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The Memoir Grade Level: 7 Length: 9 weeks

Rationale: In this unit, students will explore the genre of memoir. Students will discover through reading memoirs that writers write about life events that carry great meaning. As well, students will be able to describe and evaluate their own life events through memoir writing. Students will be encouraged to write and reflect upon their own life events by developing a life map, writing weekly in their journals, and revising memoirs of their choice. The culminating project for this unit will allow students to choose one originally written memoir, revise and edit the memoir with peer help, and publish and present the memoir to the class by creating a video representation of the memoir using images, motion pictures, and music/voice. Students will be asked to present their final project the last week of class. I will transform the classroom into a movie theater, and students will present their videos from the role of a creator, director, and producer.

Memoir is how writers look for the past and make sense of it. We figure out who we

are, who we have become, and what it means to us and to the lives of others: a memoir

puts the events of a life in perspective for the writer and for those who read it. It is a

way to validate to others the events of our lives our choices, perspectives, decisions, responses.

Memoir recognizes and explores moments on the way to growing up and becoming

oneself, the good moments and the bad ones. It distills the essence of the experience

through what the writer includes and more importantly, through what a writer

excludes. Memoir celebrates people and places no one else had ever heard of. And

memoir allows us to discover and tell our own truths as writers. (Nancie Atwell In the Middle: New Understanding About Writing, Reading, and Learning P. 372).

Allowing middle school students to reflect on life events is essential because middle school students are very social. Writing memoirs is a great way to get students writing about ideas and activities that they know about. Moreover, reading memoirs from writers that have gone through life events that students may also be living though is a great way to get students thinking and writing about their own experiences.

Interdisciplinary: Math, Social Studies, & Science Social Studies: "Here's my story" The objective of the unit is to hear someone else's story. Students will be studying memoirs written by authors in (Africa, Asia, Latin America, Europe, and Australia). (See print-out) Math: Metacognitive Memoirs (See handout) Science: Students will be studying pollution and their role. They will be required to write a memoir that depicts one time that they contributed to decreasing pollution in the air, water, or land. Learning Objectives: Students will be able to: Describe the characteristics of the "memoir" genre Evaluate effective ways of portraying a memory Analyze how perspective shapes reality/truth in a variety of materials Define the difference between autobiography and biography and the distinctions between memoir and autobiography Sequence signification events in a reading selection Identify literary elements- characters, setting... Interpret character traits Use personal writing to develop self-awareness Plan and organize their writing Incorporate own experience in writing attempts Provide positive constructive feedback to peers on their writing The learner will demonstrate increasing: Ability to use oral language to generate, clarify, and extend their personal understandings of what they observe, feel, hear, and read through personal reflections and interactions with others Ability to communicate ideas orally and in writing to a variety of their peers with growing confidence, sensitivity, fluency, and clarity Ability to spell biweekly vocabulary words as well as use vocabulary words in their own writings. Ability to integrate ideas and grammar lessons that are presented in mini-lessons. Respect for the ideas, language and communication styles of others and ability to respond sensitively and thoughtfully Interest in reading as a means of understanding themselves Awareness of, and respect for, the similarities and differences found among cultures, human behaviors, experiences, emotions and ideas conveyed through literature

Memoir Unit Student Record Sheet Student Name: ____________________________________________________


Date Description of Assignment KWL Chart Life Graph Spelling Test 1 Reading Response Journal 1 Writing Journal 1 Spelling Test 2 Reading Response Journal 2 Writing Journal 2 Spelling Test 3 Reading Response Journal 3 Writing Journal 3 Spelling Test 4 Reading Response Journal 4 Writing Journal 4 Spelling Test 5 Reading Response Journal 5 Writing Journal 5 Peer Editing Final Revisions Final Project Student Discussions/In Class Participation Extra Credit Completed Yes/No Grade Revised Grade

Common Core Standards:


Writing Standards Text Types and Purposes CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.7.3 Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, relevant descriptive details, and well-structured event sequences. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.7.3a Engage and orient the reader by establishing a context and point of view and introducing a narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally and logically. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.7.3b Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, and description, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.7.3c Use a variety of transition words, phrases, and clauses to convey sequence and signal shifts from one time frame or setting to another. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.7.3d Use precise words and phrases, relevant descriptive details, and sensory language to capture the action and convey experiences and events. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.7.3e Provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on the narrated experiences or events. Production and Distribution of Writing CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.7.4 Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 13 above.) CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.7.5 With some guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on how well purpose and audience have been addressed. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.7.6 Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing and link to and cite sources as well as to interact and collaborate with others, including linking to and citing sources. Research to Build and Present Knowledge CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.7.9 Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.7.9a Apply grade 7 Reading standards to literature (e.g., Compare and contrast a fictional portrayal of a time, place, or character and a historical account of the same period as a means of understanding how authors of fiction use or alter history). Range of Writing CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.7.10 Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.

