. Krauer

Engen

W.J. van Zyl

Municipality of

Chief Fire

081-122-0833

(064) 214-310

Private Bag 5017, Walvisbay

wvanzyl@walvisbaycc.org.na

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Walvisbay

Information Sharing Meeting: Narraville, Walvisbay Proposed Bulk Fuel Storage Facility EA Scoping Phase 24 January 2008

NAME

ORGANISATION/ POSITION TELEPHONE FAX POSTAL ADDRESS E-MAIL ADDRESS

AFFILIATION

H. van der Merwe 11, Sasolberg, 1948 Project Manager Walvisbay Network Designer Walvisbay Engineer: Network Support Town Planner Walvisbay Manager: SWEM (064) 214-304 (064) 214-310 Private Bag 5017, Walvisbay Manager: P.R & Customer Services General Manager (064) 201-3270 (064) 209-714 (064) 201-3317 (064) 214-310 Private Bag 5017, Walvisbay Private Bag 5017, Walvisbay Property Administrator (064) 208-2359 (064) 208-2373 P.O. Box 361, Walvisbay SHE Officer 081-289-6736 Coordinator EMS/QMS 081-129-0251 (064) 208-2373 (064) 208-2232 (064) 208-2232 P.O. Box 4011, Vineta P.O. Box 361, Walvisbay tim@namport.com.na Alfred@namport.com.na Ulrich@namport.com.na (064) 201-3339 (064) 206-135 Private Bag 5017, Walvisbay 081-122-4666 (064) 204-574 P.O. Box 2925, 081-205-6508 (064) 204-574 P.O. Box 2925, (064) 217-621 (064) 204-574 P.O. Box 2925,

Apex Process

Process Engineer

(016) 971-4461

(016) 971-4471

Tygerberg Street

henk@apexprocess.co.za

D. van Wyk

Erongo RED

dvanwyk@erongored.com.na

P. Johannes

Erongo RED

pjohannes@erongored.com.na

BFSF NAMCOR WALVIS BAY EIA - MARCH 2008 - DRAFT

R. Ouseb

Erongo RED

rouseb@erongored.com.na

K. Asino

Municipality of

kasino@walvisbaycc.org.na

Walvisbay

D. Uushona

Municipality of

duushona@walvisbaycc.org.na

Walvisbay

K. Adams

Municipality of

kadams@walvisbaycc.org.na

Walvisbay

A.T. Victor

Municipality of

avictor@walvisbaycc.org.na

Walvisbay

U.I. Khachab

Namport

A. Hainuca

Namport

T. Eiman

Namport

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TOTAL

24

Information Sharing Meeting: Narraville, Walvisbay Proposed Bulk Fuel Storage Facility EA Scoping Phase 24 January 2008

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APPENDIX D

BFSF NAMCOR WALVIS BAY EIA - MARCH 2008 - DRAFT

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PROPOSED BULK FUEL STORAGE FACILITY AT WALVIS BAY ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT (EA) SCOPING
MINUTES: PUBLIC CONSULTATION MEETING 24 JANUARY 2008, 18H00, NARRAVILLE CONFERENCE ROOM, NARRAVILLE MUNICIPAL OFFICE, WALVISBAY Agenda: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 6. Introduction and welcome Introduction by NamCor Project Details EA Process Mrs. Stephanie van Zyl

Ms. Patty Olivier

Mr. Cronje Loftie-Eaton Mr. Pierre Botha

Mrs. Stephanie van Zyl Mrs. Stephanie van Zyl

Issues identified so far Additional issues Wrap up

Mrs. Stephanie van Zyl

Attendance See Attached Attendance List.

1.

Introduct ion an d Welcome

Mrs. van Zyl introduced the Project and explained the reason for the meeting, namely to engage the Community to hear their concerns and answer their questions. NAMCOR, the EA and Project Teams wish to build a healthy relationship with the Community. Mrs. Van Zyl introduced the EA and Project Teams who attended the meeting.

2.

