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ngy, 12 healthy unhealthy, 13 courteous rude, 14 unambitious ambitious, 15 i
mmoral moral, 16 fanatical open-minded, 17 kind unkind, 18 thrifty extravagant,
19 ignorant knowledgeable, 20 secretive open, 21 rational emotional, 22 ugl
y beautiful, 23 quiet talkative, 24 stupid intelligent, 25 happy sad, 26 poo
r wealthy, 27 clean dirty, 28 awkward graceful, 29 regionalistic nationalistic
, 30 serious fun-loving, 31 friendly unfriendly, 32 artistic inartistic, 33
lazy hardworking, 34 flirtatious reserved, 35 strong weak, 36 clannish outgoi
ng, 37 feminine masculine, 38 adventurous unadventurous, 39 humble proud, 40
primitive modern Gardner, Kirby, Arboleda, 1973, p.192 .

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ch Encarta . Dignity is 1.1. behaviour or an appearance which is serious, calm
, and controlled; used showing approval. e.g. There was something impressive abo
ut Julias quiet dignity. 1.2. the quality of being worthy of respect. e.g. Don
t discount the importance of human dignity. 2. Someones dignity is the sense th
at they have of their own importance. e.g. He danced a step or two, then remembe
red his dignity and stood still COBUILD . 1 ; 2
teliness, elevation, nobleness of mind, worthiness, worth, regard, character, im
portance, renown, splendour, majesty; that 99

mysterious something, stuff, class, tone; honour, pride; ant. humility, lowness,
meekness; 2 [a station that commands respect] syn. rank, honour, significance;
fame; importance WNWThes . 
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basic difference in attitudes of Orthodoxy and Catholicism, the Russian attitude


and the Western attitude. Even more, sudba is as if pre-established, it embraces
the whole of human life, and therefore it can be interpreted as in a general o
utline a fixed way of life. Being understood as a divine providence it contains i
n itself a higher meaning, it becomes the experience of man, and consequently leads
to the justification and acceptance both of all kinds of misfortunes including
historical calamities as well as acts compare a proverbial sympathy of the Rus
sian people for criminals and convicts . On the other hand, the attempt to chang
e ones fate is looked upon not too favourably. Certainly not without good reason,
with such understanding of sudba all attempts of opposing it must be associated
with an iconoclastic attitude; and generally this is the case. It certainly is n
ot by accident that all historical revolts in Russia together with the October R
evolution, on the one hand, activated just such attitude and anti-religious acts
, and were carried out under the slogans of holy missions, on the other hand. So
, when it is said in various discourses sudby Rossii or puti Rossii, the talk is
not only of history, but rather, above all, of the destiny the mission of Russia a
nd it is there that the contents of this mystical destiny is sought Faryno, 1995,
p.108109 . , fate

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being succeeded to a high degree] syn. fortune, good luck, achievement, gain, be
nefit, prosperity, victory, advance, attainment, progress, profit, prosperous is
sue, bed of roses, favorable outcome; ant. defeat, loss, disaster. 3. [a success
ful person or thing] syn. celebrity, famous person, leader, authority, master, e
xpert, man of fortune; somebody, star, gallery hit, bell-ringer, VIP. ant. failu
re, loser, nonentity WNWThes . ""

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C . Futile 1 useless, ineffectual, vain; 2 frivolous, trifling [Latin futilis l
eaky, futile, related to fundere pour] COD .
vercoat ; 3 intr. as bustling adj. colloq. full of activity; [perhaps from bu
skle frequentative of busk prepare, from Old Nors] COD . Fuss n. 1 excited commo
tion, bustle, ostentatious or nervous activity; 2 a excessive concern about a
trivial thing; b abundance of petty detail; 3 a sustained protest or dispute;
4 a person who fusses; v. 1 intr. a make a fuss; b busy oneself restlessly w
ith trivial things; c often foll. by about, up and down move fussily; 2 tr.
Brit. agitate, worry; make a fuss complain vigorously; make a fuss over or Brit
. of treat a person or animal with great or excessive attention [18th c.: per
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worse, such as damage. Dated If you make mischief you say something which caus
es other people to be upset or annoyed with each other COBUILD .
; trick an action which is intended to deceive, either as a way of cheating som
eone, or as a joke or form of entertainment She played a really nasty trick on
me she put syrup in my shampoo bottle CIDE ; prank a practical joke a trick p
layed on someone to amuse others: She glued a teachers book to the desk as a pr
actical joke LDELC ; a practical joke is a joke which makes someone seem foolis
h and involves a physical action rather than words: She stuck her bosss cup and
saucer together as a practical joke CIDE . , ,

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sports, tricks or practical jokes WNDS ,

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daughters make daidling wives. , , .

