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CURRICULUM VITAE OF DR.P.G.

SASTRY
DESIGNATION : DIRECTOR & HEAD, LEARNING & DEVELOPMENT, RAMKY GROUP, HYDERABAD PHONE : MOBILE : 9849637909 RESIDENCE : 040 27634985 E-MAIL : pgsastry@yahoo.co.uk AGE : 76 YEARS

AWARDS RECEIVED:
1. ALEXANDER VON HUMBOLDT POST-DOCTORAL FELLOWSHIP on Global Competition, Germany, 1970 & 71. 2. Best paper in ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING, The Institution of Engineers (India), during 1978-79 and also in 1979-80 . 3. HEM PRABHA S.N.GUPTA BEST PAPER AWARD IN HYDROLOGY, The Institution of Engineers (India), 1990-91. 1

4. 5.
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PROFESSIONAL EXPERTISE AWARD IN ENGINEERING, Vishwabharathi Academy, 1998. PARYAVARANA PRAVEENA, title conferred by the Chief Minister of Andhra Pradesh, 2005.
BHARAT RATNA SIR M. VISVESVARAYA SPECIAL AWARD, Government of A.P. and The Institution of Engineers (India), 2005. SIR ARTHUR COTTON AWARD, Jandhyala Charitable Trust, 2006. PROFESSOR PAR EXCELLENCE, title conferred by the Chief Minister of Andhra Pradesh, 2006.

7. 8.

9.

PADMABHUSHAN DR.K.L.RAO SPECIAL AWARD, A.P. Government and the Institution of Engineers (India), 2007. 10. PAUL HARRIS FELLOW, Rotary International Foundation, 2007. 11. ENGINEERING EDUCATOR LIFE TIME ACHIEVEMENT AWARD, Indian Society for Technical Education (ISTE), 2008.
12. HONORARY DOCTORATE (D.Sc.) Acharya Nagarjuna University, 2009.

13. ROTARY VOCATIOAL EXCELLENCE Rotary Club of Hyderabad East, India, 2009.

AWARD,

14. AWARD OF EXCELLENCE IN THE FIELD OF TECHNICAL EDUCATION, Lions Clubs International, 2013.
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PAST PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE:


1. CHAIRMAN, ENVIRONMENTAL APPRAISAL COMMITTEE FOR RIVER VALLEY PROJECTS, MINISTRY OF ENVIRONMENT AND FORESTS, GOVT. OF INDIA. Cleared irrigation Projects in different states of India with a command area of about 2 million hectares and Hydropower Projects having an installed capacity of 20,000 MW. Total Estimated Cost of the Projects : Rs.2.5 lakhs of crores. 2. VISITING PROFESSOR, OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY, U.S.A. 3. SENIOR EXPERT IN RURAL WATER SUPPLY AND SANITATION & APPRAISAL MISSION FUNDED BY NETHERLANDS. 4. TRAINING SPECIALIST, WORLD BANK HYDROLOGY PROJECT. 5. DIRECTOR-GENERAL, WALAMTARI (Twice), IRRIGATION AND COMMAND AREA DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT, ANDHRA PRADESH. 3 6. DIRECTOR N.I.T., WARANGAL

PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION:
1. B.TECH.(HONS) from I.I.T. Kharagpur (only I.I.T. at the time of admission), 1957. 2. M.TECH. with FIRST RANK from I.I.T. Kharagpur, 1958. 3. Ph.D. from Germany in 1962, Class awarded: VERY GOOD (MAGNA CUM LAUDE). 4. POST-DOCTORAL RESEARCH , Germany , 1970 & 71. 5. FIRST RANK in the TRAINING OF TRAINERS (TOT) ON DIAGNOSTIC ANALYSIS OF IRRIGATION SYSTEMS, UNITED STATES AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT (USAID) and CENTRAL WATER COMMISSION (CWC), 1986. 6. RESETTLEMENT AND REHABILITATION, ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT INSTITUTE OF THE WORLD BANK, 1994. 7. ISO 9000 Lead Assessor for Assessment of Quality Management Systems, NIGEL BAUER AND ASSOCIATES, U.K., 1996. 8. ISO 14000 Lead Auditor for Auditing of Environmental Management Systems, MARSDEN ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS, U.K., 1997. 9. Certificate in Project Management with Specialization in Roads & Transportation, INSTITUTE OF PROJECT MANAGEMENT CERTIFICATION (IPMC), Delhi, 2011. 4

TRANSFER OF EXPERTISE ON OUTCOMES BASED ENGINEERING EDUCATION DURING 2012 - 13 :


1. Trained 4000 faculty in 47 engineering colleges on Outcomes Based Engineering Education. 2. Exposed 375 practising engineering professionals on Outcomes Based Engineering Education and the need for disseminating engineering graduate outcomes to the engineering faculty.

GUIDED 59 M.TECHs. AND 3 PH.Ds. AT N.I.T., WARANGAL. 84 RESEARCH PUBLICATIONS IN INDIA AND ABROAD.
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OUTCOMES-BASED ENGINEERING EDUCATION FOR ENHANCED EMPLOYABILITY


By
B.Tech. (Hons) (I.I.T.KGP), M.Tech. (I.I.T.KGP), Dr.- Ing. (GERMANY), AvHF (GERMANY), D.Sc.(hc), FIE

DIRECTOR & HEAD (L&D), RAMKY GROUP, HYDERABAD


FORMER CHAIRMAN, COMMITTEE FOR THE ENVIRONMENTAL CLEARENCE OF IRRIGATION & HYDROPOWER PROJECTS, GOVERNMENT OF INDIA, NEW DELHI FORMER CONSULTANT, WORLD BANK HYDROLOGY PROJECT FORMER SENIOR EXPERT, NETHERLANDS-FUNDED RWSS PROJECT FORMER DIRECTOR GENRAL, WALAMTARI, HYDERABAD FORMER DIRECTOR, N.I.T, WARANGAL FORMER VISITING PROFESSOR, OSU, U.S.A. 6

Getting Started

To Date Exposure On
Outcomes- Based Engineering Education

is given to:
a. 4000 Faculty of 47 Engineering Colleges, and b. 375 Executives of Seven Practicing Engineering Organizations
Mobile: 9849637909 Email: pgsastry@yahoo.co.uk 8

CONTENTS
# 1. 2. 3 4. 5. 6. 7. TRADITIONAL ENGINEERING EDUCATION ENGINEER OF THE 21ST CENTURY EMPLOYABILITY OF ENGINEERING GRADUATES PARADIGM SHIFT IN ENGINEERING EDUCATION GUIDANCE FOR FACULTY OUTCOMES BASED ENGINEERING EDUCATION WRITING LEARNING OUTCOMES TOPIC Slides 10 12 13 120 121 162 163 175 176 191 192 292 293 323

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9. 10. 11.

LINKING COURSE OUTCOMES (COs), TEACHING AND ASSESSMENT


A COMPENDIUM OF TEACHING - LEARNING PROCESS ACCREDITATION MANUAL, FOR UG ENGINEERING PROGRAMS, NATIONAL BOARD OF ACCREDITATION (NBA), TIER II, JANUARY 2013. NATIONAL BOARD OF ACCREDIATION FORMAT FOR SELF ASSESSMENT REPORT (SAR) FOR ACCREDITATION OF UG ENGINEERING PROGRAMMES (TIER-II), JANUARY, 2013 GUIDELINES AND OPERATING PRACTICES FOR ACCREDITATION VISIT AND EVALUATION FOR UG ENGINEERING PROGRAMMES, (TIER-II), JANUARY, 2013 COMPARISON OF TIER-1 & TIER-II EVALUATION GUIDELINES, NBA, JANUARY 2013 ACCREDITATION MANUAL, FOR UG ENGINEERING PROGRAMS, NATIONAL BOARD OF ACCREDITATION (NBA), TIER I, JANUARY 2013. NATIONAL BOARD OF ACCREDIATION FORMAT FOR SELF ASSESSMENT REPORT (SAR) FOR ACCREDITATION OF PG ENGINEERING PROGRAMMES (TIER-I), JANUARY, 2013 GUIDELINES AND OPERATING PRACTICES FOR ACCREDITATION VISIT AND EVALUATION FOR PG ENGINEERING PROGRAMMES, (TIER-I), JANUARY, 2013 LIST OF DOCUMENTS / RECORDS TO BE MADE AVAILABLE DURING THE VISIT SAMPLE QUESTIONS BY THE EVALUATION TEAM FOR NBA ACCREDITATION

324 329
330 405 406 481 482 587

12.
13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19.

588 631
632 635 636 704 705 800 801 843 844 854 855 895 896 1247

CASE STUDY SELF ASSESSMENT REPORT (SAR) FOR ACCREDITATION OF B.TECH. PROGRAMME IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING BY NBA, TIER I

1. TRADITIONAL ENGINEERING EDUCATION


In the traditional approach to teaching, the students listen while teachers lecture. Students take notes Teacher assigns well-defined convergent single-discipline problems, and students solve problems individually. Teachers focus on covering the content giving much less thought to the learning by the student and teaching methodology . This content-driven approach to teaching has been referred to as a teacher-centered approach. 10

Traditional Engineering Education: Educational objectives are not comprehensively planned and informed to students. Low level of student involvement Too much technical content at the expense of a broader, liberal education Stress on Lower Order Thinking Skills Student assessment is not aligned to program outcomes.
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The current paradigm for engineering education, seems increasingly suspect in an era in which the shelf life of taught knowledge has declined to a few years. The principal question asked of the engineering graduate at the time of recruitment is no longer What courses did you study to obtain your degree?" but rather What can you do now that you have obtained your degree? Talk of encouraging creativeness is mischievous unless students are also equipped with competence. Talk of problem-solving is cant unless students are knowledgeable enough to recognize a real problem when they see one. 12

2.ENGINEER OF THE 21ST CENTURY


2.1 SEVEN 21ST CENTURY CHALLENGES TO ENGINEERS:

i. Information: Proliferating ii. Technological Development: Multidisciplinary A solution may be to shift our emphasis away from providing training in an ever increasing number of specialty areas to providing a core set of science and engineering fundamentals, helping students integrate knowledge across disciplines, and equipping them with independent and lifelong learning skills.

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iii. Markets: Globalized In the future, industries that cannot compete in the international market are unlikely to survive in the domestic market. iv. The Environment: Endangered. v. Social Responsibility: Emerging Technology is responsible for much of what we value about our society and our way of life, but it must also take responsibility for the threats to public health and depletion of nonrenewable natural resources that now endanger that way of life. vi. Corporate Structures: Participatory. vii. Change: Rapid To anticipate and respond to the increasingly changing global economy.
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2.2 REQUIRED SKILLS


The skills required to address the challenges to future engineers may be divided into seven categories: i. Independent Learning, Interdependent Learning, and Lifelong Learning Skills (EC 2000 Outcomes: a,d,e, and i). Those who will succeed in the 21st century are those who can unlearn, learn and relearn, again and again. Alvin Toffler Learning how to learn is the single most crucial skill.
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ii. Problem Solving, Critical Thinking and Creative Thinking Skills (EC 2000 Outcomes : a,b,c,e, and k)
When given a problem to solve, students should be equipped to: identify the goal and put it in context; formulate a systematic plan of attack that incorporates a suitable blend of analysis, synthesis, evaluation, and problem-solving heuristics; locate sources of information;
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CRITICAL THINKING SKILLS


Critical thinking involves developing skills for analyzing information and ideas, judging their validity, and making decisions. Critical thinking helps you to distinguish between facts and opinions, evaluate evidence and arguments, take and defend informed positions on issues, integrate information and see relationships, and apply your knowledge to dealing with new and different problems and making lifestyle choices.
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Here are some basic skills for learning how to think more critically: Question everything and everybody.
Be skeptical, as any good scientist is.

Do not believe everything you hear and read, without evaluating the information you receive. Seek other sources and opinions.
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Identify and evaluate your personal biases and beliefs. Each of us has biases and beliefs taught to us by our parents, teachers, friends, role models, and experience. What are your basic beliefs, values, and biases? Where did they come from? What assumptions are they based on? How sure are you that your beliefs, values, and assumptions are right?
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Be open-minded and flexible. Be open to considering different points of view. Suspend judgment until you gather more evidence, and be willing to change your mind. Recognize that there may be a number of useful and acceptable solutions to a problem and that very few issues are black or white.
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There are trade-offs involved in dealing with issues. One way to evaluate divergent views is to try to take the viewpoints of other people. How do they see the world? What are their basic assumptions and beliefs? Are their positions logically consistent with their assumptions and beliefs? Be humble about what you know. Some people are so confident in what they know that they stop thinking and questioning.
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Evaluate how the information related to an issue was obtained. Are the statements you heard or read based on firsthand knowledge and research or on hearsay? Are unnamed sources used? Is the information based on reproducible and widely accepted scientific studies or on preliminary scientific results that may be valid but need further testing?
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Is the information based on a few isolated stories or experiences (anecdotal information) or on carefully controlled studies with the results reviewed by experts in the field involved (peer review)?
Is it based on unsubstantiated and dubious scientific information or beliefs?
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Question the evidence and conclusions presented. What are the conclusions or claims? What evidence is presented to support them? Does the evidence support them? Is there a need to gather more evidence to test the conclusions? Are there other, more reasonable conclusions? Try to uncover differences in basic beliefs and assumptions. On the surface most arguments or disagreements involve differences in opinions about the validity or meaning of certain facts or conclusions.
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Scratch a little deeper and you will find that most disagreements are usually based on different (and often hidden) basic assumptions concerning how we look at and interpret the world around us. Uncovering these basic differences can allow the parties involved to understand where each is coming from and to agree to disagree about their basic assumptions, beliefs, or principles.
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Try to identify and assess any motives on the part of those presenting evidence and drawing conclusions. What is their expertise in this area? Do they have any unstated assumptions, beliefs, biases, or values? Do they have a personal agenda? Can they benefit financially or politically from acceptance of their evidence and conclusions? Would investigators with different basic assumptions or beliefs take the same data and come to different conclusions?
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Expect and tolerate uncertainty. Recognize that scientists can disprove things but they cannot establish absolute proof or certainty. However, the reliable results of science have a high degree of certainty. Do the arguments used involve logical fallacies or debating tricks? Here are six of many examples. First, attack the presenter of an argument rather than the argument itself.
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Second, appeal to emotion rather than facts and logic. Third, claim that if one piece of evidence or one conclusion is false, then all other related pieces of evidence and conclusions are false.

Fourth, say that a conclusion is false because it has not been scientifically proven (scientists never prove anything absolutely, but they can often establish high degrees of certainty.
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Fifth, inject irrelevant or misleading information to divert attention from important points. Sixth, present only either/or alternatives when there may be a number of options. Do not believe everything you read on the Internet. The Internet is a wonderful and easily accessible source of information, including alternative explanations and opinions on almost any subject or issuemuch of it not available in the mainstream media and scholarly articles.
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Web logs, or blogs, have become a major source of information, even more important than standard news media for some people. However, because the Internet is so open, anyone can post anything they want to some blogs and other websites with no editorial control or review by experts. As a result, evaluating information on the Internet is one of the best ways to put into practice the principles of critical thinking discussed here. Use and enjoy the Internet, but think critically and proceed with caution.
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Develop principles or rules for evaluating evidence. Develop a written list of principles to serve as guidelines for evaluating evidence and claims. Continually evaluate and modify this list on the basis of your experience. Become a seeker of wisdom, not a vessel of information. Many people believe that the main goal of education is to learn as much as you can by gathering more and more information.
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We believe that the primary goal is to learn how to sift through mountains of facts and ideas to find the few nuggets of wisdom that are the most useful for understanding the world and for making decisions. Never mistake knowledge for wisdom. One helps you make a living; the other helps you make a life. Sandra Carey, writer Some individuals with a high intelligence but lacking wisdom can get all As and flunk life. Walker Percy, American writer
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PROMOTING CRITICAL THINKING SKILLS AMONG STUDENTS OF THE COURSE ON ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE CHAPTER 1: Environmental Problems, Their Causes and Their Sustainability. 1. Do you think you are living unsustainably? Explain. If so, what are the three most environmentally unsustainable components of your lifestyle? 2. List two ways in which you could apply each of the three principles of sustainability to making your lifestyle more environmentally sustainable.
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3. For each of the following actions, state one or more of the three principles of sustainability that are involved: (a) recycling aluminum cans; (b) walking or bicycling to nearby places instead of driving; (c) taking your own reusable bags to the grocery store to carry things home; (d) volunteering to help restore a choked open drain/waste dump site in your residential area; and (e) lobbying elected officials to require that a sizeable portion of your countrys electricity be produced by wind / solar power by 2020.
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4. Explain why you agree or disagree with the following propositions: a. Stabilizing population is not desirable because, without more consumers, economic growth would stop. b. The world will never run out of resources because we can use technology to find substitutes and to help us reduce resource waste. 5. Suppose the worlds population stopped growing today. What environmental problems might this help solve?
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What environmental problems would remain? What economic problems might population stabilization make worse? 6. When you read that at least 19,200 people die prematurely each day (13 per minute) from preventable malnutrition and infectious disease, how does it make you feel? Can you think of something that you and others could do to address this problem? What might that be? 7. What do you think when you read that the average American consumes 30 times more resources than the average citizen of India; and
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8. Explain why you agree or disagree with each of the following statements: a) humans are superior to other forms of life; b) humans are in charge of the earth; c) the value of other forms of life depends only on whether they are useful to us; d) because all forms of life eventually become extinct we should not worry about whether our activities cause their premature extinction;
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e) all forms of life have an inherent right to exist; f) all economic growth is good; g) nature has an almost unlimited storehouse of resources for human use; h) technology can solve our environmental problems; i) I do not believe I have any obligation to future generations; and j) I do not believe I have any obligation to other forms of life.
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9. What are the basic beliefs within your environmental worldview? Record your answer and perhaps put it into a sealed envelope. Then at the end of this course return to your answer to see if your environmental worldview has changed. Are the beliefs included in your environmental worldview consistent with your answers to question 8? Are your actions that affect the environment consistent with your environmental worldview? Explain. 10.List two questions that you would like to get answered as a result of reading this chapter.
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Chapter 3 - Ecosystems: What Are They And How Do They Work?

1.How would you explain the importance of tropical rain forests to people who think that such forests have no connection to their lives? 2.Explain why a) the flow of energy through the biosphere depends on the cycling of nutrients, and b) the cycling of nutrients depends on gravity.
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3. Explain why microbes are so important. List two beneficial and two harmful effects of microbes on your health and lifestyle. Write a brief description of what you think would happen to you if microbes were eliminated from the earth. 4. Make a list of the food you ate for lunch or dinner today. Trace each type of food back to a particular producer species. Describe the sequence of feeding levels that led to your feeding.
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5. Why do farmers not need to apply carbon to grow their crops but often need to add fertilizer containing nitrogen and phosphorus? 6. What changes might take place in the hydrologic cycle if the earths climate becomes a) hotter or b) cooler? In each case, what are two ways in which these changes might affect your lifestyle?
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8. What would happen to an ecosystem if a. all its decomposers and detritus feeders were eliminated, b. all its producers were eliminated, or c. all its insects were eliminated? Could a balanced ecosystem exist with only producers and decomposers and no consumers such as humans and other animals? Explain. 9. List three ways in which you could make your lifestyle more environmentally sustainable. 10.List two questions that you would like to get answered as a result of reading this chapter.
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Chapter 4: Biodiversity and Evolution


1. How might we and other species be affected if all of the worlds amphibian species were to become extinct? 2. What role does each of the following processes play in helping to implement the three principles of sustainability: a. natural selection, b. speciation, and c. extinction? 3. How would you respond to someone who tells you that: a. he or she does not believe in biological evolution because it is just a theory?
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b. we should not worry about air pollution because natural selection will enable humans to develop lungs that can detoxify pollutants? 4. Describe the major differences between the ecological niches of humans and cockroaches. Are these two forms of life in competition? If so, how do they manage to coexist? 5. How would you experimentally determine whether an organism is a keystone species? 6. Is the human species a keystone species? Explain. If humans were to become extinct, what are two species that might also become extinct and two species whose populations might grow?
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7. Explain how you would respond to someone who says that because extinction is a natural process, we should not worry about the loss of biodiversity when species become prematurely extinct as a result of our activities. 8. List three ways in which you could apply the Concept Human activities can decrease biodiversity by causing the premature extinction of species and by destroying or degrading habitats needed for the development of new species to live a more environmentally sustainable lifestyle.
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9. Congratulations! You are in charge of the future evolution of life on the earth. What are the three most important things you will do? 10. List two questions that you would like to get answered as a result of reading this chapter.
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Chapter 5: Biodiveristy, Species Interactions, and Population Control


1. What difference would it make if the southern sea otter became prematurely extinct because of human activities? What are three things we could do to help prevent the premature extinction of this species? 2. Use the second law of thermodynamics whenever energy is converted from one form to another in a physical or chemical change, we end up with lower quality or less usable energy than we started with to help explain why predators are generally less abundant than their prey.
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3. Explain why most species with a high capacity for population growth (such as bacteria, flies, and cockroaches) tend to have small individuals, while those with a low capacity for population growth (such as humans, elephants, and whales) tend to have large individuals. 4. Which reproductive strategy do most insect pest species and harmful bacteria use? Why does this make it difficult for us to control their populations?
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5. List three factors that have limited human population growth in the past that we have overcome. Describe how we overcame each of these factors. List two factors that may limit human population growth in the future. 6. If the human species suffered a population crash, name three species that might move in to occupy part of our ecological niche. 7. How would you reply to someone who argues that we should not worry about our effects on natural systems because natural succession will heal the wounds of human activities and restore the balance of nature? 50

8. How would you reply to someone who contends that efforts to preserve natural systems are not worthwhile because nature is largely unpredictable? 9. In your own words, restate the quotation by Sir Francis Bacon: We cannot command nature except by obeying her. Do you agree with this notion? Why or why not? 10. List two questions that you would like to get answered as a result of reading this chapter.
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Chapter 6: The Human Population and Urbanization

1. Which of the three major environmental worldviews planetary management worldview, stewardship worldview, and environmental wisdom worldview do you believe underlie each of the two major positions on whether the world is overpopulated? Should everyone have the right to have as many children as they want? Explain. Is your belief on this issue consistent with your environmental worldview? 2. Identify a major local, national, or global environmental problem, and describe the role of population growth in this problem.
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3. Do you believe that the population is too high in (a) the world, (b) your own country, and (c) the area where you live? Explain. 4. Some people have proposed that the earth could solve its population problem by moving people to space colonies, each containing about 10,000 people. Assuming we could build such large-scale, selfsustaining space stations (a big assumption), how many people would we have to ship off each day to provide living spaces for the 82 million people added to the earths population this year?
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Current space shuttles can handle about 6 to 8 passengers. If this capacity could be increased to 100 passengers per shuttle, how many shuttles would have to be launched per day to offset the 82 million people added this year? According to your calculations, determine whether this proposal is a logical solution to the earths population problem.
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5. Some people believe our most important goal should be to sharply reduce the rate of population growth in developing countries, where 97% of the worlds population growth is expected to take place. Others argue that the most serious environmental problems stem from high levels of resource consumption per person in developed countries, which use 88% of the worlds resources and have much larger ecological footprints per person than do developing countries. What is your view on this issue? Explain.
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6. Experts have identified population growth as one of the major causes of the environmental problems we face. The population of United States is growing faster than that of China and of any of the worlds other developed countries. But this problem is rarely mentioned, and the U.S. government has no official policy to slow its population growth. Why do think this is so? Do you agree with this hands-off approach? If not, list three things you would do to slow U.S. population growth.
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7. List three reasons why you (a) enjoy living in a large city, (b) would like to live in a large city, or (c) do not wish to live in a large city. 8. If you own a car or hope to own one, what conditions, if any, would encourage you to rely less on the automobile and to travel to school or work by bicycle, on foot, by mass transit, or by carpool?
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9. Congratulations!

