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A GLOBAL / COUNTRY STUDY REPORT (GCSR)

Selected Country: Netherland Selected Company: Holland P. T. Corporation (Netherland) Ashwani Metals Pvt. Ltd. (India) Selected Product: Brass Products

SUBMITTED BY PARAM INSTITUTE OF MANAGEMENT & RESEARCH, JAMNAGAR

GUIDED BY PROF. YAGNESH TRIVEDI

ACADEMIC YEAR 2011-2013

AFFILIATED TO GUJARAT TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY AHEMDABAD

Declaration:

We, students of Param Institute Of Management And Research, Jamnagar, hereby declare that the report for global/ country study report entitled Import Export Of Brass Products in Netherland is a result of our own work and our indebtedness to other work publications, references , if any, have been duly acknowledged.

Place: Jamnagar Date:

(signature) Name of student

GLOBAL / COUNTRY STUDY REPORT (GCSR) Betch : 2011 - 2013 Project Submitted By: PARAM IMR, Jamnagar

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Acknowledgement
It is our pleasure to present this project on Import Export of Brass Products in Netherland. There are so many people involved in this project, without their support this project was not possible for us to prepare such a project report. We thankful all those persons who helped us in carrying out this work. We are hardly thank to honorable VC Dr. Akshai Agrawal of Gujarat Technological University and other member of GTU. We are hardly thank to Dr. Hansaben Sheth our principle of Param IMR and our guide Mrs. Bonisa Bhandari It was really a memorable report and we would like to thank Mr. Mayur Dhuker, export manager and all those of persons of the Ashwani Metals Pvt. Ltd. Who had guided us in our project and made it really a successful one. We also thankful Mrs.Bonisa Dave Bhandari, and all other faculty members, who helped us and guide us in preparing this project report. We have tried our level best to present the available information in the best possible manner

GLOBAL / COUNTRY STUDY REPORT (GCSR) Betch : 2011 - 2013 Project Submitted By: PARAM IMR, Jamnagar

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CONTENTS
Sr.No.
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14

Particular
Overview of the Netherland Demography Detail of Netherland Economic overview of Netherland Overview of Company Organizational Study Overview of International Industries Trade & Commerce Overview of Different Sector of Natherland Policy & Norms of Import & Export Present Trade Barriers Present Trade Relation & Business Volume PESTLE Analysis Present Position of Business Opportunity SWOT Analysis Potential for Import/Export in Gujarat and Business Opportunities

Pg. No. 2 3 7 12 23 42 64 70 88 91 59 104 112 118

14 16 16 17 18

Per Capita Income Suggestion Conclusion Literacy Appendix

131 140 141 143 149

Sr.No.
1 2 3 4 5 Overview of the Netherland

Particular

Pg. No. 2 3 7 12 23
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Demography Detail of Netherland Economic overview of Netherland Overview of Company Organizational Study

GLOBAL / COUNTRY STUDY REPORT (GCSR) Betch : 2011 - 2013 Project Submitted By: PARAM IMR, Jamnagar

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 14 16 16 17 18

Overview of International Industries Trade & Commerce Overview of Different Sector of Natherland Policy & Norms of Import & Export Present Trade Barriers Present Trade Relation & Business Volume PESTLE Analysis Present Position of Business Opportunity SWOT Analysis Potential for Import/Export in Gujarat and Business Opportunities Per Capita Income Suggestion Conclusion Literacy Appendix

42 64 70 88 91 59 104 112 118 131 140 141 143 149

GLOBAL / COUNTRY STUDY REPORT (GCSR) Betch : 2011 - 2013 Project Submitted By: PARAM IMR, Jamnagar

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OVERVIEW OF NETHERLAND

GLOBAL / COUNTRY STUDY REPORT (GCSR) Betch : 2011 - 2013 Project Submitted By: PARAM IMR, Jamnagar

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Demographic Profile of Netherland Country:


Demography of any country may include several points that are given in the following chart, NO. Particular
2102 est.) Note: Note: Starting with the 1993 Factbook, demographic estimates for

Detail
16,730,630 (December

Population

some countries (mostly African) have explicitly taken into account the effects of the growing impact of the HIV/AIDS epidemic. 0-14 years: 17% (male 1,466,218/female 1,398,463) 15-64 years: 67.4% (male

Age Structure

5,732,042/female 5,624,408) 65 years and over: 15.6% (male 1,141,507/female 1,484,369) (2011 est.) Total: 41.1 years

Median Age

Male: 40.3 years Female: 41.9 years (2011 est.)

4 5

Population Growth Rate Birth Rate

0.452% (2011 est.)

10.89 births/1,000 population (2011 est.)


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GLOBAL / COUNTRY STUDY REPORT (GCSR) Betch : 2011 - 2013 Project Submitted By: PARAM IMR, Jamnagar

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Death Rate Net Migration Rate

8.39 deaths/1,000 population (July 2011 est.) 2.02 migrant(s)/1,000 population (2011 est.) Urban population: 83% of total population (2010)

Urbanization

Rate of urbanization: 0.8% annual rate of change (2010-15 est.) At birth: 1.05 male(s)/female Under 15 years: 1.05 male(s)/female

Sex Ratio

15-64 years: 1.01 male(s)/female 65 years and over: 0.8 male(s)/female otal population: 0.98 male(s)/female (2011 est.) Total: 3.73 deaths/1,000 live births

10

Infant Mortality Rate

Male: 4.03 deaths/1,000 live births Female: 3.41 deaths/1,000 live births (2011 est.) Total population: 80.91

11

Life expectancy at birth

years Male: 78.84 years Female: 83.08 years (2011 est.)

12

Total Fertility Rate

1.78 children born/woman (2011 est.)

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HIV/AIDS - adult prevalence rate HIV/AIDS - people living with HIV/AIDS HIV/AIDS - deaths Major infectious diseases

0.2% (2009 est.)

22,000 (2009 est.)

14 15 16

Fewer than 100 (2009 est.)

Noun: Dutchman(men),

17

Nationality

Dutchwoman(women) Adjective: Dutch AMSTERDAM (capital) 1.044 million;

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Major CitiesPopulation

Rotterdam 1.008 million; The Hague (seat of government) 629,000 (2009) Definition: age 15 and over can read and write

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Literacy

Total population: 99% Male: 99% Female: 99% (2003 est.)

School life expectancy Total: 17 years 20 (primary to tertiary education) 21 Education Expenditure Maternal mortality rate Health expenditures
9 deaths/100,000 live births (2008) 10.8% of GDP (2009) Male: 17 years Female: 17 years (2008) 5.3% of GDP (2007)

22 23

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24 25 26 27 28 29

Physicians density Hospital bed density Government Types of Government Currency National Holidays

3.921 physicians/1,000 population (2007) 4.25 beds/1,000 population (2008) The Hague Constitutional monarchy parliamentary democracy Euro Queens Day (30 April) Liberation Day (5 May)

Table 1: Demographic Profile of Netherland Country

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Economic Overview of the Netherland


The Dutch economy is the fifth-largest economy in the euro-zone and is noted for its stable industrial relations, moderate unemployment and inflation, a sizable trade surplus, and an important role as a European transportation hub. Industrial activity is predominantly in food processing, chemicals, petroleum refining, and electrical machinery. A highly mechanized agricultural sector employs only 2% of the labor force but provides large surpluses for the foodprocessing industry and for exports. The Netherlands, along with 11 of its EU partners, began circulating the euro currency on 1 January 2002. After 26 years of uninterrupted economic growth, the Dutch economy - highly dependent on an international financial sector and international trade - contracted by 3.5% in 2009 as a result of the global financial crisis. The Dutch financial sector suffered, due in part to the high exposure of some Dutch banks to U.S. mortgage-backed securities. In 2008, the government nationalized two banks and injected billions of dollars of capital into other financial institutions, to prevent further deterioration of a crucial sector. The government also sought to boost the domestic economy by accelerating infrastructure programs, offering corporate tax breaks for employers to retain workers, and expanding export credit facilities. The stimulus programs and bank bailouts, however, resulted in a government budget deficit of 5.3% of GDP in 2010 that contrasted sharply with a surplus of 0.7% in 2008. The government of Prime Minister Mark RUTTE began implementing fiscal consolidation measures in early 2011, mainly reductions in expenditures, which resulted in an improved budget deficit of 3.8% of GDP. The following table may clearly define the all over economic overview of the Netherland country for the year 2011. It also contains the comparison with the year 2009 and 2010.

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Particular
GDP (Purchasing Power Parity)

Statistics
$713.1 billion (2011 est.) $704.1 billion (2010 est.) $692.8 billion (2009 est.) $858.3 billion (2011 est.)

GDP (Official Exchange Rate) (As per US $)

1.6% (2011 est.) GDP-Real Growth Rate 1.6% (2010 est.) -3.5% (2009 est.) GDP-Per Capita (PPP) $42,300 (2011 est.) $41,800 (2010 est.) $41,300 (2009 est.) Agriculture: 2.7% GDP-Composition by Sector Industry: 24.2% Services: 73.1 %( 2011 est.) Labor Force 7.809 million (2011 est.) Agriculture: 2% Labor Force-By Occupation Industry: 18% Services: 80 %( 2005 est.) Unemployment Rate Population Below Poverty Investment (Gross Fixed) Budget Taxes and Other Revenues Budget Surplus(+) Or Deficit(-) Public Debt. 4.4% (2011 est.) 4.5% (2010 est.) 10.3% (2005) 18.6% of GDP (2011 est.) Revenues: $381.3 billion Expenditure: $420.4 billion (2011 est.) 45.4 % of GDP (2011 est.) -3.8% of GDP (2011 est.) 64.4% of GDP (2011 est.) 62.7% of GDP (2010 est.)

GLOBAL / COUNTRY STUDY REPORT (GCSR) Betch : 2011 - 2013 Project Submitted By: PARAM IMR, Jamnagar

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2.3% (2011 est.) Inflation Rate (Consumer Prices) 1.3% (2010 est.)

Central Bank Discount Rate

1.75% (31st December,2011) 1.75% (31st December,2010) 8.33% (31st December,2008)

Commercial Bank Prime Lending Rate

9.21% (31st December,2007) Rank: 93

Stock of Narrow Money

$367.2 billion (31st December,2011) $375.5 billion (31st December,2010) $1.119 trillion (31st December,2011) $1.088 trillion (31st December,2010) $2.083 trillion (31st December,2009) $1.824 trillion (31st December,2008) $NA (31st December,2008) $488.6 billion (2003) Grains, Potatoes, Sugar beets, Fruits,

Stock of Broad Money

Stock of Domestic Credit

Market Value of Public Traded Shares

Agriculture-Products

Vegetables; Livestock Agro Industries, Metal and Engineering Products, Electrical Machinery and Equipment, Chemicals, Petroleum, Construction, Microelectronics, Fishing -0.6% (2011 est.) 105.7 billion KWh (2009 est.) Fossil Fuel: 89.9%

Industries

Industrial Production Growth Rate Electricity Production

Electricity Production by Source

Hydro: 0.1% Nuclear: 4.3% Other: 5.7% (2001)

Electricity-Consumption Electricity-Exports Electricity-Imports


GLOBAL / COUNTRY STUDY REPORT (GCSR) Betch : 2011 - 2013 Project Submitted By: PARAM IMR, Jamnagar

112.5 billion KWh (2008 est.) 10.56 billion KWh (2009 est.) 4.888 billion KWh (2009 est.)
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Oil-Production Oil-Consumption Oil-Export Oil-Import Oil-Proves reserves Natural Gas-Production Natural Gas-Consumption Natural Gas-Export Natural Gas-Import Natural Gas-Proved Reserved Current Account Balance

59,490 bbl/day (2010 est.) 1.009 million bbl/day (2010 est.) 1.871 million bbl/day (2009 est.) 2.577 million bbl/day (2009 est.) 310 million bbl (1 January 2011 est.) 85.17 billion cu m (2010 est.) 53.19 billion cu m (2010 est.) 57.75 billion cu m (2010 est.) 25.77 billion cu m (2010 est.) 1.387 trillion cu m (1 January 2011 est.) $64.1 billion (2011 est.) $55.95 billion (2010 est.) $576.9 billion (2011 est.) $486.7 billion (2010 est.) Machinery and Equipment, Chemicals, Fuels; Foodstuffs Germany 26%, Belgium 13%, France 9.2%, UK 7.7%, Italy 4.9% (2009) $514.1 billion (2011 est.) $429.5 billion (2010 est.) Machinery and Transport equipment, Chemicals, Fuels, Foodstuffs, Clothing Germany 15.5%,China 12.6%,

Exports

Exports-Commodities

Exports Partners

Imports

Imports-Commodities

Imports-Partners

Belgium 8.3%, US 6.8%, UK 6.2%, Russia 5.6% (2009)

Reserves of Foreign Exchange and Gold Debt-External

$46.24 billion (31st December, 2010 est.) $2.655 trillion (30th June,2011) $3.733 trillion (31st December, 2010)

GLOBAL / COUNTRY STUDY REPORT (GCSR) Betch : 2011 - 2013 Project Submitted By: PARAM IMR, Jamnagar

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Sock of Direct Foreign Investment- at Home

$590.3 billion (2011 est.) $587.3 billion (2010 est.) $989.3 billion (31st December,2011) $954.6 billion (31st December,2010) Euros (EUR) 0.7345 (2007 est.) 0.7107 (2011 est.) 0.7532 (2010 est.) 0.7198 (2009 est.) 0.6827 (2008 est.) per US dollar-

Sock of Direct Foreign Investment- Abroad

Exchange Rates

Fiscal Year

Calendar Year

Table 2: Economic Overview of the Netherland

GLOBAL / COUNTRY STUDY REPORT (GCSR) Betch : 2011 - 2013 Project Submitted By: PARAM IMR, Jamnagar

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INTRODUCTION

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OVERVIEW OF THE INDUSTRY


In todays time, the Brass products are produced almost all over the world. However, this was not the case in the past. The Brass Part industry was not developed at all the places of the world, because it requires a particular type of temperature and humidity to mold the raw material into a particular shape. The raw materials required to carry on the production were also not available very easily in the past. But with the passage of time, with the development of transportation facilities and technologies all such hurdles had been removed and the Brass Part industry started developed at almost all over the country. Indian foundry industry is the sixth largest industry in the world after: USA, China, Japan, Russia and Germany. Indian foundry industry is the second largest player after China in terms of Units & Number of People Employed. There are 7000 recognized foundry units including small, medium & large scale sectors in all over the country and approx. 80% foundry units are in the small scale. Indian foundry industry has a sizable export turnover of goods valued at Rs.3400 Cr. per year. Currently, the industry is growing at 8% a year, & is determined to increase this over to 20% by 2010. The latest world census of casting by modern casting USA, India produces an estimated 6mt of various grades of casting as per International standards, proving that the foundations of Indian foundry are strong enough to cater domestic demands & exports.