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Wunder, die Verwunderung, die Wunderding, das Erstaunen, die Verbluffung, die Ve
rwirrung, das berraschen, die Neugier, die Kuriositt, die Seltenheit, die Raritt, d
er Einfall, die Grille, die Laune, das Phnomen, die Erscheinung, das Aufsehen, di
e Sensation, die Bewunderung, die Ehrfurcht, die Erstarrung, der Zauber, der Rei
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sobriety antonym Heritage ; Humour n. 1. The humour of the situation had ever
yone laughing: funniness, comedy, comicality, ridiculousness, ludicrousness, dro
llery, nonsense, jocularity, jocoseness, jocosity. 2. The book is cheerful and f
ull of humour: jokes, joking, wit, wittiness, witticisms, gags, wisecracks, jest
s, jesting, foolery, fooling, foolishness, tomfoolery, raillery, ridicule, buffo
onery, waggery, monkeyshines, comedy, high comedy, low comedy, broad comedy, sla
pstick, low humour, broad humour, burlesque, farce, caricature, parody, travesty
, satire, whimsy, wordplay, puns. Antonyms seriousness, gravity, solemnity, sobr
iety; sadness, grief, sorrow, melancholy Random House . Funny 1. adj. Behavin
g like a clown:, clownish, buffoonish, foolish, entertaining, amusing, silly, se
nsible antonym . 2. adj. Causing or deserving laughter, laughable, jocose, am
using, entertaining, comic, comical, droll, farcical, foolish, humorous, rich, b
urlesque, risible, witty, serious antonym Heritage ; funny adj. 1. Its a ver
y funny story, but I dont want to repeat it: comical, amusing, humorous, divert
ing, laughable, hilarious, absurd, ridiculous, ludicrous; witty, droll, comic, f
acetious, waggish, jocular, jocose, sporting, jesting, antic, mirthful, merry; f
arcical. Antonyms 1 serious, sober, humourless; solemn, grave; mournful Random
House .

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4 Call the Psychic Hotline from your cell phone and ask if they know what floor
youre on. 5 Hold the doors open and say youre waiting for your friend. After
awhile, let the doors close and say, "Hi Greg. Hows your day been?" 6 Drop a
pen and wait until someone reaches to help pick it up, then scream, "Thats mine
" 7 Bring a camera and take pictures of everyone in the lift. 8 Move your des
k into the lift and whenever someone gets on, ask if they have an appointment. 9
Lay down a Twister mat and ask people if theyd like to play. 10 Leave a box
in the corner, and when someone gets on ask them if they hear something ticking.
11 Pretend you are a flight attendant and review emergency procedures and exit
with the passengers. 12 Ask, "Did you feel that?" 13 Stand really close to so
meone, sniffing them occasionally. 14 When the doors close, announce to the oth
ers, "Its okay. Dont panic, they open up again." 15 Swat at flies that dont
exist. 16 Tell people that you can see their aura. 17 Call out, "Group hug" t
hen enforce it. 18 Grimace painfully while smacking your forehead and muttering
"Shut up, all of you, just shut up" 19 Crack open your briefcase or handbag,
and while peering inside, ask, "Got enough air in there?" 20 Stand silently and
motionless in the corner, facing the wall, without getting off. 21 Stare at an
other passenger for a while, then announce in horror, "Youre one of THEM" and
back away slowly. 22 Wear a puppet on your hand and use it to talk to the other
passengers. 23 Listen to the lift walls with your stethoscope. 24 Make explos
ion noises when anyone presses a button. 25 Grinning, stare at another passenge
r for a while, and then announce, "I have new socks on." 26 Draw a little squar
e on the floor with chalk and announce to the other passengers, "This is my pers
onal space" www.jokes.co.uk .

.
times like some continentals? Standardisation of a practice which can cause awka
rdness and embarrassment is surely long overdue. - Philip Watson, London W9 A: S
ocial kissing, as the name suggests, is usually reserved for social life, unless
you work in lovey-dovey metiers such as fashion, magazines, the theatre and so
on, where no professional greeting is complete without osculatory over excitemen
t. It is crass and presumptuous to kiss people you are meeting for the first tim
e: a traditional handshake or small nod of the head is all that is called for. T
he only site for a social kiss is the cheek: attempts at mouths, foreheads or an
y other part of the anatomy display distinctly sexual rather than social intenti
ons. One kiss is usual for the older generation, two quite permissible for young
people, but three is quite excessive for any age. If kissing twice, it is usual
to adopt a left-right sequence. ,

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language use in social contexts, and in particular with interaction or dialogue


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; lecturer, expositor, exponent, interpreter; prelector, assistant professor, as
sociate professor, professor, adjunct professor, chaired professor, visiting pro
fessor, professor emeritus; catechist, catechizer; initiator, mystagogue; confid
ant, consultant, adviser; teaching staff, faculty, professoriate. Other Forms sc
holar: don, reader, professor, pedagogue, teacher; sage: master, mentor, guide,
guru, pundit, rabbi, teacher; interpreter: interpreter, clarifier, explainer, ex
ponent, expounder, expositor, exegete, teacher, religious teacher; lecture: lect
urer, teacher; director: director of studies, teacher; adviser: guide, philosoph
er and friend, mentor, confidante , teacher; expert: professional, pro, special
ist, authority, doyen, professor, teacher; master: schoolmaster or -mistress, te
acher.

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