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The following lesson was created as a Webquest. It can be found online at: http://questgarden.

com/144/02/1/120427183643/

by Jeffrey Salinger, Stony Brook

Introduction
THE STRUCTURE OF DNA

Now that we learned about Gregor Mendel and his theories of Heredity, we will take a closer look at the proteins your genes are made of and what is passed on to you from your parents. In this lesson you will learn about the BUILDING BLOCKS OF LIFE called DNA - deoxyribosenucleic acid Wouldn't it be cool to see your own DNA? Would you like to see your name in DNA coding?

Would you like to know why your eyes are the color they are? Or why you are as tall or short as you are? In this Webquest we will learn about the PROTEINS that make up DNA (its structure) and how mutations affect a persons genes.

Task

1. Have you ever heard of a Double Helix? 2. Do you know what makes you, you? 3. What would have happened if one chromosome mutated (changed) or was different? Would just ONE chromosome really change you? 4. How many chromosomes do we have anyway?

There is an explanation for why your eye color, height, hair color, nose shape, skin color and even hair type are the way they are. You can even make a pretty good guess of what your own children will look like someday!

In this Webquest you will: - learn about the building blocks of life (structure of DNA) - see what the DOUBLE HELIX of DNA looks like - learn about different types of mutations the - watch/listen to ONE video and view ONE presentation about DNA and DOUBLE HELIX - read one article about the structure of DNA have - create a virtual GRAPHIC ORGANIZER to demonstrate what you learned - play a name game to see your name written in DNA code - create a DNA key chain to keep with you and remind you everyday of what makes you, YOU. - look at your own DNA in an experiment at home.

This lesson will focus on the following objectives: Language: Students will make a graphic organizer outlining the basic elements and structure of DNA. Content: Students will research to find out the basic elements and structure of DNA.

This Webquest was created to help you meet the following standards:

NYS ESL Standards


Standard 1: Students will listen, speak, read, and write in English for information and understanding. Standard 3: Students will listen, speak, read, and write in English for critical analysis and understanding.

Common Core Standards


Reading Standards for Literacy in Science and Technical Subjects Grades 9-10 Students: 2. Determine the central ideas or conclusions of a text; trace the texts explanation or depiction of a complex process, phenomenon or concept; provide an accurate summary of the text.

4. Determine the meaning of symbols, key terms, and other domain-specific words and phrases as they are used in a specific scientific or technical context relevant to grades 9-10 texts and topics.

Writing Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science and Technical Subjects Grades 9-10 Students:

6. Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish, and update individual or shared writing products, taking advantage of technologys capacity to link to other information and to display information flexibly and dynamically.

As you explore this Webquest, keep this essential question in mind to guide you:

How does DNA make us who we are?


Also, don't forget the unit question:

What makes someone deserve an award?

LET THE RESEARCH BEGIN!

Process

You have already been introduced to some of the terms you will encounter in this Webquest. Open the Word file below to check on your understanding of the terms you will see during your research. VRT - Heredity-DNA.doc

We are on the second one of the historical figures in our journey to discover everything about DNA -- Nobel Prize winners James Watson and Francis Crick . Go to the website below to see where we were, where we are now, and where will go next. http://www.nature.ca/genome/03/e/03e_30_e.cfm

Now go to the next website to watch a video giving you a brief introduction to what you will research in today's Webquest. http://sciencenetlinks.com/media/filer/2011/10/13/dna.swf

You have already been assigned to either A or B. Watch and follow along with the presentation below that has your letter next to it. You will the use the information you learn from this presentation to create a virtual graphic organizer with your Cacoo account. You are responsible for including the following terms in your graphic organizer:

DNA Proteins Genes Cell Nucleus Molecule Chromosome DNA Strand DNA Helix Double Helix

Use the Summarizing and Imagery strategies to understand the presentations. Include definitions and images to show your understanding of the words above.

Use the Cacoo features to show any relationships between these words. You will be graded on how much information you include and how detailed you are. See

EVALUATION section before beginning your presentation and graphic organizer to see more on what is required.

A - http://www.thetech.org/exhibits/online/genome/

B - http://learn.genetics.utah.edu/content/begin/tour/

Log into your Cacoo account and create your graphic organizer. Remember to include the required vocabulary words. It is okay to go back to the presentation as many times as you need to help you complete your graphic organizer.