You are in charge of the world.


List the three most important features of your policy for dealing with a) global population growth and b) urban growth and development. 10.List two questions that you would like to get answered as a result of reading this chapter.
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Chapter 7: Climate and Biodiversity


1. What would happen to the earths terrestrial and aquatic species (a) if most of the worlds oceans disappeared and (b) if most of the worlds land disappeared? 2. Describe the roles of temperature and precipitation in determining what parts of the earths land are covered with: a. a desert, b. arctic tundra, c. temperate grassland, d. a tropical rain forest, and e. a temperate deciduous forest.
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3. Why do deserts and arctic tundra support a much smaller biomass of animals than do tropical forests? Why do most animals in a tropical rain forest live in its trees? 4. Why do most species living at high latitudes and high altitudes tend to have generalist ecological niches while those living in the tropics tend to have specialist niches?
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5. Which biomes are best suited for a. raising crops and b. grazing livestock? Use the three principles of sustainability to come up with three guidelines for growing food and grazing livestock in these biomes on a more sustainable basis. 6. What type of biome do you live in? (If you live in a developed area, what type of biome was the area before it was developed?) List three ways in which your lifestyle could be contributing to degradation of this biome?
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7. You are a defense attorney arguing in court for sparing a tropical rain forest from being cut. Give your three most important arguments for the defense of this ecosystem. 8. You are a defense attorney arguing in court for protecting a coral reef from harmful human activities. Give your three most important arguments for the defense of this ecosystem.
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9. Congratulations!
You are in charge of the world. What are the three most important features of your plan for helping to sustain the earths (a) terrestrial biodiversity and ecosystems

services and
(b) aquatic biodiversity and ecosystem services? 10.List two questions that you would like to get answered as a result of reading this chapter.
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Chapter 8: Sustaining Biodiversity : The Species Approach 1. What are three aspects of your lifestyle that might directly or indirectly contribute to the premature extinction of the polar bear? 2. Describe your gut-level reaction to the following statement: Eventually, all species become extinct. So it does not really matter that the passenger pigeon is extinct, and that the polar bear and the worlds remaining tiger species are endangered mostly because of human activities. Be honest about your reaction, and give arguments to support your position.
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3. Do you accept the ethical position that each species has the inherent right to survive without human interference, regardless of whether it serves any useful purpose for humans? Explain. Would you extend this right to the Anopheles mosquito, which transmits malaria, and to infectious bacteria? Explain. 4. Wildlife ecologist and environmental philosopher Aldo Leopold wrote, To keep every cog and wheel is the first precaution of intelligent tinkering. Explain how this statement relates to the material in this chapter. 5. What would you do if fire ants invaded your yard and house?
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6. Which of the following statements best describes your feelings toward wildlife? a. As long as it stays in its space, wildlife is okay. b. As long as I do not need its space, wildlife is okay. c. I have the right to use wildlife habitat to meet my own needs. d. When you have seen one redwood tree, elephant, or some other form of wildlife, you have seen them all, so lock up a few of each species in a zoo or wildlife park and do not worry about protecting the rest. e. Wildlife should be protected in their current ranges.
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7. Environmental groups in a heavily forested state want to restrict logging in some areas to save the habitat of an endangered squirrel. Timber company officials argue that the well-being of one type of squirrel is not as important as the well-being of the many families who would be affected if the restriction causes the company to lay off hundreds of workers. If you had the power to decide this issue, what would you do and why? Can you come up with a compromise?
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8. Write an argument for a. preserving a weed species in your yard, and for b. not exterminating a colony of wooddamaging carpenter ants in your home. 9. Congratulations! You are in charge of preventing the premature extinction, caused by human activities, of the worlds existing species. List the three most important policies you would implement to accomplish this goal. 10.List two questions that you would like to get answered as a result of reading this chapter.
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Chapter 9: Sustaining Bio-diversity : The Ecosystem Approach


1. Describe some ecological, economic, and social benefits of the Green Belt Movement. Are there any areas near where you live that could benefit from such intensive planting of trees? If so, describe how it would benefit the areas. 2. In the early 1990s, Miguel Sanchez, a subsistence farmer in Costa Rica, was offered $600,000 by a hotel developer for a piece of land that he and his family had been using sustainably for many years. The land contained an old-growth rain forest and a black sand beach in an area under rapid development. Sanchez refused the offer. What would you have done if you were in Miguel 69 Sanchezs position? Explain your decision.

3. There is controversy over whether Yellowstone National Park in the United States should be accessible by snowmobile during winter. Conservationists and backpackers, who use cross-country skis or snowshoes for excursions in the park during winter, are opposed to this idea. They contend that snowmobiles are noisy, pollute the air, and can destroy vegetation and disrupt some of the parks wildlife.
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Proponents say that snowmobiles should be allowed so that snowmobilers can enjoy the park during winter when cars are mostly banned. They point out that new snowmobiles are made to cut pollution and noise. A proposed compromise plan would allow no more than 950 of these new machines into the park per day, only on roads, and primarily on guided tours. What is your view on this issue? Explain.
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4. In 2007, environmental analyst Lester R. Brown estimated that reforesting the earth and restoring the earths degraded rangelands would cost about $15 billion a year. Suppose the United States, the worlds most affluent country, agreed to put up half this money, at an average annual cost of $25 per American. Would you support doing this? Explain. 5. Should developed countries provide most of the money needed to help preserve the remaining tropical forests in developing countries? Explain. 6. Are you in favor of establishing more wilderness areas in the United States, especially in the lower 48 states (or in the country where you live)? Explain. What might be some drawbacks of doing this? 72

7. What do you think are the three greatest threats to aquatic biodiversity and aquatic ecosystem services? Why? Why is it more difficult to identify and protect endangered marine species and ecosystems than to protect endangered species and ecosystems on land?
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8. You are a defense attorney arguing in court for sparing a large area of tropical rain forest from being cut down. Give your three strongest arguments for the defense of this ecosystem. If you had to choose between sparing a tropical rain forest and sparing a coral reef of about the same size, which one would you try to save? Explain.
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9. Congratulations! You are in charge of the world. List the three most important features of your policies for using and managing a. forests, b. grasslands, c. nature reserves such as parks and wildlife refuges, d. biological hotspots, and e. the worlds aquatic biodiversity and ecosystem services. 10.List two questions that you would like to get answered as a result of reading this chapter.
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Chapter 10: Food, Soil and Pest Management


1. Do you think that the advantages of organic agriculture outweigh its disadvantages? Explain. Do you eat or grow organic foods? If so, explain your reasoning for making this choice. If not, explain your reasoning for the food choices you do make. 2. What are the three most important actions you would take to reduce chronic hunger and malnutrition a. in the country where you live and b. in the world? 3. Explain why you support or oppose greatly increased use of (a) genetically modified food (b) polyculture, and (c) perennial polyculture. 76

4. Suppose you live near a coastal area and a company wants to use a fairly large area of coastal marshland for an aquaculture operation. If you were an elected local official, would you support or oppose such a project? Explain. What safeguards or regulations would you impose on the operation? 5. Explain how widespread use of a pesticide can
a. increase the damage done by a particular pest and b. create new pest organisms.

6. If increased mosquito populations threatened you with malaria or West Nile virus, would you want to spray DDT in your yard and inside your home to reduce the risk? Explain. 77 What are the alternatives?

7. List three ways in which your lifestyle directly or indirectly contributes to soil erosion. 8. According to physicist and philosopher Albert Einstein, Nothing will benefit human health and increase chances of survival of life on Earth as much as the evolution to a vegetarian diet. Do you agree with this statement? Explain. Are you willing to eat less meat or no meat? Explain. 9. Congratulations! You are in charge of the world. List the three most important features of your a. agricultural policy, b. strategy for reducing soil erosion, c. strategy for more sustainable harvesting and farming of fish and shellfish, and d. global pest management strategy. 10. List two questions that you would like to get answered as 78 a result of reading this chapter.

Chapter 11: Water Resources and Water Pollution


1. What do you believe are the three most important priorities for dealing with the water resource problems of a given river basin? Explain your choices. 2. What role does population growth play in a. water supply problems, b. groundwater pollution problems, and c. coastal water pollution problems? 3. Explain why you are for or against a. raising the price of water while providing lower lifeline rates for the poor and lower middle class, b. withdrawing government subsidies that provide farmers with water at low cost, and c. providing government subsidies to farmers for improving irrigation efficiency.
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4. Calculate how many liters (and gallons) of water are wasted in 1 month by a toilet that leaks 2 drops of water per second. (1 liter of water equals about 3,500 drops and 1 liter equals 0.265 gallon.) 5. List three ways in which human activities increase the harmful effects of flooding. What is the best way to prevent each of these human impacts? Do you think they should be prevented? Why or why not? 6. You are a regulator charged with drawing up plans for controlling water pollution. Briefly describe one idea for controlling water pollution from each of the following sources: a. an effluent pipe from a factory going into a stream, b. a parking lot at a shopping mall bordered by a stream, 80 c. a farmers field on a slope next to a stream.

7. When you flush your toilet, where does the wastewater go? Trace the actual flow of this water in your community from your toilet through sewers to a wastewater treatment plant and from there to the environment. Try to visit a local sewage treatment plant to see what it does with your wastewater. What happens to the sludge produced by this plant? What improvements, if any, would you suggest for this plant?
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8. List three ways in which you could apply the concept : We can use water more sustainably by cutting water waste, raising water prices, slowing population growth, and protecting aquifers, forests, and other ecosystems that store and release water to make your lifestyle more environmentally sustainable. 9. List three ways in which you could apply the concept : Reducing water pollution requires preventing it, working with nature in treating sewage, cutting resource use and waste, reducing poverty, and slowing population growth to make your lifestyle more environmentally sustainable. 82

10.Congratulations! You are in charge of the world. What are three actions you would take to a. provide an adequate safe drinking water supply for the poor and for other people in developing countries, b. sharply reduce point-source water pollution in developing countries, c. sharply reduce nonpoint-source water pollution throughout the world, and d. sharply reduce groundwater pollution throughout the world. 11. List two questions that you would like to get answered as a result of reading this chapter.
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Chapter 12: Geology and Nonrenewable Minerals

1. List three ways in which decreasing the need to mine gold and reducing its harmful environmental effects could benefit you. 2. What do you think would happen if the earths tectonic plates stopped moving around? Explain. (Think about both short-term and longterm effects.)
3. You are an igneous rock. Write a report on what you experience as you move through the rock cycle. Repeat this exercise, assuming you are a sedimentary rock and then a metamorphic rock.
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4. Use the second law of thermodynamics : Whenever energy is converted from one form to another in a physical or chemical change, we end up with lower quality or less usable energy than we started with to analyze the scientific and economic feasibility of each of the following processes: a. Extracting most minerals dissolved in seawater b. Mining increasingly lower-grade deposits of minerals c. Using inexhaustible solar energy to mine minerals d. Continuing to mine, use, and recycle minerals at increasing rates
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5. List three ways in which a nanotechnology revolution could benefit you and three ways in which it could harm you. 6. Describe the strategy you would use to promote the spread of industrial ecosystems? As part of your promotion strategy for this project, describe three benefits of such systems to your community.
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7. Explain why you support or oppose each of the following proposals concerning extraction of hard rock minerals on public land : a. halting the practice of granting title to public land for actual or claimed hard rock mineral deposits, b. requiring mining companies to pay a royalty of 812% on the gross income they earn from hard rock minerals that they extract from public lands, and c. making hard rock mining companies legally responsible for restoring the land and cleaning up environmental damage caused by their activities.
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8. List three ways in which you could apply the concept : we can try to find substitutes for scarce resources, reduce resource waste, and recycle and reuse minerals to making your lifestyle more environmentally sustainable. 9. Congratulations! You are in charge of the world. What are the three most important features of your policy for developing and using the worlds nonrenewable mineral resources in the most sustainable way possible? 10.List two questions that you would like to get answered as a result of reading this chapter.
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Chapter 13 : Energy
1. Imagine that you live at the Rocky Mountain Institute headquarters building, powered mostly by the sun. Do you think that you would have to give up any of the conveniences you now enjoy? If so, what are they? Describe any adjustments you might have to make in your way of living.
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2. Some people in developing countries point out that the United States and European nations fueled their economic growth during the industrial revolution by burning coal, with little effort to control the resulting air pollution, and then sought cleaner energy sources later when they became more affluent. Developing countries say they are being asked to clean up before they becomes affluent enough to do this, without greatly slowing their economic growth. How would you deal with this dilemma? Since outdoor air pollution in developing countries has implications for the entire world, what role, if any, should the developed nations play in helping them to reduce their dependence on coal and to rely on 90 more environmentally sustainable energy sources?

3. Explain why you agree or disagree with the following proposals made by various energy analysts as ways to solve your energy problems: a. find and develop more domestic supplies of crude oil; b. place a heavy tax on gasoline and imported oil to help reduce the waste of crude oil resources and to encourage use of other alternatives;
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c. increase dependence on coal; d. phase out coal by 2050; e. increase dependence on nuclear power; f. phase out all nuclear power plants by 2025. 4. List five ways in which you unnecessarily waste energy during a typical day, and explain how these actions violate the three principles of sustainability.
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5. Congratulations! You have won a sizeable amount to build a more sustainable house of your choice. With the goal of maximizing energy efficiency, what type of house would you build? How large would it be? Where would you locate it? What types of materials would you use? What types of materials would you not use? How would you heat and cool the house?
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How would you heat water? What types of lighting, stove, refrigerator, washer, and dryer would you use? Which, if any, of these appliances could you do without? Suppose you decide not to build a house. How would you use the money to promote environmental sustainability?
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6. Should buyers of energy-efficient motor vehicles receive large rebates funded by fees levied on gas guzzlers? Explain. 7. Explain why you agree or disagree with the following proposals made by various energy analysts: a. Government subsidies for all energy alternatives should be eliminated so that all energy choices can compete in a true free-market system.
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b. All government tax breaks and other subsidies for conventional fossil fuels (oil, natural gas, and coal), synthetic natural gas and oil, and nuclear power (fission and fusion) should be phased out. They should be replaced with subsidies and tax breaks for improving energy efficiency and developing solar, wind, geothermal, hydrogen, and biomass energy alternatives.
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c. Development of solar, wind, and hydrogen energy should be left to private enterprise and should receive little or no help from the government, but nuclear energy and fossil fuels should continue to receive large government subsidies and tax breaks. 8. Congratulations! You are in charge of the world. List the five most important features of your energy policy. 9. List two questions that you would like to get answered as a result of reading this chapter.
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Chapter 14: Environmental Hazards and Human Health


1. Should we ban the use of hormone mimics such as bisphenol A in products used by children younger than age 7? Should they be banned for use in all products? Explain. 2. What are three actions you would take to reduce the global threats to human health and life from a. tuberculosis, b. HIV/AIDS, and c. malaria? 3. Evaluate the following statements: a. We should not get worked up about exposure to toxic chemicals because almost any chemical, at a 98 large enough dosage, can cause some harm.

b. We should not worry much about exposure to toxic chemicals because, through genetic adaptation, we can develop immunity to such chemicals. c. We should not worry much about exposure to toxic chemicals because we can use genetic engineering to reduce our susceptibility to the effects of toxic chemicals. d. We should not worry about exposure to a chemical such as bisphenol A (BPA) because it has not been absolutely scientifically proven that BPA has killed anyone.
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4. Workers in a number of industries are exposed to higher levels of various toxic substances than are the general public. Should workplace levels allowed for such chemicals be reduced? What economic effects might this have? 5. Explain why you agree or disagree with the proposals for reducing the death toll and other harmful effects of smoking. Do you believe there should be a ban on smoking indoors in all public places? Explain.
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6. What are the three major risks you face from a. your lifestyle, b. the area where you live, and c. what you do for a living? Which of these risks are voluntary and which are involuntary? List three steps you could take to reduce these risks. Which of these steps do you already take or plan to take? 7. Would you support legislation requiring the use of pollution prevention based on the precautionary principle in deciding what to do about risks from chemicals in the country where you live? Explain.
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8. Congratulations! You are in charge of the world. List the three most important features of your program to reduce the risks from exposure to : (a) infectious disease organisms and (b) toxic and hazardous chemicals. 9. List three ways in which you could apply the concept : We can reduce the major risks we face by becoming informed, thinking critically about risks, and making careful choices. to making your lifestyle more environmentally sustainable while reducing the major risks you face. 10.List two questions that you would like to get answered as a result of reading this chapter.
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Chapter 15 : Air Pollution, Climate Change, and Ozone Depletion


1. China relies on coal for two-thirds of its commercial energy usage and 80% of its electricity, partly because the country has abundant supplies of this resource. Yet Chinas coal burning has caused innumerable and growing problems for China and neighboring countries, and now, because of the Asian Brown Cloud, for the Pacific Ocean and the west coast of North America. Do you think China is justified in developing this resource to the maximum, as other countries, including the United States, have done with their coal resources? Explain. 103 What are Chinas alternatives?

2. Photochemical smog is largely the result of motor vehicle emissions. Considering your use, now and in the future, of motor vehicles, what are some ways in which you could reduce your contribution to photochemical smog? 3. Explain how sulfur impurities in coal can increase the acidity of rainwater and deplete soil nutrients.
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4. List three important ways in which your life would be different today if grassroots actions by U.S. citizens between the 1970s and 1990s had not led to the Clean Air Acts of 1970, 1977, and 1990, despite strong political opposition by the affected industries. List three important ways in which your life in the future might be different if grassroots actions now do not lead to strengthening of the U.S. Clean Air Act or to a similar law in the country where you live.
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5. A top U.S. presidential economic adviser once gave a speech in Williamsburg, Virginia (USA), to representatives of governments from a number of countries. He told his audience not to worry about global warming because the average global temperature increases predicted by scientists were much less than the temperature increase he had experienced that day in traveling from Washington, D.C., to nearby Williamsburg. What was the flaw in his reasoning? Outline an argument you would use to counter his claim.
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6. What are three consumption patterns or other aspects of your lifestyle that directly add greenhouse gases to the atmosphere? Which, if any, of these things would you be willing to give up to help slow projected climate change? 7. Congratulations! You are in charge of the world. List at least three points in your strategy for dealing with each of the following problems: (a) outdoor air pollution, (b) indoor air pollution, (c) climate change from human activities, and (d) ozone depletion. 8. List two questions that you would like to get 107 answered as a result of reading this chapter.

Chapter 16 : Solid and Hazardous Waste


1. Do you think that manufacturers of computers and television sets and other forms of e-waste should be required to take them back at the ends of their useful lives for repair, remanufacture, or recycling? Explain. Would you be willing to pay more for these products to cover the costs of such take-back programs? If so, what percent more per purchase would you be willing to pay?
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2. Find three items you regularly use once and then throw away. Are there other reusable items that you could use in place of these disposable items? Compare the cost of using the disposable option for a year versus the cost of using the alternatives. 3. Use the second law of thermodynamics whenever energy is converted from one form to another in a physical or chemical change, we end up with lower quality or less usable energy than we started with to explain why : a. dilution is not always the solution to pollution from hazardous wastes and b. different categories of hazardous waste and recyclable waste should not be mixed.
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4. Changing World Technologies has built a pilot plant to test a process it has developed for converting a mixture of computers, old tires, turkey bones and feathers, and other wastes into oil by mimicking and speeding up natural processes for converting biomass into oil. If this recycling process turns out to be technologically and economically feasible, explain why it could lead to increased waste production.
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5. Would you oppose having a hazardous waste landfill, waste treatment plant, deep-injection well, or incinerator in your community? For each of these facilities, explain your answer. If you oppose these disposal facilities, how do you believe the hazardous waste generated in your community should be managed? 6. How does your school dispose of its solid and hazardous waste? Does it have a recycling program? How well does it work? Does it have a hazardous waste collection system? If so, what does it do with these wastes? Write a report based on these questions and list three ways to improve your schools waste reduction 111 and management system.

7. Give your reasons for agreeing or disagreeing with each of the following proposals for dealing with hazardous waste: a. Reduce the production of hazardous waste and encourage recycling and reuse of hazardous materials by charging producers a tax or fee for each unit of waste generated. b. Ban all land disposal and incineration of hazardous waste to protect air, water, and soil from contamination and to encourage reuse, recycling, and treatment of wastes to make them less hazardous. c. Provide low-interest loans, tax breaks, and other financial incentives to encourage industries that produce hazardous waste to reduce, reuse, recycle, 112 treat, and decompose such waste.