Speaking and Listening Comprehension and Collaboration CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.7.1 Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-onone, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 7 topics, texts, and issues, building on others ideas and expressing their own clearly. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.7.1a Come to discussions prepared, having read or researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence on the topic, text, or issue to probe and reflect on ideas under discussion. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.7.1b Follow rules for collegial discussions, track progress toward specific goals and deadlines, and define individual roles as needed. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.7.1c Pose questions that elicit elaboration and respond to others questions and comments with relevant observations and ideas that bring the discussion back on topic as needed. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.7.1d Acknowledge new information expressed by others and, when warranted, modify their own views. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.7.2 Analyze the main ideas and supporting details presented in diverse media and formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively, and orally) and explain how the ideas clarify a topic, text, or issue under study. Presentation of Knowledge and Ideas CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.7.5 Include multimedia components and visual displays in presentations to clarify claims and findings and emphasize salient points. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.7.6 Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate.

Informational Texts Key Ideas and Details CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.7.1 Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.7.2 Determine two or more central ideas in a text and analyze their development over the course of the text; provide an objective summary of the text. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.7.3 Analyze the interactions between individuals, events, and ideas in a text (e.g., how ideas influence individuals or events, or how individuals influence ideas or events). Craft and Structure CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.7.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the impact of a specific word choice on meaning and tone. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.7.5 Analyze the structure an author uses to organize a text, including how the major sections contribute to the whole and to the development of the ideas.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.7.6 Determine an authors point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how the author distinguishes his or her position from that of others. Integration of Knowledge and Ideas CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.7.7 Compare and contrast a text to an audio, video, or multimedia version of the text, analyzing each mediums portrayal of the subject (e.g., how the delivery of a speech affects the impact of the words). CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.7.8 Trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is sound and the evidence is relevant and sufficient to support the claims. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.7.9 Analyze how two or more authors writing about the same topic shape their presentations of key information by emphasizing different evidence or advancing different interpretations of facts. Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.7.10 By the end of the year, read and comprehend literary nonfiction in the grades 68 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range. Conventions of Standard English CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.1 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking. o CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.1a Explain the function of phrases and clauses in general and their function in specific sentences. o CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.1b Choose among simple, compound, complex, and compound-complex sentences to signal differing relationships among ideas. o CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.1c Place phrases and clauses within a sentence, recognizing and correcting misplaced and dangling modifiers.* CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.2 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing. o CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.2a Use a comma to separate coordinate adjectives (e.g., It was a fascinating, enjoyable movie but not He wore an old[,] green shirt). o CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.2b Spell correctly. Knowledge of Language CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.3 Use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or listening. o CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.3a Choose language that expresses ideas precisely and concisely, recognizing and eliminating wordiness and redundancy. Vocabulary Acquisition and Use

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.4 Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiplemeaning words and phrases based on grade 7 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.4a Use context (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence or paragraph; a words position or function in a sentence) as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase. o CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.4b Use common, grade-appropriate Greek or Latin affixes and roots as clues to the meaning of a word (e.g., belligerent, bellicose, rebel). o CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.4c Consult general and specialized reference materials (e.g., dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses), both print and digital, to find the pronunciation of a word or determine or clarify its precise meaning or its part of speech. o CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.4d Verify the preliminary determination of the meaning of a word or phrase (e.g., by checking the inferred meaning in context or in a dictionary). CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.5 Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings. o CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.5a Interpret figures of speech (e.g., literary, biblical, and mythological allusions) in context. o CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.5b Use the relationship between particular words (e.g., synonym/antonym, analogy) to better understand each of the words. o CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.5c Distinguish among the connotations (associations) of words with similar denotations (definitions) (e.g., refined, respectful, polite, diplomatic, condescending). CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.6 Acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate general academic and domain-specific words and phrases; gather vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression.
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Materials: Texts notebook divided into three sections reading journal, writing, and dictionary writing folder post-its word wall computer lab (2 weeks) Thunder Cake written by Patricia Polacco Chicken Sunday Patricia Polacco A Chair for my Mother Vera Williams Journey Patricia MacLachlan Because of Winn-Dixie DiCamillo King of the Mild Frontier Chris Crutcher Bad Boy Dean Myers