GLOBAL / COUNTRY STUDY REPORT (GCSR) Betch : 2011 - 2013 Project Submitted By: PARAM IMR, Jamnagar

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BRASS INDUSTRY IN JAMNAGARCITY


Jamnagar is known as reputed brass parts manufacturing center for more than half a century. Another major landmark in the history of brass part industry in Jamnagar was the creation of first state sponsored industrial estate in Jamnagar viz., GIDC Phase-I in the year 1969. In 1983 the Government of Gujarat through its Gujarat industrial development corporation, launched the creation of GIDC Phase-II. These public and private industrial estates gave a real boost to the brass parts industry in Jamnagar. Basic infrastructure like electricity, road, and water was easily available in these industrial estates. This provided tremendous impetus for the clustering phenomena and within a span of three years the total number of brass parts manufacturing enterprises increased to 1500 by 1980. The number grew to 3000 units in 1988 and 4500 in 1998. Establishment of ports in Bedi and Rosi Bandar and the strategic location of Jamnagar (the Arabian Sea) also contributed for the growth of the sector. Today, with the help of the government for the development of brass part industry in Jamnagar, numbers of brass items are produced in numbers of factories. Government has provided various subsidies to brass part industry for the EOUs (Export Oriented Units) to boost the export of the brass items.

GLOBAL / COUNTRY STUDY REPORT (GCSR) Betch : 2011 - 2013 Project Submitted By: PARAM IMR, Jamnagar

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GROWTH OF BRASS INDUSTRIAL UNIT IN JAMNAGAR

Sr. No. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12.

Year 1952 1954-55 1960-61 1967-68 1979-80 1988 1994 1998 2002 2006 2007 2008

No. of units 1 15 250 700 1500 3000 3500 4500 5803 6012 6354 6623

Table 3: GROWTH OF BRASS INDUSTRIAL UNIT IN JAMNAGAR

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FACTORS BEHIND THE DEVELOPMENT OF BRASS INDUSTRY Availability of Raw Material: Raw materials used in brass parts are brass honey, dross of brass, pales in the form of strips and other scrap. This raw material became easily available in and around Jamnagar at a reasonable price. As the industry grew the process of procuring raw material, from within the country and abroad became more and more smooth. Other inputs like cock, molasses and machines were also available locally. Skilled Manpower and Customized Machines: Skilled technicians and workers were also easily available in this cluster. Because of agricultural development (mainly due to scarcity of water) and non-availability of alternative occupation, people started learning the skills of manufacturing brass parts and operating the machines. The cost of employing a labour was also minimal. Moreover, second-hand& customized machines were available at reasonable price. The Soil Base: Though there is no apparent technical reason to support their claim, the entrepreneurs at Jamnagar are of the opinion that the soil (Chiknimitti) composition also helped in manufacturing quality brass castings. A composition of oil and sand is used in the mould to a particular give shape and size to the brass parts. The more is the binding property of soil and sand, the better is the quality of casting manufactured. The availability of water also ushered the growth of the cluster.

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INTRODUCTION OF COMPANY

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VISION OF THE ASHWANI METALS PVT. LTD


To be recognized as Industry Leader for Quality Brass Parts & Assemblies, Worldwide

MISSION OF THE ASHWANI METALS PVT. LTD


To achieve organizational excellence through visionary leadership & innovative efforts with the blend of latest technology & empowered team committed to total customer satisfaction.

GLOBAL / COUNTRY STUDY REPORT (GCSR) Betch : 2011 - 2013 Project Submitted By: PARAM IMR, Jamnagar

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COMPANY DETAIL
ASHWANI METALS PVT. LTD. is a leading manufacturer of Brass Engineering Turned Components & Electrical assemblies. Our Product suits to all industrial sectors like Electrical & Electronics, Automobiles, and Plastic Molding Industry & Industrial Applications. Being an ISO 9001:2000 certified company & in the field of manufacturing activities since 45 years, we complete us to stay contemporary by systemizing advance technologies, enhancing TQS & arranging learning opportunities for all employees by Training Policy followed by health & environmental policies. Our honorable clients are based in USA, UK, Europe and Middle East. Ashwani Metals has achieved tremendous growth in the last four and a half year through the total dedication and motivated work force. It is emerging as a leading manufacturer and exporter of the Brass Engineering Turned Components & Electrical assemblies.

GLOBAL / COUNTRY STUDY REPORT (GCSR) Betch : 2011 - 2013 Project Submitted By: PARAM IMR, Jamnagar

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HISTORY OF THE ORGANIZATION

Mr. K.G. Gajara started the Brass Extrusion Plant in 1963A.D. at Jamnagar. Later on, his son Mr.Ashwin K. Gajara and Mr.Vinod K. Gajara developed a new Industry named, Ashwani Metals (P) LTD. in 2002 with advance technology. The company adopted new ideas and technologies and also employed some new personnel with better skill and knowledge to achieve their target.

MANAGEMENT COMMITTEE Promoters

Mr. K. G.Gajara Mr.AshwinK. Gajara Mr.VinodK. Gajara

CHAIRMAN MD CEO

BANKERS
o Axis Bank, & Bank of Baroda- Jamnagar.

Auditors
o M/s. Buddh and Gajara.

GLOBAL / COUNTRY STUDY REPORT (GCSR) Betch : 2011 - 2013 Project Submitted By: PARAM IMR, Jamnagar

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LOCATION CHART OF COMPANY

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Company Profile
Name: Location: Factory: Phone No: Ashwani Metals (P) LTD. Western Part of India in State of Gujarat at Jamnagar Town Plot No. 17, G.I.D.C. Phase II, Dared, Jamnagar 361 004 (India). + 91 - 288 - 2730351 / 2730352 + 91 - 288 2730353

Fax No.:

E-mail:

info@ashwanimetals.com

Website:

www.ashwanimetals.com

Quality Accreditation: Key Operating Machines:

ISO 9001:2000 by TUV Suddeutschland, Germany

Bar Turning CNC Automatic Lathe Automatic Bar Turning Trobe Type Lathe Machines Multi Station Rotary Disc Transfer Indexing Machines for Secondary Operation Electrical Distributions Equipments, Automobiles, Tele

Industries Served:

Communications, Sanitary Fittings, Utility Meters, Computers and Peripherals, Engineering Plastic Components, Fiber Optic Equipments, Electronic Circuit Hardware

Export to Countries:

USA, Italy, France, Spain, Singapore, Middle East, UK

indo German chamber of commerce Membership : engineering export promotion council of India Indian electrical and electronics manufacturer association federation of India export organization

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ORGANISATIONAL SYUDY

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MARKETING DEPARTMENT INTRODUCTION


Marketing is sum total of all business activities which deal with the movement of goods and services from producers to consumers in order to satisfy their needs. The required goods and services may include raw materials, semi-finished goods, and finished goods as well as those services that are necessary to keep consumers using and enjoying them. Marketing in fact is concerned with the satisfaction of consumers wants and needs through markets at a profit. Marketing is social and managerial process through which individuals and groups obtain what they need and want through creating, offering and exchanging products of value.

Philip Kotler

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MARKET SEGMENTATION

Ashwani Metals identified different market segmentation based on the use of their products. The products of the company can be used by different target market in the different ways. Ashwani Metals has segmented their market on the basis of the product related segmentation. This product related segmentation can be further classified in a 4 sub categories. Product usage situation Benefit segmentation Consumption Decision criteria

Of the above which Ashwani Metals segment their market mainly on the basis of the product usage situation, the market is segmented as:

Engineering Industry Electrical Industry Sanitary Parts Exports Forging

Chart 1

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PRODUCT DETAILS & PRODUCT PORTFOLIO


ASHWANI METALS PVT LTD are manufacturer and exporter of Brass electrical accessories including SCREW, NUTS, & OTHERS in confirmation to different standards like IS, BS, DIN, ASTM, JIS, UNS, CEN, SABS, CSA, AS and various other International Standards of brass alloy extrusion.

Product of Ashwani Metals They manufacture extruded brass electrical accessories of different shapes in confirmation to different international standards in alloys such as C 36000 Brass CW 614 N Brass C 37700 Brass CW 617 N Brass Naval Brass High Tensile Brass etc.

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PRODUCTPORTFOLIO

Brass and Brass Alloy Extrusion

Brass Screws

Brass Inserts

Brass Cable Glands Brass Male Female Pillars Brass Neutral Link

Special head screws Slotted grub screws Philips head screws Pan head slotted screws Socket head screws

Brass Threaded Inserts Brass Knurled Inserts

Brass Nuts Brass Bolts Others

Chart 2

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PRODUCTION DEPARTMENT

INTRODUCTION
Operation management is one of the major departments of any organization. It plays a crucial role in all the activities of company management. All the business activities revolve around the production process. The term product refers to the creation of goods and services to satisfy the needs and wants of the consumers. The production process is nothing but the step-by-step conversion of material form to another. It is the process comprises of various inputs and then these inputs are processed to convert them into required form of output. Here, the inputs can be in the form of tangible goods or intangible goods. Production department is the most vital aspect in a set of organization because the success of the industry depends upon the targets that are fulfilled by the production department. Thus, it is essential to develop a production structure in the industry.

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LOCATION OF THE UNI


Ashwani Metals is located at G.I.D.C. Phase II at Jamnagar.

MANUFACTURING PROCESS

RAW MATERIAL

SEMIFINISHED GOODS

FINISHED GOODS

Chart 3 Raw Material In a ASHWANI the raw-material are imported from all over the DOMESTIC MARKET. All given beloveare the main Raw material of the production.

Round

Section

Flat
GLOBAL / COUNTRY STUDY REPORT (GCSR) Betch : 2011 - 2013 Project Submitted By: PARAM IMR, Jamnagar

Others
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Semi-Finished Goods:
Semi-Finished Goods are those goods which are in process to be finished goods for sales to the target customers of the firms, or in the market. Finished Goods: Finished Goods are those goods which are ready to sales in the market and to the target customers of the firm. Given below are the products of Ashwani Metals (P) LTD.

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TOTAL QUALITY ChartMANAGEMENT 4


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Ashwani has the title of "ISO 9001:2000 Certified Company" since the first year of their working to their credit, which reflects in their strong quality focus attitude.

The quality assurance and testing facilities at Ashwani are absolutely state-of-the-art. The laboratory is fully equipped to test the material, both Chemical & Physical. Testing of Brass Alloys through Electro Photo Spectrometer, not only ensure exacting Chemical Composition of Brass Alloys, but instills in us a confidence to guarantee quality.

QUALITY ASSURANCE Hardness Testing Machine Physical Testing Machine

PERSONNEL DEPARTMENT
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INTRODUCTION

The management of man is very important in any organization because of management can achieve its goals with co-operative of people working in the organization so personnel department is the most important department. Personnel management is the direction and co-ordination of human relations in the business organization. Its main objective is maximum output with the minimum use of physical and mental effort of labour force.

Personnel Department

Manager Administration

Welfare

Medical

Transport

HRP

Compensation

Appraisal

Training & Development

Chart 5

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MANPOWER PLANNING
In Ashwani Metals, the CEO of the company along with the head of the personnel department decides about the numbers of employees as well as workers required to carry out the required work and also that of the right quality. So that the work can be carried on very efficiently and effectively without hampering to the quality of the work and as per the planning that has been carried out in advance.

MANPOWER PLANNING PROCESS Environment

Organizational Objective & Policies

HR Needs Forecast

HR Supply Forecast

HR Programming

HRP Implementation

Control & Evaluation of Programmer Surplus Restricted Hiring Reduced Hours etc. Shortage Recruitment & Selection

Chart 6

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RECRUITMENT AND SELECTION RECRUITMENT


In Ashwani Metals,

Once the requisition has been received, the personnel department can begin the process of recruitment or the job-preview given by the company. They are using several sources for recruitment show in below figure.

Sources of Recruitment

Internal Sources Existing Staff Members Companys Database Workers Reference

External Sources Advertisement in Newspaper Placement Agencies Job Contractors Campus Interview

Chart 7

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SELECTION Selection Procedure followed by Ashwani Metals

Internal Environment

Preliminary Interview Selection Test

Rejected Application

Employment Interview

Reference & Background Analysis

Selection Decision Job Offer Recruitment Evaluation External Environment Chart 8

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PERFORMANCE APPRAISAL SYSTEM

Ashwani Metals refers to all the formal procedures used in working organizations to evaluate the personalities and contribution and potential of group members. The treads nowadays is in the direction of attempting to measure what the man does (Performance Appraisal) rather than what he is (Merit Rating) - to measure what is the output rather than what is input.

Performance Appraisal Method

Individual Evaluation Method 1. Confidential Report 2. Essay Evaluation 3. Critical Incidents 4. Checklist 5. Graphic Rating Scale 6. Behaviorally Anchored Rating Scale 7. MBO

Multiple-person Evaluation Method 8. Ranking 9. Paired Comparison 10. Forced Distribution

Other Method 11. Group Appraisal 12. HRA 13. Assessment Center 14. Field Review

Chart 9 InAshwani Metals, The performance appraisal is carried on regularly. An employee from the date of joining to six months is observed by the respective Head of the Department. On the basis of the observation employees competitive skill assessment is done which is reassessed after 3 month. Ashwani Metals checks the performance of the employees by Field Review method and by Checklist Method. Accordingly, the decision regarding training, promotion, etc. is taken by the Board of Directors along with the head of Personnel Department.

GLOBAL / COUNTRY STUDY REPORT (GCSR) Betch : 2011 - 2013 Project Submitted By: PARAM IMR, Jamnagar

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TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT

Training

On-the-job Training Orientation Training Job Instruction Training Internship Training

Off-the-job Training Lecture Case Study Programmed Instruction Seminar

Chart 10 After measuring the competency skills of the employee on various parameters, every six months Ashwani Metals conducts training and development programme. Management reviews necessity of training requirements for personnel in technical and non - technical departments. In company more emphasis is kept on the on-the-job training methods. They also invite specialist trainer and provide classroom training. They also provide training outside the organization.

GLOBAL / COUNTRY STUDY REPORT (GCSR) Betch : 2011 - 2013 Project Submitted By: PARAM IMR, Jamnagar

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FINANCE DEPARTMENT INTRODUCTION


Finance management means rising of adequate funds at the minimum cost and using them effectively in business. In other words, finance is concerned with the financial problems of the business organization. Thus finance management does not stop at procuring the required finance. It has also to see that it is effectively utilized in business. Financial management is concerned with such matters as, how a business corporation raises its finance and how it makes use of it.