Introduct ion by NamCor

Ms. Patty Olivier introduced NamCor (Pty) Ltd Presentation.

who they are and what they do,

including upstream and downstream activities and NamCor s future. See the attached

Information Sharing Meeting: Narraville, Walvisbay Proposed Bulk Fuel Storage Facility
BFSF NAMCOR WALVIS BAY EIA - MARCH 2008 - DRAFT

Geo Pollution Technologies (Pty) Ltd.

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2

3.

Project D etails

Mr. Cronj Loftie-Eaton presented the details of the project, namely:


Site Location Analysis conducted beforehand Safety standards and design parameters Basic design details of the scheme

See the attached presentation.

4.

EA Proces s Ms . Step hanie v an Zyl

Mrs. van Zyl defined an Environmental Assessment (EA) and its process. She explained that this EA Process is in its Scoping Phase and that input from Interested and Affected Parties are now required to help determine what need to be investigated. attached presentation showing the EA process applicable to the Project. See

5.

Issues id entifi ed so far

Mr. Pierre Botha ran the meeting through the key issues related to the construction and operational phases of the Bulk Fuel Storage Facility that have been identified so far, as follows. Construction Phase Pipeline from Harbor to Depot Traffic issues Trench dewatering Aesthetic issues from open trench and excavated sand Noise Issues Safety Issues Traffic Issues Aesthetic issues from construction site Noise Issues Safety Issues

Depot Construction

Operational Phase Traffic Issues Aesthetic Issues

Information Sharing Meeting: Narraville, Walvisbay Proposed Bulk Fuel Storage Facility
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3

Noise Issues Safety Issues Nuisance Pollution Groundwater Pollution Vapour Emissions Aeolian Sand Movement

Information Sharing Meeting: Narraville, Walvisbay Proposed Bulk Fuel Storage Facility
BFSF NAMCOR WALVIS BAY EIA - MARCH 2008 - DRAFT

Geo Pollution Technologies (Pty) Ltd.

6.

Issues/questions posed duri ng the meeting

Participant

Issues/comments/questions

Respondent

Response
The distance from Narraville will be at least 500m. SANS 10089 prescribed minimum distances between buildings on the premises.

BFSF NAMCOR WALVIS BAY EIA - MARCH 2008 - DRAFT

Mr. B Coetzee Community member

Confirm the distance of the facility from Hendrik Boshoff Narraville. What is the minimum distance such a facility can be placed from a residential area according to applicable standards?

Mr. M Stuart Shell Namibia

Geo Pollution Technologies (Pty) Ltd.

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Mr. S Bauman Home owner

Will the existing tanker jetty at the harbour be used? What structures are proposed at the jetty? There are already a number of problems in Narraville e.g. the smells from the sewerage sludge and the fishing industry, noise from the railroad, and windblown sand.

Henk van der Merwe It depends on the size of the tanks. The minimum distance between the tank and the roads edge is prescribed as half the diameter of the tank, e.g. if the tanks diameter is 50m, then the tank should be at least 25m from the edge of the road. According to SANS 10089 it should be safe to build up to the boundary. NFPA 30 and SANS 10089-1 safety regulations provide restrictions of minimum distances to permissible land uses at immediate boundaries, but there is no distinction between residential and other areas. However recommendations of 500 m to the nearest residential areas from Walvis Bay municipality far exceeds even the Buncefield recommendations. There are many examples elsewhere in the world (first world countries with strict regulations) where bulk fuel storage facilities are much closer to residential areas. Hendrik Boshoff Namport is presently busy with studies to investigate the structures at the tanker Jetty and this Team is waiting for an answer from them in this regard. Hendrik Boshoff The only vapours from such a project result from the Cronje Loftie Eaton offloading of fuel at the trucks. A vapour recovery system is being proposed which would condensate any vapours. At a distance of 500m there will be no

Information Sharing Meeting: Narraville, Walvisbay Proposed Bulk Fuel Storage Facility EA Scoping Phase 24 January 2008

Participant

Issues/comments/questions

Respondent

Response

BFSF NAMCOR WALVIS BAY EIA - MARCH 2008 - DRAFT

Now it is being proposed to add another set of nuisances such as vapours from fuel and noise from shunting activities. How was this approved by the Municipality without consulting the community?