I will be checking your progress on the main screen. Send me a chat if you need help!

https://cacoo.com/

After you make your graphic organizer, go to the site with your letter. Read through a review of the information you found in the presentation. Check that you have included everything you learned about DNA in your graphic organizer. Ahttp://rarediseases.about.com/od/geneticdisorders/a/genesbasics.ht m Bhttp://www.amnh.org/exhibitions/genomics/1_identity/discover.ht ml

After you check that you included all the information you need, do the Vocabulary Recognition Task again to check how your understanding has improved. The link to the document is below: VRT Web - Heredity-DNA.doc

Now for a fun review, play this game to change your name into DNA code. Experiment with the different types of mutations and read about their effects. http://www.nature.ca/genome/04/0413_e.cfm

Evaluation
This is how your work will be evaluated.
Beginning 1
No Vocabulary words are present, and defined or explained in writing or represented with an image. No (0) images are used to show relationships between terms. Descriptions and Definitions cover no (0) parts of DNA structure (found in presentations).

Developing 2
Few Vocabulary words are present, and defined or explained in writing or represented with an image. Few (1-2) images are used to show relationships between terms. Descriptions and Definitions cover few (1-2) parts of DNA structure (found in presentations).

Qualified 3
Some Vocabulary words are present, and defined or explained in writing or represented with an image. Some (3-5) images are used to show relationships between terms. Descriptions and Definitions cover some (3-5) parts of DNA structure (found in presentations).

Exemplary 4
All Vocabulary words are present, and defined or explained in writing or represented with an image. Many (5+) images are used to show relationships between terms. Descriptions and Definitions cover all parts of DNA structure (found in presentations).

Score

Vocabulary Words

Images

Descriptions/ Defintions

Conclusion

Now we will head back to class and visit the following website together to review everything one more time. Then everyone will make their own personal DNA key chain. http://www.nature.ca/genome/05/051/0511/0511_m205_e.cfm

HW: Wouldn't it be fun to see your own DNA cells?!? The website below shows you how to do that, all you need is a clear cup and a few supplies! Get a worksheet from the teacher if you want to try it tonight. Come in tomorrow and tell the class what you saw.

http://www.nature.ca/genome/05/051/0511/0511_m204_e.cfm

Credits
http://www.nature.ca/genome/03/e/03e_30_e.cfm

http://sciencenetlinks.com/media/filer/2011/10/13/dna.swf

http://www.thetech.org/exhibits/online/genome/

http://learn.genetics.utah.edu/content/begin/tour/

https://cacoo.com/diagrams/4loYFqYJUn2eMiOE/edit

http://rarediseases.about.com/od/geneticdisorders/a/genesbasics.ht m

http://www.amnh.org/exhibitions/genomics/1_identity/discover.htm l

http://www.nature.ca/genome/04/0413_e.cfm

http://www.nature.ca/genome/05/051/0511/0511_m205_e.cfm

http://www.nature.ca/genome/05/051/0511/0511_m204_e.cfm

Author Biography

Permissions We all benefit by being generous with our work. Permission is granted for others to use and modify this WebQuest for educational, non-commercial purposes as long as the original authorship is credited. The modified WebQuest may be shared only under the same conditions. See the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial Share-Alike license for details.

This WebQuest was created in QuestGarden

by Jeffrey Salinger, Stony Brook

Teacher Introduction
This Webquest was designed during a teacher preparation course based on ELL content-based instruction. It was created as part of Thematic Unit on the Nobel Prize and focuses on the basic concepts related to discoveries in DNA made by James Watson and Francis Crick. These discoveries led to them winning the Nobel Prize in Medicine in 1962.

Learners
This Webquest was developed with a class of 12 Hispanic students in mind, approximately half at an intermediate proficiency level, and the other half at an advanced level. It was designed with the goal of introducing students to the basic concepts related to DNA, its structure, and the discoveries made by James Watson and Francis Crick that won them the Nobel Prize for Medicine in 1962. These students have experience approaching and dealing with concepts that will be presented to them across all subject areas. The Webquest features the website https://cacoo.com/. It is virtual graphic organizer creator. It is essential that students already be familiar with this website and how to use it in order to do so in this Webquest. A lesson can be dedicated to introducing students to the site and how to use its features, followed by an assignment to create their first graphic organizer. This can be done during class time, or as at assignment at home, giving the students substantial time to coordinate access to a computer if not present in their home (1-2 weeks). The teacher can also create a paper copy for students to use if that is preferred. Students will demonstrate their ability to use the strategies of Summarizing and Imagery to understand a presentation on DNA and include relevant information in the graphic organizer. They will also see the development of their understanding of key vocabulary following the Webquest through a pre and posttest Vocabulary Recognition Task.