Ongoing activities and procedures for the unit: students keep a record of their writing and its status: incomplete, rough, published, etc. students keep all their writing, including rough drafts, in their writing folders and journals students peer-edit students revise and edit their own writing students work towards increasing their vocabulary and spelling abilities Strategies used throughout the unit: instruction & mini-lessons(Story Grammar, Point of View Stories, ...) silent sustained writing silent sustained reading reading to students discussion notebook (journal writing) anecdotal records portfolios (writing folder)

ESL & ESL accommodations: use of hand signals to accompany verbal instruction hands on activities such as drawing daily outline given prior to class lesson/write key points on the board reading aloud students will create picture dictionaries modeling scaffolding cooperative learning (ESL and ESE students will be paired with English speakers and higher level learners with possible).

journal writing definitions of vocabulary before a topic is discussed vocabulary list is provided with fill-in-the blank tests additional time can be provided for vocabulary assessments

Assessments (formative and summative) Formative: o Final vocabulary assessment scores will be compared against pre-assessment scores. Students that increased their vocabulary will be given a check mark. There are a possibility of 6 check marks. o At the end of the term, check marks will be tallied. Students are able to receive extra credit checkmarks by using their vocabulary terms in their writing and by showing the use of the vocabulary words in their reading. o Classroom assessments will be graded on completion. If students complete the assignments, they will be given full credit and/or a checkmark. o Classroom etiquette and discussion will be graded daily on a checklist basis. If students participate and add to discussions they will be given a checkmark. o Peer editing will be graded for completion. There is a rubric.

Summative: Reading and Writing journal will be graded by rubrics. There are 6 grading submission in the unit for the reading and writing journals. Every other Monday students will hand in their journals and I will return journals by Friday. The writing portion of the journal will be graded by a rubric as well. The final project will be graded by a rubric.

Spelling and Vocabulary Both spelling and vocabulary will be taught and assessed in this unit. I feel that vocabulary and spelling can be presented in a variety of ways and each of these ways are dependent on the students and their learning abilities. I do not want to impose a specific form of vocabulary instruction because there is not one way that will reach all students. Each year I will assess my students abilities and find out what kind of learners they are and at this point I will integrate vocabulary and spelling into the unit. For the purpose of this unit, I have placed markers on the intended days and weeks that I will be presenting vocabulary and spelling lessons and assessments. As needed, ESL and ESE students can have the assessments provided orally to them. As well, with each new set of words, students will be required to draw images that depict the words. This will create a picture dictionary that can be used throughout the year for students to use while writing.

Lesson #1 What is a memoir? Learning Objectives: Identify significant events in a reading selection. Identify characteristics of a memoir Common Core: Comprehension and Collaboration CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.7.1 Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-onone, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 7 topics, texts, and issues, building on others ideas and expressing their own clearly. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.7.1c Pose questions that elicit elaboration and respond to others questions and comments with relevant observations and ideas that bring the discussion back on topic as needed. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.7.1d Acknowledge new information expressed by others and, when warranted, modify their own views. Craft and Structure CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.7.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the impact of a specific word choice on meaning and tone. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.7.5 Analyze the structure an author uses to organize a text, including how the major sections contribute to the whole and to the development of the ideas.

ELL Modifications Level 1: Students will draw pictures when completing KWL chart. Students will be paired in groups with level 3 and 4 ESL students. Students will be encouraged to act out their ideas about memoirs. Level 2: Students will work in groups and be placed advanced English language speakers when available. Students will complete KWL chart by listing ideas and drawing. Level 3: Students will be paired with lower level native speakers and advanced English language speakers. Students will summarize ideas that are presented in their cooperative learning groups and restate the ideas. Level 4: Students will work in cooperative learning groups and scaffold level 1-3 ELL students when available. Students will create a KWL by analyzing ideas from their group members; students will create supporting ideas that describe the notions about memoirs. Students will describe their group KWL chart to the class. Resources:

KWL handout one poster board reading/writing notebook markers brainstorm handout

Suggested Text Thunder Cake Patricia Polacco.

