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Lesson Plan Three 1 APPENDIX F.

LESSON PREPARATION AND EVALUATION Lesson Preparation Teacher Candidate: Heather Rutherford Title of Lesson: Phonics: Sound Sheet and Sound Blending Grade Level: Fifth Grade Subject Area: Reading Lesson Topic (What is the big idea?): Teach the student to associate sounds with the letters on a page (Birsh, 2011 p. 116) by using the Sound Sheet program (See Idol, 1997, P. 71). Teach the student to blend those sounds into words. What standard(s) and/or IEP goal(s) will it address? Colorado Academic Standards (2010): Reading for All Purposes, Fifth Grade 1. Literary texts are understood and interpreted using a range of strategies 2. Ideas found in a variety of informational texts need to be compared and understood 3. Knowledge of morphology and word relationships matters when reading Content Area: Reading, Writing, and Communicating Standard: 2. Reading for All Purposes Prepared Graduates: Interpret how the structure of written English contributes to the pronunciation and meaning of complex vocabulary. Grade Level Expectation: Fifth Grade Concepts and skills students master: 3. Knowledge of morphology and word relationships matters when reading a. Students can use combined knowledge of all letter-sound correspondences, syllabication patterns, and morphology (e.g., roots and affixes) to read accurately unfamiliar multisyllabic words in context and out of context. (CCSS: RF.5.3a) Content Area: Reading, Writing and Communicating Grade Level Expectations: Kindergarten Standard: 1. Oral Expression and Listening 3. Vocal sounds produce words and meaning to create early knowledge of phonemic awareness d. Blend sounds orally to make one-syllable words This lesson will address the 5th grade standard by first targeting the sub-skills of lettersound correspondence and sound blending. Once JJ masters these sub-skills, he can

Lesson Plan Three 2 then move onto syllabication patterns and morphology. This continuous progression will help JJ to move towards attaining his grade-level standard.

Main Objective of Instruction (What do you want the student to learn?): Teach the student to understand letter-sound correspondence and increase students phonemic awareness by using sound sheets (Idol, 1997, p. 71) and short stories from the Reading a-z.com program, Level C (Readinga-z.com, 2002). Teach the student to blend individual phonemic sounds into words using the Sound Blending model (See Idol, 1997, P. 82) and by finger tapping each phoneme in the word (See Birsh, 2011 p. 132). Supporting Objectives: 1. For the student to read, orally, a Level C book from the Reading a-z.com program (Readinga-z.com, 2002).

Specific Strategies to be taught/modeled: 1. Use a sound sheet to help the student prepare to read a short story. 2. Use the DISTAR Error Correction Procedure for Sounds (See Idol, 1997, p. 82) 3. Use fingers to tap out each phoneme in a word (See Birsh, 2011 p. 132)

Planning for individual differences (mediated scaffolding): What are the accommodations/modifications you need to prepare? 1. Multisensory Teaching a. See the letter-sound correspondence on the sound sheet b. Hear the letter-sound correspondence from the teacher and self (the student) c. See the word on the page d. Hear the phonemic sounds in the word from the teacher and self (the student) e. Use fingers to tap out each phoneme in the word (See Birsh, 2011 p. 132) 2. The student has been identified with a moderate intellectual disability and will need extra processing time

What background knowledge do the students have? 1. Student knows the letters of the alphabet 2. Student knows that the letters of the alphabet correspond to sounds

How will you assess students learning pre, during and post?

Lesson Plan Three 3 Pre: 1. Sound Sheet - The student will read the sounds under Pretest and Model section of the sound sheet (See Idol, 1997, p. 71). 2. Sound Blending - Student will read the book with the teacher. If student can read book with no errors, teacher will pick a book from the next level. During: 1. Sound Sheet - The student will read the sounds under the Practice and Lead section of the sound sheet (See Idol, 1997, p. 71). 2. Sound Blending - Teacher will note which, and how many, words the student has difficulty reading. After: 1. Sound Sheet - The student will read the sounds under the Test (Timed) section of the sound sheet (See Idol, 1997, p. 71). 2. Sound Blending - Teacher will chart how many words student had difficulty reading and monitor progress each day the book is read. What management/grouping issues do you need to consider? 1. Find an area in the room away from distractions 2. Provide specific positive praise 3. Encourage the student to continue trying if/when he becomes frustrated

Materials and Resources: 1. Level C book from Reading a-z.com (Readinga-z.com, 2002) 2. Sound Sheet (See Appendix E.) Birsh, J. R. (Ed.). ( 2011). Multisensory teaching of basic language skills (3rd ed.), Baltimore: Paul H. Brooks Publishing Co. Idol, L. (1987). Reading Success. Austin, TX: Pro-Ed.

