Вы находитесь на странице: 1из 3

IPG Interns Name: Brandy Huhman Subject: Science 1. TEKS: 3.

5B describe and classify samples of matter as solids, liquids, and gases and demonstrate that solids have a definite shape and that liquids and gases take the shape of their container. Objective: To learn that matter can be classified as a solid, liquid or a gas and demonstrate that solids hold their shape while liquids and gases that the shape of their containers. 3 Assessment Evidence (INDIVIUAL ACTIVITY) Now that we have discussed matter and its different forms, we will do an activity. Take a piece of construction paper and turn in long ways, and then fold in half. Cut the top fold so that it has three flaps that can be opened up. On each flap, write a state of matter: 1) Solid 2) Liquid 3) Gas. Open each flap and draw a shape that describes each (here I did an example to show everyone). Then, glue cereal in each shape to show how close the particles (called atoms) are. 4. Opening Hook: (WHOLE CLASS QUESTIONS) Can anyone remember what we said matter was yesterday? (Matter makes up all things. Matter is anything that takes up space) So, does this pencil take up space? Does this book take up space? Why is matter important? Because, if there were no matter, I wouldnt be here to ask that question and you wouldnt be here to answer that question. Did you know that matter has different forms? 5. Instructional Strategies / Student Activities 6. Input: Today we are going to learn about those different form. Matter can be a solid, like this desk here.or a liquid, like my drink here.or a gas, like the air in a balloon. What is this desk? Is it solid? Liquid? Or gas? And what about its shape? Can we change it? Without doing something big like cutting it? So it keeps it shape. So, weve already said my drink is a liquid. Right now, its in the shape of this bottle. What happens if I pour it into a cup? Does it take the shape of the cup? Ok, so what happens if I pour it into my shoe? Will it take the shape of my shoe? So liquid changes shape.
10/27/2013, page 1 of 3, 183626006.doc

Date: 10/12/13 Grade Level: 3rd 2. Big Understandings: It is important to understand matter because everything around us that we can see, and (not see; air) is made of matter. Learning the different phases of matter helps us to classify things in different groups as we need to.

And what about gases? If we put helium in a balloon, what shape does it take? What if the balloon is shaped like a star? So gases change shape too. So how about the molecules in each? How do we think they are in a solid? A liquid? A gas? Here, we will watch a video of sort that shows the movement of the atoms in each. Modeling: 1) (CLASS) In this class, I will pick a few to come to the front and help in a line. Line up so we can demonstrate. In an actual class, I would put a hula-hoop on the floor and as a class, we would pack together and try to move. Inside the hoop represents how close the atoms are packed and why solids are solids. For liquids, we would dance around a litter farther apart and the few inside the hoop would represent the atoms. Gases, we would dance around the room, leaving room for only one or no students in the hoop, to represent the atoms spaced out for gases. Draw on the board and model what kids are to do on their project while modeling to them what I want on the paper. (GROUP ACTIVITY) To demonstrate solids, we will make a tightly packed circle where kids can not move very much. To demonstrate liquids, we will link arms and dance around, but have more room. To demonstrate gases, we will walk around freely, bouncing off one another. To get them back in order, I will clap which will tie into my taught procedure. Guided Practice: 1) Pass out paper and materials to each student. 2) Have students work individually on project CFU: Can someone give me an example of a solid? Can someone explain to me what the particles in a solid are doing? Are they moving? Do they have much room to move? How close together do you think they are? Do you think there are more of less than in a liquid? How about in a gas? So what about their shape? Do they change shapes? Can someone give me an example of a liquid? What about the particle in a liquid? Are they moving as well? How spaced out do you think they are? What about their shape? Does it change or stay the same when poured into something else? Do you think there are more or less than in a gas? Finally, can someone give me an example of a gas? How about the shape of gas? Is it easy to see the shape of gas? No, but if we fill a balloon, what shape does it take? Is there air in this jar? What shape do you think it is? Independent Practice: (INDIVIUAL ACTIVITY) Now that we have discussed matter and its different forms, we will do an activity. Take a piece of construction paper and turn in long ways, and then fold in half. Cut the top fold so that it has three flaps that can be opened up. On each flap, write a state of matter: 1) Solid 2) Liquid 3) Gas. Open each flap and draw a shape that describes each (here I did an example to show everyone). Then, glue cereal in each shape to show how close the particles (called atoms) are. This is all modeled to the kids from the overhead projector. 7. Materials / Resources: Paper, glue, scissors, cereal 8. Grouping Patterns: Class, group, individual 9. Ending, Summary / Reflection: Who can remind me of what matter is? And why is matter important? Who can tell me the three phases of matter we learned about today? And can anyone give me an example of a solid? A liquid? And a gas? Great, tomorrow we will pick up here and learn about . . .
10/27/2013, page 2 of 3, 183626006.doc

10. Technology: Use the overhead to draw examples and use of a video

10/27/2013, page 3 of 3, 183626006.doc

Похожие интересы