8. List three ways in which you could apply the concept : Shifting to a low-waste society requires individuals and organizations to reduce resource use and to reuse and recycle wastes at local, national, and global levels to making your lifestyle more environmentally sustainable. 9. Congratulations! You are in charge of the world. List the three most important components of your strategy for dealing with (a) solid waste and (b) hazardous waste. 10.List two questions you would like to get answered as a result of reading this chapter.
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Chapter 17 : Environmental Economics, Politics, and Worldviews 1. Is environmental regulation bad for the economy? Explain. Describe harmful and beneficial forms of environmental regulation. 2. Suppose that over the next 20 years, the environmental and health costs of goods and services will be gradually internalized until their market prices more closely reflect their total costs.
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What harmful effects and what beneficial effects might such full-cost pricing have on your lifestyle? 3. Explain why you agree or disagree with each of the major principles for shifting to a more environmentally sustainable economy. 4. Explain why you agree or disagree with each of the eight principles, which some analysts have proposed for use in making environmental policy decisions.
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5. This chapter summarized several different environmental worldviews. Go through these worldviews and find the beliefs you agree with, and then describe your own environmental worldview. Which, if any, of your beliefs were added or modified as a result of taking this course? Compare your answer with those of your classmates. 6. Explain why you agree or disagree with the following ideas: a. everyone has the right to have as many children as they want;
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b. all people have a right to use as many resources as they want; c. individuals should have the right to do whatever they want with land they own, regardless of whether such actions harm the environment, their neighbors, or the local community; d. other species exist to be used by humans; e. all forms of life have an intrinsic value and therefore have a right to exist. Are your answers to each of these items consistent with the beliefs making up your environmental worldview, which you described in answering question 5?
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7. If you could use television or YouTube to speak to everyone in the world today about our environmental problems, what are the three most important pieces of environmental wisdom that you would give in your speech? What beliefs from your environmental worldview influenced your selection of these three items? Compare your choices with those of your classmates. 8. List two questions that you would like to get answered as a result of reading this chapter.
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iii. Interpersonal / Group / Team Skills (EC 2000 Outcomes: d, g, f).

iv. Communication Skills


(EC 2000 Outcomes : d, g, and h). v. Assessment and Self-assessment Skills (EC 2000 Outcomes : d, f, and i).

vi. Integration of Disciplinary Knowledge


and Global Thinking Skills
(EC 2000 Outcomes : a,b,c,d,e and h,i,j,k).

vii. Change Management Skills


(EC 2000 Outcomes : d, f, h, j, and k).
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Attitudes and Values (EC 2000 Outcomes : f, h, j, and i)


The failure of the engineering curricula to address attitudes and values systematically has had unfortunate consequences. Engineers often make decisions without feeling a need to take into account any of the social, ethical, and moral consequences of those decisions, believing that those considerations are in someone elses purview.
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3. EMPLOYABILITY OF ENGINEERING GRADUATES

3.1 UNDERSTANDING EMPLOYABILITY SKILLS


Engineer is the heart of any Engineering Business.

We live in a time of revolutionary change. The world is relying increasingly on technology for economic growth and job development. Within this technological context, engineers play an ever more significant role. They develop new manufacturing processes and products;
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create and manage energy, transportation, infrastructure, and communications systems; prevent new and redress old environmental problems; create pioneering health care devices; and, in general, make technology work. Through these activities, engineers create a huge potential to develop national wealth.
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The nation with the best engineering talent is in possession of the core ingredient of comparative economic and industrial advantage. Development of employability skills in engineering students and employees is essential to any nations continued competitiveness and growth in highly competitive global markets. At the same time employers and educators are unclear about what employability skills are and how to develop them.
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Everyone employees, employers, educators, and students can benefit from developing employability skills. Employees find it easier to manage the changes and challenges they face in the workplace. Employers gain in the form of enhanced productivity, shorter production cycles, lower staff turnover, reduced error rates and other bottom-line gains. Employers also gain happier and more selfconfident employees who are able to better satisfy the customers.
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Educators gain when education is made more relevant for students. Students find it easier to make transition to the world of work or to pursue further study. Employability skills are the generic skills, attitudes and behaviours that employers look for regardless of kind of work to be done: when they hire new recruits, and that they seek to develop in their current employees.
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In addition to equipping a person for the world of work, employability skills: open up avenues for achieving personal fulfilment, increasing organizational prosperity, and contributing to nations well-being. Employability skills are the career capital that people need to get a job and acquire job-specific skills while on the job.
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Some central characteristics of a fully skilled person: The ability to keep informed of current circumstancesin other words, a capacity to learn and keep learning throughout ones life. The flexibility to adjust in a timely fashion to a constantly changing environmentin other words adaptability; The ability to work well with othersin the broadest sense, sociability; and The finesse to analyze a situation, develop a plan and carry it out.
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People who have employability skills are highly employable; those who do not are at a significant disadvantage in the labour market. Everyone can develop employability skills and gain valuable career capital for themselves. Employability skills are developed in school and college and through a variety of life experiences outside. The student, the family and the educational system, supported and enhanced by the rest of society share this responsibility.
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Relationship between Employability Skills and other Kinds of Learning (Typology of Learning: The Learning Hierarchy)

Learning
Skills Generic
Employability Academic Personal Management Teamwork Life/ Other

Knowledge

Specific
JobTechnical Specific Technological

Source: The conference Board of Canada, 1999.


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3.2 EMPLOYABILITY SKILLS PROFILE (ESP): (The conference Board of Canada, 1992)
The employability skills (26) are divided into three categories: Academic Skills (9): Communicating (4), Thinking (4), and Learning (1). Personal Management Skills (10): Positive Attitude and Behaviors (4), Responsibility (3), and Adaptability(3). Teamwork Skills (7)
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Academic Skills(9) Employers need a person who can: Communicate (4) 1.Understand and speak the languages in which business is conducted 2.Listen to, understand and learn 3.Read, comprehend and use written materials, including graphs, charts and displays 4.Write effectively in the languages in which business is conducted
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Think (4) 5. Think critically and act logically to evaluate situations, solve problems and make decisions 6. Understand and solve problems involving mathematics and use the results 7. Use technology, instruments, tools and information systems effectively 8. Access and apply specialized knowledge from various fields (e.g., skilled trades, technology, physical sciences, arts and social sciences) Learn (1) 9. Continue to learn for life (Learning from cradle to grave)
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Traditional IQ focuses on cognitive intelligence. Learning is also an emotional process. If you doubt this, recall the excitement you felt when you finally succeeded in working really difficult problem in school/college. Remember the dread of entering an exam room when, you werent sure about the subject material. If there is no emotion, there probably isnt much learning going on.
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The Evolution-Designed Brain


External stimuli or translated into the language of the brain

Thalamus

Neocortex

Seat of rational thought

Amygdala
A small almond-shaped region
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To be successful in life, a more holistic approachboth the cognitive and affective dimensions of intelligenceis needed. In effect we have two minds, one that thinks and one that feels. Significant insights have been discovered in recent years that the emotions produced by brain affect all aspects of life. An emotion is a physiological response to a situation that is too important to leave to intellect, such as danger, painful loss, persisting toward a goal despite frustrations, bonding with a mate, building a family.
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There are eight basic emotions: 1. Anger, 2. Fear, 3. Happiness, 4. Sadness, 5. Love, 6. Surprise, 7. Disgust, and 8. Shame. Understanding Emotional Intelligence holds some valuable lessons as we attempt to design more effective Human Resource Development programs.
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Personal Management Skills (10): Personal Management Skills fall into three categories: Positive Attitude and Behaviors (4), Responsibility (3), and Adaptability (3). Employers need a person who can demonstrate: Positive Attitudes and Behaviours (4) 10.Self-esteem and confidence 11.Honesty, integrity and personal ethics 12.A positive attitude toward learning, growth and personal health 13.Initiative, energy and persistence to get the job done
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Responsibility (3): 14. The ability to set goals and priorities in work and personal life 15. The ability to plan and manage time, money and other resources to achieve goals 16. Accountability for actions taken Adaptability (3): 17. A positive attitude toward change 18. Recognition of and respect for peoples diversity and individual differences 19. The ability to identify and suggest new ideas to get the job donecreativity
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Is Your Glass Half Full / Half Empty?


POSITIVE ATTITUDE: IT CHANGES EVERYTHING

The difference is their attitude

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Perceptual Ambiguity : Young Woman / Old Woman (British Cartoonist W.E. Hill, 1915)

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Teamwork Skills (7) Employers need a person who can: Work with Others 20. Understand and contribute to the organizations goals 21. Understand and work within the culture of the group 22. Plan and make decisions with others and support the outcomes 23. Respect the thoughts and opinions of others in the group 24. Exercise give and take to achieve group results 25. Seek a team approach as appropriate 26. Lead when appropriate, mobilizing the group for high performance 142

Attitudes: States of being (6) Motivate people and have the potential to shape their actions. Personal Management (5) 10. Self-esteem and confidence 12. Positive attitude toward learning 16. Accountability toward change 17. Positive attitude to change 18. Recognition and respect of diversity Teamwork (1) 23. Respect the thoughts and opinions of others For example, a positive attitude to learning might incline a person to learn to be self-reliant on the job rather than always depending on fellow workers for help. 143

Behaviours: States of having(12) Quality that predisposes people to act in characteristic ways. Academic (1) 7. Continue to learn for life Personal Management (5) 11. Have honesty, integrity and personal ethics 13. Have initiative, energy and persistence 14. Have ability to set goals and priorities 15. Have ability to plan and manage time, etc. 16. Have ability to identify and suggest new ideas
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Teamwork (6)
20. Understand and contribute to the organizations goals 21. Understand and work within the culture of the group 22. Plan and make decisions with others 24. Exercise give and take 25. Seek a team approach 26. Lead when appropriate For example, having leadership behaviours entails being in the habit of leading when appropriate.
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Skills: States of doing (8):


Which are discernible only when they are called forth in action. Academic (8) 1. Understand and speak the languages of business 2. Listen to, understand and learn 3. Read, comprehend and use written materials 4. Write effectively in languages of business 5. Think critically 6. Understand and solve problems 7. Use technology 8. Access and apply specialized knowledge For example, effective writing can only take place 146 when a person actually writes

3.3 EMPLOYABILITY OF ENGINEERING GRADUATES IN INDIA


(Policy Research Working Paper 5640, The World Bank, South Asia Region, Education Team April 2011). Government of India is implementing Technical Education Quality Improvement Program (TEQIP) with World Bank co-finance to improve learning outcomes of engineering graduates. World Bank conducted an employer survey amongst the member companies of Federation of Indian Chambers of Commerce and Industry (FICCI)
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The employer survey seeks to address this skill gap by answering three questions: Which skills do employers consider important when hiring new engineering graduates? How satisfied are employers with the skills of engineering graduates? and In which important skills are the graduates falling short?
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25 skills are listed below in three groups. Order of importance is indicated in the top right corner of each skill.
Group 1 Core Employability Skills (10)

Group 2 Professional Skills (7)

Group 3 Communication Skills (8)

Integrity

1 Identify, formulate, 20 Written (understands/applies and solve technical / communication professional and ethical engineering problems
principles to decisions)

14

Self-discipline
(exhibits control of personal behavior)

7 Design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs

22 Design & conduct 17 experiments, and analyze and interpret data 15

Reliability

2 Use appropriate/ 11 Reading (can be depended on to modern tools, complete work equipment, assignments) technologies (other than computers)

Self-motivated

Apply knowledge of 12 Communication in 6 mathematics, science, English 149 engineering

Group 1 Core Employability Skills


Entrepreneurship Skills

Group 2 Professional Skills


skills

Table Continued Group 3 Communication Skills


16 18

5 Customer service 25 Technical skills 3 Knowledge of 23 Verbal

(e.g., programming) communication


13

Team Work
(interpersonal relationships)

contemporary issues

Understands and 10 Creativity takes directions for (identifies new work assignments approaches to Willingness to learn 4 problems)
(Life-long learning)

Basic computer 19
(e.g.,word-processing)

Flexibility (responds 9
well to change)
Empathy (understands 21 the situations, feelings, or motives of others)

Advanced 24 computer (e.g., spreadsheets, databases)

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The results of the survey confirm widespread dissatisfaction with the current engineering graduates. 64% of employers are only somewhat satisfied or worse with the quality of the new hires. Skill gaps are particularly severe in the HigherOrder Thinking Skills (HOTS, Blooms taxonomy). Communication in English has the smallest skill gap, but remains one of the most demanded skills by the employers. There exists a mismatch of industry needs and the skill sets of the engineering graduates.
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3.4 SELF-ASSESSMENT & SELF-DEVELOPMENT EXERCISE


You measure yourself against each skill on a scale 1 to 25 (25 being high) In areas you feel you are strong, just keep doing what you have been doing. In areas you feel you need to improve, map out a plan for self-improvement.
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Skill
Integrity (understands/applies professional and ethical principles to decisions) Reliability (can be depended on to complete work assignments) Team Work (interpersonal relationships) Willingness to learn (Lifelong learning) Entrepreneurship Skills Communication in English

Rating Importance Personal


25

24

3 4 5 6

23

22
21 20
153

Skill
Self-discipline (exhibits control of personal behavior) Self-motivated Flexibility (responds well to change) Understands and takes directions for work assignments

Rating Importance Personal 19 18 17 16 15 14


154

8 9 10

11

Use appropriate/ modern tools, equipment, technologies (other than computers)


Apply knowledge of mathematics, science, engineering

12


13

Skill
Creativity (identifies new approaches to problems)

Rating Importance Personal 13

14
15 16

Written communication
Reading Technical skills (e.g., programming

12 11
10

17
18 19

Design & conduct experiments, and analyze and interpret data


Verbal communication Basic computer (e.g., word-processing)

9
8 7
155


20 21

Skill
Identify, formulate, and solve technical / engineering problems Empathy (understands the situations, feelings, or motives of others) Design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs Knowledge of contemporary issues Advanced computer (e.g., spreadsheets, databases) Customer service skills

Rating
Importance Personal 6

5
4

22 23 24 25

3
2 1
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Rate the skills on a scale of 1 to 25 (25 being high) as to their relative importance.
25 1
12 13

25 25

PERSONAL RATING

II

I
13 12

13 12

III
1
12 13

IV
1 25

IMPORTANCE
Skills Needing least attention Skills Needing greatest attention 157

Pick the skills that need your greatest attention and the skills that need your least attention. Develop a plan for self-improvement for those that need your greatest attention. Implement the plan.
# Skills needing greatest Attention Skills needing least Attention

Quadrant IV

Quadrant III

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Corporations and employers have frequently and publicly complained about the lack of professional awareness and low levels of communication and teamwork skills in engineering graduates. Increasing numbers of administrators and professors of engineering education have been questioning the viability of the way engineering has been traditionally taught.
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3.5 THE CHANGING NATURE OF STUDENT GENERATIONS

The background, attitudes and expectations of students are changing increasingly rapidly. Each generation grows up in a different technological environment, in a different economic climate and according to different social mores. Todays students are no longer the people our educational system was designed to teach. It has to be the business of engineering educators to motivate students to engage with modern engineering and to relate their offered programs to the contemporary environment, both in content and style.
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3.6 SOCIETAL ISSUES:


We can look at the various societal pressures on the engineering curriculum and on engineering programs. We cannot, and should not, ignore the reality that we live in a world containing war, famine, environmental damage, nuclear power, weapons of mass destruction, religions and climate change. We must also recognize the technological and social change relating to communication and travel.
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Finally, knowledge increases exponentially, forcing us to make choices about what is important and what is worth learning. We must consider what are the most timely and contemporary examples of engineering with which to illustrate our chosen content and make its societal context relevant to our students. Additionally we have to consider the teaching and learning methodologies which best encourage student learning.
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4. PARADIGM SHIFT IN ENGINEERING EDUCATION Education is not the amount of information that is put into your brain and runs riot there, undigested, all your life. We must have lifeenriching, man-making, character- building assimilation of ideas. Swami Vivekananda

In todays world and in the future, engineering education programs must not only teach the fundamentals of engineering theory, experimentation and practice, but be RELEVANT, ATTRACTIVE and CONNECTED:
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RELEVANT to the lives and careers of students, preparing them for a broad range of careers, as well as for lifelong learning involving both formal programs and hands-on experience; ATTRACTIVE so that the excitement and intellectual content of engineering will attract highly talented students with a wider variety of backgrounds and career interests and will empower them to succeed; and CONNECTED to the needs and issues of the broader community through integrated activities with other parts of the educational system, industry and government.
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And just as important as their specific technical skills, engineers receive valuable preparation for a host of other careers in such areas as finance, medicine, law and management. These professions require analytical, integrative and problem-solving abilities, all of which are part of an engineering education. Thus, an up to date undergraduate engineering education is a necessity for living and working in the technologicallydependent society of the twenty-first century.
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While engineering education has served our nation well, there is broad recognition that it must change to meet new challenges. These changes are vital to the nations industrial strength and to the ability of engineers to serve as technology and policy decision makers. To meet the challenges, engineering education must undergo a paradigm shift. New standards are needed to emphasize clear educational objectives, industry collaboration, outcomes assessment, and continuous improvement.
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4.1 WHAT IS ENGINEERING?


Engineering is concerned with Developing, Providing and Maintaining Infrastructure, Products, Processes and Services for Society. Engineering addresses the complete life cycle of a product, process or service, from conception, through design and manufacture, to decommissioning and disposal, within the constraints imposed by economic, legal, social, cultural and environmental considerations.
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Engineering relies on three core elements:


scientific principles,

mathematics, and
realization.

Scientific principles clearly underpin all engineering, while mathematics is a language used to communicate parameters, model and optimise solutions.
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Realization encapsulates the whole range of creative abilities which distinguish the engineer from the scientist; to conceive, make and actually bring to fruition something which has never existed before.
This creativity and innovation to develop economically viable and ethically sound sustainable solutions is an essential and distinguishing characteristic of engineering, shared by the many diverse, established and emerging disciplines within engineering.
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4.2 PURPOSE OF ENGINEERING EDUCATION

Engineering Education is not about the acquisition of specific practical skills, however useful or interesting they might be.

It is not about training people to run CFD codes or send CAD designs to a CNC machine or to grow crystals or to sign off structural steel work.
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Engineering Education is about the conceptual, planning, and design skills which should precede all these activities.
It is about imagining and understanding and predicting, as quantitatively as possible, why and how an engineering objective can be realised and delivered.
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It is not about how to cut the teeth on a gear wheel; it is about deciding on the number of teeth and their shape and understanding why (if at all) this gear wheel is essential to the proper functioning of the device. If indeed the device itself is necessary. Engineering curricula moved from handson, practice-based curricula to ones that emphasized mathematical modeling and theory-based approaches.
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Engineering Benchmark Statement


(Quality Assurance Agency(QAA), UK, 2010) Engineering graduates need to possess the following characteristics. They will: be rational and pragmatic, interested in the practical steps necessary for a concept to become reality. want to achieve sustainable solutions to problems and have strategies for being creative, innovative and overcoming difficulties by employing their knowledge in a flexible manner.
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be numerate and highly computer literate, and capable of attention to detail. be cost and value-conscious, and aware of the social, cultural, environmental, health and safety, and wider professional responsibilities they should display. appreciate the international dimension to engineering, commerce and communication. when faced with an ethical issue be able to formulate and operate within appropriate codes of conduct.
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be professional in their outlook, capable of team working, effective communicators, and able to exercise responsibility.
Vital Characteristics of Engineering Education: Mathematics and applied science skills, Creativity (Problem Solving and Making Things),

Teamwork, and
Communication
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5.GUIDANCE FOR FACULTY


The faculty is the heart of any education program Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET). Four characteristics of the model engineering faculty member: i. Scholars Four forms of scholarship: Scholarship of Teaching Scholarship of Discovery Scholarship of Integration Scholarship of Application
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ii. Effective Teachers:


Pedagogy: Study of how education works, and how students learn. Pedagogy, in our context, is a misnomer, since it refers to how children learn. Andragogy has been suggested as a better word for the study of the learning of adults, but it does not seem to be catching on. Appropriate pedagogical and education training is critical to enhancing the effectiveness of faculty in creating excitement for learning by students.
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Alternative pedagogical techniques have been shown to be more effective and address the spectrum of student learning styles: Cooperative (team-based) learning, Cooperation among students typically results in: higher achievement and greater productivity, more caring, supportive, and committed relationships, and greater psychological health, social competence, and self-esteem.
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Inductive (discovery) learning,


problem-based learning,

Assignment of open-ended questions,


Multidisciplinary problems and problem formulation exercises, Routine in-class problem-solving,

Brainstorming, and
Trouble-shooting exercises.
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Kolbs Experiential Learning Theory


(ELT, 1984) Kolb postulated that learning involves a cycle of four processes, in which knowledge is created through transformation of experience. The axis of the cycle the vertical dimension and the horizontal dimension represent the two dimensions of the learning task.
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The vertical dimension (concrete experience to abstract conceptualization) represents the input information either from experience or from abstractions.
The horizontal dimension (reflective observation to active experimentation) refers to the processing of information by either internally reflecting on the experience or externally acting upon the conclusions which have been drawn.
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THE KOLB LEARNING CYCLE

Vertical Dimension: Concert Experience to Abstract conceptualization

1. Learners Concrete Experience (CE)


Learners personal involvement in a specific experience (Sensing / Feeling)

QUADRANT 4 WHAT IF?

QUADRANT 1 WHY?

4. Active Experimentation(AE) 2. Learners Reflective observation (RO) Learners Experiments (Real or Learner reflects on this experience from imagined to confirm / refute / many views, seeking to find its meaning. refine the concept; moves on to (Observing / Watching) new concrete experience. QUADRANT 3 QUADRANT 2 (Doing) WHAT? HOW? Horizontal Dimension: Reflective Observation to Active Experimentation 3. Learners Abstract Conceptualization (AC): Learner reasons and forms an abstract concept (Thinking)

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SAMPLE INSTRUCTIONAL SEQUENCE


1. CE: In laboratory, students work with a variety of systems to observe the properties of frequency response

4. AE Students use an oscilloscope to measure amplitude ratio, plot results, compare with theory

2. RO With computer, students attempt to derive function common for their observations.

3. AC Instructor lectures on Bode plots with mathematical derivation relating it to systems derived by students

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Instructional activities that may support different aspects of learning cycle.


CONCRETE EXPERIENCE (CE) laboratories observations primary text reading simulations/games field work trigger films readings problem sets examples ACTIVE EXPERIMENTATION (AE) REFLECTIVE OBSERVATION(RO) simulations logs case study journals laboratory discussion field work brainstorming projects thought questions homework rhetorical questions ABSTRACT CONCEPTUALIZATION (AC) lecture papers model building projects 184 analogies

BIGGS CONSTRUCTIVE ALIGNMENT (1999)


Constructionist (or the constructivist) nature of engineering education: learning engineering involves constructing understanding from a number of smaller components. This construction can only be done by the learner, not by the teacher. Teacher cannot learn for the student; learning is to be done by the student. Constructive alignment: the curriculum should be designed so that the learning activities, and assessment of them, should both be aligned with the program outcomes.
185

Characteristics of an Effective Teacher: Stimulating, clear, well-organized, warm, approachable, prepared, helpful, enthusiastic, fair, and so forth.
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Two dimensional Model of Effective Teaching Intellectual Interpersonal Rapport (Obligation to students)
Excitement (Obligation to knowledge and society)
High (Extremely clear and exciting)

Punishing
(Attacking, sarcastic, disdainful, controlling and unpredictable)

Low
(Cold, distant, highly controlling, unpredictable)

Moderate

High

( Relatively (Warm, Open, Warm, predictable, and approachable, highly student democratic, and oriented ) predictable)

Intellectual Attacker

6. Intellectual Authority

8. Exemplary Lecturer

9. Complete, exemplary

Moderate (Clear and interesting)


Low (Vague and dull)

Adequate Attacker
Inadequate Attacker

3. Adequate

5. Competent

7. Exemplary Facilitator
4. Warm fuzzy
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1. Inadequate

2. Marginal

iii. Relevant Practical Experience:


What nobler employment, or more valuable to the state, than that of the man who instructs the rising generation?
- Cicero (106-43 B.C.), Roman Author and Politician

Those who can, do; those who cant, teach George Bernard Shaw (1856 1950), Irish Playwright, Nobel Prize in Literature 1925

But in todays world, engineering teachers have to be able to: do engineering, and teach engineering
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iv. Positive Role Models:


For many students, the first engineer they meet is the engineering faculty member. Balancing Teaching with Other Responsibilities: An engineering faculty member has to fulfill a tripartite mission teaching, research and service to institution.
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CRITICAL QUESTIONS IN CURRICULUM


DEVELOPMENT AND TEACHING METHODS

What steps can be taken to integrate class material across disciplines to develop students approach to problem- solving? How should the development of critical skills be facilitated in the curriculum?
190

How can students be motivated to be self-directed learners? How can we create an environment in the engineering college in which many exciting, engaging, and
empowering educational innovations

can flourish and make a significant difference in educating future engineers?