In the business organization to manage the finance properly and to make the financial management effective special finance department is created which mainly perform the function like:

MAJOR FUNCTIONS OF FINANCE DEPARTMENT

Financial Planning Raising of Funds Allocation of Funds Financial Control

Chart 11

GLOBAL / COUNTRY STUDY REPORT (GCSR) Betch : 2011 - 2013 Project Submitted By: PARAM IMR, Jamnagar

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ASHWANI METALS PRIVATE LIMITED BALANCE SHEET


AS AT 31ST MARCH 2010
PERTICULERS Sources of Funds: Equity Share Capital Reserve & Surplus Loans (Liability) Secured Loan Unsecured loan TOTAL APPLICATION OF FUND Fixed Assets Less: Depreciation Fixed Asset After Depreciation Current Assets Closing Stock Deposits (Asset) Loans & Advances (Asset) Sundry Debtors Cash & Bank Balance TOTAL Less: Current Liabilities and Provisions Net Current Assets Miscellaneous Expenditure (Preliminary Expenses) Total

(Rupees In lakh)
AS AT 31.03.2010 50 110 170 80 410 112.28 10.1 102.18 88.00 10.00 40.00 334.27 16.37 488.64 180.85 307.79 0.03 410 AS AT 31.03.2009 45 75 100 100 320 90.63 9.08 81.55 66.00 8.00 35.00 234.71 10.05 353.76 115.35 238.41 0.04 320

As per our report of even date For Budh&Gajara AshwaniMetals(P)Limited Chartered Accountants Place: Jamnagar Date:

For (Ashwin K. Gajara)(Vinod K. Gajara) Managing DirectorDirector/CEO

Table 4

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ASHWANI METALS PRIVATE LIMITED PROFIT & LOSS A/C AS AT 31ST MARCH 2010 PERTICULERS
Income: Sales Other Income Variation in Stock Total Expenditure: Raw Material Consumption Manufacturing Expenses Admin., Selling &Distri. Expenses Miscellaneous Expenditure W/off Total Profit / (Loss) Before Depreciation Less: Depreciation Profit / (Loss) Before Tax Less: Taxes Net Profit After Tax No. of equity shares EPS

(Rupees In lakh) AS AT 31.03.2010


1051 7.00 4.00 1062.00

AS AT 31.03.2009
982.00 6.00 3.00 991.00

574 300.00 130 0.01 1004.01 57.99 10.1 47.89 15 32.89 50000 65.78

535 285.00 122 0.01 942.01 48.99 9.08 39.91 14 25.91 45000 57.58

As per our report of even date For Budh&Gajara AshwaniMetals(P)Limited Chartered Accountants Place: Jamnagar Date:

For (Ashwin K. Gajara)(Vinod K. Gajara) Managing DirectorDirector/CEO

Table 5
GLOBAL / COUNTRY STUDY REPORT (GCSR) Betch : 2011 - 2013 Project Submitted By: PARAM IMR, Jamnagar

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OVERVIEW OF INDUSTRIES TRADE & COMMERCE


The spearheads of Dutch trade are the automobile and textile industries (the latter employing 18% of the workforce), followed by the food industry (raw and processed products), machinery and equipment and electronic equipment, steel and chemical sectors respectively. The European Union is by far Netherland's leading customer (56.4% of Dutch exports), followed by the United States, China and Iraq. Dutch exports have relatively low added value. Similarly, Dutch exports are still not very present on markets with high development potential (China or Eastern Europe) and suffer from being compared to German ones.

CHIEF EXPORTS: Clothing, foodstuffs, textiles, metal manufactures.

CHIEF IMPORTS: Machinery, semi-finished goods, chemicals, transport equipment, fuels.

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TRADE TEXTILES AND CLOTHING


It is one of the most important sectors in the Dutch economy, accounting for 10 percent of GDP, 20 percent of the labor force, and 40 percent of total manufacturing output.

This sector is the largest in the country and it is the largest supplier of exports as well. Today, Netherland is extremely competitive in international markets.

The fact that Netherland is a major grower of cotton is a great advantage for the textile and clothing sector.

The easy availability of the raw materials, Dutch spinning and weaving industries have developed significantly, creating integrated and diversified production in all sub-sectors of the textile industry.

The clothing industry has shown stable growth over the years and is today one of the most important manufacturing sectors.

The clothing manufacturers are spread through the west and south of the country, with the majority based in Istanbul.

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IRON AND STEEL


The foundations of the iron and steel industry were laid in the late 1930s with the establishment of the first integrated steel mill in 1939.

At present, there are 3 integrated steel mills: The recently privatized KDCI (Karabuk, Black Sea region) plant The 2 public-sector plants, Erdemir (Eregli, Black Sea region) Isdemir (Iskenderun, East Mediterranean region).

The steel industry is the second most important export sector in the country, after textiles and clothing.

CHEMICALS

Netherland has been manufacturing chemicals since the very early years of the republic.

Currently, it is one of the country's largest industries in terms of value, and is the fourth major export sector. The major chemical exports are plastic raw materials and plastic products, followed by rubber and rubber products.

There are 6,000 companies manufacturing chemicals in Netherland.

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CEMENT

In comparison with the rest of Europe, Netherland was a latecomer to the cement industry. However, with accelerated investments and a number of structural reforms such as the elimination of government price-setting practices& privatization of the industry.

Netherland has become self-sufficient in this sector. Today, there are 51 cement plants in Netherland, all of which are private companies.

The country was the eighth largest cement producer in the world with a 2.5 percent share of the world market, and the largest producer in Europe.

Netherland produced 38.1 million tons of cement. While 34.7 million tons of it went to the domestic market, the balance was exported. The chief markets for Dutch cement are the United States, Spain, Israel, Egypt, and France. MINING

Geologically complex, Netherland possesses some of the richest and most diverse mineral deposits in the world numbering 4,400, excluding petroleum and coal.

Today, 53 minerals are produced in the Dutch mining sector, with 85 percent of production belonging to the state-owned enterprises that predominate in the production of mineral fuels and metallic ore.

Netherland is a major producer of boron, chromite, marble, barites, magnesite, pumice, feldspar, celestite, and emery.

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SERVICES
The services sector accounted for 64 percent of GDP, while employing over one-third of the total labor force.

Tourism and banking are the 2 primary service industries in Netherland.

TOURISM
With a share of nearly 26 percent of GDP, the tourism industry in Netherland is strategically important to the Dutch economy.

Netherland is currently in the world's top 20 tourist destinations, both in terms of visitor numbers and earnings.

Netherland remains a relatively undiscovered land for tourists.

The country's long and gorgeous coastline, high mountains and lakes, and wealth of historical, religious, and archaeological sites offer opportunities for massive development of tourism.

Today tourism is considered to be one of the leading industries in the Dutch economy. It creates jobs for at least 10 million Dutch citizens

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FINANCIAL SERVICES / BANKING The Dutch financial system is based upon a universal banking system that legally enables commercial banks to operate in all financial markets.

As such, banks carry out nearly all of the activities in the money and capital markets in Netherland, and the banking sector has become almost synonymous with the Dutch financial system. There were more than 80 banks operating in Netherland,Seven of the banks are stateowned.

Most state banks are located in Ankara, while many of the private banks are cantered in Istanbul. The Central Bank of Netherland is responsible for the supervision of the banking sector in order to guarantee that banks meet liquidity requirements and operate responsibly.

GLOBAL / COUNTRY STUDY REPORT (GCSR) Betch : 2011 - 2013 Project Submitted By: PARAM IMR, Jamnagar

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INTRODUCTION OF SELECTED COUNTRY NETHERLAND

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Geography:
Netherland, also known unofficially as Holland, country in northwestern Europe, west of Germany and north of Belgium. The Netherlands Antilles and Caribbean Sea, are part of the Netherlands. The European portion of the Netherlands has a total area of 41,526 sq km (16,033 sq mi). The capital and largest city is Amsterdam

Land and Resources


The Netherlands is a low-lying country, about half of which is below sea level. The coastline consists mostly of dunes, behind which lies the land below sea level, protected from flooding by a systems of dikes, dams, and locks. It is kept dry by continuous mechanical pumping. The country's largest lake, the IJsselmeer, is an artificial lake created as part of a continuing project to reclaim land from the sea. Major rivers include the Rhine, the Maas, and the Schelde, which form a delta covering much of the country and provide shipping access to the interior of Europe.

The Netherlands has a temperate maritime climate. Because land is scarce and fully exploited, areas of natural vegetation are limited. The remnants of forests are carefully managed. Grasses and heather provide habitats for rabbits, but larger wildlife has disappeared.

Population:
With a population of 15,649,729 (1997 estimate), the Netherlands is one of the world's most densely populated countries. Some 89 percent of the people live in urban areas. The great majority of inhabitants are Dutch, but the Frisians constitute a distinct cultural and linguistic group. Similarly, the official language is Dutch, but Frisian is also spoken. Roman Catholics constitute about 33 percent and Protestants 23 percent of the population; about 39 percent of the people are not church members.

Education:
About one-third of schools are public; about two-thirds are nonpublic, mainly operated by religious institutions. Both are publicly financed. Attendance is compulsory from ages 5 to 16.

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HISTORY OF NETHRLAND About Netherland:


The history of the Nederlands is the history of a seafaring people thriving on a watery lowland river delta on the North Sea in northwestern Europe. When the Romans and written history arrived in 57 BC, the country was sparsely populated by various tribal groups at the periphery of the empire. Over four centuries of Roman rule had profound demographic effects, resulting eventually in the establishment of three primary Germanic peoples in the area: Frisians, Low Saxons and the Franks. Hiberno-Scottish and Anglo-Saxon missionaries led them to adopt Christianity by the 8th century. The descendants of the Salian Franks eventually came to dominate the area, and from their speech the Dutch language arose.

Carolingian rule, loose integration into the Holy Roman Empire and Viking depredation followed, the local noblemen being left relatively free to carve out highly independent duchies and counties. For several centuries, Brabant, Holland, Zeeland, Friesland, Gelre and the others fought intermittently amongst themselves, but at the same time trade continued and grew, land was reclaimed, and cities prospered. Forced by nature to work together, over the centuries they built and maintained a network of polders and dikes that kept out the sea and the floods, in the process transforming their desolate landscape into a highly productive garden-state, mastering the North Sea and the high seas beyond, and emerging out of the struggle as one of the most urban and enterprising nations in Europe.

Habsburg Netherlands 1919-1981


Under Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor and King of Spain, the Netherlands region was part of the Seventeen Provinces, which also included most of present-day Belgium, Luxembourg, and some land in France and Germany.

The Eighty Years' War between the provinces and Spain began in 1568. In 1579, the northern half of the Seventeen Provinces formed the Union of Utrecht, a treaty in which they promised to support each other in their defence against the Spanish army. The Union of Utrecht is seen as the foundation of the modern Netherlands. In 1581 the northern provinces adopted the Act of Abjuration, the declaration of independence in which the provinces officially deposed Philip II of Spain as reigning monarch in the northern provinces.
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GLOBAL / COUNTRY STUDY REPORT (GCSR) Betch : 2011 - 2013 Project Submitted By: PARAM IMR, Jamnagar

Dutch Republic 15811795


After independence, the provinces of Holland, Zeeland, Groningen, Friesland, Utrecht, Overijssel, and Gelderland formed a confederation. All these provinces were autonomous and had their own government, the "States of the Province". The States-General, the confederal government, were seated in The Hague and consisted of representatives from each of the seven provinces. The sparsely populated region of Drenthe, mainly consisting of poor peatland, was part of the republic too, although Drenthe was not considered one of the provinces; it had its own States, but the landdrost of Drenthe was appointed by the States-General. Moreover, the Republic had come to occupy during the Eighty Years' War a number of so-called Generality Lands (Generaliteitslanden in Dutch). These territories were governed directly by the States-General. They did not have a governmental structure of their own and did not have representatives in the States-General. Their population was mainly Roman Catholic, and these areas were used as a buffer zone between the Republic and the Southern Netherlands.

Mark Rutte The Prime Minister of the Nehterlands since October 2010
The monarch is the head of state, at present Queen Beatrix. On 28 January 2013 Queen Beatrix announced her abdication from the throne on 30 April 2013. Willem-Alexander, crownprince, will from that moment on be the King of the Netherlands. Constitutionally, the position is equipped with limited powers. The monarch can exert some influence during the formation of a new cabinet, where they serve as neutral arbiter between the political parties. Additionally, the king (the title queen has no constitutional significance) has the right to be briefed and consulted. Depending on the personality and qualities of the king and the ministers, the king might have influence beyond the power granted by the constitution.

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INTRODUCTION OF HOLLAND P. T. CORP.

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However, Holland P.T. filled that need by being the first establishment committed solely to aiding local industry and farmers with commercial grade products and the service to match.

Holland P.T. knew companies needed reliable products that could withstand the rigors of production. And so, several hose manufactures including Dayco, Weatherhead, Imperial Eastman, Aeroquip and Parker Hannifin were inspected at their sites with Parker being the clear choice in quality and overall variety of industrial-related items. Parker continues to be the base for products at Holland P.T. yet is supplemented by an ever growing network of manufacturers. Top-notch companies such as Peninsular Cylinder, Reelcraft, MRO solutions, Dixon Valve, and a plethora of others help Holland P.T. provide solutions to industrys challenges. We are people who know the products, understand customers needs, and perform in good spirit to the best of our ability.

Good products are a key element at Holland P.T. Although, the companys biggest value

is founded in its people. People who know the products, understand customers needs,

and perform in good spirit to the best of their ability. They consider it a privilege to be a part of the wheel that turns the areas economy and are grateful to the individuals and companies that support them in return.

Thank you for visiting this site and considering Holland P.T. as part of your solution. Should you require more than the offerings in these electronic pages contact the people
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GLOBAL / COUNTRY STUDY REPORT (GCSR) Betch : 2011 - 2013 Project Submitted By: PARAM IMR, Jamnagar

at 304 Garden Ave. via email, phone, fax, or stop by in person. Holland P.T. is here to serve.

The Vision of the Holland P.T. Corp. To be recognized as Industry Leader for Quality Brass & Assemblies, pneumatics, Worldwide

The Mission of the Holland P. T. Corp. To achieve organizational excellence through visionary leadership & innovative efforts with the blend of latest technology & empowered team committed to total customer satisfaction.

GLOBAL / COUNTRY STUDY REPORT (GCSR) Betch : 2011 - 2013 Project Submitted By: PARAM IMR, Jamnagar

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HISTORY OF HOLLAND P. T. CORP.