Activities: 1. I will inform that class that we are starting a new unit: the memoir. I will explain that memoir writing can help writers explore who they are and how memoires can shape who a person can become. 2. In groups, students will complete the K and the W of a KWL handout. Each student will fill out his or her worksheet individually. I will begin by modeling one K and one W example. (ESE/ELL) Students are grouped with non-ELL/ESE students to allow for scaffolding. I will also be walking around the room to help facilitate lead students). 3. Once students are finished, I will ask students to discuss their responses. I will then list their responses on a poster board to display in the classroom. Students will also fill in their KWL charts along with the class. 4. After the discussion is complete, I will read aloud the picture memoir, Thunder Cake written by Patricia Polacco. Before reading, I will show the cover of the book to the students and inform them that the book is a memoir. I will then ask them what they think the book is written about. 5. During reading, I will reread portions of the text to emphasize the main event. I will check for understanding by asking students for predictions. After reading, as a class we will discuss the events that unfold in Thunder Cake. I will then inform students about common characteristics of memoirs. 6. At this time, working in groups, students will fill out the (L) portion of the KWL chart. Students then will glue their KWL sheets into their writing portion of the journals. I will ask the groups to come up with at least three characteristics that they learned about memoirs. Groups will be required to provide the characteristics and I will add the ideas to the class KWL chart. Students will be encourages to write down the additional group ideas in their KWL charts if they think that they have learned the information provided by the groups.

(Qualities/Characteristics of a Memoir)

The voice is first person singular: I, not we, one, or you. The memoirist is the main character, the someone for readers to be with in the story. The writer's thoughts and feelings, reactions, and reflections are revealed. There's enough context - background information - to understand the events of the story. A reader can envision (see) the story. A reader can imagine the setting - where and when the event is taking place. A reader can imagine the relationships among the characters. The dialogue sounds like these people talking, both what they say and how they say it: "Boy, you're gonna be sorry," versus, "You will be sorry." There isn't unnecessary information. The writer leaves out what the reader doesn't need to know. The lead (introduction) invites the reader into the world of the memory. The conclusion is deliberate: it represents a writer's decision about how to leave his or her readers. The writer isn't acting like a reporter: the writing is subjective. The writer invents details that fit with the specific memory and the writer's theme. The memoir sounds and feels like literature, not reporting. A reader learns something about life by reading about a life. (Nancie Atwell, P. 392).

Assessment Working in groups completing their KWL charts, students are asked to provide three characteristics of a memoir. Groups will be asked to provide the information that they discuss. Each student's ability to identify the characteristics of a memoir will be assessed by their completion of their KWL chart. I will be walking around the room to check each student's comprehension and I will collect the student's reading/writing journals and provide students with a grade of 100 if each column of the KWL chart is completed. ESL Modification for Assessment: I will be walking around the room to check for understanding. I will ask level 1 and 2 ESL students yes/no questions regarding memoirs. I will ask level 1 and level 2 students to draw out what they learned about memoirs and to write 1-2 words that describe their images. I will ask level 3 students to list ideas that they learned about

memoirs. Level 4 students will be asked to write out complete sentences that describe what they learned about the characteristics of memoirs.

Lesson #2 What is on your Life Map? Objectives: Reflect on significant events in their lives and consider their influence Graphically represent important life events by demonstrating one's ability to plan and organize life events. Use personal writing to develop self-awareness Common Core: Text Types and Purposes CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.7.3 Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, relevant descriptive details, and well-structured event sequences. ELL Modifications Level 1: Students will draw pictures when completing life map. Students will be paired in groups with level 3 and 4 ESL students. Students will be encouraged to act out their memories in their groups. Level 2: Students will work in groups and be placed advanced English language speakers when available. Students will complete life map by listing memories, categorizing good and bad life events and drawing images that depict the life events. Level 3: Students will be paired with lower level native speakers and advanced English language speakers. Students will recall events of their life and compare good events to bad events. Students will write a memoir that using descriptive language to define their memory. Level 4: Students will work in cooperative learning groups and help scaffold the learning of lower level ELL students. Students will create a life map and analyze their lists to choose specific moments in time to create a memoir that describes a specific moment. Resources: life map brainstorm handout life map handout glue sticks overhead projector reading/writing journal Activity: 1. I will inform students that they are going to be creating a life map. I will describe to students that a life maps allows them to reflect on significant events in their life and display them. To begin, I will turn on the projector and model how to brainstorm about significant events by writing down events that have taken place in my own life by writing down the event and the approximate year it occurred. 2. I will then provide the life map brainstorm handout to the students. I will ask students to write or draw on their handouts at least 10 significant events that have occurred in their own lives along with the corresponding dates. Students may