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6. OUTCOMES BASED ENGINEERING EDUCATION


International trends in education show a shift from the traditional "teachercentered" approach to a "student-centered" approach. This alternative model focuses on what the students are expected to be able to do at the end of the program. Hence, this approach is commonly referred to as an Outcomes-Based Education(OBE).
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The great end of life is not knowledge, but action. T.H.Huxley (1825 1895) Actions speak louder than words. Proverb Knowing is not enough, we must apply. Willing is not enough, we must do.
Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

Tell me and I forget; Teach me and I remember; Involve me and I Learn.


Benjamin Franklin (1706 90), American Writer

Education is the ladder to reach the fruit of the tree of knowledge, not the fruit itself.
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Difference between deep and surface learning Teachers need to develop understanding in the sudents, not just the ability to memorise or parrot information. Outcomes-Based Education (OBE) focuses on what the student is capable of doing not on what he/she merely knows (gap between mere knowing and doing).
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Course: A discrete credit-bearing element of teaching, often with an associated examination or other assessment. Program: A coherent set of taught courses which leads to a qualification such as a degree. Undergraduate Program: Program which leads to a first degree such as B.Tech., or B.E. and Postgraduate taught program: Program which involves teaching beyond first graduation such as M.Tech., or M.E.
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Planning, teaching, and assessment are the three interactive components of educational instruction. Planning involves the establishment of program educational objectives, and program outcomes, which lead to decisions about the curriculum, courses, and the types of instructional activities that will enable students to successfully achieve the required course outcomes.
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The desired learning outcomes and instructional activities then guide the assessment techniques. Finally, the assessment results direct, and even modify the teaching-learning process. Student assessment is the systematic process of collecting and interpreting information to make decisions about students status in relation to course objectives, decisions that affect student lives. High-quality assessments not only provide valuable information about student achievement, they also assist educator to determine the effectiveness of teaching-learning process.
197

Interaction of Planning, Teaching, and Assessment in Educational Instruction

PLANNING
Program Educational Objectives and Program Outcomes

Course Outcomes

Instructional Activities

A S S E S S M E N T

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6.1 VISION & MISSION


Vision: Futuristic statement that the institution would like to achieve over a long period of time. Mission: Means by which the institution proposes to move towards this vision. Mission statements are essentially the means to achieve the vision of the institution. Vision Statement (Aspirational; Dream or Ideal): It is something you want to become, to achieve, its a seductive image of an ideal future. The vision sets out what the organization wants to accomplish, and should inspire staff and supporters.

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Mission statement: How the company intends to make that future into a reality. It explains the purpose of the organization why it exists? It captures the organizations soul. Mission emphasizes action.
Difference between Vision & Mission Statements:

Vision statement focuses organizations future. Mission statement focuses organizations present state.

on on

an an
200

Examples:
Vision of an Engineering College: To create high quality engineering professionals. Mission of the Engineering College: To offer a well balanced programme of instruction, practical experience and opportunities for an overall personality development.
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Vision __________________(Name of the Institute) will be recognized as a global leader for excellence in technical education, research and industry collaboration. Mission To impart quality technical education blended with professional and life-long learning skills to meet national and global challenges, and To inculcate and promote leadership qualities and right values amongst engineering students.
202

Canadian Cancer Society Vision Statement: Creating a world where no Canadian fears cancer. Canadian Cancer Society Mission Statement: The Canadian Cancer Society is a national, community-based organization of volunteers whose mission is the eradication of cancer and the enhancement of the quality of life of people living with cancer. Nike Vision Statement: To be the number one athletic company in the world. Nike Mission Statement: To bring inspiration and innovation to every athlete in the world. 203

An engineering educational program must have a mission statement which is in conformity with the mission of the institution. The program mission must be translated into specific program objectives and program outcomes that are expected of the engineering educational process.
204

6.2 PROGRAM EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES (PEOs)


Curriculum
Program Mission Student Admission

Engineering Career
Time

Graduation: POs

Few years after Graduation: PEOs

Program educational objectives are broad statements that describe the career and professional accomplishments that the program is preparing graduates to achieve (during the first few years following graduation from the program).
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For defining the program objectives the faculty members must continuously work with local employers, industry, R&D advisors, and the alumni. While framing the Program Educational Objectives (PEOs) the following points should be kept in mind: Stakeholders and faculty members should participate in framing the PEOs. PEOs should be consistent with the mission of the Program. 206

PEOs should be based on the needs of the constituencies. PEOs should be specific program and not too broad. to the

PEOs should be achievable by the program. PEOs should not be too narrow and similar to Program Outcomes. The number of PEOs should be manageable.
207

The program objectives can be broadly defined on five counts:


I. Core Competence: To provide students with a solid foundation in mathematical, scientific and engineering fundamentals required to solve engineering problems. II. Breadth: To train students with good scientific and engineering breadth so as to comprehend, analyze, design, and create novel products and solutions for the real life problems.
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III. Preparation:
To prepare students to excel in competitive examinations / postgraduate programs / advanced education or to succeed in industry/ technical profession.

IV. Professionalism:
To inculcate in students professional and ethical attitude, effective communication skills, teamwork skills, multidisciplinary approach, and an ability to relate engineering issues to broader social context. 209

V. Learning Environment: To provide student with an academic environment with awareness of excellence, leadership, and the life-long learning needed for a successful professional career.

Achievement of PEOs
There should be enough evidence and documentation to show the achievement of PEOs as set by the Institution with the help of the assessment and evaluation processes that have been developed. Also show that this continuous process leads 210 to refinement / improvement of PEOs.

6.3 PROGRAM OUTCOMES (POs)


Curriculum
Program Mission

Engineering Career
Time

Student Admission

Graduation: POs

Few years after Graduation: PEOs

Program outcomes are narrower statements that describe what students are expected to know, attitudes they are expected to hold, and what they are able to do by the time of graduation. These are essentially a range of the knowledge, skills, and attitudes (behavior) that students acquire in their matriculation through the program by the time of graduation.

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Knowledge: Facts students know and concepts they understand Skills: Skills students use in managing and applying their knowledge such as computation, experimentation, analysis, synthesis/design, evaluation, communication, leadership, and teamwork. Attitudes: Attitudes that dictate the goals toward which their knowledge and skills will be directed personal values, concerns, preferences, and biases.
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The engineering programs must demonstrate that their graduates attain the following outcomes by the time of graduation (Criterion 3 of Engineering Criteria (EC) 2000, ABET): a) Application of Engineering and other sciences: an ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science and engineering,
213

b) Experimental Skills: an ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data, c) Engineering Design: an ability to design a system, component or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability,
214

d) Multi-disciplinary Teamwork:
an ability to function on multidisciplinary teams, e) Problem Solving: an ability to identify, formulate and solve engineering problems, f) Professionalism & Ethics:

an understanding of professional and ethical responsibility,


215

g) Effective Communication:

an ability to communicate effectively,


h) Broad Education:

the broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context,
i) Life-long Learning:

a recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long learning,


216

j) Contemporary Issues: knowledge of contemporary issues, and k) Modern Engineering Tools: an ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice. Programs Outcomes are outcomes (a) through (k) plus any additional outcomes that may be articulated by the program.
217

POs (Criterion 2, NBA) formulated must be consistent with the NBAs Graduate Attributes.

NBA Graduate Attributes (In alignment with Washington Accord (WA) Graduate Attributes) i. Engineering Knowledge: Apply knowledge of mathematics, science, engineering fundamentals and core engineering specialization to the defined and applied engineering procedures, processes, systems or methodologies (PO a of EC 2000).
218

ii. Problem Analysis:


Identify, formulate, study literature, and analyze broadlydefined engineering problems in
reaching substantiated conclusions

using analytical tools appropriate to respective discipline or area of specialisation (POs a & e of EC 2000).
219

iii. Design / Development of Solutions: Design solutions for broadly defined engineering/technology problems and contribute to the design of systems, components or processes to meet the specified needs with appropriate consideration for public health and safety, cultural, societal, and environmental considerations (PO c of EC 2000).

220

iv. Investigations of complex problems :

Conduct investigations of broadly defined problems; locate, search and select relevant data from codes, databases and literature design and conduct experiments to provide valid conclusions (PO b of EC 2000).
221

v. Modern Tool Usage: Select and apply appropriate techniques, resources, and modern engineering and IT tools, including prediction and modeling, to broadly-defined engineering activities, with an understanding of the limitations (PO k of EC 2000).
222

vi. The Engineer and Society: Demonstrate understanding of the societal, health, safety, legal and cultural issues, and
the consequent responsibilities

relevant to engineering technology practice (POs c, h, & j of EC 2000)


223

vii. Environment and Sustainability:

Understand the impact of engineering/technology solutions in societal and environmental context, and demonstrate knowledge of, and need for sustainable development (POs c & j of EC 2000).
224

viii. Ethics:
Understand and commit to professional ethics and responsibilities and norms of engineering technology practice (PO f of EC 2000).

ix. Individual and Team Work: Function effectively as an individual, and as a member or leader in diverse technical teams (PO d of EC 2000).
225

x. Communication: Communicate effectively on broadly defined engineering activities with the engineering community and with society at large, by being able to comprehend and write effective reports and design documentation, make effective presentations, and give and receive clear instructions (PO g of EC 2000) .
226

xi. Project Management and Finance: Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of engineering management principles and apply the same to ones own work, as a member and leader in a team and to manage projects in multidisciplinary environments (POs d & j of EC 2000).
227

xii. Life-long Learning: Recognize the need for, and have the ability to engage in independent and life-long learning in specialized
technologies (PO i of EC 2000).
228

Suggested Program Outcomes


Combining NBAs GAs and ABETs POs
1. Application of Engineering and Other Sciences

to the Real World Engineering Issues:


An ability to identify, formulate, research literature, analyze, and solve complex engineering problems reaching substantiated conclusions applying the knowledge of mathematics, natural & physical, and engineering sciences. (NBAs GAs: 1 & 2; ABETs POs: a & e)
229

2. Systems Approach to the Real World Engineering

Issues Incorporating all the Constraints: An ability to design a system, component or process and develop solutions for complex engineering problems to meet the desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, legal, social, political, cultural, professional, ethical, health & safety, manufacturability, and sustainability.
(NBAs GAs: 3, 6, 7 & 8; ABETs POs: c f h & j)
230

3. Investigative Approach to the Real World Engineering Issues:


An ability to use research-based knowledge and research methods including design & conduct of experiments, analysis & interpretation of data, and synthesis of the information to draw valid inferences. (NBAs GA: 4; ABETs PO: b)
231

4. Application of IT and Other Modern Tools:

An ability to create, select, and apply appropriate techniques, skills, resources, and modern engineering and IT tools including modeling to complex engineering activities with an understanding of the limitations.

(NBAs GA: 5; ABETs PO: k)


232

5. Interpersonal & Team Skills:


An ability to function effectively as an individual, and as a member or leader in a team to manage projects and in multidisciplinary settings and teams. (NBAs GAs: 9 & 11; ABETs PO: d)
233

6. Effective Communication:
An ability to communicate effectively on complex engineering activities with the engineering and other professionals and with society at large, such as, being able to comprehend and write effective reports and design documentation, make effective presentations, and give and receive clear instructions. (NBAs GA: 10; ABETs PO: g)
234

7. Life-long Learning:
A recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in independent, and life-long learning in the broadest context of technological change. (NBAs GA: 12; ABETs PO: i)
235

The major emphasis of the accreditation process is to measure the outcomes of the program that is being accredited. The outcomes as listed in NBA Manual (2013) are observable, measurable and prepare graduates to attain the PEOs.

The common stem of the outcomes is:


When this chapter has been completed. The phrases that define the outcomes begin with the action verbs: define, calculate, estimate, and outline.
236

6.4 MAPPING POs TO PEOs AND COs TO POs


How does one develop program objectives and program outcomes?

Is this a chicken and egg type of question?


No, the program outcomes derive from the program objectives. POs must foster attainment of PEOs.

There is a hierarchy to the process and it is a top-down process that begins with the Program Objectives.

237

The sequential structure, from objectives to courses, consists of: 1. Program Educational Objectives are expected career descriptors. 2. Program Outcomes are graduates attributes that foster the achievement of the objectives. 3. The curriculum / courses / other program aspects are to instill the program outcomes.
238

The structure in which one component supports another may be compared to a fruit tree. The curriculum, courses, and other program aspects are the trunk that supports the outcomes and objectives. The branches form the structure of the program outcomes. Finally, the objectives are the fruit yielded by educated and informed graduates.
239

Learning takes place in a variety of ways through experience, making and doing things, experimentation, reading, discussion, asking, listening, thinking, reflecting, and expressing oneself in speech or writing both individually and with others. Learners require opportunities of all these kinds in the course of their development. A curriculum is what constitutes a total teaching-learning process comprising of overall aims, syllabus, materials, methods, and assessment.
240

In short it provides a framework of knowledge and capabilities, seen as appropriate to a particular level. Course Outcomes: Course Outcomes are statements that describe what students are expected to know, attitudes they are expected to hold, and what they are able to do as a result of taking a course Assessment not only measures progress and achievement of the learners but also the effectiveness of the teaching materials and methods used for the transaction.
241

Hence, assessment should be viewed as a component of curriculum with the twin purpose of effective delivery and further improvement in the teaching-learning process. Outcomes assessment in the form of standardized exams (prerequisite exams, mid-sessional exams, comprehensive final exams, laboratory exams, written reports, oral presentations, etc.) provide possible means of demonstrating that the chosen performance thresholds defined by the program outcomes are met.

242

Mapping is the process of representing, preferably in matrix form, the correlation among the parameters.
It may be done for one to many, many to one, and many to many parameters.
Program
Educational

Program Outcomes a b c d e f g h i j k

Objectives I II III IV V

243

6.5 CASE STUDIES


6.5.1 B.Tech. Civil Engineering Program
(SELF-STUDY REPORT, UNIVERSITY OF PUERTO RICO MAYAGEZ, 2008)

VISION: We provide society with people serving and problem solving professionals in civil engineering. MISSION:
To provide our society with high quality professionals having a strong education in civil engineering; with rich cultural, ethical, environmental, and social sensitivities; capacity for critical thinking; and the entrepreneurial skills to solve civil infrastructure problems. 244

B.TECH. CIVIL ENGINEERING PROGRAM (SELF-STUDY REPORT, UNIVERSITY OF PUERTO RICO MAYAGEZ, 2008)

Provide services to solve engineering problems as members of interdisciplinary teams. PROGRAM EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES (PEOs) Graduates will: 1. Address the challenges that they will face in their careers.

2. Pursue life-long learning and continue to develop their problem-solving skills,


3. Exhibit leadership and team-building skills.
245

B.TECH. CIVIL ENGINEERING PROGRAM (SELF-STUDY REPORT, UNIVERSITY OF PUERTO RICO MAYAGEZ, 2008)

4. Provide quality service to the profession, government, and society. 5. Function as effective members of interdisciplinary teams. 6. Apply current and innovative engineering technologies and criteria.
246

B.TECH. CIVIL ENGINEERING PROGRAM (SELF-STUDY REPORT, UNIVERSITY OF PUERTO RICO MAYAGEZ, 2008)

PROGRAM OUTCOMES (POs)


a. Ability to understand and apply fundamental knowledge of mathematics through differential equations, probability and statistics; science (physics and chemistry); and engineering sciences (Part of ABETS a) . b. Proficiency in a minimum of four recognized major civil engineering areas, such as: construction management, environmental, geotechnical, structural, transportation, and water resources (Part of ABETS a) .
247

B.TECH. CIVIL ENGINEERING PROGRAM (SELF-STUDY REPORT, UNIVERSITY OF PUERTO RICO MAYAGEZ, 2008)

c. Ability to conduct experiments and to critically analyze and interpret data in a minimum of four major civil engineering areas (ABETS b) . d. Ability to perform civil engineering integrated design of systems, components, or processes by means of practical experiences throughout the professional component of the curriculum (ABETS c). e. Ability to play an effective role in multidisciplinary professional work groups solving engineering problems (ABETS d).
248

B.TECH. CIVIL ENGINEERING PROGRAM (SELF-STUDY REPORT, UNIVERSITY OF PUERTO RICO MAYAGEZ, 2008)

f. Ability to identify, formulate, and solve civil engineering problems using modern engineering tools, techniques, and skills (ABETS e & k).

g. Understanding of the importance of compliance with professional practice and ethical issues, such as: bidding; procurement; and professional interaction; among others (ABETS f).
h. Ability to communicate effectively in English (ABETS g).
249

B.TECH. CIVIL ENGINEERING PROGRAM (SELF-STUDY REPORT, UNIVERSITY OF PUERTO RICO MAYAGEZ, 2008)

i. Broad education necessary to understand the impact of civil engineering solutions on health, general welfare, safety, environmental quality and economy in a global context (ABETS h). j. Commitment to engage in lifelong learning (ABETS i). k. Awareness of contemporary social, cultural, economic, artistic, aesthetic, environmental and engineering issues (ABETS j).
250

B.TECH. CIVIL ENGINEERING PROGRAM (SELF-STUDY REPORT, UNIVERSITY OF PUERTO RICO MAYAGEZ, 2008)

Program Outcomes Vs. ABET Program Outcomes


ABET Program Outcomes
a. Application of Engineering and other sciences b. Experimental Skills c. Engineering Design d. Multi-disciplinary Teamwork

Program Outcomes
1 X X X 2 X X X 3 X X X 4 X X X X X X X X 5 6 X 7 8 9 10 11

e. Problem Solving
f. Professionalism & Ethics g. Effective Communication h. Broad Education

X
X X X

X
X X X

X
X X X X X

X
X X X

X X X

i. Life-long Learning
j. Contemporary Issues k. Modern Engineering Tools
X X X X X X X X

X
X

X
X X

X
X
251

B.TECH. CIVIL ENGINEERING PROGRAM (SELF-STUDY REPORT, UNIVERSITY OF PUERTO RICO MAYAGEZ, 2008)

Students learn specific content and skills in each Course. In the aggregate, those courses, together with other program experiences such as academic advising, internships, and research, should result in the desired student learning outcomes at the program level.
252

B.TECH. CIVIL ENGINEERING PROGRAM (SELF-STUDY REPORT, UNIVERSITY OF PUERTO RICO MAYAGEZ, 2008)

Tables provide a mapping of the program objectives and outcomes as related to the required core curriculum courses / elective courses/ other core courses from supporting departments. The tables show all outcomes and objectives are addressed in numerous courses throughout the program, although often to different degrees.
253

B.TECH. CIVIL ENGINEERING PROGRAM (SELF-STUDY REPORT, UNIVERSITY OF PUERTO RICO MAYAGEZ, 2008)

Mapping of Courses to Program Outcomes and Program Educational Objectives


Course Code
Mathematics Physics Chemistry Engineering Mechanics Mechanics of Materials Algorithms and Computer Programming Engineering Graphics Geology for Engineers Fluid Mechanics

Course
a b c

Program Outcomes
d e f g h i j k
1

Program Educational Objectives


2 3 4 5 6

Surveying
Highway Location & Curve Design Introduction to Environmental Engineering Structural Steel Design Reinforced Concrete Design Civil Engineering Seminar Structural Analysis Highway Engineering Civil Engineering Materials Foundations Introduction to Construction Management Mathematical Methods in Civil Engineering Applied Statistics for Civil Engineering Introduction to Water Resources Engineering

254

6.5.2 B.TECH. MECHANICAL ENGINEERING PROGRAM (SELF-STUDY REPORT, UNIVERSITY OF PUERTO RICO MAYAGEZ, 2008)

Mission: To prepare and form leaders in mechanical engineering by mean of promotion of creativity, development of analytical and research abilities, integration of professional & ethical behavior and encouraging a culture of continuous learning for the long term.
255

B.TECH. MECHANICAL ENGINEERING PROGRAM (SELF-STUDY REPORT, UNIVERSITY OF PUERTO RICO MAYAGEZ, 2008)

PROGRAM EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES (PEOs) Graduates Will: 1. Be capable of using modern engineering tools to apply mathematics, science, and engineering fundamentals to the modeling, analysis, and solution of real-life mechanical engineering problems. 2. Be capable of designing and conducting experiments and maintain a critical and objective mind when interpreting data. 3. Be able to communicate effectively in English.
256

B.TECH. MECHANICAL ENGINEERING PROGRAM (SELF-STUDY REPORT, UNIVERSITY OF PUERTO RICO MAYAGEZ, 2008)

4. Have the skills needed to perform effectively in multidisciplinary teams. 5. Be able to generate specifications, and subsequently design a component, system, or process to meet desired needs in both the mechanical and thermal domain. 6. Have an understanding of the engineering canons of ethics and the contemporary issues in which they apply. 7. Be motivated to continue his/her quest for knowledge through his/her life.
257

B.TECH. MECHANICAL ENGINEERING PROGRAM (SELF-STUDY REPORT, UNIVERSITY OF PUERTO RICO MAYAGEZ, 2008)

Program Outcomes (POs)


a. To have knowledge of basic chemistry and calculus-based physics (Part of ABETS a). b. To have the ability to apply knowledge of science, engineering, and advanced mathematics, including multivariate calculus and differential equations, to the solution of engineering problems (Part of ABETS a). c. To have the ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data (ABETS b).
258

B.TECH. MECHANICAL ENGINEERING PROGRAM (SELF-STUDY REPORT, UNIVERSITY OF PUERTO RICO MAYAGEZ, 2008)

d. To have the ability to work professionally in both thermal and mechanical systems areas, including the design and realization of such systems (ABETS c). e. To have the ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs (Part of ABETS c). f. To have the ability to function on multi-disciplinary teams (ABETS d).
259

B.TECH. MECHANICAL ENGINEERING PROGRAM (SELF-STUDY REPORT, UNIVERSITY OF PUERTO RICO MAYAGEZ, 2008)

g. To have the ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems (ABETS e). h. To have an understanding of professional and ethical responsibility (ABETS f). i. To have an ability to communicate effectively in English (ABETS g).
260

B.TECH. MECHANICAL ENGINEERING PROGRAM (SELF-STUDY REPORT, UNIVERSITY OF PUERTO RICO MAYAGEZ, 2008)

j. To have the broad education and the knowledge of contemporary issues necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global and societal context (ABETS h & j).

k. To have a recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in, life-long learning (ABETS i). l. To have the ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice (ABETS c).