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Location: Phone No: Fax No.:

304 Garden Avenue Holland, Michigan 49424 (616) 396-0406 (616) 396-0603 24 Hour Emergency (616) 412-1633

Website Key Operating Machines:

www.hollandpt.com Bar Turning CNC Automatic Lathe Automatic Bar Turning Trobe Type Lathe Machines Multi Station Rotary Disc Transfer Indexing Machines for Secondary Operation

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Specialist:

Precision Turned & Machined Components Exclusively in Brass & Other related Copper Alloys

Certification: UL, CE (as per Requirement of Customer)

Industries Served: Export to Countries:

Hydraulics, Pneumatics

USA, Italy, France, Spain, Singapore, Middle East, UK

Key Persons: A. K. Gajara (Managing Director) V. K. Gajara (Chief Executive Officer) Experience: 45 years in Quality Brass Hydraulic Machined Components Business Work Force: 300 Employees

Membership: The Netherland-India Chamber of Commerce & Trade Engineering Export Promotion Council of India Indian Electrical and Electronics Manufacturer Association (IEEMA) Federation of India Export Organization (FIEO)

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OVERVIEW OF INTERNATIONAL TRADE AND COMMERCE OF NETHERLAND

Netherlands International Role: Netherland has an increasingly active foreign policy in the Middle East, the Western Balkans and South Asia. As a candidate for EU accession, NATO ally, member of the OSCE and Council of Europe, and a recent member of the UN Security Council, Netherland is a vital strategic partner for the UK. Netherland is contributing to the ISAF mission in Afghanistan as well as the NATO mission in Libya. Due to the implementation of the liberalization process since the 1980s, the Dutch economy has experienced a period of substantial growth. Foreign trade, in respect of both exports and imports, has grown rapidly and notable changes in the structure of exports have been observed. In this regard, industrial products have gained prominence over agricultural products. Netherland became a member of the World Trade Organization (WTO) in 1995.

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TRADE AND INVESTMENT: Trade and Investment with the UK Netherland is the 6th largest economy in Europe and 16th in the world. It attracted $9 billion of Foreign Domestic Investment (FDI) in 2011 and this is expected to increase to $10bn in 2012, particularly in energy, automotive, financial services, R&D, and IT. Netherlands investment climate has strengthened in the last decade and foreign investors are optimistic about their long term investment prospects in Netherland. Netherland is a major trading partner of the UK. The current value of UK-Netherland trade is worth over $9 billion a year. Trade volume between the two countries has continued to increase in2012, with a 59% increase in exports (to Netherland) and 28% increase in imports during the first two months of 2012 for the same period in 2011. Over 41British companies from a wide range of sectors, are investing in Netherland, including BP, Shell, Vodafone, Unilever (UK), HSBC, Aviva, Tesco, and Cadbury. Most recently two large UK firms, Diageo and Stagecoach, have won bids for major investments in Netherland (1.3bn and 527m respectively). The Netherland and the UK currently operate a number of joint economic and investment forums including the UK / Netherland Knowledge Partnership and the CEO forum. This currently makes Netherland the fastest growing country in Europe. Netherland is expected to grow by 4.5-5% in 2011 and, according to the OECD, is estimated to be the third fastest growing country after China and India by 2017. Netherland is already a member of the EU Customs Union and is negotiating for full EU membership.

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With its large, young and well educated population (latest estimate 77 million), Netherland is one of the most dynamic and attractive markets for UK companies, with opportunities in a wide variety of sector.

Netherland's Membership of International Trade Organizations: Netherland has been a member of the World Trade Organization (WTO) since 1995. The countrys commitment to integrating regional and international trade norms can be seen in its participation in and membership of various organizations, including the Economic Cooperation Organization (ECO), the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD), the Organization of the Black Sea Economic Cooperation (BSEC), the World Customs Organization (WCO), the International Chamber of Commerce (ICC), D-8, and various other organizations. In addition to the Customs Union with the EU, Netherland has signed Free Trade Agreements (FTA) with Iceland, Norway, Switzerland and Lichtenstein, Georgia, Israel, the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Croatia, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Tunisia, Morocco, the Palestinian Authority, Syria, Egypt, Albania, Montenegro, Serbia, Chile, Jordan, and Lebanon (where Lebanon is in the ratification process).

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Taxation policy:
Netherland has one of the most competitive corporate tax rates in the OECD region. The new Corporate Tax Law that was enacted on June 21, 2006 has made some important amendments to the current applications and also included new concepts in the tax legislation. With the new Corporate Tax Law in place, Dutch corporate tax legislation now has noticeably clearer, more objective and better harmonized provisions which are in line with international standards.

Income Taxes:
Income taxes in Netherland are levied on all income, including that of domestic and foreign individuals and corporations residing in Netherland. Non-residents earning income in Netherland through employment, ownership of property, business transactions, or any other activity which generates income are also subject to taxation, but only on the income earned in Netherland.

(A) Corporate Income Taxes In Netherland, the basic corporate income tax rate levied on business profits i 20%.

(B) Individual Income Tax The personal income tax rate varies from 15% to 35%. Income tax rates applicable to yearly gross earnings from 2011 are as follows:

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Combined rates in Box 1 for persons younger than 65 Taxable income Of more than But less than 5.85 % 31.15 % 19,645 31.15 % 37 % 42 % 42 % 52 % 7,268 5,761 9,504 Tax Premium Total Total Cumulative per National rate per bracket Insurance bracket

7,268 13,029 22,533

10.85 19,645 33,363 % 42 % 33,363 55,991 55,991 52 %

Table 6 (C)Tax Incentives: Prioritized development zones Technology development zones Organized industrial zones Free zones Research and development Private educational corporations. Cultural investments and enterprises.

Statistics (.000 $)
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YEARS 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012

EXPORTS 56.047 74.373 72.724 71.365 136.317 219.869 222.242 348.229 542.730 411.216 606.840 722.44 978.67

IMPORTS 449.307 354.875 564.463 722.855 1.046.398 1.280.473 1.579.405 2.299.732 2.457.908 1.902.607 3.409.823 4.444.950 5.566.87

VOLUME 505.354 429.248 637.187 794.220 1.182.715 1.500.342 1.801.647 2.647.961 3.000.638 2.313.823 4.016.663 5.167.994 6.545.544

BALANCE -393.260 -280.502 -491.739 -651.490 -910.081 -1.060.604 -1.357.163 -1.951.503 -1.915.178 -1.491.391 -2.802.983 -3.722.51 -4.588.2

Table 7

GLOBAL / COUNTRY STUDY REPORT (GCSR) Betch : 2011 - 2013 Project Submitted By: PARAM IMR, Jamnagar

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OVERVIEW OF DIFFERENT ECONOMIC SECTOR OF NETHERLAND


Services account for more than half of the national income and are primarily in transportation, distribution, and logistics, and in financial areas, such as banking and insurance. The breadth of service providers in financial services and a Protestant work ethic have contributed to the Netherlands achieving a DAW Index score of 5 in 2012. Industrial activity, including mining, generates about 20% of the national product and is dominated by the metalworking, oil refining, chemical, and food-processing industries. Construction amounts to about 6% of GDP. Agriculture and fishing, although visible and traditional Dutch activities, account for just 2%.

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Shares of different sectors in the economy Service sector contribute 65% in the economy Industry: 26% Agriculture: 9%

contribution
0% industry 9% agriculture 26% service 65% service

Chart 12

Based on the above, Netherland is among the 17th biggest economies in the world. Furthermore, it is an unsaturated market in almost every category of consumption goods, ranging from fast moving consumer goods to high technology products.

Industry Sector
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Industry, which has always been considered to be the key sector of the economy, Among the several sub-sectors of the Dutch industrial sector, there exist:

A: Agriculture and Food The Netherlands is one of the world's largest exporters of agricultural and food products, thanks to its innovative agro food technology. The Dutch agro food sector is a sustainable source of healthy, safe food that is produced with respect for nature and the environment. The Dutch agricultural sector is diverse; it covers a wide range of livestock and plant-cultivation sectors that include, for example, arable and dairy farming, cultivation under glass, tree-growing and pig farming.

B: Creative Industries
Today, Dutch creativity is producing pioneering architecture, design, music, TV, gaming and fashion. Rotterdam is the city of architecture and urban design. Eindhoven, the technological heart of the nation, is home to the Design Academy, declared the 'School ofCool' by Time Magazine. Delft hosts the largest and oldest academic programme in industrial design. Utrecht is home to the Gaming Institute and Amsterdam is a creative melting pot of communication, interactive design and fashion. The ArtEZ Institute of the Arts in Arnhem is known for its Fashion Biennale and internationally successful fashion designers. The Netherlands is home to roughly 46,600 designers, of which, almost three-quarters work in the commercial services industry, 1300 fashion designer.

C: Chemical
Holland is one of Europe's leading suppliers of chemical products and services. Important raw materials are available or easy to supply while an extensive transportation network provides access to Europe and beyond.

Some of the leading chemical companies in the Netherlands are AkzoNobel, Shell, DSM, Purac, MSD, and ECN. Research institutions include TNO, Delft University, TwenteUniversity, Wageningen University and Eindhoven University .
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D: High Tech Industries The high-tech sector includes a number of closely related industries including: the high-tech systems industries, automotive, aerospace and materials including steel. Dutch companies and knowledge institutes in the HTSM sector are renowned for their technological excellence and have become leaders in their market segments. Rapid innovation and collaboration across the value chain is imperative in this highly competitive and highly complex sector.

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Service Sector

A: Transport
In terms of inbound transportation, Rotterdam is the third largest port in the world and Amsterdam is the third largest European airport. As for outbound transportation, a lot of transportation into Europe ... is done overnight." Tim Postel, EMEA Service Parts Operations Manager, IBM Corporation

B: Communications Respect is shown through speaking one's mind and being direct. Little respect is given to those who appear devious or underhand in what they are saying. This directness of approach can sometimes be misconstrued as aggression or even rudeness - but is, rather, a useful tool for enabling the meeting to reach an agreed solution.

Remember that even though the Dutch speak very good English, much humour is culturallybased and unintelligible to other cultures.

C: Tourism sector: The Netherlands is a densely populated country. Amsterdam is the capital and largest city known for its many canals, historic buildings, red light district (De Wallen) andcannabis coffee shops. One can purchase and use cannabis without fear of prosecution in the Netherlands, which is rare for most western countries, and has led to a large number of "drug tourists" from abroad. Amsterdam is also a city of rich culture and history with popular attractions like the Van Gogh Museum, Rijksmuseum(national museum), Rembrandt House Museum and Anne Frank House.

D: Financial sector The Central Bank of the Republic of Netherland (TrkiyeCumhuriyetMerkezBankas) was founded in 1930, as a privileged joint-stock company. It possesses the sole right to issue notes. It also has the obligation to provide for the monetary requirements of the state agricultural and commercial enterprises
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Agricultural Sector

The Netherlands is a small country (41.528 km, including 7.750 km of open water) with an average population density of over 400 persons per km. Its geographic position, along the North Sea in the delta of a number of important European rivers, has always been a stimulus for transport and trade to and from the European hinterland. The prevailing natural conditions -a temperate climate with a fair rainfall distribution (total annual average 750 mm/yr), relatively fertile soils in a flat landscape- favour a varied and productive agriculture.

The combination of these two factors, together with a governmental policy that strongly supports a competitive agricultural sector, good entrepreneurial skills, support from a state-of-the-art agricultural research and education system, innovative supply and processing industries, the availability of inexpensive natural gas supporting greenhouse horticulture and floriculture as well as the production of cheap fertilizers, -and since the nineteen fifties- the emergence of the European Union and the associated market enlargement has resulted in a very strong agricultural sector in the Netherlands. Agricultural imports amount to some 34 billion per year (2007) and include cereaoilseeds, vegetable proteins and fats (soy for instance) mostly as animal feed stuff. These imports originate mainly from countries outside the European Union, the United StatBrazil and Thailand in particular. For many of the imported products the Netherlands haprime role as processor and distributor to other countries in the European Union.

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POLICY AND NORMS OF IMPORT & EXPORT

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Exports & Imports

Whereas exporting represent goods and services flowing out of a country, importing represents goods and services flowing into a country. Exports results in receipts and imports result in payments. Although export and import activities are a natural extension of distribute strategy, they also include elements of product, promotion and pricing factors and decisions. Both exporting and importing entail a lower level of risk than FDI. But while exporting offers less control over the marketing function, importing offers less control over the production function. This chapter will focus primarily on the issue of a companys motivation for and development of an export strategy.

Trade policy of a country is one of the many economic instruments for achieving economic growth. IT includes exports and imports option to find balance deficits in the international business. The EXIM policy is also known as foreign trade policy which re-allocates around promoting and restricting export and import. The basic twin objectives of the trade policy have been to Promote exports and Restrict imports to the level of foreign exchange available in the country.

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Exports
The term exports is derived from the conceptual meaning as to ship the goods and services out of the port of a country. The seller of such goods and services is referred to an exporter who is based in the country of export whereas the overseas based buyers referred to as an importer. Exporting refers to the sale of goods or services produced by a company based in one country to customers that reside in a different country.

Imports When the trader of one country purchase the goods from the trader of another country, it is known as Import trade. The term Import is derived from the conceptual meaning as to bring in the goods and services into the port of a country. The buyer of such goods and services is referred to an importer who is based in the country of import whereas the overseas based seller is referred to as an exporter.

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Phases of Export Development

Orientation Training

Chart 13

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International Transition Chain

On-the-job Training

Chart 14

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Documentation Related to Export Trade: Export Documents Commercial Invoice Letter of Credit Shipping Bill Bill Of Lading Combined Transport Document Consular Invoice Inspection Certification Destination Control Statement Export Packing List GR Form Bill of Exchange Marine Insurance Policy Airway Bill Commercial Invoice Certificate of Origin Dock Receipt & Warehouse Receipt Insurance Certificate

Documentation Related to Export Trade: Import Documents Import License Bill of Sight Indent Letter of Advice Bill of Entry Dock Challan Insurance Policy

Sources: International Business

EXTRACTS FROM FOREIGN TRADE POLICY


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Applicable from 2009 - 2014 (w.e.f 1.4.2009 31.3.2014)

GENERAL PROVISIONS REGARDING IMPORTS AND EXPORTS

1. Exports and Imports free unless regulated Exports and Imports shall be free, except where regulated by FTP or any other law in force. The item wiseexport and import policy shall be, as specified in ITC (HS) notified by Director General of Foreign Trade, asamended from time to time.

2. Compliance with Laws Every exporter or importer shall comply with the provisions of the Foreign Trade (Development and Regulation) Act, 1992, the Rules and Orders made there under, the FTP and the terms and conditions of any Authorisation granted to him, as well as provisions of any other law for the time being in force. All imported goods shall also be subject to domestic Laws, Rules, Orders, Regulations, technical specifications, environmental and safety norms as applicable to domestically produced goods. No import or export of rough diamonds shall be permitted unless accompanied by Kimberley Process (KP) Certificate required under the procedure specified by the Gem &Jewellery Export Promotion Council (GJEPC).

3. Interpretation of Policy If any question or doubt arises in respect of interpretation of any provision contained in FTP, or classification of any item in ITC (HS) or HBP-v1, or Schedule of DEPB Rates (including content, scope or issue of an authorization there under), said question or doubt shall be referred to DGFT whose decision thereon shall be final and binding.