discuss amongst their group members if they get stuck. (ESE/ELL) Students may write or draw out their significant events. As well, members of their group may scaffold their learning by discussing events in their own lives. 3. Once students are finished, I will demonstrate how to rate the events +10 would be a positive event and -10 would be a negative event. 0 would be a neutral event. I will go through a few of my events on the overhead and demonstrate how I would rate each item. I then will ask students to rate their life events. (ESE/ELL) I will be walking around the room to check understanding of the task. If anyone is stuck, I will model the practice on the overhead projector by rating one of my life events. 4. Once students have completed rating their life events I will model on the overhead project how to map one's life events using the life map handout and my events. I will then pass out high quality paper to the students along with markers and ask the students to map their life events. I will encourage students to write a small snippet of information about the event, the date, along with a small pictorial representation of the event. 5. Once students begin to finish, I will ask students to pick one event and write in their writing journals about their memory of the event (Journal 1). I will display on the overhead and read a work written by me about one of the events on my life map. I will encourage students to finish their life map and provide students with time the following day to write in their journals about their life event. I will display the life maps in the classroom and then students will be required to keep them in their writing folder. Assessment I will be walking around the room and visually assessing each student's life map while

they work on their project. Once students are finished with their life maps, I will collect their reading/writing journals and check each student's journals for their ability to reflect, define, and graphically represent their life events. If the life map is complete with 10 significant events and a pictorial representation for each event, students will receive 100 points. If a student is not able to receive 100 points due to missing information, I will direct the student to the area that needs more information and ask the student to resubmit their life map. ESL Modification: level 1 and level 2 students will be asked to draw images that depict their life events. As well, I will expect level 2 students to write 1-2 words that describe their

imagines. Level 3 students will be asked to draw an image that represents their life event as well as write sentences that describes the life event. Level 4 students will be asked to develop 10 significant events, provide images, and provide one sentences that describes each life event.

Lesson: 3 Objective: Students will write silently about their life events. Students will define vocabulary words and make a text-to-text or text-to-text connection with the story Chicken Sunday written by Patricia Polacco. Provide students with vocabulary words (visualize, connect, infer, synthesize, text-totext, text-to-self). Read aloud Chicken Sunday by Patricia Polacco. During reading I will be having the students take part in TPR (total physical response). I will ask the students to mimic and act out the actions of the story while I read. I will make frequent pauses, ask the students how the main character is responding, and then have the students act out the actions. During reading, I will be rereading and defining the vocabulary terms while connecting them to the text. After reading, I will ask the students if they made a text-to-self or textto-text connection with the book. We will discuss the differences as well as possible connections. In groups, students will be responsible for finding the definitions of one or two words, creating sentences, and drawing images or cutting and pasting from provided magazines onto construction paper or index cards. Students then will show their words to the class and present their findings as well as place their works in the word wall. Students will then write in their reading journals their vocabulary words, the definitions, and one original sentence using the word. I will discuss with the class how they are to keep both a writing/reading/dictionary journal and a writing folder. Students will be required to file their revised/edited writings in their writing folders/portfolios for the unit. I will provide students with two rubrics that will depict how they will be graded on their writings for the unit.

Lesson: 4 In groups, students will choose one memoir picture book. As a group, students will read the book and define the author's purpose, what the story is about, the relationship between the subject and writer, what the book makes them visualize (text-to-text, text-toself). I will inform students that they must present to the class their findings. Students will be asked to inform the class using the $3.00 or 30 words format. After presentations, I will inform the class that they did a great job synthesizing the information into 30 words. I will show an example of an exceptional student memoir. Lesson: 5 I will begin class by reading one of the memoirs that I have written. Then I will show book talks hosted on YouTube of five memoir books. Students will have the opportunity flip through the books, read the back, and choose one book. Each student will sign out one book. Students will be required to read for 30 minutes each night and write one journal entry each week about their books. Students can choose how they want to write their journal but they must include in every entry a summary of what occurred and their response to the book up to that point. In groups, students will share one of their memoirs that they have written. Students will be asked to provide two quality feedback statements to each of their peers.