S van Zyl

Mr. I Marchal Youth Project

What happens if the project is implemented C Loftie-Eaton and there are negative impacts on the community? The community would like proof/something in writing that the mitigation measures promised will be implemented. Will the community be compensated for ill health/damages incurred? S Van Zyl

vapours detected. There will be no bottom sludge we propose a pigging system to separate different products and not use water between different products in the line. The only water on site will be rainwater, which is channelled to an oil separator, which will separate any hydrocarbons, and automatically tests the water quality before it is released to the stormwater system. There will be a maximum of three shunts per day during office hours, namely early in the morning (e.g. 07h00), midday and afternoon (e.g. not later than 19h00). Each shunt lasts about 20min. All shunting on site will be done with a pulley systemno shunting is done with a locomotive. The Municipality of Walvis Bay approved the project in principle subject to certain conditions, including the requirement for an Environmental Assessment which also involves consultation with Interested and Affected Parties. This is why this meeting has been arranged, namely to meet with the community and hear their concerns. This facility is essentially the same as a large fuel station. The frequency of activities and associated vapours and noise at a filling station is much higher. We are doing a proper design to avoid all anticipated impacts.

Geo Pollution Technologies (Pty) Ltd.

The documents with proposed mitigation will be available in writing. The Environmental Management Plan will be available for scrutiny and it is the Communitys responsibility to check that those recommendations are implemented. One of the recommendations will be that baseline and continuous monitoring of air, water and soil

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Information Sharing Meeting: Narraville, Walvisbay Proposed Bulk Fuel Storage Facility EA Scoping Phase 24 January 2008

Participant
quality is undertaken. available to the public. The new facility will be constructed according to the latest standards that were not available at the time when the BP facility was erected. Some of the differences include floating roofs to avoid gases from escaping and further distances between tanks. Those figures should be

Issues/comments/questions

Respondent

Response

Mr. W Human Businessman

How does the existing BP fuel storage facility Cronje Loftie-Eaton compare to this one in terms of technology used? The prevailing winds would carry the vapours from the proposed facility straight towards Narraville.

BFSF NAMCOR WALVIS BAY EIA - MARCH 2008 - DRAFT

Mr. T Muatunga Businessman Mr. B Coetzee

We are not against the investment. We Cronje Loftie-Eaton however question the proposed site locality. Why not place it out of town away from existing communities? In 20 years the original project team will no longer be there to check the effects on the community. What were the criteria used to select the site? It seems as if financial considerations dominated the selection of the site. Sites A and C seem much more favourable because they are away from any existing residential areas than B which introduces additional traffic and noise and health and safety risks.

A robust and objective method to select the site was used and financial consideration was only one of many determinants. The distance from the Narraville community was not considered a constraint because if one considers worldwide recognised standards then it is clear that the distance from the community is far There will be no additional traffic created in the town of Walvis Bay the traffic is merely redirected.

Mr. D Paulse Community member

What will happen if there is an explosion at the Henk van der Merwe site or at any exposed pipelines taking into consideration the prevailing wind direction and the accessibility of the pipeline to the public. Burning cigarette stumps can for instance easily be discarded on a leaking fuel pipeline.

The following example was given to explain what happens in event of a fire. Last year 7 trucks burned at a site similar to this one. The road tankers burned to the ground but there were no explosions. This facility does not pose an explosion risk because the fuel to be stored there is not stored above its boiling point and therefore does nor form a vapour cloud when released. Vapours normally explode. There will be an electronic metering system installed for the pipeline, which will automatically detect any

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Information Sharing Meeting: Narraville, Walvisbay Proposed Bulk Fuel Storage Facility EA Scoping Phase 24 January 2008

Participant

Issues/comments/questions

Respondent

Response

I lungameni

What will happen if the EIA finds significant S van Zyl negative impacts will the decision of the Walvis Bay Municipality then be reverted? Will the minutes of the meeting be distributed?