4. Procedure DGFT may, specify procedure to be followed for an exporter or importer or by any licensing or any othercompetent authority for purpose of implementing provisions of FT (D&R) Act, the Rules and the Orders madethere under and FTP. Such procedures shall be published by means of Public Notice, and may, in likemanner, be amended from time to time.

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5. Principles of Restriction DGFT may, through a notification, adopt and enforce any measure necessary for : i. Protection of public morals. i. Protection of human, animal or plant life or health. iii. Protection of patents, trademarks and copyrights and the prevention of deceptive practices. iv. Prevention of use of prison labour. v. Protection of national treasures of artistic, historic or archaeological value. vi. Conservation of exhaustible natural resources. vii. Protection of trade of fissionable material or material from which they are derived; viii. Prevention of traffic in arms, ammunition and implements of war.

6.

Restricted Goods

Any goods the export or import of which is restricted under ITC (HS) may be exported or imported only inaccordance with an Authorisation or in terms of a public notice issued in this regard.

7. Terms and Conditions of a Licence/Certificate/Permission/Authorisation Every Authorisation shall be valid for prescribed period of validity and shall contain such terms and conditionsas may be specified by RA which may include: a. The quantity, description and value of the goods; b. Actual User condition; c. Export obligation; d. The value addition to be achieved; and e. The minimum export/import price

8. Transit Facility Transit of goods through India from or to countries adjacent to India shall be regulated in accordance with thebilateral treaties between India and those countries and will be subject to such restrictions as may be specifiedby DGFT in accordance with International Conventions.

9. Import of samples Import of samples shall be governed by the provisions given in Handbook (Vol. 1)
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10. Import of Gifts Import of gifts shall be permitted where such goods are otherwise freely importable under this Policy. In othercases, a Customs Clearance Permit (CCP) shall be required from DGFT.

11. Passenger Baggage Bonafied household goods and personal effects may be imported as part of passenger baggage as per thelimits, terms and conditions thereof in the baggage rules notified by the Ministry of Finance. Samples of suchitems that are otherwise freely importable under this Policy may also be imported as part of Passenger baggagewithout an Authorisation. Exporters coming from abroad are also allowed to Import drawings, patterns, labels,price tags, buttons, belts, trimming, and embellishments required for export, as part of their passenger baggagewithout an Authorisation.

12. Import of goods used in projects abroad After completion of the projects abroad, project contractors may Import, without an Authorisation used goodsincluding capital goods provided they have been used for at least one year.

13. Sale on high seas Sale of goods on high seas for import into India may be made subject to FTP or any other law in force.

14. Free Exports All goods may be exported without any restriction except to the extent that such exports are regulated by ITC(HS) or any other provision of FTP or any other law for the time being in force. The Director General of ForeignTrade may, however, specify through a Public Notice such terms and conditions according to which any goods,not included in the ITC (HS), may be exported without an Authorisation.

15. Export of Samples Export of samples and Free of charge goods shall be governed by the provisions given in Handbook (Vol. 1).
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16. Export of Passenger Baggage Bonafide personal baggage may be exported either along with the passenger or, if unaccompanied, within oneyear before or after the passengers departure from India. However, items mentioned as restricted in ITC (HS)shall require an Authorisation. Government of India officials proceeding abroad on official postings shall,however, be permitted to carry along with their personal baggage, food items (free, restricted or prohibited )strictly for their personal consumption.

17. Exports of Gifts Goods including edible items, of value not exceeding Rs. 5,00,000/- in licensing year, may be exported as a gift.However, items mentioned as restricted for exports in ITC (HS) shall not be exported as a gift, without anAuthorisation.

18. Export of Imported Goods Goods imported, in accordance with FTP, may be exported in the same or substantially the same formwithout an Authorisation provided that the item to be imported or exported is not restricted for import orexport in ITC (HS).Exports of such goods imported against payment in freely convertible currency would bepermitted against payment in freely convertible currency.

19. Goods, including those mentioned as restricted item for import (except prohibited items) may be importedunder Customs Bond for export in freely convertible currencwithout an Authorisation, provided thatthe item is freely exportable without any conditionality / requirement of licence / permission as may berequired under ITC (HS) Schedule ll.

Sources:-www.dgft.gov.in

Procedures for Import and Export


General Provisions about Customs Procedures
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Basic document is Entry

Entry in relation to goods means entry made in Bill of Entry, Shipping Bill or Bill of Export. In case of import by post, label or declaration accompanying goods is entry

Loading and unloading at specified places only Computerisation of customs procedures Amendment to documents

Imported goods can be unloaded only at specified places. Goods can be exported only from specified places.

Customs procedures are largely computerised. Most of documents have to be e-filed. Documents submitted to customs can be amended with permission In case of bill of entry, shipping bill or bill of export, it can be amended after clearance only on the basis of documentary evidence which was in existence at the time the goods were cleared, warehoused or exported, and not on basis of any subsequent document. [provision to section 149].

ICD and CFS

Imported and export goods are usually handled in containers. These can be stored in Inland Container Depot (ICD) or Container Freight Station (CFS). They function like dry port for handling and temporary storage of imported/export goods and empty containers. Boat Notes are used for transferring small cargo from ship to shore, or from shore to ship, without berthing the ship.

Boat Notes

Transshipment of goods

Goods can be transshipped from one conveyance to other after following required procedure. Such transhipment may be to any major port or airport in India. The goods can be transshipped to any other customs station in India if Customs Officer is satisfied that the goods are bona fide intended for transhipment to any customs station. The facility is available at all customs ports and Inland Container Depots (ICDs).

Coastal goods

Procedures have been prescribed for coastal goods, even if there is neither import nor export.

Table 8 Import Procedures


e-filing of documents Goods should arrive at customs port/airport only. Most of customs procedures are computerised. E-filing of documents is required.
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Import manifest or Import Report Entry Inwards Risk Management System Bill of Entry for home consumption on payment of customs duty

Person in charge of conveyance is required to submit Import Manifest or Import Report. Goods can be unloaded only after grant of Entry Inwards. Self Assessment on basis of Risk Management System (RMS) has been introduced in respect of specified goods and importers. Importer has to submit Bill of Entry giving details of goods being imported, along with required documents. Electronic submission of documents is done in major ports. White Bill of Entry is for home consumption. Imported goods are cleared on payment of customs duty. Yellow Bill of Entry is for warehousing. It is also termed as into bond Bill of Entry as bond is executed. Duty is not paid and imported goods are transferred to warehouse where these are stored. Green Bill of Entry is for clearance from warehouse on payment of customs duty. It is for ex-bond clearance.

Bill of Entry for warehousing

Noting, examination and assessment Bond

Bill of Entry is noted, Goods are assessed to duty, examined and preaudit is carried out. Customs duty is paid after assessment. Bond is executed if required if assessment is provisional (PD bond) or concessional rate of customs duty is subject to certain post import conditions. Goods can be cleared outside port after Out of Customs Charge order is issued by customs officer. After that, port dues, demurrage and other charges are paid and goods are cleared.

Out of customs charge order

Demurrage if clearance from port delayed

Demurrage is payable if goods are not cleared from port/airport within three days. Goods can be disposed of if not cleared from port within 30 days.

Table 9

Export Procedures

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Entry Outward

Loading in conveyance can start after Entry Outward is given by customs officer. Person in charge of conveyance is required to submit Export Manifest or Export Report. Exporter has to be obtain IEC number from DGFT is advance. He should be registered with Export Promotion Council if he intends to claim export benefits.

Export manifest/Export report Registration with DGFT and EPC

Third party exports

Export can be by manufacturer himself or third party (i.e. by exporter on behalf of another). Merchant exporter means a person engaged in trading activity and exporting or intending to export goods [para 9.40 of FTP]

Registration of documents under Export Promotion Scheme Shipping Mill

Advance authorisation, DEPB etc. should be registered if exports are under Export Promotion Scheme.

Export is required to submit Shipping Bill with required documents for obtaining permission to export. There are five forms : (a) Shipping Bill for export of goods under claim for duty drawback - these should be in Green colour (b) Shipping Bill for export of dutiable goods - this should be yellow colour (c) Shipping bill for export of duty free goods - it should be white colour (d) shipping bill for export of duty free goods ex-bond - i.e. from bonded store room - it should be pink colour (e) Shipping Bill for export under DEPB scheme - Blue colour.

FEMA formalities Noting, assessment, examination Certification of documents for export incentives Let export order

GR/SDF/Softex form (under FEMA) is required to be submitted. The shipping bill is noted, goods are assessed and examined. Export duty is paid, if applicable. If export is under export incentives, relevant documents are checked and certified. Then proof of export is obtained on ARE-1. Conveyance can leave only after Let Export order is issued.

Table 10

Documentation

Related to Export Trade:


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Export Documents Commercial Invoice Letter of Credit Shipping Bill Bill Of Lading Combined Transport Document Consular Invoice Inspection Certification Destination Control Statement Export Packing List GR Form Bill of Exchange Marine Insurance Policy Airway Bill Commercial Invoice Certificate of Origin Dock Receipt & Warehouse Receipt Insurance Certificate

Documentation Related to Export Trade:


Import Documents Import License Bill of Sight Indent Letter of Advice Table 12 Sources: International Business Bill of Entry Dock Challan Insurance Policy

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FOREIGN TRADE POLICY OF NETHERLAND

Holland & Knights International Trade Group routinely represents the interests of foreign governments and U.S. and foreign industries before the agencies of the United States Government, the United States Congress and multilateral financial institutions. We partner with our clients to determine desired trade policy outcomes and create a detailed plan to implement those outcomes. We then effectively lobby the relevant governmental and international entities to achieve the desired result.

In the area of bilateral trade negotiations, we have served for the past two years as advisors to the Kingdom of Bahrain, a strategically important country in the Middle East, in connection with its negotiation of a U.S.-Bahrain Free Trade Agreement (FTA). We have advised the Bahraini Government on three levels, working simultaneously on technical trade negotiations with USTR, lobbying of appropriate members of Congress to ensure passage of the FTA by Congress, and strategic communications counseling. Our Trade Group also advises a number of important Colombian industry groups with respect to the ongoing U.S.-Andean FTA negotiations.

We regularly represent foreign governments and private sector clients on a wide variety of matters before all of the federal government agencies with responsibilities for the development of U.S. international commercial policy, with particularly strong contacts at the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative (USTR), the Department of Commerce and the Department of Homeland Security (which now houses the former U.S. Customs Service). One of our attorneys was formerly an Assistant General Counsel at USTR. In this area of practice, we work closely with our Government attorneys, including a number of former members of Congress, whose contacts in the Executive Branch and on Capitol Hill can prove invaluable in advocating for our clients. Representations of this type include the governments of the United Kingdom, El Salvador, all five Central American countries, Senegal, Jamaica, Trinidad and Tobago, as well as a broad range of foreign commercial interests. Our Trade Group has considerable experience with the GATT, WTO, CBI, NAFTA and other trade agreements.

Our Trade Group has successfully represented coalitions of U.S. companies on high-profile
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public policy and lobbying campaigns in support of open U.S. trade and investment policies. Our experience in U.S. trade policy enables Holland & Knight to work with companies on both major trade lobbying initiatives and narrower, company and sector-specific concerns relating to tariff, customs, market access and antidumping/countervailing duty provisions of U.S. trade legislation.

A key ingredient in effective representation in the trade policy area is a strong working knowledge of the specific trade specialties. Our Trade Group works daily on a wide variety of international trade matters, such as customs, trade litigation, U.S. export controls and sanctions. In addition, our Trade Group can draw upon the resources, knowledge and contacts of a wide range of experienced Holland & Knight lawyers from areas as diverse as telecommunications, international banking and labor law.

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UNDERSECRETARIAT OF FOREIGN TRADE


TASKS
Assisting the government in determining the policies of foreign trade, Arranging bilateral and multilateral trade and economic relations along with exports,

encouragement of exports, imports and contracting services abroad, monitoring the implementations and promoting them.

General Directorate of Exports Areas of Duty


Export Regulations, Observation, Control, Orientation in Export, State Aids for Export, Promotion Activities for Export Products, Efforts against Restrictive Measures on Export, Exporter Unions and Their Umbrella Institutions, Off-shore and Border Trade

Aspects of Important Activities


Inward and Outward Processing Regimes Trade and Buyers Missions Fairs and Exhibitions Government Subsidies in Context of WTO and EU Obligations Sectorial Foreign Trade Companies

General Directorate of Imports Areas of Duty


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Designing and implementing the import policy, Preparing Import Regime Decree and other import-related legislation, Conducting importation towards the set objectives, Implementing import-related product policies, Taking measures necessary for the domestic industry, Determining fiscal charges applicable in importation. The Import Regime, which constitutes

the basis of the Import Policy, is formulated in accordance with:


Multilateral Agreements annexed to the Agreement Establishing the World Trade organization

and other arrangements there to,


Arrangements regulating our relations with the EU, Other bilateral and multilateral agreements, the needs of the domestic industry.

General Directorate of Agreements Areas of Duty


Bilateral Trade Agreements, Bilateral Commercial, Industrial and Technical Cooperation Agreements Multilateral Trade Agreements, Overseas Contracting Services

Sources: www.igeme.gov.in

Trade barriers in Imports


1. Restriction on imports:
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Control over the import of goods into India is exercised by the Import Trade Control Organization, which functions under the ministry of Commerce. This organization is supervised by the Director General of Foreign Trade stationed at New Delhi, who is assisted by Additional and Joint Directors General and by other licensing authorities at various centers. Current import policy, valid from April 1992 to March 1997, is embodied in the Export and Import Policy book out by the Director General of Foreign Trade. Some salient features of the import restrictions are as follows. The importing of prohibited items is banned; The importing of restricted items is permitted under specific license, or in accordance with a public notice conveying a general schedule; Canalized items can be imported only through designated public sector agencies, such as the Indian Oil Corporation and the State Trading Corporation. However, the central government may grant licenses to others to import any canalized goods. The negative list of import is under constant review; it is important to check the current list at the time of import. The import of consumer goods and durables continues to be restricted (with exceptions for Specific items). The import of capital goods machinery has been liberalized and is generally allowed without license. Secondhand capital goods are also allowed, subject to certain conditions. Special licensing schemes permit the import of capital goods required for export production either duty-free import of inputs required for export production. The import of gold and specified items of consumer goods is also permissible under special import licenses issued to certain categories of exporters on the basis of either the net foreign exchange earning or the FOB value of physical exports.

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2. Duties on imports: Customs duties are levied at specific percentage ad valorem, specific amount per unit of quantity or both, depending on the classification of the imported goods in the Customs Tariff Act. Duty rates may change according to the country of origin and the type of product. For example, complete exemption or rate concessions are allowed on the import of specified items from some neighboring and developing countries such as Bangladesh, Bhutan, Egypt, Myanamar, Nepal, and Sri Lanka.