261

B.TECH. MECHANICAL ENGINEERING PROGRAM (SELF-STUDY REPORT, UNIVERSITY OF PUERTO RICO MAYAGEZ, 2008)

Relationship between Program Educational Objectives(PEOs) and Program Outcomes(POs)


Program Educational Objectives 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Program Outcomes
a X X b X X c X d X e X X X X X X X X f g h i j X X k l X

X X

X X X X

X X
262

B.TECH. MECHANICAL ENGINEERING PROGRAM (SELF-STUDY REPORT, UNIVERSITY OF PUERTO RICO MAYAGEZ, 2008)

Program Outcomes Vs. ABET Program Outcomes


ABET Program Outcomes
a. Application of Engineering and other sciences b. Experimental Skills c. Engineering Design d. Multi-disciplinary Teamwork e. Problem Solving f. Professionalism & Ethics X

Program Outcomes
a
X

b
X

X X X X X X

g. Effective Communication
h. Broad Education i. Life-long Learning j. Contemporary Issues

X
X X X

k. Modern Engineering Tools

X
263

B.TECH. MECHANICAL ENGINEERING PROGRAM (SELF-STUDY REPORT, UNIVERSITY OF PUERTO RICO MAYAGEZ, 2008)

Program Educational Objectives Vs. ABET Program Outcomes

ABET Program Outcomes


a. Application of Engineering and other sciences b. Experimental Skills c. Engineering Design d. Multi-disciplinary Teamwork

Program Educational Objectives 1


X X X X X X

2
X

5
X X X X

e. Problem Solving
f. Professionalism & Ethics g. Effective Communication h. Broad Education i. Life-long Learning j. Contemporary Issues X X

X
X X X

X
X X

X
X X X X

X
264

k. Modern Engineering Tools

6.5.3a B.TECH. ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING PROGRAM


(SELF-STUDY REPORT, COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING, COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY, JUNE 2007)

MISSION: Program is formulated to educate and prepare undergraduate students to pursue exemplary careers in the Electrical Engineering Industries and academia and to generate new knowledge by the pursuit of research in selected areas of electrical engineering.
265

B.TECH. ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING PROGRAM (SELF-STUDY REPORT, COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING, COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY, JUNE 2007)

PROGRAM EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES (PEOs) Graduates Will: 1. Identify, analyze, formulate, and solve electrical engineering problems associated with their professional position, both independently and in a team environment; 2. Manage multi-faceted and multi-disciplinary projects with a significant technical, legal, ethical, regulatory, social, environmental, and economic considerations using a broad systems perspective;
266

B.TECH. ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING PROGRAM (SELF-STUDY REPORT, COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING, COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY, JUNE 2007)

3. Communicate effectively with co-workers, professional clients, and the public; and 4. Demonstrate commitment and progress in lifelong learning, professional development, and leadership.
267

B.TECH. ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING PROGRAM (SELF-STUDY REPORT, COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING, COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY, JUNE 2007)

Program Outcomes (POs)


a. Apply knowledge of mathematics, science and engineering (ABETS a); b. Identify, formulate, and solve electrical engineering problems (ABETS e); c. Design and conduct experiments and analyze and interpret data (ABETS b); d. Design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints (ABETS c); e. Communicate effectively (ABETS g);
268

B.TECH. ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING PROGRAM (SELF-STUDY REPORT, COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING, COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY, JUNE 2007)

f. Function in multi-disciplinary (ABETS d); and

teams

g. Use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools and technologies necessary for electrical engineering practice (ABETS k);

They also shall have:


h. The broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and diverse societal context (ABETS h);
269

B.TECH. ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING PROGRAM (SELF-STUDY REPORT, COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING, COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY, JUNE 2007)

i. A knowledge of contemporary issues (ABETS j); j. An understanding of professional and ethical responsibility (ABETS f); and k. A recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in, life-long learning (ABETS i).
270

B.TECH. ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING PROGRAM (SELF-STUDY REPORT, COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING, COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY, JUNE 2007)

Relationships between Program Outcomes and ABET Program Outcomes


ABET Program Outcomes
a. Application of Engineering and other sciences b. Experimental Skills c. Engineering Design d. Multi-disciplinary Teamwork e. Problem Solving f. Professionalism & Ethics X X

Program Outcomes
a
X
X X X

g. Effective Communication
h. Broad Education i. Life-long Learning j. Contemporary Issues

X
X X X

k. Modern Engineering Tools

271

B.TECH. ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING PROGRAM (SELF-STUDY REPORT, COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING, COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY, JUNE 2007)

Relationships of Program Outcomes to Program Educational Objectives


Educational Objectives
1 Program Outcomes a X b X c X d X e X f X g X h i j k

2
3

X
X

X
X

X
X

X
X

X
272

6.5.3b B. TECH. ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING PROGRAM


(SELF-STUDY REPORT, SOUTH DAKOTA SCHOOL OF MINES AND TECHNOLOGY, RAPID CITY, JUNE 2010)

MISSION: To provide electrical engineering students with education that is broadly based in the fundamentals of the profession so that graduates will be able to maintain a high degree of adaptability throughout their professional careers. It is also intended that the students will develop a dedication to the profession and an ability to maintain professional competency through a program of lifelong learning.
273

B.TECH. ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING PROGRAM


(SELF-STUDY REPORT, SOUTH DAKOTA SCHOOL OF MINES AND TECHNOLOGY, RAPID CITY, JUNE 2010)

PROGRAM EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES (PEOs) Graduates will be: 1. Able to successfully practice electrical engineering and related fields regionally, nationally, and globally. 2. Well-educated in the fundamental concepts of electrical engineering and be able to continue their professional development throughout their careers. 3. Skilled in clear communications and team work and capable of functioning responsibly in diverse environments.
274

B.TECH. ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING PROGRAM


(SELF-STUDY REPORT, SOUTH DAKOTA SCHOOL OF MINES AND TECHNOLOGY, RAPID CITY, JUNE 2010)

Program Outcomes (Adopted ABET outcomes)

Each student shall demonstrate: a. An ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering b. An ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data.
275

B.TECH. ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING PROGRAM


(SELF-STUDY REPORT, SOUTH DAKOTA SCHOOL OF MINES AND TECHNOLOGY, RAPID CITY, JUNE 2010)

c. An ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability. d. An ability to function on multidisciplinary teams e. An ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems f. An understanding of professional and ethical responsibility
276

B.TECH. ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING PROGRAM


(SELF-STUDY REPORT, SOUTH DAKOTA SCHOOL OF MINES AND TECHNOLOGY, RAPID CITY, JUNE 2010)

g. An ability to communicate effectively h. The broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context. i. A recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long learning j. A knowledge of contemporary issues k. An ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice.
277

B.TECH. ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING PROGRAM


(SELF-STUDY REPORT, SOUTH DAKOTA SCHOOL OF MINES AND TECHNOLOGY, RAPID CITY, JUNE 2010)

Course Title: Communications Systems


Course Outcomes: Upon completion of this course students should demonstrate the ability to : 1. Define specialized communication terms 2. Describe and explain modulation methods 3. Describe and explain the effects of noise on communications systems. 4. Analyze communications systems using basic tools such as Fourier transform, convolution, and sampling theory.
278

B.TECH. ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING PROGRAM


(SELF-STUDY REPORT, SOUTH DAKOTA SCHOOL OF MINES AND TECHNOLOGY, RAPID CITY, JUNE 2010)

5. Use tools such as MATLAB and C programming for analyzing and designing communications systems. 6. Test, debug, and verify that the design meets the desired specifications. 7. Work effectively in design and development teams to implement components of communications systems. 8. Understand concepts of professionalism, ethics, product liability, social responsibility, and intellectual property in the context of communications systems design.
279

B.TECH. ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING PROGRAM


(SELF-STUDY REPORT, SOUTH DAKOTA SCHOOL OF MINES AND TECHNOLOGY, RAPID CITY, JUNE 2010)

9. Use design resources such as professional journals, trade journals, and the web in a communications system design. 10. Communicate the project design effectively. Relation of Course to Program Outcomes. The following table indicates the relative strengths of each course outcome in addressing the program outcomes on a scale of 1 to 4 where 4 indicates a strong emphasis.
280

B.TECH. ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING PROGRAM


(SELF-STUDY REPORT, SOUTH DAKOTA SCHOOL OF MINES AND TECHNOLOGY, RAPID CITY, JUNE 2010)

Program Outcomes
a. Application of Engineering and other sciences b. Experimental Skills c. Engineering Design

Course Outcomes
1
1
1 1 1

2
2

3
1
1 1

4
2
2 1

5
2
2 2

9
1

10

3 3

d. Multi-disciplinary Teamwork
e. Problem Solving f. Professionalism & Ethics g. Effective Communication h. Broad Education i. Life-long Learning j. Contemporary Issues k. Modern Engineering Tools 1 1 2 1

1
1 1 1

2
2 1

3
1 3 1 1 3 2 3 3 2 2

1 1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1 4

281

Relationship Between PEOs and POs


Program Educational Objectives

Program Outcomes
a. Application of Engineering and other sciences b. Experimental Skills c. Engineering Design

1. Able to successfully practice electrical engineering and related fields regionally, nationally, and globally.

2. Well-educated in the fundamental concepts of electrical engineering and be able to continue their professional development throughout their careers.

3. Skilled in clear communications and team work and capable of functioning responsibly in diverse environments

X X X

d. Multi-disciplinary Teamwork
e. Problem Solving f. Professionalism & Ethics g. Effective Communication

X
X X X X X

h. Broad Education
i. Life-long Learning j. Contemporary Issues k. Modern Engineering Tools

X
X X X X X

282

B.TECH. ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING PROGRAM


(SELF-STUDY REPORT, SOUTH DAKOTA SCHOOL OF MINES AND TECHNOLOGY, RAPID CITY, JUNE 2010)

CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT OF PROGRAM

Continuous review of program comprises two feedback loops: The Outer loop (Strategic Planning Loop) for improving the program and The Inner Loop (Assessment & Improvement Loop) to provide for curricula improvement.
283

B.TECH. ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING PROGRAM (SELF-STUDY REPORT, SOUTH DAKOTA SCHOOL OF MINES AND TECHNOLOGY, RAPID CITY, JUNE 2010)

Mission
Stakeholders Input
Outer Loop
(Strategic Planning Loop)

NBA

Objectives
Outcomes Assessment
Curriculum

Inner Loop
(Assessment & Improvement Loop)

Improvement Planning

Evaluation

Courses and Courses and activities Courses and


Admission

activities Courses and activities Courses and activities Courses and activities activities

Graduation
284

Figure : Short and Long Term Loop

B.TECH. ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING PROGRAM


(SELF-STUDY REPORT, SOUTH DAKOTA SCHOOL OF MINES AND TECHNOLOGY, RAPID CITY, JUNE 2010)

Outer Loop: The Outer Loop (Strategic Planning Loop) is used to provide initial and follow-on high-level guidance to the department in developing and maintaining the program objectives and outcomes. Initial input comes from stakeholders, NBA guidance, and university-level directives. These inputs are used to refine and monitor program objectives and outcomes.
285

B.TECH. ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING PROGRAM


(SELF-STUDY REPORT, SOUTH DAKOTA SCHOOL OF MINES AND TECHNOLOGY, RAPID CITY, JUNE 2010)

Inner Loop: The Inner Loop (Assessment and Improvement Loop) provides for ongoing curricula and course improvement. Based on feedback obtained, the department renders curricular changes, and individual instructors refine, when appropriate, the courses under their jurisdiction.
286

B.TECH. ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING PROGRAM


(SELF-STUDY REPORT, SOUTH DAKOTA SCHOOL OF MINES AND TECHNOLOGY, RAPID CITY, JUNE 2010)

The inner loop also provides a mechanism for the faculty and students to provide feedback on specific courses.

The inner loop is the domain of course improvement, and suggestions for course improvements typically arise from instructor and student comments and discussions of the program faculty.
287

B.TECH. ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING PROGRAM (SELF-STUDY REPORT, SOUTH DAKOTA SCHOOL OF MINES AND TECHNOLOGY, RAPID CITY, JUNE 2010)

Assessment
Assessment & Improvement Loop

Every Course Offering

Scheduled Intervals Internal Input Exit Interviews Feedback from Academic advisors Feedback from succeeding course in a sequence Feedback from capstone design

Instructor Course Assessment

Improvement Planning

Evaluation
Student Course Assessment

Courses and activities

External Input Alumni Survey Employer input Advisory Board

Figure: Assessment of Program Outcomes by course

288

PO (b)

PO (d)

PO (h)

PO (e)

PO (a)

PO (g)

PO (f)

PO (j)

PO (i)

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R

S
T U V W

1 = COs address PO slightly, 3 = COs address PO substantively

2 = COs address PO moderately,


289

PO (l)

Course Course Code

PO (k)

PO (c)

Program Stakeholders (Constituencies)


Program Mission PEOs POs
Curriculum, Courses, COs

Step 1: Prepare PEOs that address program mission. PEOs are responsive to the expressed interests of program stakeholders. Step 2: Formulate a set of POs (knowledge, skills, and attitudes program graduates should have) Step 3: Frame curriculum, courses, and COs that address the POs and in turn the PEOs.
290

Step 4: The program must evaluate student performance, advise students regarding curricular and career matters, and monitor student progress to foster their success in achieving program outcomes, thereby enabling them as graduates to attain program objectives. Step 5: Develop a system with built-in Continuous Improvement Mechanism (Institutionalization of continuous improvement and assessment processes at all levels).
291

RESPONSIBILITIES OF A FACULTY MEMBER 1. Formulate the learning outcomes and the finally the course outcomes. 2. Teach the course to enable the students attain the course outcomes. 3. Examine the students whether the course outcomes have been attained. 4. Improve continually the course outcomes so that they in turn foster the program outcomes.
292

7. WRITING LEARNING OUTCOMES


What is a learning outcome? A learning outcome is a statement that captures specifically what knowledge, skills, attitudes learners should be able to exhibit following instruction. Why have learning outcomes? Creating clear learning outcomes during the planning process of a unit/week/individual session serves the following purposes: Helps unit planners integrate across a day/ week/ unit of learning
293

Serves to connect content and assessment around learning.


Outcomes

Learning

Assessment

Content

Guides selection of teaching/learning activities that will best achieve outcomes. Gives learners a clear picture of what to expect and whats expected of them. Forms the basis for evaluating teacher, learner, and curriculum effectiveness.
294

What are the key components of a learning outcome? Learning outcomes should be SMART

Specific Measurable/Observable Attainable for target audience within


scheduled time and specified conditions

Relevant and results-oriented

Targeted

to the learner and to the desired level of learning


295

How do I create a useful learning outcome? To create specific, measurable/observable, and results-oriented outcomes: Its helpful to finish the sentence, After this unit/week/individual session, you should be able to Start with an observable action verb that captures what the learner should be able to do. Avoid ill-defined terms that are open to variable interpretation (e.g., understand, learn, grasp); use instead terms that describe directly observable behaviors. When necessary, specify criteria concerning expected standard of performance.
296

To create attainable learning outcomes: Consider the beginning level of understanding/skill of your learners and craft your outcome to move them to the next level. Consider and specify when appropriate the conditions under which performance will take place. Limit number of outcomes to major learning points you would like students to walk away with.
297

To create outcomes targeted to the audience and desired level of learning/thinking: Ask yourself whether you want learners to be able to: know, comprehend, apply, analyze, synthesize, or evaluate (Blooms Taxonomy). These outcomes represent different levels/ kinds of thinking. Match your action verb to the desired level. Match learning objective with appropriate teaching/learning strategy.
298

The work of Benjamin Bloom (1913 - 1999) was found to provide a useful starting point when writing learning outcomes. Bloom studied in Pennsylvania State University, USA, and graduated with bachelor and master degrees from that institution. He then worked at the University of Chicago and graduated with a PhD in Education in 1942.

Three Domains of Learning


Bloom identified three domains of learning cognitive, affective and psychomotor - and within each of these domains he recognized that there was an ascending order of complexity.
299

7.1 WRITING LEARNING OUTCOMES IN THE COGNITIVE DOMAIN


Bloom's taxonomy is frequently used for writing learning outcomes. Use of the correct verbs is the key to the successful writing of learning outcomes. Since learning outcomes are concerned with what the students can do at the end of the learning activity, all of these verbs are action (active) verbs. Each stage of Blooms taxonomy is considered and the corresponding list of verbs is proposed. 300

Bloom proposed that the cognitive or knowing domain is composed of six successive levels arranged in a hierarchy as shown.
Hierarchy of Levels of Achievement in Cognitive Domain
Problem-Solving
(Analyzing, Synthesizing, Evaluating)

Application Knowledge
(Recall and understanding)
301

BLOOMS TAXONOMY OF LEARNING OUTCOMES: COGNITIVE DOMAIN


Synthesis (Creating )
Evaluation (Evaluating) Analysis (Analyzing) Application (Applying)
Comprehension (Understanding) Putting elements together to form a coherent or functional whole; reorganizing elements into a new pattern or structure through generating, planning or producing. Design, plan, create, formulate Making judgments based on criteria and standards through checking and criticizing. Make criteria-based judgments. Choose, prioritize, rate, critique Breaking material into constituent parts, determining how the parts relate to one another and to an overall structure or purpose through differentiating, organizing and attributing. Explain, interpret, predict the behavior of a system Carrying out or using a procedure through executing or implementing. Apply known procedures to novel problems Constructing meaning from oral, written and graphic messages though interpreting, exemplifying, classifying, summarizing, inferring, comparing and explaning. Explain, interpret, classify, compare terms, observations, & concepts Retrieving, recognizing, and recalling relevant knowledge from long-term memory. Recall facts & definitions, replicate known solution procedures

Knowledge (Remembering)

302

Blooms Taxonomy : Cognitive Domain


Synthesis (Creating )

Evaluation (Evaluating)

Higher Order Thinking Skills (HOTS)

Analysis (Analyzing)

Application (Applying) Comprehension (Understanding)

Lower-Order Thinking Skills

Knowledge (Remembering)

Each higher-level skill automatically involves the lower-level skills Usually, undergraduate education deals almost exclusively with Remembering, Understanding and Applying.
Ideally, all Bloom levels should be addressed in every course (need not be sequential).
303

LEVEL 1: KNOWLEDGE
Knowledge may be defined as the ability to recall or remember facts without necessarily understanding them.
304

Action verbs used to assess knowledge


Arrange Collect Count Define Describe Draw Examine Find Identify Label List Locate Name Order Outline Present Point Quote Recollect Record Recount Relate Repeat Reproduce State Tabulate Tell Write

Duplicate
Enumerate

Match
Memorize

Recall
Recite

Select
Show

305

Some examples of learning outcomes for courses in various disciplines that demonstrate evidence of knowledge: List the criteria to be taken into account when caring for a patient with tuberculosis. Recall genetics terminology: homozygous, heterozygous, phenotype, genotype, homologous chromosome pair, etc. Define what behaviours constitute unprofessional practice in the solicitor - client relationship. Describe how and why laws change and the consequences of such changes on society. Identify and consider ethical implications of scientific investigations. 306

LEVEL 2: COMPREHENSION Comprehension may be defined as the ability to understand and interpret learned information.
307

Action verbs used to assess Comprehension:


Associate Change Cite Defend Demonstrate Differentiate Extrapolate Generalize Locate Match Select Specify Solve

Give examples Paraphrase

Clarify
Compute

Discuss
Discriminate

Identify
Illustrate

Predict
Recognise

Summarise
Tell

Conclude
Construct

Estimate
Explain

Indicate
Infer

Report
Restate

Translate

Contrast
Decode

Express
Extend

Interpret
Interrelate

Rewrite
Review
308

Some examples of learning outcomes for courses in various disciplines that demonstrate evidence of comprehension: Classify reactions as exothermic and endothermic. Differentiate between civil and criminal law Identify participants and goals in the development of electronic commerce. Explain the social, economic and political effects of World War II on the post-war world. Predict the genotype of cells that undergo meiosis and mitosis.
309

LEVEL 3: APPLICATION Application may be defined as the ability to use learned material in new and concrete situations, e.g. put ideas and concepts to work in solving problems.
310

Action verbs used to assess Application:


Add Apply Complete Construct Experiment Operate Find Generalize Paint Plot Select Show Simulate Administer Compute

Assess
Articulate Calculate Change Chart

Contribute
Discover Divide Dramatise Draw

Graph
Illustrate Interpret Interview

Practise
Predict Prepare Produce

Sketch
Subtract Transfer Translate Use

Implement Provide

Choose
Classify Collect

Employ
Establish Examine

Manipulate Relate
Map Modify Role-play Schedule
311

Some examples of learning outcomes for courses in various disciplines that demonstrate evidence of application:
Apply knowledge of infection control in the maintenance of patient care facilities. Construct a timeline of significant events in the history of India In the 19th century. Modify guidelines in a case study of a small manufacturing firm to enable tighter quality control of production. Relate energy changes to bond breaking and formation. Select and employ sophisticated techniques for analysing the efficiencies of energy usage in complex industrial processes. Show how changes in the criminal law affected levels of 312 incarceration in Britan in the 19th century.