BFSF NAMCOR WALVIS BAY EIA - MARCH 2008 - DRAFT

Hendrik Boshoff

losses and leakages. It is required that any leakages be immediately cleaned up and fixed according to set procedures. The EIA will be submitted to the Walvis Bay Municipality if the recommendations are negative toward the project then they should consider whether it should be finally approved. The EIA document and these minutes will be available for public perusal. The project will likely require international funding the IFC will not provide funding if there are significant impacts which cannot be mitigated. Part of the design process is to find a suitable site. If the EIA process finds the existing site to be unsuitable, then another site should be selected.

Geo Pollution Technologies (Pty) Ltd.

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8

7.

Wrap up

Mrs. Van Zyl invited participants to write key issues important to them on cards. The cards were collected and read out to the audience. The figure below shows the cards collected and grouped according to themes.

Mrs. Van Zyl adjourned the meeting by inviting further comments and providing relevant contact details. The issues from this meeting will be addressed in the EIA.
Information Sharing Meeting: Narraville, Walvisbay Proposed Bulk Fuel Storage Facility
BFSF NAMCOR WALVIS BAY EIA - MARCH 2008 - DRAFT

Geo Pollution Technologies (Pty) Ltd.

NAME
(061) 379-000 Windhoek 081-124-3652 Windhoek (061) 257-411 Windhoek (016) 971-4461 Sasolberg, 1948 081-128-7002 Windhoek (061) 204-5000 Windhoek (061) 204-5052 Windhoek (061) 386-003 (061) 204-5092 Private Bag 13196, Windhoek (061) 204-5021 (061) 204-5061 Private Bag 13196, Windhoek 083-228-5306 (031) 466-2771 P.O. Box 149, Durban 081-303-5050 (064) 201-3315 P.O. Box 2042, Walvisbay 081-127-9229 (064) 205-018 P.O. Box 1122, Walvisbay (064) 201-3339 (064) 206-135 Private Bag 5017, Walvisbay kasino@walvisbaycc.org.na ymiller@walvisbaycc.org.na satamab@yahoo.com dawn@ivstorage.co.za mkavendjii@namcor.com.na lkapingana@namcor.com.na (061) 204-5092 Private Bag 13196, Toni.beukes@namcor.com.na (061) 2040-5092 Private Bag 13196, patty@namcor.com.na (061) 307-437 P.O. Box 20837, envirod@africaonline.com.na (016) 971-4471 Tygerberg Street 11, henk@apexprocess.co.za (061) 257-411 P.O. Box 11073, Pierre@imlt.com.na (061) 379-001 P.O. Box 1496, cronje@burmeister.com.na (061) 379-001 P.O. Box 1496, hboshoff@burmeister.com.na

ORGANISATION/ POSITION TELEPHONE FAX POSTAL ADDRESS E-MAIL ADDRESS

AFFILIATION

H. Boshoff

Burmeister & Partners

Project Manager

H.C. Loftie-Eaton

Burmeister & Partners

Industrial Engineer

P. Botha

Geo Pollution

EIA Manager

Technologies

H. van der Merwe

Apex Process

Process Engineer

BFSF NAMCOR WALVIS BAY EIA - MARCH 2008 - DRAFT

S. van Zyl

Enviro Dynamics

Public Participation

Manager

P. Olivier

NAMCOR

Petroleum Downstream

Manager

T. Beukes

NAMCOR

Legal Advisor

L. Kapingana

NAMCOR

Trader

M. Kavendjii

NAMCOR

HSSE Officer

D. Benyi

Island View Storage

Commercial Manager

D.R. Gamab

Satamab Trading

General Manager

Enterprises cc.

Y. Miller

Municipality of

Cashier

Walvisbay

K. Asino

Municipality of

Town Planner

Geo Pollution Technologies (Pty) Ltd.