3. Concession on duty:
Duty is waived or a concessional duty rate is permitted for export into India of capital goods under the Export promotion Capital Goods (EPCG) Scheme.

4. Provisions for Antidumping duty:


Antidumping duty provisions have been invoked in some cases. Indications are that they may be applied more actively where availability of imports in India at lower price that that prevailing in the exporting country is likely to cause significant harm to the domestic industry.

5. Long procedures for documentations:


The rules and procedures for imports are contained in the Handbook of Procedures - Imports and Export Promotion, which is issued from time to time by the Director General of Foreign Trade.

Import licenses are issued in duplicate and market for customs and exchange control purposes, respectively. It is important that the correct quantity, description and value of the goods be properly recorded on the license and exporter's invoices, because failure to do so could lead to protracted delays in the clearance of goods and litigation.

Every invoice must be signed. Invoices should normally be prepared on FOB terms, A freight note should be attached, since in the absence of documentary evidence of the amount payable for freight and insurance, Indian customs adds 10 percent to the invoice price in arriving at the value for imposing import duty.

Where an import license is required, no letter of credit may be opened or remittance made to a foreign country for imports unless the importer is in possession of a valid import license marked for exchange control purposes.
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6. Customs and storage:


The quality of customs and storage facilities and the security of goods are modest to adequate, varying from port to port. To facilitate access to imported inputs for exporters, the government has allowed private operators to set up bonded warehouses subject to certain conditions. However, there are no restrictions on the type of goods to be warehoused. 7. Re Exports: The Duty Exemption Scheme enables imports of duty-free raw materials, components, intermediates, consumables, parts, spares, and packing materials required for purposes of export production. Licenses issued for this purpose require adherence to value-added and input-output norms and fulfilment of export obligations. Units set up in export-processing zones or as 100 percent exportoriented units are also required to comply with specific value-added norms

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PRESENT TRADE RELATIONS AND BUSINESS VOLUME OF DIFFERENT PRODUCTS WITH INDIA

Main Commodities Subject to Trade:


Dutch export products to India are iron and steel products, oil-seeds, crude fertilizers, textile yarn, machinery, metal ores, road vehicles and mineral manufactures.

Imports are dominated by textile yarn and fabrics, organic chemicals, clothing accessories, medicinal and pharmaceutical products, petroleum oils, motor vehicles, iron and steel, textile fibers, coloring materials.

The number of Indian companies operating in Netherland doubled from 60 in 2008 to 120 in 2010. Significant Indian companies are interested in oil refining, metal processing, and agroindustry and cosmetics sectors.

Dutch and Indian companies to enjoy fruitful collaborations in the fields of R&D and their commercial spin-offs in the areas of bio-technology, nano-technology and information technology.

Indian investments in Netherland are in several diverse sectors viz., railway construction, electricity transmission, pipelines, consultancy services for earthquake emergency, hydrocarbon, CNG conversion and IT services.

Dutch investments in India are in sectors of travel and tourism, home textile products, construction/maintenance of roads, etc.

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BUSINESS VOLUME
Indian companies led by the Tata group, Mahindra and Mahindra, GMR and Arcelor Mittal are already operating in various parts of Nethrland and the rush does not seem to stop.

Indian companies having interests in mining, minerals, those wanting to acquire coal mines and also take part in the energy and power projects have made a beeline for Nethrland.

Several business communities in both the countries would enjoy a well-designed and smooth atmosphere for trade and economic relations.

The total trade volume in the year 2007 was US $2.6 billion, and a target has been set to raise it up to $5 billion by 2012 and to $10 billion by 2020

Netherland companies in India:


More than 150 companies with Indian capital have registered businesses in Netherland in the form of joint ventures, trade and representative offices. They include Gateway Group of Company Cadila Pharmaceutical LTD. Aarding India Private Limited ABN Amro Bank NV

Agaram Industries (P) Limited

Moser Baer Bluestar Limited FoodCert India (P) Ltd.

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PESTEL ANALYSIS

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Definition:
A type of situation analysis in which political-legal, economic interest rates, socio-cultural , and technological factors are examined to chart an organization's long-term plans.

What is a PESTEL Analysis?


PEST is an acronym that stands for the following four Macro-Economic factors: Political - how a government intervenes in your business. It may include taxes, law, political stability, regulation and de-regulation. Economic - These include interest rates, inflation rates, unemployment rates, income rates/distribution and tariff rates. Social - These include cultural aspects of population growth, age distribution, career trends, lifestyle trends, etc. Technological - These include trends such as remote working, A Virtual Workplace, mobile computing, the Internet and other R & D innovations. Environmental - these include trends of global warming and all environmental issues. Legal - these includes trends such as competition law, health and safety and employment law.
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PESTEL ANALYSIS OF NETHERLAND

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POLITICAL The political landscape discusses the evolution of the political scenario in Netherlands in different periods. The economic, social, foreign and defence policies are considered in the political landscape section. It also discusses the performance of the country as per World Bank Governance Indicators.

ECONOMICAL

The economic landscape describes the evolution of the economy of Netherlands in different periods. It also examines the countrys performance in terms of GDP growth, composition by sector (agriculture, industry and services), fiscal situation, international investment position, monetary situation, credit disbursement, banking sector and
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employment. The economic landscape also explains the financial system in the country, especially with regard to financial authorities/regulators.

Year

GDP (IN $ BILLION)

GDP( per capita) (in $) $42,183

Annual real GDP

Inflation rate

2011

$704.034 BILLION

1.1%

2.3%

2010 2009

$704.1 BILLION $41,800 $692.4 BILLION $41,300


Table 13

1.6% 1.5%

2.4% 2.1%

Natural Resources Natural gas, petroleum, peat, limestone, salt, sand and gravel, arable land Agriculture Grains, Potatoes, Sugar beets, Fruits, Vegetables; Livestock Industry (-0.6%)
Agro Industries, Metal and Engineering Products, Electrical Machinery and Equipment, Chemicals, Petroleum, Construction, Microelectronics, Fishing

Trade 1. IMPORT: $514.1 BILLION (2011 EST.) $429.5 Billion (2010 est.)

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Import Commodities: Machinery and Transport equipment, Chemicals, Fuels, Foodstuffs, and Clothing 2. EXPORT: $576.9 BILLION (2011 EST.) $486.7 billion (2010 est.) Export Commodities: Machinery and Equipment, Chemicals, Fuels; Foodstuffs

SOCIAL The social landscape covers the demographics, education and healthcare scenario in Netherlands. The social welfare policies of the government along with the countrys performance in terms of healthcare, income distribution and education are also provided.

Language Dutch 80.7%, EU 5%, Indonesian 2.4%, Dutch 2.2%, Surinamese 2%, Moroccan 2%, Caribbean 0.8%, other 4.8% (2008 est.) Religions Roman Catholic 30%, Protestant 20% (Dutch Reformed 11%, Calvinist 6%, other Protestant 3%), Muslim 5.8%, other 2.2%, none 42% (2006)

RELIGION
None, 42% Roman Catholic, 30%

Other, Muslim, 2.20% 5.80%


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Protesta nt, 20%


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TECHNOLOGICAL The technological landscape discusses the structure and policies in terms of Intellectual property, research & development, technology agreements/pacts; and policies related to the promotion of technology in Netherlands.

ENVIORNMENT

The environmental landscape in Netherlands discusses the environmental regulations and policies of the country. The performance of the country in terms of in terms of environmental indicators and impact of environmental policies is also examined.

LEGAL

The legal landscape examines the structure of the judicial system, legislation affecting businesses, tax regulations, labor laws, trade regulations and corporate governance in Netherlands.

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PESTEL ANALYSIS OF INDIA

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POLITICAL

India is the biggest democracy in the World. The government type is federal republic. Based on English common law; judicial review of legislative acts; accepts compulsory ICJ jurisdiction with reservations; separate personal law codes apply to Muslims, Christians, and Hindus. The political Situation in the country is more or less stable.

Parties involved in Indian political group: 1. Indian national congress (INC), 2. Bharatiya janta party (BJP), 3. Communist party of India (CPI), 4. United progressive alliance (UPA).

Overall India currently has a coalition led government and both major political parties the UPA and BJP, whichever comes in power.

ECONOMICAL
The economic factors in India are improving continuously. Gross domestic product: The GDP is estimated at 2.965 trillion U.S. dollars in the year 2007. The GDP- per Capita was 2700 U.S. dollars as estimated in 2007. The GDP- real growth rate in 2007 was 8.7%. India has the third highest GDP in terms of purchasing power parity just ahead Japan and behind U.S. and China.

Foreign direct investment:


Foreign direct investment rose in the fiscal year ended March 31 2007 to about $16 billion from just $5.5 billion a year earlier.

Per capita income: There is a continuous growth in per capita income; Indias per capita income is expected to reach 1000 dollars by the end of 2007-08 from 797 dollars in 2006-07
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SOCIAL

India is the second most populous nation in the world with an approximate population of over 1.1billion people. This population is divided in the following age structure: 0-14 years 31.8%, 15-64 years 63.1% and 65 years and above 5.1%. The main factors which are included in social factors are as under: 1. Emphasis on safety 2. Career attitudes 3. Population growth rate 4. Age distribution 5. Health consciousness

TECHNOLOGICAL

The technological knowhow and expertise will also enter the Indian market with an increase in competition. For example beer brewing technology major Ziemann has entered India and has set up manufacturing plant in India. Ziemann Group, based in Ludwigsburg near Stuttgart in Germany, has founded Ziemann India. The technological change in India is always on a lower basis and it doesnt effect on country as a whole. The main technological factors include: 1. Research and development activity 2. Technology incentives 3. Rate of technological change 4. Automation

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ENVIORNMENTAL

Initially the environmental factors play a vital role in the economy of any country. The environmental factors dont play a vital role in the capital market but the time has changed and people are eco-friendly. This is really bothering them that if any firm or industry is environment friendly or not. An increasing number of people, investors, and corporate executives are paying importance to these facts, the capital markets still see the environment as a liability. They believe that it is of no use for their strategy.

LEGAL

Legal factors plays a vital role in development and sustain the capital market. Legal issues relating to any industry or firm decides the fate of the capital market. If the govt. of india or the parliament introduces a new law that can affect the running of the industry then the industry will be demotivated and this demonization will lead to the demonization of the investors and will result in the fall of capital market.

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PRESENT POSITION OF BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY

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Objectives of the Company


To strive for global positioning with a strong customer focused approach and constant quest for standard quality products. To ensure the best services around the world and shall sustain organizational excellence through innovative efforts. To Innovative effort with blend of technology to become reputed known company in the eye of global customer. To Committed to total customer satisfaction. To establish the highest standards of business ethics through fair business practice.

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Competitors Details
In todays business world, there will be hardly any field where there will not be competition among two or more units for increasing the market share of their products. Today this competition has reached to its top level.

It becomes the cut-throat competition. The organizations have to adopt newer and newer technologies to survive in the market against such cut-throat competition that they are facing from their competitors. For instance, a giant organization HLL is also facing the competition from Nirma, P & G, etc.

Same way, Ashwani is also facing the competition from various competitors in the local markets as well as from the overseas markets. If we talk only about the local markets, then also there are number of competitors available that are in the same field of manufacturing the Brass Engineering Turned Components & Electrical assemblies. But as we all know that, Quality as well as Quantity both plays a very important role in competitive advantages, Ashwani Metals has understood this technique and same thing applied to its business activities. Competitors of the Ashwani Metals Pvt. Ltd. 1) Megha Corporation Pvt. Ltd. 2) Precision Industry 3) Myank Metallurgical Pvt. Ltd. 4) Senor Metal Pvt. Ltd. 5) Mayank Metal Pvt. Ltd. 6) Rajshanti Metal Pvt. Ltd.

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Present status
As on date there are 7000 brass part manufacturing unit along with 520 electroplating and metal finishing of brass parts. Around 750 brass foundry units catering to the need of raw material for brass part manufacturing units in Jamnagar. Brass parts are manufactured from brass casting which is the basic raw material for the brass parts machining units.

There are about 1000 foundries with a capacity of about one ton per day, besides fourteen brass-extrusion plants; 550 to 700 buffing / nickel / electroplating factories and about 65 highly experienced and accomplished brass-parts machinery fabricators. All these manufacturing units are supported by a large number of traders, middlemen and exporters whose number is guessed to be about 850 (including outsiders).

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Domestic Export of Brass Extursion Products


Ashwani metals pvt ltd, considering its domestic export of brass extrusion products throughout the whole India mainly focusing on the state Gujarat. The main focus of company is to targeting the customer with the context of domestic market of brass products.

The main benefits of domestic export of brass extrusion products is that ashwani metals particularly aware about the requirement of the domestic customers.

So its easy for the company to capture or positioning to cattered the domestic market. Sr.No City No.Of Units 1. Surat 4500 2008
N Brass C 37700 ASTM

Year

Types

Standards

2.

Rajkot

2882

2006-09

Brass CW 617 N

DIN,ASTM,SABS,

3.

Ahmedabad

450

2009

N Brass C 37700

Uns

4.

Borada

2100

2007

C 36000

SABS, CSA

5.

Anand

1500

2009-08

36-de 343

CEN,SABS, CSA

6.

Gandhinagar

2155

2010

d-g5600

IS, BS, JIS, UNS, CEN,

7.

Bharuch

750

2010

d-g212

SABS, CSA

8.

Junagadh

950

2011

Brass 6700

DIN, ASTM, JIS,

Table 14
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Domestic Export
In the year, 2006 Ashwani metals pvt. Ltd started its working in Rajkot with the product of brass CW 617N. Gradually, it has continues the business in Baroda with product of C-36000 and the standard of SABS, CSA. Upto 2006-2007, product is reached in many big city of Gujarat. In the year 2008-2009, Ashwani metals limited started dealing with Surat product of N crass c 37700 e along with the standard ASTM. In Anand, product 36-de 343 standard considering CEN,SABS,CSA. Finally, for the year commencing 2009-10, Ashwani metals pvt. Ltd. Covered the mega city of Ahmedabad with introducing product of N brass C 37700 of standard uns. recently, company gets connected with junagadh starting with the product brass 6700 considering standard of product DIN,ASTM,JIS.

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Domestic import Of Brass Extursion Products


Ashwani metals pvt. Ltd depends mainly on domestic market for procurement of the all inputs for its product i.e. raw-materials. The main purpose of company in domestic import is to get all inputs for product at economic price level as well best from the quality point of view. Domestic import market facilitates the company to manage its inventory time to time. Sr.No City No. Of Units Year Types Standards

1.

Bilimora

60

2009-10

N Brass C 37700

ASTM, CSA

2.

Ahmedabad

630

2006

Brass CW 617 N

IS,

CEN,

SABS, CSA

3.

Bhavnagar

220

2009-11

N Brass C 37700

ASTM, SABS, CSA SABS, CSA

4.

Borada

100

2007

C 36000

5.