LEVEL 4: ANALYSIS
Analysis may be defined as the ability to break down information into its components, e.g. look for inter-relationships and ideas so that its organizational structure may be understood.
313

Action verbs used to assess Analysis:


Analyse Appraise Arrange Connect Contrast Corelate Diagram roup Recognise Research Separate Survey Simplify Subdivide Differentiate Infer Discover Inspect

Break down Criticise Calculate Categorise Debate Deduce

Discriminate Investigate Distinguish Divide Order Outline

Characterize Detect
Classify Compare Determine Develop

Draw conclusions
Examine Experiment

Point out
Question Relate

Test

314

Some examples of learning outcomes for courses in various disciplines that demonstrate evidence of analysis:
Analyse why society criminalises certain behaviours. Calculate gradient from maps in m/km, % and ratio. Compare and contrast the different electronic business models. Compare the classroom practice of a newly qualified teacher with that of a teacher of 20 years teaching experience. Debate the economic and environmental effects of energy conversion processes.
315

LEVEL 5: SYNTHESIS
Synthesis may be defined as the ability to put parts together to form a new whole. Learning outcomes in this area stress creative behaviors and place major emphasis on the formulation of new patterns or structure.
316

Action verbs used to assess Synthesis:


Argue Arrange Construct Create Group Originate Reorganize Revise Hypothesize Perform

Assemble
Anticipate Categorise Collect Combine Compile Compose

Design
Develop Devise Establish Formulate Generalise Generate

Incorporate Plan
Integrate Invent Make Manage Modify Order Organize Prepare Prescribe Produce Propose Rearrange Reconstruct Recognize

Rewrite
Structure Set up Summarise Tell

Collaborate Facilitate

317

Some examples of learning outcomes for courses in various disciplines that demonstrate evidence of synthesis: Organise a patient education programme. Propose solutions to complex energy management problems both verbally and in writing. Recognise and formulate problems that are amenable to energy management solutions. Relate the sign of enthalpy changes to exothermic and endothermic reactions. Summarise the causes and effects of the 1917 Russian revolution.
318

LEVEL 6: EVALUATION
Evaluation may be defined as the ability to judge the value of material for a given purpose, e.g. present and defend opinions; identify strengths / weaknesses; make convincing arguments. The judgments are to be based on definite criteria. These may be internal criteria (organization) or external criteria (relevance to the purpose) and the individual may determine the criteria or be given them. Learning outcomes in this area are highest in the cognitive hierarchy because they contain elements of all the other categories as well as conscious value judgments based on clearly defined criteria.319

Action verbs used to assess Evaluation:


Appraise
Argue Ascertain Assess Attach Award Choose Compare & contrast Conclude Consider

Contrast
Convince Criticise Critique Decide Defend Detect Determine

Evaluate
Explain Grade Interpret Judge Justify Measure Monitor

Prioritize
Prove Rank Rate Relate Resolve Revise Score Select

Standardize
Summarize Support Test Value Verify Weight

Recommend Validate

Discriminate Persuade Estimate Predict

320

Some examples of learning outcomes for courses in various disciplines that demonstrate evidence of evaluation:
Assess the importance of three key participants in bringing about change in post-independence Indian history. Evaluate marketing strategies for different electronic business models. Appraise the key areas contributing to the craft knowledge of experienced teachers. Predict the effect of change of temperature on the position of equilibrium. Summarise the main contributions of Michael Faraday to the field of electromagnetic induction. 321

Levels of Thinking/Learning
Category
Knowledge

Dimension
Recalling Comprehending

Definition
Rote recall: Know common terms, specific facts, methods, procedures, concepts, principles Interpolation or interpretation: Understand, estimate future implied consequences, justify methods and procedures Using a concept in a new context: Apply theory, solve problems, construct graphs, demonstrate procedure Breaking something down and understanding its structure, the relationship between parts, the organizational principles: Recognize unstated assumptions and logical fallacies, distinguish between facts & inferences, determine Relevance Building a structure/pattern from diverse elements: Write well-organized essay, propose research question, develop plan for solving a problem, formulate a classification scheme Judging the value of ideas, works, solutions, materials: Judge logical consistency, adequacy of data in support of conclusions, value of work by internal & external standards 322

Application Applying ProblemSolving Analyzing

Synthesizing

Evaluating

Teaching/Learning Strategies Best Suited for Each Level of Learning


Desired Dimension
Knowing and Comprehending

Suggested Presentational Strategies


Presentation, lecture, question-and-answer, small group discussion, development of learning issues, self-awareness exercises/tests, review sessions, teaching others, independent study, web-based instruction Hands-on, lab, demonstration, case study, live or video demonstration, simulation, role-playing, action plan, teaching others, guided practice with feedback, precepting, role-modeling Question-and-answer, brainstorming, case study, problemsolving, trouble-shooting, role-playing, article discussion

Applying

Analyzing

Synthesizing
Evaluating

Case study, writing, concept mapping, theory and model building, teaching others, developing research questions
Case study, critical review, self and group assessment/ reflection, reflective writing
323

8. LINKING COURSE OUTCOMES TEACHING AND ASSESSMENT

(COs),

The challenge for teachers is to ensure that there is alignment between teaching methods, assessment techniques, assessment criteria and learning outcomes.
324

Teacher and student perspectives regarding assessment:


Teacher Perspectives: Curriculum Course Outcomes (COs) Teaching Activities Assessment

Student Perspectives:

Assessment

Learning activities

Course outcomes

To the teacher, assessment is at the end of the teaching-learning sequence of events, but to the student it is at the beginning.
325

Students will learn what they think will be assessed, not what may be on the curriculum or even what has been covered in lectures! The old adage that "assessment is the tail that wags the dog" is very true. Assessment is often described in terms of formative assessment or summative assessment.
326

Formative Assessment: Formative assessment has been described as being assessment FOR learning. In other words, formative assessment helps to inform the teacher and the students as to how the students are progressing.
327

Summative Assessment:
Summative Assessment is assessment that tries to summarise student learning at some point in time usually at the end of a course or program. Thus, the use of summative assessment enables a grade to be generated that reflects the student's performance.

328

Continuous Assessment:
In theory, continuous assessment is a combination of summative and formative assessment. In practice, continuous assessment often amounts to repeated summative assessments with marks being recorded but little or no specific feedback being given to students.
329

9. A COMPENDIUM OF TEACHING LEARNING PROCESS


Guide the learner: Be sure that students know the PEOs, POs, Curriculum and Assessment Process. ii. Develop a structured hierarchy of content: Content needs to include concepts, applications and problem solving.
i.
330

iii. Use images and visual learning: Most people prefer visual learning and have better retention when this mode is used. Encourage students to generate their own visual learning aids. iv. Ensure that the student is active: v. Requires practice: Learning complex concepts, tasks, or problem solving requires a chance to practice in a nonthreatening environment.
331

vi. Provide feedback:


Feedback should be prompt and, if at all possible, positive. Reward works much better than punishment. Students need a second chance to practice after feedback in order to benefit fully from it.
332

vii. Have positive expectations of students:

Positive expectations by the professor and respect from the professor are highly motivating. Low expectations and disrespect are demotivating. A master teacher truly believes that her or his students are capable of great things.
333

viii. Provide means for students to be challenged yet successful: Provide sufficient time and tasks that everyone can do successfully but be sure that there is a challenge for everyone. Success is very motivating. ix. Individualize the teaching style: Use a variety of teaching styles and learning exercises so that each student can use his or her favorite style and so that each student becomes more proficient at all styles.
334

x. Make the class more cooperative: Use cooperative group exercises. xi. Ask thought-provoking questions: Thought-provoking questions do not have to have answers. Posing questions without answers can be particularly motivating for more mature students. xii. Be enthusiastic and demonstrate the joy of learning: Enthusiasm is motivating and will help students enjoy the class.
335

xiii. Encourage students to teach other students:

Students who tutor others learn more themselves and the students they tutor also learn more. In addition, students who tutor develop a sense of accomplishment and confidence in their ability. xiv. Care about what you are doing: An efficient teacher can do a good job teaching a course in less time than it takes an inefficient teacher to do a mediocre job.
336

FLUID MECHANICS: Course Content


UNIT 1: Fluid Properties and Fluid Statics Learning Outcomes
After completing unit 1, the student should be able to:

determine the dimensions and units of physical quantities(L2). identify the key fluid properties used in the analysis of fluid behavior(L2). calculate common fluid properties given appropriate information(L3). explain effects of fluid compressibility(L4).
337

use the concepts of viscosity, vapor pressure, and surface tension(L4). determine the pressure at various locations in a fluid at rest(L3). explain the concept of manometers and apply appropriate equations to determine pressures(L3). calculate the hydrostatic pressure force on a plane or curved submerged surface(L3). calculate the buoyant force and discuss the stability of floating or submerged objects(L4).
338

1.1
1.2

Some Characteristics of Fluids


Dimensions, Dimensional Homogeneity, and Units

1.2.1 Systems of Units

1.3
1.4

Analysis of Fluid Behavior


Measures of Fluid Mass and Weight

1.4.1 Density
1.4.2 Specific Weight 1.4.3 Specific Gravity 1.5 1.6 Ideal Gas Law Viscosity
339

1.7 1.7.1 1.7.2 1.7.3 1.8 1.9 1.10

Compressibility of Fluids Bulk Modulus Compression and Expansion of Gases Speed of Sound Vapor Pressure Surface Tension A Brief Look Back in History

1.11 1.12 1.13 1.13.1 1.13.2

Pressure at a Point Basic Equation for Pressure Field Pressure Variation in a Fluid at Rest Incompressible Fluid Compressible Fluid
340

1.14 1.15

Standard Atmosphere Measurement of Pressure

1.16

Manometry

1.16.1 Piezometer Tube 1.16.2 U-Tube Manometer 1.16.3 Inclined-Tube Manometer 1.17 1.18 1.19 Mechanical and Electronic Pressure Measuring Devices Hydrostatic Force on a Plane Surface Pressure Prism
341

1.20

Hydrostatic Force on a Curved Surface

1.21

Buoyancy, Flotation, and Stability

1.21.1 Archimedes Principle

1.21.2 Stability
1.22 Pressure Variation in a Fluid with RigidBody Motion

1.22.1 Linear Motion 1.22.2 Rigid-Body Rotation


342

Life Long Learning Problems


Although there are numerous nonNewtonian fluids that occur naturally (quick sand and blood among them), with the advent of modern chemistry and chemical processing, many new, manmade nonNewtonian fluids are now available for a variety of novel application.
Obtain information about the discovery and use of newly developed non-Newtonian fluids(L5). Summarize your findings in a brief report(L6).
343

For years, lubricating oils and greases obtained by refining crude oil have been used to lubricate moving parts in a wide variety of machines, motors, and engines. With the increasing cost of crude oil and the potential for the reduced availability of it, the need for nonpetroleum based lubricants has increased considerably. Obtain information about nonpetroleum based lubricants(L5). Summarize your findings in a brief report(L6).
344

It is predicted that nano-technology and the use of nano-sized objects will allow many processes, procedures, and products that, as of now, are difficult for us to comprehend.
Among new nanotechnology areas is that of nano-scale fluid mechanics. Fluid behavior at the nano-scale can be entirely different than that for the usual everyday flows with which we are familiar. Obtain information about various aspects of nano-fluid mechanics(L5) Summarize your findings in a brief report(L6).
345

Although it is relatively easy to calculate the net hydrostatic pressure force on a dam, it is not necessarily easy to design and construct an appropriate, long-lasting, inexpensive dam. In fact, inspection of older dams has revealed that many of them are in peril of collapse unless corrective action is soon taken. Obtain information about the severity of the poor conditions of older dams throughout the country(L5). Summarize your findings in a brief report(L6).
346

Liquid-filled manometers and Bourdon tube pressure gages have been the mainstay for measuring pressure for many, many years. However, for many modern applications, these tried-and-true devices are not sufficient. For example, many new uses need small, accurate, inexpensive pressure transducers with digital outputs. Obtain information about some of the new concepts used for pressure measurement(L5). Summarize your findings in a brief report(L6).
347

UNIT 2: Elementary Fluid Dynamics, Bernoulli Equation and Fluid Kinematics Learning Outcomes
After completing unit 2, the student should be able to: discuss the application of Newtons second law to fluid flows. explain the development, uses, and limitations of the Bernoulli equation. use the Bernoulli equation (stand-alone or in combination with the continuity equation) to solve simple flow problems. apply the concepts of static, stagnation, dynamic, and total pressures. calculate various flow properties using the energy and hydraulic grade lines. 348

discuss the differences between the Eulerian and Lagrangian descriptions of fluid motion. identify various flow characteristics based on the velocity field. determine the streamline pattern and acceleration field given a velocity field. discuss the differences between a system and control volume. apply the Reynolds transport theorem and the material derivative.
349

2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5

Newtons Second Law F = ma along a Streamline F = ma normal to a Streamline Physical Interpretation Static, Stagnation, Dynamic, and Total Pressure 2.6 Examples of Use of the Bernoulli Equation 2.6.1 Free Jets 2.6.2 Confined Flows 2.6.3 Flowrate Measurement
350

2.7

The Energy Line and the Hydraulic Grade Line

2.8

Restrictions on Use of the Bernoulli Equation

2.8.1 Compressibility Effects


2.8.2 Unsteady Effects

2.8.3 Rotational Effects


2.8.4 Other Restrictions
351

2.9

The Velocity Field

2.9.1 Eulerian and Lagrangian Flow Descriptions 2.9.2 One-, Two-, and Three-Dimensional Flows

2.9.3 Steady and Unsteady Flows


2.9.4 Streamlines, Streaklines, and Pathlines

2.10

The Acceleration Field

2.10.1 The Material Derivative 2.10.2 Unsteady Effects 2.10.3 Convective Effects 2.10.4 Streamline Coordinates 163
352

2.11
2.12 2.12.1 2.12.2 2.12.3 2.12.4 2.12.5 2.12.6 2.12.7

Control Volume and System Representations The Reynolds Transport Theorem Derivation of the Reynolds Transport Theorem Physical Interpretation Relationship to Material Derivative Steady Effects Unsteady Effects Moving Control Volumes Selection of a Control Volume
353

Life Long Learning Problems


The concept of the use of a Pitot-static tube to measure the airspeed of an airplane is rather straightforward. However, the design and manufacture of reliable, accurate, inexpensive Pitot-static tube airspeed indicators is not necessarily simple. Obtain information about the design and construction of modern Pitot-static tubes. Summarize your findings in a brief report.
354

In recent years damage due to hurricanes has been significant. The low barometric pressure, high winds, and high tides generated by hurricanes can combine to cause considerable damage. According to some experts, in the coming years hurricane frequency may increase because of global warming. Obtain information about the fluid mechanics of hurricanes. Summarize your findings in a brief report.
355

Orifice, nozzle, or Venturi flow meters have been used for a long time to predict accurately the flow rate in pipes. However, recently there have been several new concepts suggested or used for such flow rate measurements. Obtain information about new methods to obtain pipe flow rate information. Summarize your findings in a brief report.
356

Ultra-high-pressure, thin jets of liquids can be used to cut various materials ranging from leather to steel and beyond. Obtain information about new methods and techniques proposed for liquid jet cutting and investigate how they may alter various manufacturing processes. Summarize your findings in a brief report.
357

Even for the simplest flows it is often not be easy to visually represent various flow field quantities such as velocity, pressure, or temperature. For more complex flows, such as those involving three dimensional or unsteady effects, it is extremely difficult to show the data. However, with the use of computers and appropriate software, novel methods are being devised to more effectively illustrate the structure of a given flow. Obtain information about methods used to present complex flow data. Summarize your findings in a brief report.
358

For centuries people have obtained qualitative and quantitative information about various flow fields by observing the motion of objects or particles in a flow. For example, the speed of the current in a river can be approximated by timing how long it takes a stick to travel a certain distance. The swirling motion of a tornado can be observed by following debris moving within the tornado funnel. Recently various high-tech methods using lasers and minute particles seeded within the flow have been developed to measure velocity fields. Such techniques include the laser doppler anemometer (LDA), the particle image velocimeter (PIV), and others. Obtain information about new laser-based techniques for measuring velocity fields. Summarize your findings in a brief report.
359

Unit 3: Finite Control Volume Analysis and Differential Analysis of Fluid Flow Learning Outcomes
After completing unit 3, the student should be able to:
select an appropriate finite control volume to solve a fluid mechanics problem. apply conservation of mass and energy and Newtons second law of motion to the contents of a finite control volume to get important answers. know how velocity changes and energy transfers in fluid flows are related to forces and torques. understand why designing for minimum loss of energy in fluid flows is so important. 360

determine various kinematic elements of the flow given the velocity field.
explain the conditions necessary for a velocity field to satisfy the continuity equation.

apply the concepts of stream function and velocity potential.


characterize simple potential flow fields. analyze certain types of flows using the NavierStokes equations.
361

3.1 3.1.1 3.1.2 3.1.3 3.1.4 3.2 3.2.1 3.2.2 3.2.3 3.2.4

Conservation of MassThe Continuity Equation Derivation of the Continuity Equation Fixed, Nondeforming Control Volume Moving, Nondeforming Control Volume Deforming Control Volume Newtons Second LawThe Linear Momentum and Moment-of- Momentum Equations Derivation of the Linear Momentum Equation Application of the Linear Momentum Equation Derivation of the Moment-of- Momentum Equation Application of the Moment-of- Momentum 362 Equation

3.3

First Law of ThermodynamicsThe Energy Equation

3.3.1 Derivation of the Energy Equation

3.3.2 Application of the Energy Equation


3.3.3 Comparison of the Energy Equation with the Bernoulli Equation 3.3.4 Application of the Energy Equation to Nonuniform Flows

3.3.5 Combination of the Energy Equation and the Moment-of- Momentum Equation
363

3.4
3.4.1 3.4.2

3.4.3

3.4.4

Second Law of Thermodynamics Irreversible Flow Semi-infinitesimal Control Volume Statement of the Energy Equation Semi-infinitesimal Control Volume Statement of the Second Law of Thermodynamics Combination of the Equations of the First and Second Laws of Thermodynamics Application of the Loss Form of the Energy Equation
364

3.5 3.5.1 3.5.2 3.5.3 3.6 3.6.1 3.6.2 3.6.3 3.7 3.7.1

Fluid Element Kinematics Velocity and Acceleration Fields Revisited Linear Motion and Deformation Angular Motion and Deformation Conservation of Mass Differential Form of Continuity Equation Cylindrical Polar Coordinates The Stream Function Conservation of Linear Momentum Description of Forces Acting on the Differential Element 3.7.2 Equations of Motion 3.8 Inviscid Flow 3.8.1 Eulers Equations of Motion 3.8.2 The Bernoulli Equation

365

3.8.3 Irrotational Flow 3.8.4 The Bernoulli Equation for Irrotational Flow 3.8.5 The Velocity Potential 3.9 Some Basic, Plane Potential Flows 3.9.1 Uniform Flow 3.9.2 Source and Sink 3.9.3 Vortex 3.9.4 Doublet 3.10 Superposition of Basic, Plane Potential Flows 3.10.1 Source in a Uniform StreamHalf-Body 3.10.2 Rankine Ovals 3.10.3 Flow around a Circular Cylinder

366

3.11 3.12 3.12.1 3.12.2 3.13 3.13.1 3.13.2 3.13.3 3.13.4 3.14 3.14.1

Other Aspects of Potential Flow Analysis Viscous Flow Stress-Deformation Relationships The NaiverStokes Equations Some Simple Solutions for Viscous, Incompressible Fluids Steady, Laminar Flow between Fixed Parallel Plates Couette Flow Steady, Laminar Flow in Circular Tubes Steady, Axial, Laminar Flow in an Annulus Other Aspects of Differential Analysis Numerical Methods
367

Life Long Learning Problems


What are typical efficiencies associated with swimming and how can they be improved? Discuss the main causes of loss of available energy in a turbo-pump and how they can be minimized. What are typical turbo-pump efficiencies? Discuss the main causes of loss of available energy in a turbine and how they can be minimized. What are typical turbine efficiencies?
368

What sometimes appear at first glance to be simple fluid flows can contain subtle, complex fluid mechanics. One such example is the stirring of tea leaves in a teacup. Obtain information about Einsteins tea leaves and investigate some of the complex fluid motions interacting with the leaves. Summarize your findings in a brief report.
369

Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has moved from a research tool to a design tool for engineering. Initially, much of the work in CFD was focused in the aerospace industry, but now has expanded into other areas. Obtain information on what other industries (e.g., automotive) make use of CFD in their engineering design. Summarize your findings in a brief report.
370

Unit 4: Dimensional Analysis, Similitude, Modeling and Viscous Flow in Pipes


Learning Outcomes
After completing unit 4, the student should be able to: apply the Buckingham pi theorem. develop a set of dimensionless variables for a given flow situation. discuss the use of dimensionless variables in data analysis. apply the concepts of modeling and similitude to develop prediction equations.
371

identify and understand various characteristics of the flow in pipes. discuss the main properties of laminar and turbulent pipe flow and appreciate their differences. calculate losses in straight portions of pipes as well as those in various pipe system components. apply appropriate equations and principles to analyze a variety of pipe flow situations. predict the flowrate in a pipe by use of common flowmeters.
372

4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4 4.4.1 4.4.2 4.4.3 4.5 4.6 4.7 4.7.1

Dimensional Analysis Buckingham Pi Theorem Determination of Pi Terms Some Additional Comments About Dimensional Analysis Selection of Variables Determination of Reference Dimensions Uniqueness of Pi Terms Determination of Pi Terms by Inspection Common Dimensionless Groups in Fluid Mechanics Correlation of Experimental Data Problems with One Pi Term

373

4.7.2 4.8 4.8.1 4.8.2 4.8.3 4.9 4.9.1 4.9.2 4.9.3 4.10

Problems with Two or More Pi Terms Modeling and Similitude Theory of Models Model Scales Practical Aspects of Using Models Some Typical Model Studies Flow through Closed Conduits Flow around Immersed Bodies Flow with a Free Surface Similitude Based on Governing Differential Equations

374

4.11 4.11.1 4.11.2 4.11.3 4.12 4.12.1 4.12.2 4.12.3 4.12.4 4.13 4.13.1 4.13.2 4.13.3

General Characteristics of Pipe Flow Laminar or Turbulent Flow Entrance Region and Fully Developed Flow Pressure and Shear Stress Fully Developed Laminar Flow From F = ma Applied to a Fluid Element From the NavierStokes Equations From Dimensional Analysis Energy Considerations Fully Developed Turbulent Flow Transition from Laminar to Turbulent Flow Turbulent Shear Stress Turbulent Velocity Profile
375

4.13.4 4.13.5 4.14 4.14.1 4.14.2 4.14.3 4.15 4.15.1 4.15.2 4.16 4.16.1 4.16.2

Turbulence Modeling Chaos and Turbulence Dimensional Analysis of Pipe Flow Major Losses Minor Losses Noncircular Conduits Pipe Flow Examples Single Pipes Multiple Pipe Systems Pipe Flowrate Measurement Pipe Flowrate Meters Volume Flow Meters

376

Life Long Learning Problems


Microfluidics is the study of fluid flow in fabricated devices at the micro scale. Advances in micro fluidics have enhanced the ability of scientists and engineers to perform laboratory experiments using miniaturized devices known as a lab-ona-chip. Obtain information about a lab-on-a-chip device that is available commercially and investigate its capabilities. Summarize your findings in a brief report.
377

For some types of aerodynamic wind tunnel testing, it is difficult to simultaneously match both the Reynolds number and Mach number between model and prototype. Engineers have developed several potential solutions to the problem including pressurized wind tunnels and lowering the temperature of the flow. Obtain information about cryogenic wind tunnels and explain the advantages and disadvantages. Summarize your findings in a brief report.
378

The field of bioengineering has undergone significant growth in recent years. Some universities have undergraduate and graduate programs in this field. Bioengineering applies engineering principles to help solve problems in the medical field for human health.
Obtain information about bioengineering applications in blood flow.

Summarize your findings in a brief report.