Standards

NYS ESL Standards


Standard 1: Students will listen, speak, read, and write in English for information and understanding. Standard 3: Students will listen, speak, read, and write in English for critical analysis and understanding.

Common Core Standards


Reading Standards for Literacy in Science and Technical Subjects Grades 9-10 Students: 2. Determine the central ideas or conclusions of a text; trace the texts explanation or depiction of a complex process, phenomenon or concept; provide an accurate summary of the text.

4. Determine the meaning of symbols, key terms, and other domain-specific words and phrases as they are used in a specific scientific or technical context relevant togrades 9-10 texts and topics.

Writing Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science and Technical Subjects Grades 9-10 Students: 6. Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish, and update individual or shared writing products, taking advantage of technologys capacity to link to other information and to display information flexibly and dynamically.

Teacher Process
This Webquest was designed to take approximately 50-60 minutes. Another 20 minutes will be dedicated to a closing activity where students will briefly review the concepts learned and then create their own personal DNA key chain. The research portion of the Webquest will be carried out in a computer lab, and the class will return to its regular classroom in order to create the key chains. Students will complete a Vocabulary Recognition Task to activate prior knowledge and informally introduce them to terms they will encounter during the Webquest. They will then review the history of developments related to DNA, and watch a general introductory video on DNA and heredity. Following this intro students will then view one of two presentations on DNA structure and make-up, depending on their English proficiency, and use the information from these presentations to create a virtual graphic organizer. Students will check the information in their graphic organizer with a reading outlining the basic elements of DNA composition. They will then take a Vocabulary Recognition Task posttest to assess the development of their understanding of key vocabulary words. Upon completion of these tasks, students will be allowed to play a game changing their name from letters to genetic code. The game also allows them to apply various mutations to their name once it is in genetic code. Students will then return their regular class, as mentioned above, to review the material together from a third source. The last in-school activity will be the creation of a personal DNA key chain. For HW students will be given a worksheet consisting of instructions to carry out and experiment to view their down DNA cells in a cup at home. Students will be assessed on the completion of their pre and posttest Vocabulary Recognition Task, their ability to stay on task in performing the Webquest, and on the depth and breadth of information contained in their graphic organizers.

Resources
Below are all the websites students will visit during this Webquest:

http://www.nature.ca/genome/03/e/03e_30_e.cfm

http://sciencenetlinks.com/media/filer/2011/10/13/dna.swf

http://www.thetech.org/exhibits/online/genome/

http://learn.genetics.utah.edu/content/begin/tour/

https://cacoo.com/diagrams/4loYFqYJUn2eMiOE/edit

http://rarediseases.about.com/od/geneticdisorders/a/genesbasics.ht m

http://www.amnh.org/exhibitions/genomics/1_identity/discover.htm l

http://www.nature.ca/genome/04/0413_e.cfm

http://www.nature.ca/genome/05/051/0511/0511_m205_e.cfm

http://www.nature.ca/genome/05/051/0511/0511_m204_e.cfm

Credits
http://www.nature.ca/genome/03/e/03e_30_e.cfm

http://sciencenetlinks.com/media/filer/2011/10/13/dna.swf

http://www.thetech.org/exhibits/online/genome/

http://learn.genetics.utah.edu/content/begin/tour/

https://cacoo.com/diagrams/4loYFqYJUn2eMiOE/edit

http://rarediseases.about.com/od/geneticdisorders/a/genesbasics.ht m

http://www.amnh.org/exhibitions/genomics/1_identity/discover.htm l

http://www.nature.ca/genome/04/0413_e.cfm

http://www.nature.ca/genome/05/051/0511/0511_m205_e.cfm

http://www.nature.ca/genome/05/051/0511/0511_m204_e.cfm

Author Biography

Permissions We all benefit by being generous with our work. Permission is granted for others to use and modify this WebQuest for educational, non-commercial purposes as long as the original authorship is credited. The modified WebQuest may be shared only under the same conditions. See the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial Share-Alike license for details.

This WebQuest was created in QuestGarden