Jamnagar

2100

2009

36-de 343

DIN, ASTM, JIS, UNS,

CEN, SABS, CSA

6.

Gandhinagar

233

2010-11

d-g5600

IS,BS,DIN, ASTM, JIS, UNS, CEN, SABS, CSA

7.

Bharuch

2346

2010-11

d-g212

IS, BS, DIN, ASTM, JIS,

8.

Anand

40

2011

Brass 6700

CEN, SABS, CSA

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GLOBAL / COUNTRY STUDY REPORT (GCSR) Betch : 2011 - 2013 Project Submitted By: PARAM IMR, Jamnagar

Domestic Import
In the year 2006, Ahmedabad became the main supplier of raw-material for the ashwani metals pvt. Ltd. With the impact of inflation, prices of raw-materials of brass had been increased thus, company has change supplier and jump with the supplier of baroda for the product of C 36000. In the year 2009, company has decided to import material same city i.e. Jamnagar only for product of 36-d 343. While in year 2010-2011,Gandhinagar and Bharuch became leading suppliers of ashwani metals pvt. Ltd.

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SWOT ANALYSIS

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SWOT analysis is a tool, used in management and strategy formulation. It can help to identify the Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats of a particular company. Strengths and weaknesses are internal factors that create value or destroy value. They can include assets, skills, or resources that a company has at its disposal, compared to its competitors. They can be measured using internal assessments or external benchmarking.

Opportunities and threats are external factors that create value or destroy value. A company cannot control them. But they emerge from either the competitive dynamics of the industry/market or from demographic, economic, political, technical, social, legal or cultural factors (PEST).

This report gives an overview of strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats of the Dutch guidance system. It is prepared for the Work Package 2 (Access) group of the ELGPN. However, the SWOT analysis is aimed at the guidance system in the Netherlands as a whole. The report is based on official or general accepted documents but is not reflect an official Dutch viewpoint on guidance. Rather it reflects the viewpoint of the ELGPN representatives in the ELGPN network.

A recent reflection note on the present state of the guidance system in the Netherlands can be found in McCarthy (2009).

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STRENGTH
Strengths of the Dutch guidance

are also pointed out in OECD, 2012. This report mentioned as potential strengths of the Dutch guidance system a) The extent and quality both of labour market information and of consumer information, for use in guidance. b) The formal affirmation within the vocational education system of the central importance of the students career path. c) The emergent market in career guidance and information services created by the policy of decentralization and marketization: still limited and fragile, but with potential for Development. d) The network of Public Employment Services, in Dutch since 2009 UWV Werkbedrijf (formerly known as CWI), alongside the werk.nl website and the proposed customer support center.

WEAKNESS
The potential weaknesses of the Dutch guidance system are already pointed out in OECD, 2012: a) The limited attention attached to career guidance, and particularly to contacts with the labour market, within the general education part of the education system.
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b) More generally, the fragmented nature of the guidance system as a whole: arguably, it is not currently a system at all, in any meaningful sense, but a series of disconnected entities. c) The lack of accountability, monitoring and quality assurance: this is particularly evident in relation to schools, but is an issue in all sectors. d) The lack of clarity regarding the role of government within a decentralised and marketwise system.

Seven years later it can be concluded that these weaknesses still stand very strongly. More background to the Dutch guidance system and its weaknesses can be found in Jansen, 2006.

OPPORTUNITY
a) Regional cooperation structures b) Sectorial career guidance c) Mobility Centers d) Learner information package (ELD)

THREATS
If we compare reports on workforce development and preparation from the Netherlands in the past four years with the guiding principles of the 2008 Council Resolution, we can see that: a) The first of these principles citizens acquisition of career management skills - is not yet on the education, training and employment policy agendas b) Limited moves are being made to improve physical access to guidance services for adults through the use of Work and Income Centres and to improve virtual access by means of telephone and internet c) A minimalist approach to quality assurance of schools guidance provision is a proposed action strand in the Career Orientation and Guidance report
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d) Significant cooperation is reported between different ministry directorates within and across the education, training and labour market sectors, and with the social partners at regional level. e) Joining parties involved in life long guidance in the Netherlands could evolve to a new talking group, without concrete actions.

SWOT ANALYSIS OF INDIAN BRASS INDUSTRY


Strengths:
Manpower available at economical rate. Aesthetic know how, functional integration and engagements. Few competitors for hand made products. Products with unique features. Exporters are flexible and can handle small to medium orders.

Weaknesses:
Unstable price of raw material. Internal competition. Expensive infrastructure. Exporters cannot handle big orders. Untimely delivery. Stereotype manufacturing.
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Opportunities:
Increasing interest for decorative items by consumers in the developed countries. Passion for novelty and exclusivity. Mammoth income at the disposal of customers in developed countries. Growing trend of offering gifts to developing interpersonal relationship. Growth in retail sector. Growth of e- commerce for direct marketing.

Threats:
Competitors are providing products of better quality at a competitive rate. Trade terms of competitors compatible to the customers. International standards. Unstable government at home. Legal obligations.
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Potential for Import/Export in Gujarat and Business Opportunities

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AGRICULTURE AND ALLIED SECTORS


AGRICULTURE Output of agricultural sector in Gujarat State has been largely dependent on south-west monsoon.The State frequently experiences erratic behaviour of the south-west monsoon, which can partly be attributed to geographic situation of the State. The wide variation in rainfall received by different parts of the State has been the characteristic feature of monsoon. Valsad district in south Gujarat received maximum rainfall of 2064 mm, while Kachchh district received minimum rainfall of 663 mm in the monsoon of year 2007.

Season 2010-11

As the rainfall was started in the third week of June, and it was favourable for growing of Kharif crops like Bajra, Jowar, Moong, Math, Urad, Groundnut, Cotton etc. In many district farmers started sowing of this crop in last week of June.

WATER RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT Water resources management of the State is aimed at providing water efficiently, in equitable and sustainable manner. The State has given due attention to accelerate the pace of water resources development to increase the net water availability by creating additional storage, completion of ongoing projects, improvement in water use efficiency, bridging the gap between the potential created and its utilization, restoration & modernization of old irrigation system, conjunctive use of ground and surfacewater, promoting participatory irrigation management, large scale peoples participation in water conservation programmes and inter-basin transfer of water.

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INDUSTRIES AND MINING

INDUSTRIES Gujarat Industrial Policy - 2003 1 The State Government has announced Gujarat Industrial Policy 2003. The main objective of Gujarat Industrial Policy-2003 is to achieve sustainable industrial development with a view to create large scale employment opportunities and achieving global competitiveness by improving productivity among industrial units.

2 Gujarat Industrial Policy-2003 has enumerated following aspects as part of the strategy industrial development in the state. (i) Enabling an entrepreneur easy access to authentic source of information. (ii) Sensitizing Government officials from grass root level to the apex level, to be able to emphasize with legitimate concerns of an entrepreneur. (iii) Developing better than the best infrastructure. (iv) Empowering industrial estates. (v) Producing quality human resources in accordance with contemporary requirements of industries.

Special Economic Zones Special Economic Zones (SEZs) are growth engines that can boost manufacturing, augment exports and generate employment. The Government has enacted Special Economic Zones Act, 2004 in orderto provide a hassle free operational regime and encompassing state of the art infrastructure and support services. Special Economic Zone (SEZ) is a specifically delineated duty free enclave and shall be deemed to be foreign territory for the purpose of trade and operations and duty and tariffs. The goods and services going into Special Economic Zone area from DTA shall be treated as exportsand goods coming from Special Economic Zone area into DTA shall be treated as imports. SEZ units may be set up for manufacturing of goods and for rendering of services

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Small Scale Industries Gujarat has witnessed impressive development in Small Scale Industrial (SSI) sector. The numbers of SSIs were just 2169 in the year 1961, it has gone up to 3.12 lakh as on September2009.

DEVELOPMENT IN IMPORTANT SECTORS OF GUJARAT ECONOMY 24 Socio-Economic Review, Gujarat State, 2007-08 In the small scale sector, in all 10055 SSI units have been registered during the year 2008-09. At the end of March-2009, the cumulative of registered SSI units have crossed the figure of 3.10 lakh. In addition to this 2764 new SSI units have been registered till September-2009. Thus at the end of September-2009 cumulative of registered SSI units have crossed the figure of 3.12 lakh. Moreover under MSMED Act total more than 8100 units have been registered as Micro, Small and Medium Enterprises from 02-10-2009 to 30-09-2010.

Medium and Large Industries During the year 2000-01, a Census of Medium andLarge Scale Industries was carried out. It waspossible to enlist 2100 industrial units for censuswork. Under the survey of medium and largeindustrial programme, it was possible to carry outsurvey of 2059 industrial units in medium and large

SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY Information Technology Sector Government of Gujarat is focusing upon the development of I.T. Infrastructure in the State as perInformation Technology Policy 2006-2011. In addition, Department of Science & Technology isendeavoring for attracting quality investments for IT and BT Sectors in the State. Socio-Economic Review, Gujarat State, 2007-08 43

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DEVELOPMENT IN IMPORTANT SECTORS OF GUJARAT ECONOMY Vibrant Gujarat IT Summit 2006

This event was organized on 1st December, 2006. MoUs worth Rs.11,000crores were signed with IT Infrastructure Developers and ICT Investors. Later, another set of MoUs worth Rs.3500 crores were also signed during the Global Investor Summit - 2007. Put together these MoUs are expected to attract potential investment of Rs.15,000crores and employment opportunities for 3.3 lac persons.5.66 In addition, a large number of reputed educational institutions, IT Parks and Gujarat International Finance Tech-City (GIFT) are being set up in Gandhinagar - Ahmedabad knowledge corridor. This would create a large number of employment opportunities to the skilled manpower in the State.Similarly, GIDC is setting up an IT SEZ Park for IT Mega Projects in Gandhinagar.

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RECENT INITIATIVES
1. By enacting the Micro, Small and Medium Enterprises Development Act, 2006, the

Government has recently fulfilled one of the needs felt and articulated by this segment for long. This Act seeks to facilitate promotion and development and enhancing competitiveness of these enterprises. It provides the first-ever legal framework for recognition of the concept of "enterprise" (comprising both manufacturing and services) and integrating the three tiers of these enterprises, namely, micro, small and medium. Apart from clearer and more progressive classification of each category of enterprises, particularly the small, the Act provides for a statutory consultative mechanism at the national level with wide representation of all sections of stakeholders, particularly the three classes of enterprises; and with a wide range of advisory functions.

Establishment of specific Funds for the promotion, development and enhancing competitiveness of these enterprises, notification of schemes/programmes for this purpose, progressive credit policies and practices, preference in Government procurements to products and services of the micro and small enterprises, more effective mechanisms for mitigating the problems of delayed payments to micro and small enterprises and

simpl ification of the process of closure of business by all three categories of enterprises are some of the other features of this legislation.

2. The Government has also announced

a Policy Package for Stepping up Credit to

Small and Medium Enterprises assuring, inter alia, a 20 per cent year-on-year growth in credit flow.

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3.

Significant improvements have also been made in the Credit Linked Capital Subsidy

Scheme for Technological Up gradation, leading to a spurt in the number of units availing of its benefits.

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Sr.No.

Sector

No.

of

MOUs/

Proposed Investment (Rs in Crore)

Employments

dealings

1) 2) 3) 4) 5) 6) 7) 8) 9) 10) 11) 12) 13) 14) 15) 16) 17) 18) 19)

SEZ Chemical & Petrochemicals Pharmaceuticals Engineering. Auro Textiles & Apparels Agro & Food Processing Biotechnology I.T. Oil & Gas Power Port Civil Aviation Road & Rail Project Paper Industries Urban Development Financial Sector Education Health Care Tourism Total

28 31 5 36 29 61 19 21 26 19 22 4 6 6 5 1 2 8 34 363 Table 15

170889 13414 347 14963 8283 10375 1541 14811 44766 133429 13518 10028 2516 1577 6985 1000 510 2092 10793 461835

632640 15169 1060 44090 106230 73401 7714 330200 16515 12560 12100 10200 575 2813 25000 9250 26870 1326387

The total 363 MOUs have been signed in 19 different sectors with of Rs. 461835 crore and generation of 1326387 employment opportunities in the State.

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Potential for Import/Export in Gujarat and Business Opportunities


Above table depict that the potential opportunity is available mainly in the

Education

Pharmaceutucals

Opportunity

Civil aviation

Finance sectoer

The table showing that the Gujarat state importing the investment in Special economic zone, 170889Cr. Power 133429Cr. Engineering and Auto with 14963Cr.

Comparing and contrasting an investment with an employment. Its showing positive relationships, both going hand on hand.

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BUSINESS OPPORTUNITES IN FUTURE


Doing in Business Negotiation If you are going to Netherland to do business, know two things: Your success is defined by your ability to build effective person relationship combined with on clearly outlined and well-presented proposal. Business is personal in Netherland. Although this is change with more corporate culture in some of the larger countries many business are still family owned and run. Turkes are primarily oral and visual communicators so it addition to return statistic projection and the likely to present information vocally or with maps, graphs and charts. If you are doing business in Netherland involves negotiating, it may not always be necessary to focus on financial benefits, it is just a useful to print to areas such as power, influence, owner, respect and other monetary resources. Dont use deadlines or present tactics as the Nehterland will use this to their advantage in reverse tactics by threatening to cancel agreement and or end negotiation be patient.

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INTRODUCTION Property and construction are the backbone of the Australian economy. It provides 14% of nations wealth and employees 7,30,000 people. It has impact on other industries also. If the industry uses its resources effectively than it would be more competitive.

Looking to the future is an important step in an industry. So the national initiative of cooperative research for construction innovation Australia is taking a significant step forward in establishing a vision for the future construction industry. Industry leaders and members around the country have been consulted in order to refine the research for our important industry.

AN OVERVIEW OF BRASS INDUSTRY. The brass parts industry is primarily an intermediate industry Supplying a wide variety of brass parts and components to almost all The engineering industries ranging from electrical/ electronics industry To automobile industry. Its phenomenal growth could also be ascribed To the growth and diversification of other engineering related sectors Of the industry. The brass parts industry has a heavy concentration in Jamnagar. Jamnagar is famous known as CHOTTA KASHI, PARIS OF SAURASTRA. Brass city etc. the origin of kingdom of NAWANAGAR former known as Jamnagar can be tracked of the times of Jam Hala who crossed over the north and entered saurastra and entered the greeted part of territory of haler. The districts head quarter is Jamnagar.

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HISTORY AND EVOLUTION OF BRASS PARTS INDUSTRY IN JAMNAGAR DISTRICT

The brass parts industries in Gujarat is mostly concentrated in an Around Jamnagar district which caters to the requirement of around70% of the machine brass component of the country and also in some Quantity export to various countries. The brass parts industry in Jamnagar supplies to wide ranging industries such as electrical Appliances, automobiles, bicycles, electronics, building hardware.