Page 64 of 66

Walvisbay

Information Sharing Meeting: Narraville, Walvisbay Proposed Bulk Fuel Storage Facility EA Scoping Phase 24 January 2008

10

NAME

ORGANISATION/ POSITION TELEPHONE FAX POSTAL ADDRESS E-MAIL ADDRESS

AFFILIATION
(064) 201-3348 Walvisbay 081-127-6819 Walvisbay (064) 202-014 Narraville (064) 204-105 081-302-3192 (064) 203-875 081-124-4054 081-222-7111 Walvisbay (064) 204-548 Narraville 081-124-0214 (064) 206-542 P.O. Box 8091, Narraville 081-122-6064 (064) 298-1221 P.O. Box 2975, Walvisbay 081-249-2051 (064) 206-672 P.O. Box 8212, Narraville 081-129-4008 081-127-0085 081-349-9778 N/A (064) 207-888 N/A N/A N/A P.O. Box 1176, Walvisbay 081-129-9602 (064) 218-630 N/A Bertie.c@ebhnamibia.com N/A N/A Riaan.Els@transnamib.com.na Wutow_wvb@cyberhost.com.na N/A P.O. Box 8047, N/A (064) 203-112 P.O. Box 867, Walvisbay quinta@namfi.net (064) 203-875 P.O. Box 2169, Walvisbay i.s@mweb.com.na (064) 204-105 P.O. Box 615, whuman@iway.na N/A P.O. Box 8207, N/A (064) 221-261 P.O. Box 4093, N/A (064) 206-135 Private Bag 5017, ilungameni@walvisbaycc.org.na

I. Lungameni

Municipality of

N/A

Walvisbay

M.W. Stuart

Shell Wam

Marine Manager

A.C. Simpson

N/A

Pensioner

W.J. Human

Draconian VD Boors

Director

BFSF NAMCOR WALVIS BAY EIA - MARCH 2008 - DRAFT

L.T. Deyzel

Draconian

Director

Q. Nendongo

NAMFI

N/A

J. Maggott

N/A

Pensioner

D. Paulse

Community Member

Sales Rep

R.C. Els

TransNamib Holdings

Area Manager (West)

Ltd

S. Baumann

Home Owner

Engen Workshop

Narraville

Foreman

S.J. Victor

LAS-NAS

Director

T.N. Muatunga

C.L.C. Construction

Owner

N/A P.O. Box 7227, Walvisbay

D. Christiaan

Blues ea Trading

Managing Director

Enterprises

B. Coetzee

Elgin Brown &

Engineering Estimator

Geo Pollution Technologies (Pty) Ltd.

Page 65 of 66

Hammer

Information Sharing Meeting: Narraville, Walvisbay Proposed Bulk Fuel Storage Facility EA Scoping Phase 24 January 2008

11

NAME
081-220-7646 (064) 218-630 N/A Joseph.h@ebhnamibia.com

ORGANISATION/ POSITION TELEPHONE FAX POSTAL ADDRESS E-MAIL ADDRESS

AFFILIATION

J.V. Haimbodi

Elgin Brown &

Engineering Junior

Hammer 081-299-1211 081-240-0420 Walvisbay 081-231-3842 Windhoek (061) 307-437 P.O. Box 20837, Su_uka@hotmail.com (064) 206-497 P.O. Box 4055, icmarshall@iway.na (064) 204-813 N/A otis@namibtimes.net

Estimator

O.C. Finer

Namib Times

Reporter

I.C. Marshall

Eagle Upholstery &

Owner

Signs (Youth Project)

E. Kuliwoye

Enviro Dynamics

Student

BFSF NAMCOR WALVIS BAY EIA - MARCH 2008 - DRAFT

TOTAL

31

Geo Pollution Technologies (Pty) Ltd.

Page 66 of 66

Information Sharing Meeting: Narraville, Walvisbay Proposed Bulk Fuel Storage Facility EA Scoping Phase 24 January 2008

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