Lesson: 6 I will read aloud the book A Chair for my Mother written by Vera Williams. After reading, we will discuss as a group how the author starts with an object (the money jar) and writes a story about the object. I will ask students to brainstorm a list of objects that are important to them. I then will ask students to write in their writing journals about one object and

its importance in their life. (When/where did they get the object, how was their day up-to receiving the object...) (Journal 2)

Lesson: 7 I will begin reading aloud the book Journey by Patricia MacLachlan. I will stop at page 25. We will discuss how photographs or art can tell a story of an event much like a memoir. Students will then draw in their writing journals an event from their life graph. I will ask students to bring in one photograph that depicts an event in their life. (Journal 3)

Lesson: 8 I will continue reading the book Journey by Patricia MacLachlan. I will stop at page 50. Students then will be given the opportunity to discuss in their group their photographs. After discussion, I will share one image with the class and the memory then ask if any students would like to share their image and memory. Students will also write in the writing journals about their photograph and the memory that coincides. I will remind students to remain in first person, to paint a picture, and to describe the memory to the best of their recollection. (Journal 4)

Lesson: 9 I will finish reading the book Journey by Patricia MacLachlan. I will ask students to write a reader response in the writing journals. Students will be asked to reflect on one specific event in the story. The first line of their response will describe the event. Students relate the event they chose to a memory of themselves (a text-to-self) by writing a memoir about the memory. (Journal 5)

Lesson: 10 Students will be given a vocabulary assessment. After the assessment, I will ask students to choose one event from their life graph and write a memoir about the event. If a new memory has occurred since they created their life graph, they may chart their new memory and then write a memoir about the memory. (Journal 6). Before students leave, I will collect journals.

Week: 3 I will return journals. Students will also be given back their vocabulary assessments. Students will write in their writing journals any vocabulary words that they have not yet mastered. This week, I will be reading the memoir, Because of Winn-Dixie written by DiCamillo aloud to the students. On Monday, the class will take part in the prereading strategy, Probable passage. Vocabulary words that represent the story will be presented in the probably passage worksheet. I will provide students with background about the author while I pass out the handout. Working in groups students will place their vocabulary words in the different categories. Students will also write a gist statement. Students will share their probably passage with the class. During reading, I will be defining the vocabulary terms while connecting them to the text. In groups, students will be responsible for finding the definitions of one or two words, creating sentences, and drawing images or cutting and pasting from provided magazines onto construction paper or index cards. Students then will show their words to the class and present their findings as well as place their works in the word wall. Students will then write in their reading journals their vocabulary words, the definitions, and one original sentence using the word. Students will write an additional two memoirs this week. We will begin each day with a mini-lesson about grammar issues that were found in their journals.

By Thursday, most students should be finishing their out of class book choice. I will be asking students to give a book talk on their book on Friday. Students then will have the opportunity to choose another book. Students will be reminded to read at least 30 minutes a night and write a reflection about their reading once a week.

Friday, in groups, students will share one of their memoirs that they have written. Students will be asked to provide two quality feedback statements to each of their peers.

Week: 4

This week, I will be reading aloud the memoir, King of the Mild Frontier written by Chris Crutcher (T/W)Students will write an additional two memoirs this week.

Wednesday, in groups, students will share one of their memoirs that they have written. Students will be asked to provide two quality feedback statements to each of their peers

(Th/F) Students will begin the revision process of their memoirs. Students will peerrevise each other's memoirs looking for areas that can be revised as well as edited. Students will be given a peer revision handout and asked to complete the handout.

Friday, students will be given a vocabulary assessment and I will collect journals.

Week: 5 I will return journals. Students will also be given back their vocabulary assessment they will write in their writing journals any vocabulary words that they have not yet mastered. We will begin each day with mini-lesson about various grammar topics that students are struggling with in their journals.

This week, I will finish reading the text King of the Mild Frontier written by Chris Crutcher. During reading, I will be defining the vocabulary terms while connecting them to the text.

In groups, students will be responsible for finding the definitions of one or two words, creating sentences, and drawing images or cutting and pasting from provided magazines onto construction paper or index cards. Students then will show their words to the class and present their findings as well as place their works in the word wall. Students will then write in their reading journals their vocabulary words, the definitions, and one original sentence using the word.