379

Data used in the Moody diagram were first published in 1944. Since then, there have been many innovations in pipe material, pipe design, and measurement techniques. Investigate whether there have been any improvements or enhancements to the Moody chart. Summarize your findings in a brief report.
380

Flow separation in pipes can lead to losses. External flow separation is a significant problem. For external flows, there have been many mechanisms devised to help mitigate and control flow separation from the surface, e.g., from the wing of an airplane. Investigate either passive or active flow control mechanisms that can reduce or eliminate internal flow separation (e.g., flow separation in a diffuser). Summarize your findings in a brief report.
381

Unit 5: Flow Over Immersed Bodies and Open-Chennel Flow


Learning Outcomes
After completing unit 5, the student should be able to:
identify and discuss the features of external flow. explain the fundamental characteristics of a boundary layer, including laminar, transitional, and turbulent regimes. calculate boundary layer paremeters for flow past a flat plate. provide a description of boundary layer separation. calculate the lift and drag forces for various objects.
382

discuss the general characteristics of open-channel flow.

use a specific energy diagram.


apply appropriate equations to analyze open-channel flow with uniform depth. calculate key properties of a hydraulic jump. determine flowrates based on openchannel flow-measuring devices.
383

5.1 5.1.1 5.1.2 5.2 5.2.1


5.2.2 5.2.3 5.2.4 5.2.5

General External Flow Characteristics Lift and Drag Concepts Characteristics of Flow Past an Object Boundary Layer Characteristics Boundary Layer Structure and Thickness on a Flat Plate Prandtl/Blasius Boundary Layer Solution Momentum Integral Boundary Layer Equation for a Flat Plate Transition from Laminar to Turbulent Flow Turbulent Boundary Layer Flow
384

5.2.6 Effects of Pressure Gradient 5.2.7 Momentum-Integral Boundary Layer Equation with Nonzero Pressure Gradient 5.3 Drag 5.3.1 Friction Drag 5.3.2 Pressure Drag 5.3.3 Drag Coefficient Data and Examples 5.4 Lift 5.4.1 Surface Pressure Distribution 5.4.2 Circulation 5.5 General Characteristics of Open- Channel Flow 5.6 Surface Waves 5.6.1 Wave Speed 5.6.2 Froude Number Effects
385

5.7 5.7.1 5.7.2 5.8 5.8.1 5.8.2 5.8.3 5.9 5.9.1 5.9.2 5.10 5.10.1 5.10.2 5.10.3 5.10.4

Energy Considerations Specific Energy Channel Depth Variations Uniform Depth Channel Flow Uniform Flow Approximations The Chezy and Manning Equations Uniform Depth Examples Gradually Varied Flow Classification of Surface Shapes Examples of Gradually Varied Flows Rapidly Varied Flow The Hydraulic Jump Sharp-Crested Weirs Broad-Crested Weirs Underflow Gates

386

Life Long Learning Problems


Pressure-sensitive paint technique

is a new method of measuring surface pressure. Obtain information about


Pressure-sensitive paint technique

and its advantages. Summarize your findings in a brief report.


387

For typical aircraft flying at cruise conditions, it is advantageous to have as much laminar flow over the wing as possible since there is an increase in friction drag once the flow becomes turbulent. Various techniques have been developed to help promote laminar flow over the wing, both in airfoil geometry configurations as well as active flow control mechanisms. Obtain information on one of these techniques. Summarize your findings in a brief report.
388

We have seen that streamlining an automobile can help to reduce the drag coefficient. One of the methods of reducing the drag has been to reduce the projected area. However, it is difficult for some road vehicles, such as a tractor-trailer, to reduce this projected area due to the storage volume needed to haul the required load. Over the years, work has been done to help minimize some of the drag on this type of vehicle. Obtain information on a method that has been developed to reduce drag on a tractor-trailer. Summarize your findings in a brief report.
389

With the increased usage of low-lying coastal areas and the possible rise in ocean levels because of global warming, the potential for widespread damage from tsunamis (i.e., tidal waves) is increasing. Obtain information about new and improved methods available to predict the occurrence of these damaging waves and how to better use coastal areas so that massive loss of life and property does not occur. Summarize your findings in a brief report.
390

Recent photographs from NASAs Mars Orbiter Camera on the Mars Global Surveyor provide new evidence that water may still flow on the surface of Mars. Obtain information about the possibility of current or past openchannel flows on Mars and other planets or their satellites. Summarize your findings in a brief report.
391

Hydraulic jumps are normally associated with water flowing in rivers, gullies, and other such relatively high-speed open channels. However, recently, hydraulic jumps have been used in various manufacturing processes involving fluids other than water (such as liquid metal solder) in relatively small-scale flows. Obtain information about new manufacturing processes that involve hydraulic jumps as an integral part of the process. Summarize your findings in a brief report.
392

Unit 6: Compressible Flow and Turbomachines Learning Outcomes


After completing unit 6, the student should be able to:
distinguish between incompressible and compressible flows, and know when the approximations associated with assuming fluid incompressibility are acceptable. understand some important features of different categories of compressible flows of ideal gases. explain speed of sound and Mach number and their practical significance.
393

solve useful problems involving isentropic and nonisentropic flows including flows across normal shock waves. appreciate the compelling similarities between compressible flows of gases and open channel flows of liquids. move on to understanding more advanced concepts about compressible flows. explain how and why a turbomachine works. know the basic differences between a turbine and a pump. recognize the importance of minimizing loss in a turbomachine.
394

select an appropriate class of turbomachine for a particular application. understand why turbomachine blades are shaped like they are. appreciate the basic fundamentals of sensibly scaling turbomachines that are larger or smaller than a prototype. move on to more advanced engineering work involving the fluid mechanics of turbomachinery (e.g., design, development, research).
395

6.1 6.2 6.3 6.4 6.4.1 6.4.2 6.4.3 6.5 6.5.1 6.5.2 6.5.3

Ideal Gas Relationships Mach Number and Speed of Sound Categories of Compressible Flow Isentropic Flow of an Ideal Gas Effect of Variations in Flow Cross-Sectional Area ConvergingDiverging Duct Flow Constant-Area Duct Flow Nonisentropic Flow of an Ideal Gas Adiabatic Constant-Area Duct Flow with Friction (Fanno Flow) Frictionless Constant-Area Duct Flow with Heat Transfer (Rayleigh Flow) Normal Shock Waves

396

6.6 6.7 6.8 6.9 6.10 6.11 6.11.1 6.11.2 6.11.3 6.11.4 6.12

6.12.1

Analogy between Compressible and OpenChannel Flows Two-Dimensional Compressible Flow Introduction Basic Energy Considerations Basic Angular Momentum Considerations The Centrifugal Pump Theoretical Considerations Pump Performance Characteristics Net Positive Suction Head (NPSH) System Characteristics and Pump Selection Dimensionless Parameters and Similarity Laws Special Pump Scaling Laws

397

6.12.2 6.12.3 6.13 6.14 6.15 6.15.1 6.15.2 6.16 6.16.1 6.16.2

Specific Speed Suction Specific Speed Axial-Flow and Mixed-Flow Pumps Fans Turbines Impulse Turbines Reaction Turbines Compressible Flow Turbomachines Compressors Compressible Flow Turbines
398

Life Long Learning Problems


Is there a limit to how fast an object can move through the atmosphere? Explain. Discuss the similarities between hydraulic jumps in open channel flow and shock waves in compressible flow. Explain how this knowledge can be useful. Estimate the surface temperature associated with the reentry of the Space Shuttle into the earths atmosphere. Why is knowing this important?
399

[See Fluids in the News article titled Hilsch tube (Ranque vortex tube), Section 11.1.] Explain why a Hilsch tube works and cite some high and low gas temperatures actually achieved. What is the most important limitation of a Hilsch tube and how can it be overcome?
400

[See Fluids in the News article titled Supersonic and compressible flows in gas turbines, Section 11.3.] Using typical physical dimensions and rotation speeds of manufactured gas turbine rotors, consider the possibility that supersonic fluid velocities relative to blade surfaces are possible.
How do designers use this knowledge?
401

Develop useful equations describing the constant temperature (isothermal) flow of an ideal gas through a constant cross section area pipe.
What important practical flow situations would these equations be useful for? How are real gas effects estimated?
402

What do you think are the major unresolved fluid dynamics problems associated with gas turbine engine compressors?
For gas turbine engine high-pressure and low-pressure turbines? For gas turbine engine fans?

Outline the steps associated with the preliminary design of a turbomachine rotor.
403

What are current efficiencies achieved by the following categories of turbomachines? (a) Wind turbines; (b) hydraulic turbines; (c) power plant steam turbines; (d) aircraft gas turbine engines; (e) natural gas pipeline compressors; (f) home vacuum cleaner blowers; (g) laptop computer cooling fan; (h) irrigation pumps; (i) dentist drill air turbines. What is being done to improve these devices?
404

How is cavitation and, more importantly, the damage it can cause detected in hydraulic turbines? How can this damage be minimized?
405

10. ACCREDITATION MANUAL, FOR UG ENGINEERING PROGRAMS, NATIONAL BOARD OF ACCREDITATION (NBA), TIER I, JANUARY 2013.
406

10.1 INTRODUCTION
10.1.3 The objective of the NBA is to assess and accredit professional programmes offered at various levels by the technical institutions on the basis of norms prescribed by the NBA. The NBA works very closely with stakeholders (faculty, educational institutions, government, industries, regulators, management, recruiters, alumni, students and their parents) to ensure that the programmes serve to prepare their graduates with sound knowledge of fundamentals and to develop in them an adequate level of professional competence, such as would meet the needs of the engineering profession locally as well as globally. 407

10.1.4 NBAs Vision:

To be an accrediting agency of international repute by ensuring the highest degree of credibility in assurance of quality and relevance of professional education and come to the expectations of its stakeholders, viz., academicians, corporate, educational institutions, government, industry, regulators, students, and their parents.
408

10.1.5 NBAs Mission:


To stimulate the quality of teaching, self evaluation, and accountability in the higher education system, which help institutions realise their academic objectives and adopt teaching practices that enable them to produce high- quality professionals and to assess and accredit the programmes offered by the colleges or the institutions, or both, imparting technical and professional education.
409

10.1.7 The main objectives of the NBA are to:

a) assess and grade colleges and/or institutions of technical and professional education, the courses and programmes offered by them, their various units, faculty, departments etc., b) stimulate the academic environment and quality of teaching and research in these institutions, c) contribute to the sphere of knowledge in its discipline ,
410

d) motivate colleges and/or institutions of technical and professional education for research, and adopt teaching practices that groom their students for the innovation and development of leadership qualities, e) encourage innovation, self-evaluation and accountability in higher education, f) promote necessary changes, innovation and reforms in all aspects of the working of the colleges / institutions of technical and professional education for the above purpose , and g) help institutions to realise their academic objectives.
411

10.3 ACCREDITATION
Accreditation is a process of quality assurance and improvement, whereby a programme in an institution is critically appraised to verify that the institution or the programme continues to meet and exceed the norms and standards prescribed by the appropriate designated authorities. Accreditation does not seek to replace the system of award of degree and diplomas by the universities/autonomous institutions.
412

But, accreditation provides quality assurance that the academic aims and objectives of the institution are honestly pursued, and effectively achieved by the resources available, and that the institution has demonstrated capabilities of ensuring effectiveness of the educational programmes over the validity period of accreditation. NBA accreditation is a quality assurance scheme for higher technical education.
413

NBA operates a two-tier system : TIER-I and TIER-II


TIER I System : For the engineering programs offered by autonomous institutions and university departments. TIER II System : Fine-tuned for the needs of the nonautonomous institutions affiliated to a university. In both TIER I and TIER II documents, the same set of criteria have been considered for accreditation.
414

In the TIER I document : Criteria based on outcome parameters have been given more weightage. In the TIER II document : The weightage for criteria based on outcome parameters has been reduced. thereby enhancing the weightage of the output-based criteria. However, a non-autonomous institution may also apply for accreditation on the basis of TIER I document, if they feel that their curriculum is capable of attaining the desired outcomes of a program.
415

10.3.1 Significance of Accreditation


To make the institute/department aware of the weaknesses of the programme offered by it and act on suggestions for improvement. To encourage the institute to move continuously towards the improvement of quality of its programme, and the pursuit of excellence. To facilitate institutions for updating themselves in programme curriculum, teaching and learning processes, faculty achievements, students skills/abilities/knowledge.
416

To excel among stakeholders. (peers, students, employers, societies etc.)


To facilitate receiving of grants from Government regulatory bodies and institutions/agencies.

To attain international recognition of accredited degrees awarded. To facilitate the mobility of graduated students and professionals.
417

10.5. ACCREDITATION CRITERIA 10.5.1 General Information


The assessment and evaluation process of accreditation of a PG engineering programme is based on 9 broad criteria developed through a participatory process involving experts from reputed national-level technical institutions, industries, R&D organisations and professional bodies. Each criterion relates to a major feature of institutional activity and its effectiveness. The criteria has been formulated in terms of parameters, including quantitative measurements that have been designed for maximally objective assessment of each feature. 418

An engineering programme to be accredited or re-accredited has to satisfy all the criteria during the full term of accreditation. The educational institution should periodically review the strengths and weaknesses of the programme and seek to improve standards and quality continually, and to address deficiencies, if any aspect falls short of the standards set by the accreditation criteria.

During the full term of accreditation, the institutions are required to submit their annual self-assessment report to eNBA online.
419

10.5.2 ACCREDIATION CRITERIA


CRITERION 1 VISION, MISSION AND PROGRAMME EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES (PEOs) Each engineering programme to be accredited or re-accredited should have: i. Published department vision and mission, and programme educational objectives that are consistent with the mission of the educational institution as well as criteria 2 to 9 listed below, and ii. The PEOs should be assessable and realistic within the context of the committed resources.
420

The comprehensive list of various stakeholders of the programme, who have been involved in the process of defining and redefining the PEOs, is to be provided. While framing the PEOs, the following factors are to be considered: The PEOs should be consistent with the mission of the institution. All the stakeholders should participate in the process of framing the PEOs. The number of PEOs should be manageable.
421

PEOs should be based on the needs of the stakeholders. PEOs should be achievable by the programme. PEOs should be specific to the programme and not too broad. PEOs should not be too narrow and similar to the POs. For example, the PEOs of an academic programme might read like this: Statement of areas or fields in which the graduates find employment Preparedness of graduates to take up higher studies.
422

The programme shall provide how and where the department vision and mission and the PEOs have been published and disseminated. It should also describe the process that documents and demonstrates periodically that the PEOs are based on the needs of the stakeholders of the programme. The programme shall demonstrate how the PEOs are aligned with the mission of the department / institution. The PEOs are reviewed periodically based on feedback of the programmes various stakeholders.
423

For this purpose, there should be in place a process to identify and document relationships with stakeholders (including students) and their needs, which have to be adequately addressed when reviewing programme curriculum and processes. Justifications shall be provided as to how the composition of the programme curriculum contributes towards the attainment of the PEOs defined for the programme.
424

Also, it is expected to expound how the administrative system helps the programme to ensuring the attainment of the PEOs. The institution shall provide the additional curricular / co-curricular activities carried out to attain the defined PEOs. There should be adequate evidence and documentation to prove that the PEOs set by the institution have been achieved. Also the assessment (indicate the tools and their usage, methodology employed etc.) and evaluation process developed to assess and evaluate the achievement of the said PEOs should be provided.
425

Also, the institution must show that this continuous process leads to the revision or refinement of the PEOs. The institute shall provide the required information for assessment, evaluation and review methods to evaluate the attainment of the PEOs as per the format given in the SAR. If the institute wishes to provide additional information, it will include that information in a suitable format wherever necessary.
426

CRITERION 2 PROGRAMME OUTCOMES


Graduate Attributes (GAs) form a set of individually assessable outcomes that are the components indicative of the graduates potential to acquire competence to practice at the appropriate level. The GAs are exemplars of the attributes expected of a graduate from an accredited programme.
427

The Graduate Attributes of the NBA for UG Programmes are as following:

i. Engineering Knowledge: Apply the knowledge of mathematics, science, engineering fundamentals, and an engineering specialization for the solution of complex engineering problems. ii. Problem Analysis: Identify, formulate, research literature, and analyze complex engineering problems reaching substantiated conclusions using first principles of mathematics, natural sciences, and engineering sciences.
428

iii. Design / Development of Solutions: Design solutions for complex engineering problems and design system components or processes that meet the specified needs with appropriate consideration for public health and safety, cultural, societal, and environmental considerations. iv. Investigations of Complex Problems : Use research-based knowledge and research methods including design of experiments, analysis and interpretation of data, and synthesis of the information to provide valid conclusions.
429

v. Modern Tool Usage: Create, select, and apply appropriate techniques, resources, and modern engineering and IT tools, including prediction and modeling to complex engineering activities, with an understanding of the limitations. vi. The Engineer and Society: Apply reasoning informed by the contextual knowledge to assess societal, health, safety, legal, and cultural issues and the consequent responsibilities relevant to the professional engineering practice.

430

vii. Environment and Sustainability: Understand the impact of the professional engineering solutions in societal and environmental contexts, and demonstrate the knowledge of, and need for sustainable development. viii. Ethics: Apply ethical principles and commit to professional ethics and responsibilities and norms of the engineering practice.
431

ix. Individual and Team Work: Function effectively as an individual, and as a member or leader in diverse teams, and in multidisciplinary settings. x. Communication: Communicate effectively on complex engineering activities with the engineering community and with the society at large, such as, being able to comprehend and write effective reports and design documentation, make effective presentations, and give and receive clear instructions.
432

xi. Project Management and Finance: Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the engineering and management principles and apply these to ones own work, as a member and leader in a team, and to manage projects in multidisciplinary environments. xii. Life-long Learning: Recognize the need for, and have the preparation and ability to engage in independent and life-long learning in the broadest context of technological change.

433

The POs formulated for each programme by the institute must be consistent with the NBAs Graduate Attributes. The POs must foster the attainment of the PEOs. The programme shall indicate the process involved in defining and redefining the POs. It shall also provide how and where the POs are published and disseminated. It should also describe the process that documents and demonstrates periodically that the POs are based on the needs of the stakeholders of the programme.
434

The extent to which and how the POs are aligned with the Graduate Attributes prescribed by the NBA shall be provided. The correlation between the POs and the PEOs is to be provided as per the format given in the SAR in order to establish the contribution of the POs towards the attainment of the PEOs. Precise illustrations of how course outcomes, modes of delivery of the courses, assessment tools are used to assess the impact of course delivery / course content, and laboratory and project work are contributing towards the attainment of the POs shall be given by the institution.
435

The attainment of POs may be assessed by direct and indirect methods. Direct methods of assessment are essentially accomplished by the direct examination or observation of students knowledge or skills against measurable performance indicators. On the other hand, indirect methods of assessment are based on ascertaining opinion or self-report.
436

Rubric is a useful tool for indirect assessment. A rubric basically articulates the expectations for students performance. It is a set of criteria for assessing students work or performance.
437

Rubric is particularly suited to program outcomes that are complex or not easily quantifiable for which there are no clear right or wrong answers or which are not evaluated with the standardised tests or surveys. For example, assessment of writing, oral communication, or critical thinking often require rubrics. The development of different rubrics and the achievement of the outcomes need to be clearly stated in the SAR.
438

The results of assessment of each PO should be indicated, since they play a vital role in implementing the Continuous Improvement Process of the programme. The institute shall provide the ways and means of how the results of assessment of the POs help to refine processes of revising/redefining the POs. The institute shall provide the required information for assessment, evaluation and review methods to evaluate the attainment of the POs as per the format given in SAR.
439

CRITERION 3 PROGRAMME CURRICULUM The programme shall provide how its curriculum is designed, published, and disseminated. The structure of the curriculum, which comprises course code, course title, total number of contact hours (lecture, tutorial and practical) and credits is to be provided. Flow diagram that shows the prerequisites for the courses shall also be provided.
440

Each programme should cover general and specialised professional content of adequate breadth and depth, and should also include appropriate components in the Sciences and Humanities. The relevance of curriculum components including core engineering courses to the POs shall be given. The institute shall describe how the core engineering subjects in the curriculum add to the learning experience with the complex engineering problems.
441

In addition to the General Criteria, each programme must satisfy a set of criteria specific to it, known as programme specific criteria which deal with the requirements for engineering practice particular to the related sub-discipline. The stipulations in the Programme Specific Criteria chiefly concern curricular issues and qualifications of faculty. The programme curriculum in correlation with programme specific criteria is to be provided.
442

The NBA is intended to adopt the programme specific criteria specified by appropriate American Professional associations such as ASME, ASCE, IEEE etc,. The institution shall provide evidence that the programme curriculum satisfies the programme specific criteria, and industry interactions/ internship.
443

The institution must ensure that the programme curriculum that was developed at the time of inception of the programme has been refined in the subsequent years to make it consistent with the PEOs and POs.

The institute shall provide the required information for assessment, evaluation and review methods to evaluate the attainment of the COs.
444

CRITERION 4 STUDENTS PERFORMANCE


(i) Students admitted to the programme must be of a quality that will enable them to achieve the programme outcomes. The policies and procedures for student admission and transfer should be transparent and spelt out clearly. (ii) The educational institution should monitor the academic performance of its students carefully. The requirements of the programme should be made known to every student.
445

(iii) The educational institution must provide student support services including counselling/tutoring / mentoring. (iv) The institute shall provide the required information for three complete academic years for admission intake in the programme, success rate, academic performance, placement and higher studies and professional activities as per the format given in the SAR. However, it shall provide the information in a suitable format, wherever necessary, in case the format is not provided in the SAR.
446

CRITERION 5 FACULTY
(i) The faculty members should posses adequate knowledge / expertise to deliver all the curricular contents of the programme. (ii) The number of faculty members must be adequate, so as to enable them to engage in activities outside their teaching duties, especially for the purposes of professional development, curriculum development, student mentoring/counselling, administrative work, training, and placement of students, interaction with industrial and professional practitioners.
447

(iii) The number of faculty members must be sufficiently large in proportion to the number of students, so as to provide adequate levels of facultystudent interaction. In any educational programme, it is essential to have adequate levels of teacher-student interaction, which is possible only if there are enough teachers, or in this case, faculty members.
448

(iv) The faculty must be actively involved in research and development. The programme must support, encourage and maintain such R&D activities. A vibrant research and development culture is important to any academic programme.
449

It provides new knowledge to the curriculum.

The students education is enriched by being part of such a culture, for it cultivates skills and habits for life-long learning and knowledge on contemporary issues.
450

(v) The academic freedom to steer and run the programme will be in the hands of members of the faculty. This includes the rights over evaluation and assessment processes and decisions on programme involvement. They should also engage themselves in the process of accreditation for the continuous improvement of the PEOs and the POs.
451

(vi) The faculty must have sound educational qualifications, and must be actively updating knowledge in their respective areas of interest.
It is desirable that the members of the faculty possess adequate industrial experience, and be from diverse backgrounds.
452

In terms of teaching, the faculty must possess experience, be able to communicate effectively, and be enthusiastic about programme improvement. For courses relating to design, the faculty members in charge of the course must have good design experience and participate in professional societies.
453

(vii) The institute shall provide the required information for three complete academic years for Student-Teacher Ratio (STR), Faculty Cadre Ratio, faculty qualifications, faculty retention, Faculty Research Publications (FRP), Faculty Intellectual Property Rights (FIPR), Funded R&D Projects and Consultancy (FRDC), faculty interaction with outside world, faculty competence correlation with program specific criteria and faculty as participants / resource persons in training and development activities as per the format given in the SAR. However, it shall provide the information in a suitable format, wherever necessary, in case 454 the format is not provided in the SAR.