OPPORTUNITES
KNOWING THE MARKET Currently, private sector foreign investment remains subdued, however, the interim Government advises it is committed to investing in capital works in the infrastructure of roads, water and sewerage and there are plans for around a$170 million of capital works in water utilities alone by 2012. Road-related works and government housing projects have been financed by Banks from Asian countries, which has resulted in tethering of the bulk of delivery to these countries corporations.

FUTURE OPPORTUNITIES Growth of the Construction sector will also give a boost to many other economic activities. It will stimulate substantial growth in the construction equipment industry as well as a host of other down-stream industries like cement, steel, paints/chemicals, fixture & fittings, bricks & tiles, non-ferrous metals/plastics/glass, timber and wood based products.

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The main opportunities in services are in the provision of consulting for designs, management of building projects and construction as head contractor. The head contractor then engages the local contractors to assist. Companies must be aware of the long lead times from project conception to implementation.

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PER CAPITA INCOME

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PER CAPITA INCOME


What does Per Capita income mean? Meaning :
Per capita Income means how much an individual earns, of the yearly income that is generated in the country through productive activities. It means the share of each individual when the income from the productive activities is divided equally among the citizens. Why per capita income is required? Per capita income is reported in units of currency. Per capita income reflects the gross national product of a country. Per capita income is also a measure of the wealth of a population of a nation when compared with other countries. It is expressed in terms of commonly used international currency such as Euro, Dollars because these currencies are widely known. How to find per capita income? The total income of the country is divided by the total number of population of the country. That figure shows the per capita income of the country.

Per capita income=

total income of country Total number of population of country

Or

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In other words, Per capita income or income per person is a measure of mean income within an economic aggregate, such as a country or city. It is calculated by taking a measure of all sources of income in the aggregate and dividing it by the total population. It does not attempt to reflect the distribution of income or wealth.

Per capita income = mean of income of specified area like country or city Total population of specified area like country or city

Significance of per capita income:


1. Per capita income is often used as a measure of the wealth of the population of a nation,
particularly in comparison to other nations. 2. It is usually expressed in terms of a commonly-used international currency such as the Euro or United States dollar, and is useful because it is widely known, easily calculated from readilyavailable GDP 3. Per capita income comprises population estimates and produces a straightforward statistic for comparison. 4. Gross domestic product (GDP) refers to the market value of all final goods and services produced within a country in a given period. GDP per capita is often considered an indicator of a country's standard of living.

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List of countries by GDP (PPP) per capita

World map showing countries above and below the world GDP (PPP) per capita, currently $10,700. Source: IMF (International Monetary Fund).

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Particular GDP (Purchasing Power Parity) GDP (Official Exchange Rate) (As per US $) GDP-Real Growth Rate

Statistics $713.1 billion (2011 est.) $704.1 billion (2010 est.) $692.8 billion (2009 est.) $858.3 billion (2011 est.) 1.6% (2011 est.) 1.6% (2010 est.) -3.5% (2009 est.) $42,300 (2011 est.) $41,800 (2010 est.) $41,300 (2009 est.) Agriculture: 2.7% Industry: 24.2% Services: 73.1 %( 2011 est.) 7.809 million (2011 est.) Agriculture: 2% Industry: 18% Services: 80 %( 2005 est.) 4.4% (2011 est.) 4.5% (2010 est.) 10.3% (2005) 18.6% of GDP (2011 est.) Revenues: $381.3 billion Expenditure: $420.4 billion (2011 est.) 45.4 % of GDP (2011 est.) -3.8% of GDP (2011 est.) 64.4% of GDP (2011 est.) 62.7% of GDP (2010 est.) 2.3% (2011 est.) 1.3% (2010 est.) 1.75% (31st December,2011) 1.75% (31st December,2010) 8.33% (31st December,2008) 9.21% (31st December,2007) Rank: 93 $367.2 billion (31st December,2011) $375.5 billion (31st December,2010)
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GDP-Per Capita (PPP)

GDP-Composition by Sector Labor Force Labor Force-By Occupation Unemployment Rate Population Below Poverty Investment (Gross Fixed) Budget Taxes and Other Revenues Budget Surplus(+) Or Deficit(-) Public Debt.

Inflation Rate (Consumer Prices) Central Bank Discount Rate Commercial Bank Prime Lending Rate Stock of Narrow Money
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Stock of Broad Money Stock of Domestic Credit Market Value of Public Traded Shares Agriculture-Products

Industries

Industrial Production Growth Rate Electricity Production Electricity Production by Source Electricity-Consumption Electricity-Exports Electricity-Imports Oil-Production Oil-Consumption Oil-Export Oil-Import Oil-Proves reserves Natural Gas-Production Natural Gas-Consumption Natural Gas-Export Natural Gas-Import Natural Gas-Proved Reserved Current Account Balance Exports Exports-Commodities
GLOBAL / COUNTRY STUDY REPORT (GCSR) Betch : 2011 - 2013 Project Submitted By: PARAM IMR, Jamnagar

$1.119 trillion (31st December,2011) $1.088 trillion (31st December,2010) $2.083 trillion (31st December,2009) $1.824 trillion (31st December,2008) $NA (31st December,2008) $488.6 billion (2003) Grains, Potatoes, Sugar beets, Fruits, Vegetables; Livestock Agro Industries, Metal and Engineering Products, Electrical Machinery and Equipment, Chemicals, Petroleum, Construction, Microelectronics, Fishing -0.6% (2011 est.) 105.7 billion KWh (2009 est.) Fossil Fuel: 89.9% Hydro: 0.1% Nuclear: 4.3% Other: 5.7% (2001) 112.5 billion KWh (2008 est.) 10.56 billion KWh (2009 est.) 4.888 billion KWh (2009 est.) 59,490 bbl/day (2010 est.) 1.009 million bbl/day (2010 est.) 1.871 million bbl/day (2009 est.) 2.577 million bbl/day (2009 est.) 310 million bbl (1 January 2011 est.) 85.17 billion cu m (2010 est.) 53.19 billion cu m (2010 est.) 57.75 billion cu m (2010 est.) 25.77 billion cu m (2010 est.) 1.387 trillion cu m (1 January 2011 est.) $64.1 billion (2011 est.) $55.95 billion (2010 est.) $576.9 billion (2011 est.) $486.7 billion (2010 est.) Machinery and Equipment, Chemicals, Fuels; Foodstuffs
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Exports Partners Imports Imports-Commodities Imports-Partners Reserves of Foreign Exchange and Gold Debt-External Sock of Direct Foreign Investmentat Home Sock of Direct Foreign InvestmentAbroad

Exchange Rates Fiscal Year

Germany 26%, Belgium 13%, France 9.2%, UK 7.7%, Italy 4.9% (2009) $514.1 billion (2011 est.) $429.5 billion (2010 est.) Machinery and Transport equipment, Chemicals, Fuels, Foodstuffs, Clothing Germany 15.5%,China 12.6%, Belgium 8.3%, US 6.8%, UK 6.2%, Russia 5.6% (2009) $46.24 billion (31st December, 2010 est.) $2.655 trillion (30th June,2011) $3.733 trillion (31st December, 2010) $590.3 billion (2011 est.) $587.3 billion (2010 est.) $989.3 billion (31st December,2011) $954.6 billion (31st December,2010) Euros (EUR) per US dollar0.7345 (2007 est.) 0.7107 (2011 est.) 0.7532 (2010 est.) 0.7198 (2009 est.) 0.6827 (2008 est.) Calendar Year

Table 16

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History of India per Capita GDP


In 2009-10 the Per Capita Income in India was Rs 20,040. In2011-12 the Per Capita Income in India was Rs 30,989. GDP at factor cost at constant (1999-2000) prices in the year 2008-2009 is likely to attain a level of Rs 3351653.India achieved a growth rate of 7.1 per cent in 2008-2009. Agriculture, forestry and fishing had a combined growth rate of 2.6 per cent during 2010-2011 Industry had growth rate of 3.4 per cent during 2010-2011 Service sector had a growth rate of 10.3 per cent during 2010-2011

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SUGGESTION & CONCLUSION

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Suggestions
Encourage the employee to experiments with new methods and carry out creative ideas. Enter the new high- tech technology of machines in organizations, for instant increate profit project got plating thickness testing machines and also computer. Ashwani metals have to increase some expenditure to promote their business at national and international level. To recruit the person based on their skills and knowledge of technology because ashwani metals works in global market. Last but not the least, selection of right supplier at the right time is also important for company while dealing in global market because timely completion of consignment is also acquire a vital role.

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Conclusion
In todays time, the Brass products are produces almost all over the world. However this was not the case in the past. Ashwani Metals has achieved tremendous growth in the last four and a half year through the total dedication and motivated work force.

It is emerging as a leading manufacturer and exporter of the Brass Extrusion products. Ashwani Metals is a large scale unit and is a huge manufacturer of copper and copper alloy extrusions. To identify wants and create customers the company has set up a marketing department.

There would be great demand of this type of copper alloys in later years as people would like to have this type of alloys in future so it would be greater opportunity for India. Today, there are many countries at where the brass part factories have been started and also working properly. For instance India, china, Usa, Uk, Malaysia, Singapore, etc. Out of all these countries, the two major countries that are producing Brass part items are china and India.

As of today, Netherland has a fast growing, strong and sound economy

1. With rapid growth rates and a young and increasing population ofover 70 million, Netherland has the potential to be the largest economy inEurope after Germany and the most populous if it should be acceptedinto the EU.

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Netherland has attractive country for a foreign investors with a business friendly regulatory environment .they allow more and more foreign investors then they could have more foreign income from their country. Thats why export is every easy to do in Netherland.

Nevertheless Netherland still has problems that need attention. Inflation is still prevalent, the current account deficit is large, corruption is widespread, competitiveness is an issue, and most problematic, unemployment is exceedingly high.

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LITERACY

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Meaning of Literacy
Literacy has traditionally been described as the ability to read for knowledge, write coherently and think critically about printed material. Literacy represents the lifelong, intellectual process of gaining meaning from print. Key to all literacy is reading development, which involves a progression of skills that begins with the ability to understand spoken words and decode written words, and culminates in the deep understanding of text. Reading development involves awareness of speech sounds (phonology), spelling patterns (orthography), word meaning (semantics), grammar (syntax) and patterns of word formation (morphology), all of which provide a necessary platform for reading fluency and comprehension. The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) defines literacy as the "ability to identify, understand, interpret, create, communicate and compute, using printed and written materials associated with varying contexts. Literacy involves a continuum of learning in enabling individuals to achieve their goals, to develop their knowledge and potential, and to participate fully in their community and wider society.

Year 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012

Literacy Rate 91% 93% 95% 96% 99%

Table 17

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Comparing Related World Country Facts

Country

Continent

Literacy Rate

Literacy Rate Rank (out of 194 countries)

Mexico

North America

92%

85

Egypt Malaysia

Africa Asia

66% 91% 99% 64% 54%


Table 18

148 89 26 180 163

Netherland Asia India Pakistan Asia Asia

Education levels in The Netherlands A striking feature of the Dutch educational system is the multiformity. The biggest difference between other countries might be that there are already several difficulty levels in secondary school; there is no high school in The Netherlands, there are several kinds of high schools. After primary school, children go to a secondary school that is adapted on their performance and intelligence.

If you want to study in The Netherlands (as a foreigner) you can attend a 'universiteit' aka 'WO' or a 'hogeschool' aka 'HBO'. According to most dictionaries, both institutions mean 'college'. But why do the Dutch have two designations for college? And what is MBO? Is it possible to attend an MBO study when you are an exchange student? In this article the differences are explained.
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LITERACY IN INDIA
Literacy in India is key for socio-economic progress and the Indian literacy rate grew to 74.04% in 2011 from 12% at the end of British rule in 1947.

India currently has the largest illiterate population of any nation on earth, there is a wide gender disparity in the literacy rate in India: effective literacy rates (age 7 and above) in 2011 were 82.14% for men and 65.46% for women.

The low female literacy rate has had a dramatically negative impact on family planning and population stabilization efforts in India.

The census provided a positive indication that growth in female literacy rates (11.8%) was substantially faster than in male literacy rates (6.9%) in the 2001-2011 decadal period, which means the gender gap appears to be narrowing.

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COMPARATIVE LITERACY STATISTICS


Although schooling is free and compulsory from 614 years of age, facilities are inadequate and often totally lacking. Approximately 40% of students, mostly girls, drop out by secondary school it is estimated that by the year 2020 over 50% of the illiterate population will live in India. The table below shows the adult and youth literacy rates for India and some neighboring countries in 2002.Adult literacy rate is based on the 15+ years age group; while Youth literacy rate is for the 1524 years age group (i.e. youth is a subset of adults).

Country name China Sri Lanka Burma Iran World Average India Nepal Pakistan Bangladesh

Adults literacy rate 93.3% (2007) 90.8 (2007) 89.9% (2007) 82.4% (2007) 84% (1998) 74.04% (2013) 56.5 (2007) 62.2 (2007) 53.5 (2007) Table 19

Youth literacy rate 98.9% (2004) 98.0 94.4% (2004) 95% (2002) 88% (2001) 82% (2001) 62.7 73.9 74

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Reason for Low Literacy Rate

The absence of adequate school infrastructure. The study of 188 government-run primary schools in central and northern India revealed that 59% of the schools had no drinking water facility and 89% no toilets. A 25% rate of teachers being absent from school on any particular day in 2005. A 25% rate of teachers being absent from school on any particular day in 2005. The average Pupil Teacher Ratio for All India is 1:42, implying teacher shortage The National Sample Survey Organization and the National Family Health Survey collected data in India on the percentage of children completing primary school which are reported to be only 36.8% and 37.7% respectively. On 21 February, 2005, the Prime Minister of India said that he was pained to note that only 47 out of 100 children enrolled in class I reach class VIII, putting the dropout rate at 52.79 per cent. Absolute poverty in India has also deterred the pursuit of formal education as education is not deemed of as the highest priority among the poor as compared to other basic necessities. The large proportion of illiterate females is another reason for low literacy in India. Inequality based on gender differences resulted in female literacy rates being lower at 54.2% than that of their male counterparts at 75.8%. Due to strong stereotyping of female and male roles, Sons are thought of to be more useful and hence are educated. Females are pulled to help out on agricultural farms at home as they are increasingly replacing the males on such activities which require no formal education. Fewer than 2% of girls who engaged in agriculture work attended school.

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APPENDIX

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List of Tables
Sr. No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 Particular Table -1 Table -2 Table-3 Table-4 Table-5 Table-6 Table-7 Table-8 Table-9 Table-10 Table-11 Table-12 Table-13 Table-14 Table-15 Table-16 Table- 17 Table-18 Table-19 Page No. 3 8 15 48 49 63 64 80 81 82 83 83 96 108 110 124 131 132 134

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