Students will write an additional two memoirs this week. Wednesday, in groups, students will share one of their memoirs that they have written. Students will be asked to provide two quality feedback statements to each of their peers

(Th/F) Students will begin the revision process of their memoirs. Students will peerrevise each other's memoirs looking for areas that can be revised as well as edited.By Thursday, most students should be finishing their out of class book choice. I will be asking students to give a book talk on their book on Friday. Students then will have the opportunity to choose another book. Students will be reminded to read at least 30 minutes a night and write a reflection about their reading once a week.

Week: 6 I will be reading the text, Bad Boy, A Memoir by Dean Myers aloud to the students. Monday, the class will take part in the before reading strategy, Tea Party. Provide students with one index card per person. Each index card will have one sentence taken from the short story.

Instruct students to pair up and read their sentences aloud to each other. After reading their cards, they should discuss what they believe the story is about based on what their cards. Have students return to their desks, in their groups, students will discuss what they think the story is going to be about. Students will create a "we think" statement. Groups will then present their "we think statements" and conclusions to how they came up with their ideas.

I will be giving mini-lessons all week on how to revise. Tuesday, I will demonstrate and remind students about how they should be filling their written work in their writing portfolios/folders (daft, revised, final).

On Thursday, we will be in the computer lab. Students will be typing and posting one of their memoirs on Edmodo.

On Friday, students will be given a vocabulary assessment and then we will be in the computer lab. Student journals will also be collected. Students will be replying to two of their classmate's posts on Edmodo. Students are required to post feedback that aids the writer in the revision process.

Week: 7 I will return journals. Monday, I will show examples of how past students created videos that depicted their memoirs. Tuesday & Wednesday students will create a storyboard for their movie memoir. Students will use the storyboard to plan how they will use images, sounds, and text to depict their memoir.

Thursday, most students should be finishing their out of class book choice. I will be asking students to give a book talk on their book on Friday. Students then will have the opportunity to choose another book. Students will be reminded to read at least 30 minutes a night and write a reflection about their reading once a week. I will be giving minilessons all week on how to edit.

On Thursday, we will be in the computer lab. Students will be typing and posting their final chosen memoir on Edmodo. On Friday, we will be in the computer lab. Students will be replying to two of their classmate's posts on Edmodo. Students we be required to post feedback that aids the writer in the revision process.

Week: 8 (Monday- I will provide instruction on how to create a video using Windows Media Maker/I movie). Students will be in the computer lab working on their video representation of their revised memoir. Students will be working on either revising their memoir or creating their video.

Week: 9 (M, T, W) Students will be in the computer lab working on their video representation of their revised memoir. Students will be working on either revising their memoir or creating their video. Wednesday, the videos must be turned in along with self-assessment. Thursday, & Friday we will be viewing the memoir videos. I will transform the classroom into a movie theater and we will eat popcorn.

Name: ___________________

Date:_________________

Period:____________

Final Project Url: _____________________

Authors Statement: What have you learned about memoirs? What makes a good memoir? Which was your favorite memoir that we read? Why?

Reflect on the process you used to write your final draft of your memoir. What parts did you do especially well? What would you do differently next time? Why?

Self Assessment: Complete the self-assessment portion of the rubric. Staple your final draft of your memoir, this sheet, along with your self-assessment rubric. Don't forget to hand this in!

(http://ela7through12stpaul.pbworks.com, 2012).

Life Map Handout

Events: 1._____________________Year: __________________Image: Circle one: Positive or Negative

2._____________________Year: __________________Image: Circle one: Positive or Negative

3._____________________Year: __________________Image: Circle one: Positive or Negative

4._____________________Year: __________________Image: Circle one: Positive or Negative

5._____________________Year: __________________Image: Circle one: Positive or Negative

6._____________________Year: __________________Image: Circle one: Positive or Negative

7._____________________Year: __________________Image: Circle one: Positive or Negative 8._____________________Year: __________________Image:

Circle one: Positive or Negative

9._____________________Year: __________________Image: Circle one: Positive or Negative

10._____________________Year: __________________Image: Circle one: Positive or Negative

11._____________________Year: __________________Image: Circle one: Positive or Negative

12._____________________Year: __________________Image: Circle one: Positive or Negative

13._____________________Year: __________________Image: Circle one: Positive or Negative

14._____________________Year: __________________Image: Circle one: Positive or Negative

15._____________________Year: __________________Image: Circle one: Positive or Negative

(http://teacher.scholastic.com/writeit, 2012).