How/where will students be able to integrate (generalize) this learning? The student will be required to read in all areas of his life. Understanding how to blend sounds into words will be a skill that is necessary in every part of the students life. How will you evaluate the lesson (judicious review)? I will chart the students progress with the sound sheets on a multi-band chart (See Idol, 1997, p. 77). This chart will show if the sound sheet program (Idol, 1997, p. 69) is helping the student progress. I will chart the students progress with sound blending on a teacher made data sheet. This data sheet will show if the DISTAR Error Correction Procedure and finger tapping (See Birsh, 2011 p. 132) is helping the student progress.

Lesson Plan Three 4 Lesson Title: Phonics: Sound Sheet and Sound Blending Main Objective of this lesson: Teach the student to understand letter-sound correspondence and increase students phonemic awareness by using sound sheets (Idol, 1997, p. 71) and short stories from the Reading a-z.com program, Level C (Readinga-z.com, 2002). Teach the student to blend individual phonemic sounds into words using the Sound Blending model (See Idol, 1997, P. 82) and by finger tapping each phoneme in the word (See Birsh, 2011 p. 132). (CONTENT-PROCESS) Opening: (SET How will you get the student(s) attention?) Relate lesson to prior learning. Communicate the objective of the lesson. 1. Show the student the book he is going to read 2. Ask the student: What do you think this book might be about? 3. Ask the student: When youre reading books like this, is it sometimes hard for you to read all the words? 4. Say to the student: I have a strategy that is going to help you learn how to blend the sounds you know into words.

Procedure: (Is this an informal presentation, direct instruction, or structured discovery?) This is direct instruction to teach letter-sound correspondence and sound blending. Strategies (I Do): 1. Sound Sheet - The teacher points to the sounds on the Sound Sheet, and says the sounds (See Idol, 1997, p. 71). 2. Sound Blending - The teacher says, My turn. Say it slow, c-a-t (See Idol, 1997, p. 82). As each phoneme is pronounced, the teacher will tap a finger to the thumb starting with the index finger and moving to a new finger for each sound (See Birsh, 2011 p. 132). The teacher will then say, Say it fast, cat. Check for Understanding- What will you ask? 1. Sound Sheet - The teacher will ask the student to read the sounds in the Test (Timed) section of the sound sheet (See Idol, 1997, p. 71). 2. Sound Blending - The teacher will ask the student to re-read the sentence with the word that the student struggled to read. Differentiation: N/A The lesson is for one student and is, therefore, tailored to the students needs. (PRODUCT) Sound sheet scores will be charted on a multi-band chart (Idol, 1997, p. 77). Words the student struggled with, for sound blending, will be charted on a teacher made data sheet.

Lesson Plan Three 5

Guided Practice (We Do): 1. Sound Sheet - Student and teacher will read the sounds together from the Sound Sheet (See Idol, 1997, p. 71). 2. Sound Blending - The teacher says, Our turn. Say it slow, c-a-t (See Idol, 1997, p. 82). The teacher and student will say and tap each phoneme together (See Birsh, 2011 p. 132). The student and teacher will then say, Say it fast, cat.

Closure: Student(s) summarize, demonstrate learning of lesson. Independent Practice (You Do). 1. Sound Sheet - The student will read the Sound Sheet alone (See Idol, 1997, p. 71). 2. Sound Blending - The teacher says, Your turn. Say it slow. The student will say c-a-t (See Idol, 1997, p. 82). The student will say and tap each phoneme independently (See Birsh, 2011 p. 132). The teacher will then say, Say it fast. The student will say, cat.

Formally END the lesson 1. Praise student for participation and hard work 2. Chart progress on teacher made data sheet.