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LESSON PLAN FORMAT

Name Rachael Ortega Subject ELA 1. # in Group Date 2/22/13 Grade 5 Time 9:00-9:45

School Eisenberg Elementary

STUDENT CHARACTERISTICS AND PRIOR KNOWLEDGE: Prior knowledge: The students are familiar with point of view. They know that it is talking about the authors perspective. However, many of them did not know the different 3 rd persons.

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STATEMENT OF STANDARD(S): STANDARDS:

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.4.6 Compare and contrast the point of view from which different stories are narrated, including the difference between first- and third-person narrations.

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CONTENT FOCUS: The students will be learning about point of view. They will be delving into the differences between 1st person, 3rd person limited, and 3rd person omniscient. They will be identifying texts as well as writing their own. Vocabulary that they should know during this lesson is perspective, point of view, limited, and omniscient. ESSENTIAL QUESTION, LESSON OBJECTIVE(S), & ASSESSMENT(S): ESSENTIAL QUESTION: How can we identify the authors point of view in a text? OBJECTIVE(S): Identify the difference between 3rd person limited and 3rd person omniscient Identify the point of view using key or clue words Classify the point of view of the text Write a paragraph in either 1st person, 3rd person limited, or 3rd person omniscient

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ASSESSMENT(S): Essential Question:

Objective(s)

Assessment Tool (s) Whos telling the story worksheet

Identify the difference between 3rd person limited and 3rd person omniscient Identify the point of view using key or clue words Classify the point of view of the text Classify the point of view of the text Write a text in either 1st person, 3rd person limited, or 3rd person omniscient

How will you determine which students are progressing toward learning key knowledge, skills, and abilities targeted in the lesson? Give the students the Whos telling the story worksheet at the beginning of the lesson to see if they remember what we introduced yesterday and can identify each passage using their prior knowledge as well as highlighting the key words.

Cat/Dog sheet

Read and identify the point of view of the cat/dog sheet. Have the students write a paragraph in the point of view of a bird. Use rubric below to grade.

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RESOURCES AND MATERIALS: Point of View anchor chart Dog/Cat worksheet Whos telling the story worksheet Elmo SmartBoard Looseleaf Paper Rubric INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES AND LEARNING TASKS: Activating Strategies: Tell them were going to continue our discussion on point of view from yesterday Give whos Telling the Story worksheet and ask if they see if they can figure out the passages from what they remember Tell them to highlight clue words Teaching Strategies: Go over Whos telling the story passages Have students explain why they chose which point of view for each passage, using details from the text (clue words) and characters Discuss why it is 3rd person limited verses omniscient Pass out the cat/dog diary Read to class Figure out what point of view this worksheet is in Pass out loose-leaf paper and tell the students that we will be writing a paragraph from the point of view of a bird I will be coming around telling you which point of view you are writing from (differentiation of students, students who have an IEP in ELA, or low achievement in ELA will do 1st person, and then I will decide for 3rd person limited or omniscient for the rest of the students) Summarizing Strategies (Closure): Highlight clue words in paragraph Explain that we will wrap this up on Monday We might use this in the referendum! Have the students read their POV pieces to parents!

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Narrative Structure

Exemplary Writer 3 pts Exemplary Writer The narrative contains a beginning, middle, and end.

Average Writer 2 pts Average Writer The narrative does not have a beginning, middle, and end. OR The narrative has a beginning, middle, and end, but is too short or merely just a list. Average Writer The paragraph has a few examples of sensory detail, figurative language and/or imagery. Average Writer There is one error in sentence structure. Average Writer There are only 1-3 errors in capitalization or punctuation. Average Writer The narrative switches to another character's point of view only once.

Amateur Writer 1 pts Amateur Writer The narrative does not contain a beginning, middle, and end.

Descriptive Ideas

Exemplary Writer This paragraph has many examples of sensory detail, figurative language and/or imagery. Exemplary Writer All sentences are complete. There are no run-on, stringy or fragmented sentences. Exemplary Writer There are no errors in capitalization or punctuation. Exemplary Writer The story is told from the birds point of view only.

Amateur Writer The paragraph has one or no examples of sensory detail, figurative language and/or imagery. Amateur Writer There are multiple errors in sentence structure Amateur Writer There are more than 3 errors in capitalization or punctuation. Amateur Writer The narrative switches to another's point of view two or more times.

Sentence Structure

Spelling/Capitali zation

Point of View