CRITERION 6 FACILITIES AND TECHNICAL SUPPORT

(i) The institution must provide adequate infrastructural facilities to support the achievement of the programme outcomes. Classrooms, tutorial rooms, meeting rooms, seminar halls, conference hall, faculty rooms, and laboratories must be adequately furnished to provide an environment conducive to learning.
455

Modern teaching aids such as digital interactive boards, multimedia projectors etc., should be in place to facilitate the teaching-learning process so that programme outcomes can be achieved.
456

(ii)The laboratories must be equipped with computing resources, equipments, and tools relevant to the programme. The equipments of the laboratories should be properly maintained, upgraded and utilised so that the students can attain the programme outcomes.
457

There should be an adequate number of qualified technical supporting staff to provide appropriate guidance for the students for using the equipment, tools, computers, and laboratories.
The institution must provide scope for the technical staff for upgrading their skills and professional advancement.
458

(iii) The institute shall provide the required information for class rooms in the department, faculty rooms in the department, laboratories in the department to meet the curriculum requirements as well as the POs, and technical manpower in the department as per the format given in the SAR. However, it shall provide the information in a suitable format wherever necessary, in case the format has not been provided in the SAR.
459

CRITERION 7 ACADEMIC SUPPORT UNITS AND TEACHING LEARNING PROCESS (i) The programme must employ effective teaching-learning processes. The modes of teaching used, such as lecture, tutorial, seminar, teacherstudent interaction outside class, peergroup discussion, or a combination of two or more of these, must be designed and implemented so as to facilitate and encourage learning.
460

Practical skills, such as the ability to operate computers and other technologically advanced machinery, must be developed through hands-on laboratory work. (ii) The effectiveness of the teaching-learning processes must be evaluated on a regular basis. The evaluation, besides reviewing the above mentioned factors, must also look at whether the academic calendar, the number of instructional days and contact hours per week, are maximally conducive to teaching and learning.
461

Student feedback on various aspects of the process must be carefully considered as well. Internal reviews of quality assurance procedures should be carried out periodically. (iii) The institute shall provide the required information for students admission, assessment of first year student-teacher ratio (FYSTR), assessment of faculty qualification, teaching first year common courses, academic support units and common facilities for the first year courses ,
462

tutorial/ remedial classes/ mentoring, teaching and evaluation process, feedback system, self learning, career guidance, training, placement and entrepreneurship cell, and co-curricular and extra curricular activities as per the format given in the SAR. However, it shall provide the information in a suitable format, wherever necessary, in case the format is not provided in the SAR.
463

CRITERION 8 GOVERNANCE, INSTITUTIONAL SUPPORT AND FINANCIAL RESOURCES

(i) The governance structure of the programme must clearly assign authority and responsibility for the formulation and implementation of policies that enable the programme to fulfill its mission. The programme must possess the financial resources necessary to fulfill its mission and the PEOs.
464

In particular, there must be sufficient resources to attract and retain wellqualified staff, and to provide them with opportunities for continuous development and career growth. The programmes budgetary planning process must also provide for the acquisition, repair, maintenance and replacement of physical facilities and equipment. (ii) The educational institution must have a comprehensive and up-to-date library and extensive educational, technological facilities.
465

(iii) The institute shall provide the required information for campus infrastructure and facility, organisation, governance and transparency, budget allocation and public accounting (for both institutions and programme), library, internet, safety norms and checks, counseling, and emergency medical care and first-aid as per the format given in the SAR. However, it shall provide the information in a suitable format, wherever necessary in case the format has not been provided in the SAR.
466

CRITERION 9 CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT


Modifications in the programme curriculum, course delivery and assessment brought in from the review of the attainment of the PEOs and the POs will be helpful to the institutions for continuous improvement. The programme must develop a documented process for the periodic review of the PEOs, the POs and the COs. The continuous improvement in the PEOs and the POs need to be validated with proper documentation.
467

The institute shall provide the required information for improvement in the success index of students, improvement in academic performance index of students, improvement in student-teacher ratio, enhancement of faculty qualifications index, improvement in faculty research publications, R&D and consultancy work, continuing education, curricular improvement based on the review of attainment of the PEOs, and the POs, course delivery and assessment improvement
468

based on the review of the attainment of the PEOs, and the POs, new facility created, and overall improvement since last accreditation, if any, otherwise since the commencement of the programme, as per the format given in the SAR. However, it shall provide the information in a suitable format, wherever necessary, in case the format has not been provided in the SAR.
469

10.5.3 Awarding Accreditation


Programmes of the institutions scoring a minimum of 750 points in aggregate out of 1000 points with minimum score of 60% in each criteria shall be eligible for accreditation for 5 years under TIER-I system. The programmes under TIER-I, which shall score a minimum of 600 points in aggregate (without any stipulation), will be eligible for the status of prospective candidate for accreditation under TIER-I.
470

10.6 STEPS INVOLVED IN ACCREDITATION PROCEDURE

The accreditation process, whether for a first accreditation or re-accreditation, broadly involves the following activities. The institute shall submit the Self Assessment Report (SAR) which contains the required information in the prescribed format. The NBA shall appoint an Evaluation Team to assess the SAR. The Evaluation Team shall make an onsite accreditation visit and it shall prepare an evaluation report based on its findings.
471

The Evaluation Team shall share the strengths and weaknesses of the programme/institute with the members of the institution vis--vis accreditation process during the exit meeting. The evaluation report will be placed before the EAC for its recommendations. The recommendations of the EAC will be submitted to the EC for its final decision vis--vis granting accreditation. The NBA shall inform the outcome of accreditation to the institution.
472

10.6.1 DOs and DONTs for Preparing the SAR


DOs: The SAR must Be concise, pointed, and adequate in length and breadth for the purpose of accreditation. Provide relevant information as per the format specified for the individual programme. Be printed on one side of paper with double spacing, using font 12 Times New Roman, with at least one inch (2.54 cm) margin on all sides Contain carefully compiled and authentic data. Proper presentation of data in appendices with charts, graphics, and visuals wherever applicable. 473

Provide relevant data for the past three years, unless specified otherwise in the respective programme manual. The documents should be submitted as hard copy in a soft bound form and mailed to the NBA, New Delhi. The soft copy should be uploaded on the NBA website. DONTs: Dont send the following objects with the SAR: Original documents Publications such as books, journals, newsletters, thesis, etc.
474

10.8 ACCREDITATION VISIT


The Evaluation Team will visit the institution seeking accreditation of its programme(s) evaluate and validate the assessment of the institute/department through the SAR of the programme concerned as per specified accreditation criteria. The evaluators may obtain such further clarifications from the institution as they may deem necessary. Although it may not be possible to adequately describe all the factors to be assessed during the on-site visit, some of the common ones are the following:
475

(i) Outcome of the education provided; (ii) Quality assurance processes, including internal reviews; (iii) Assessment; (iv) Activities and work of the students; (v) Entry standards and selection for admission of students; (vi) Motivation and enthusiasm of faculty; (vii) Qualifications and activities of faculty members; (viii) Infrastructure facilities; (ix) Laboratory facilities; (x) Library facilities; (xi) Industry participation; (xii) Organisation
476

In order to assist the Evaluation Team in its assessment, the educational institution should arrange for the following: Discussions with a) The Head of the institute/Dean/Heads of Department (HOD)/Programme and course coordinators b) A member of the management (to discuss how the programme fits into the overall strategic direction and focus of the institution, and management support for continued funding and development of the programme) c) Faculty members d) Alumni (sans Alma Maters) e) Students 477 f) parents

(ii) Availability of the following exhibits a) Profile of faculty involved in the programme b) Evidence that the results of assessment of course outcomes and programme outcomes are being applied to the review and ongoing improvement of programme effectiveness c) List of publications, consultancy and sponsored/funded research projects by programme faculty d) Sample materials for theory and laboratory courses e) Sample test / semester examination question papers for all courses
478

f) Sample of test/semester examination answer scripts, projects, assignments, (including at least one excellent, one good and one marginal pass for each examination) question papers and evidences related to assessment tools for COs and POs g) Student records of three immediate batches of graduates h) Sample project and design reports (excellent, good and marginal pass) by students i) Sample student feedback form j) Sample for industry-institute interaction k) Results of quality assurance reviews
479

l) Records of employment/higher studies of graduates m) Records of academic support and other learning activities n) Any other documents that the Evaluation Team/NBA may request. (iii) Visits to a) Classrooms b) Laboratories pertaining to the programme c) Central and department library d) Computer centre e) Hostel and dispensary
480

The Evaluation Team should conduct an exit meeting with the Management Representative, the Head of the institute, the Head of Department and other key officials at the end of the on-site visit to present its findings (strengths, weaknesses, and scope for the improvement). The institution will be given a chance to withdraw one or more programmes from the process of accreditation. In this case, the Head of the institution will have to submit the withdrawal in writing to the Chairperson of the Evaluation Team during the exit meeting.
481

11. NATIONAL BOARD OF ACCREDIATION FORMAT FOR SELF ASSESSMENT REPORT (SAR) FOR ACCREDITATION OF UG ENGINEERING PROGRAMMES (TIER-I) JANUARY, 2013
482

11. SELF ASSESSMENT REPORT (SAR)


Abbreviations
CAY CAYm1 CAYm2 LYG LYGm1 CFY CFYm1 PEOs POs SI FYSTR UG PG : : : : : : : : : : : : :

Several abbreviations have been used in this document.


Current Academic Year Current Academic Year minus one Current Academic Year minus two Latest Year of Graduation Latest Year of Graduation minus one Current Financial Year Current Financial Year minus one Program Educational Objectives Program Outcomes Success Index First Year Student-Teacher Ratio Undergraduate Postgraduate

483

PART A Institutional Information


I.1. Name and Address of the Institution and Affiliating University: (Instruction: The name, address of the institution and the name of the university, which has given affiliation to this institution ,are to be listed here.) I.2. Name, designation, telephone number, mobile number and E-mail address of the contact person for the NBA: (Instruction: The name of the contact person, with other details, has to be listed here.)
484

I.3. History of the Institution (including the date of introduction and number of seats of various programs of study along with the NBA accreditation, if any), in a tabular form:
Year
.............

Description
Institution started with the following programs (Intake strength) . . . . .

.............
.............

NBA accreditation visits and accreditation granted, if any . . . .


Addition of new programs, increase in intake strength of the existing programs and/or accreditation status . . . .

(Instruction: History of the institution and its chronological development along with the past accreditation records need to be listed here.)

485

I.4. Ownership Status: Govt.(Central/State) / Trust / Society (Govt. / NGO / Private) / Private/ Other: (Instruction: Ownership status of the Institute has to be listed here.) I.5. Mission and Vision of the Institution: (The Institution needs to specify its Mission and Vision) I.6. Organizational Structure: Organizational chart showing the hierarchy of academics and administration is to be included.
486

I.7. Financial Status: Govt.(Central/State) / grantsin-aid / not-for-profit / private self-financing / other: (Instruction: Financial status of the Institute has to be mentioned here.) I.8. Nature of the trust / society : Also list other institutions/colleges run by the trust/society: (Instruction: Way of functioning and activities of the trust /society have to be listed here.)
Name of the Institution Year of Establishment Location

487

I.9. External Sources of Funds :


Name of the External Source CFY CFYm1 CFYm2 CFYm3

(Instruction: The different sources of the external funds over the last three financial years are to be listed here.)

I.10. Internally Acquired Funds :


Name of the Internal Source Students fee CFY CFYm1 CFYm2 CFYm3

(Instruction: The different sources of the internal funds over the last three financial years are to be listed here.)
488

I.11. Scholarships or any Financial Assistance provided to Students ?


(Instruction: If any scholarship or financial assistance is provided to the students then the details of such assistances over the last three financial years has to be listed here. Also mention needs to be made of the basis for the award of such scholarship).
Details
Category Scholarship Assistance Amount
489

CFY

CFYm1

CFYm2

CFYm3

I.12. Basis/Criterion for Admission to the Institution: All India entrance / State-level entrance / University entrance / 12th standard mark sheet/ others: (Instruction: The basis / criterion for student intake has to be listed here.) I.13. Total number of engineering students:
CAY Total no .of boys CAYm1 CAYm2 CAYm3

Total no. of girls


Total no. of students

Total Number of other students, if any: (Instruction: Total number of engineering students, both boys and girls, has to be listed here. The data may be categorized in a tabular form as undergraduate, postgraduate engineering, or other program, if 490 applicable.)

I.14. Total number of employees

(Instruction: Total number of employees, both men and women, has to be listed here. The data may be categorized in a tabular form as teaching and supporting staff.)
Minimum and maximum number of staff on roll in the Engineering Institution, during the CAY and the previous CAYs (1st July to 30th June):
491

A. Regular Staff
CAY
Items Min Max M

CAYm1

CAYm2

CAYm3
Min Max

Min Max Min Max

Teaching staff in Engineering


Teaching staff in science & humanities Non-teaching staff

F
M

F
M F

(Instruction: Staff strength both teaching and nonteaching over the last three academic years has to be listed here.)
492

B. Contract Staff
CAY Items Min Max Teaching staff in Engineering M F M F Min Max Min Max Min Max CAYm1 CAYm2 CAYm3

Teaching staff in science & humanities


Non-teaching staff

M
F
493

II. Departmental Information


II.1 Name and address of the department II.2 Name, designation, telephone numbers and email address of the contact person for the NBA : II.3 History of the department including dates of introduction and number of seats of various programs of study along with the NBA accreditation, if any.
Program
UG in..............

Description
Started with ................seats in ............. Intake increased to ............. in ............. Intake increased to ............. in ............. ...................................... ......................................

UG in..............

MCA..............
PG in ..............
494

II.4 Mission and Vision of the Department (The department is required to specify its Mission and Vision). II.5 List of the programs / departments which share human resources and/or the facilities of these programs /departments (in %): (Instruction: The institution needs to mention the different programs being run in the department which share the human resources and facilities with this department / program being accredited.)
495

II.6. Total number of students UG:


II.7. Minimum and maximum number of staff on roll during the current and three previous academic years (1st July to 30th June) in the department :
CAY
Items Min Max
Teaching staff in the department Non-teaching staff Total
496

CAYm1
Min Max

CAYm2
Min

CAYm3

Max Min Max

II.8 Summary of budget for the CFY and the actual expenditure incurred in the CFYm1, CFYm2 and CFYm3 (for the Department)
Items Budg eted in CFY Actual expense s in CFY (till..) Budgeted in CFYm1 Actual BudgeExpens ted in es in CFYm2 CFYm1 Actual Budge- Actual Expens ted in Expens es in CFYm3 es in CFYm2 CFYm3

Laboratory equipment Software Laboratory consumables Maintenance and spares

Training & Travel


Miscellaneous expenses for academic activities

Total
497

III. Program Specific Information III.1. Name of the Programme UG in______________ (List name of the programme, as it appears on the graduates certificate and transcript, and abbreviation used for the programme.) III.2. Title of the Degree (List name of the degree title, as it appears on the graduates certificate and transcript, and abbreviation used for the degree.) III.3. Name designation telephone number, and e-mail address of the Programme coordinator for the NBA:
498

III.4. History of the programme along with the NBA accreditation, if any:
Program
UG in.

Description
Started with ..seats in . Intake increased to .. In . Intake increased to in . Accredited in

III.5. Deficiencies, weaknesses/concerns from previous accreditations: III.6. Total number of students in the programme:
499

III.7. Minimum and maximum number of staff for current and three previous academic years (1st July to 30th June) in the programme :
CAY
Items Min Max
Teaching staff in the department Non-teaching staff

CAYm1
Min Max

CAYm2
Min

CAYm3

Max Min Max

500

III.8 Summary of budget for the CFY and the actual expenditure incurred in the CFYm1, CFYm2 and CFYm3 (exclusively for this programme in the department):
Items Budg eted in CFY Actual expense s in CFY (till..) Budgeted in CFYm1 Actual BudgeExpens ted in es in CFYm2 CFYm1 Actual Budge- Actual Expens ted in Expens es in CFYm3 es in CFYm2 CFYm3

Laboratory equipment Software Laboratory consumables Maintenance and spares

Training & Travel


Miscellaneous expenses for academic activities

Total

501

PART B
CRITERION 1: VISION, MISSION AND PROGRAM EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES (100)
1.1 Vision and Mission (5) 1.1.1 State the Vision and Mission of the institute and department (1) (List and articulate the vision and mission statements of the institute and department) 1.1.2 Indicate how and where the Vision and Mission are published and disseminated (2) (Describe in which media (e.g. websites, curricula books) the vision and mission are published and how these are disseminated among stakeholders)
502

1.1.3 Mention the process for defining Vision and Mission of the department (2) (Articulate the process involved in defining the vision and mission of the department from the vision and mission of the institute). 1.2 Programme Educational Objectives (15) 1.2.1 Describe the Programme Educational Objectives (PEOs) (2) (List and articulate the programme educational objectives of the programme under accreditation)
503

1.2.2 State how and where the PEOs are published and disseminated (2) (Describe in which media (e.g. websites, curricula books) the PEOs are published and how these are disseminated among stakeholders.) 1.2.3 List the stakeholders of the programme (1) (List stakeholders of the programme under consideration for accreditation and articulate their relevance) 1.2.4 State the process for establishing the PEOs (5) (Describe the process that periodically documents and demonstrates that the PEOs are based on the needs of the programmes various stakeholders.)
504

1.2.5 Establish consistency of the PEOs with the Mission of the institute (5). (Describe how the programme educational objectives are consistent with the Mission of the department.) 1.3. Achievement of the Programme Educational Objective (30) 1.3.1 Justify the academic factors involved in achievement of the PEOs (15) (Describe the broad curricular components that contribute towards attainment of the Programme Educational Objectives.)
505

1.3.2 Explain how administrative system helps in ensuring the achievement of the PEOs (15) (Describe the committees and their functions, working process and related regulations.) 1.4 Assessment of the achievement of Programme Educational Objectives (40)
1.4.1 Indicate tools and processes used in assessment of the achievement of the PEOs (25) Describe the assessment process that periodically documents and demonstrates the degree to which the Programme Educational Objectives are attained. (10)
506

Include information: (15) a) A listing and description of the assessment processes used to gather the data upon which the evaluation of each programme educational objective is based. Example of data collection process may include, but are not limited to, employer surveys, graduate surveys, focus groups, industrial advisory committee meetings, or other processes that are relevant and appropriate to the programme; b) The frequency with which these assessment processes are carried out.
507

1.4.2 Provide the evidences for the achievement of the PEOs (15) a) The expected level of attainment for each of the programme educational objectives; b) Summaries of the results of the evaluation processes and an analysis illustrating the extent to which each of the programme educational objective is being attained; and c) How the results are documented and maintained. 1.5. Indicate how the PEOs have been redefined in the past (10) (Articulate with rationale how the results of the evolution of PEOs have been used to review/redefine the PEOs) 508

CRITERION 2. PROGRAMME OUTCOMES (225)


2.1. Definition and Validation of Course Outcomes and Programme Outcomes (30) 2.1.1. List the Course Outcomes(COs) and Programme Outcomes (POs) (2) (List the course outcomes of the courses in programme curriculum and programme outcomes of the programme under accreditation) 2.1.2. State how and where the POs are published and disseminated (3) (Describe in which media (e.g. websites, curricula books) the POs are published and how these are disseminated among stakeholders)
509

2.1.3. Indicate processes employed for defining of the POs (5) (Describe the process that periodically documents and demonstrates that the POs are defined in alignment with the graduate attributes prescribed by the NBA.) 2.1.4. Indicate how the defined POs are aligned to the Graduate Attributes prescribed by the NBA (10) (Indicate how the POs defined for the programme are aligned with the Graduate Attributes of NBA as articulated in accreditation manual.) 2.1.5. Establish the correlation between the POs and the PEOs (10) (Explain how the defined POs of the programme 510 correlate with the PEOs)

2.2. Attainment of Programme Outcomes (40) 2.2.1. Illustrate how course outcomes contribute to the POs (10) (Provide the correlation between the course outcomes and the programme outcomes. The strength of the correlation may also be indicated) 2.2.2. Explain how modes of delivery of courses help in attainment of the POs(10) (Describe the different course delivery methods/ modes (e.g. lecture interspersed with discussion, asynchronous mode of interaction, group discussion, project etc.) used to deliver the courses and justify the effectiveness of these methods for the attainment of the POs. This may be further justified using the indirect assessment methods such as course-end surveys.) 511

2.2.3. Indicate how assessment tools used to assess the impact of delivery of course/course content contribute towards the attainment of course outcomes/programme outcomes (10) (Describe different types of course assessment and evaluation methods (both direct and indirect) in practice and their relevance towards the attainment of POs.) 2.2.4. Indicate the extent to which the laboratory and project course work are contributing towards attainment of the POs (10) (Justify the balance between theory and practical for the attainment of the POs. Justify how the various project works (a sample of 20% best and average projects from total projects) carried as part of the programme curriculum contribute towards the attainment of the POs.) 512

2.3. Evaluation of the attainment of the Programme Outcomes (125)


2.3.1. Describe assessment tools and processes used for assessing the attainment of each PO (25)

Describe the assessment process that periodically documents and demonstrates the degree to which the Programme Outcomes are attained.
513

Include information on: (50)


a) A listing and description of the assessment processes used to gather the data upon which the evaluation of each programme educational objective is based. Examples of data collection processes may include, but are not limited to, specific exam questions, student portfolios, internally developed assessment exams, senior project presentations, nationally-normed exams, oral exams, focus group, industrial advisory committee; b) The frequency with which these assessment processes are carried out.
514

2.3.2. Indicate results of evaluation of each PO (50) c) The expected level of attainment for each of the program outcomes; d) Summaries of the results of the evaluation processes and an analysis illustrating the extent to which each of the programme outcomes are attained; and e) How the results are documented and maintained. 2.4. Use of evaluation results towards improvement of the programme (30) 2.4.1. Indicate how the results of evaluation used for curricular improvements (5) (Articulate with rationale the curricular improvements brought in after the review of the attainment of the POs) 515

2.4.2. Indicate how results of evaluation used for improvement of course delivery and assessment (10) (Articulate with rationale the curricular delivery and assessment improvements brought in after the review of the attainment of the POs) 2.4.3. State the process used for revising/ redefining the POs (15) (Articulate with rationale how the results of the evaluation of the POs have been used to review/redefine the POs in line with the Graduate Attributes of the NBA.)
516

CRITERION 3: PROGRAMME CURRIUCLUM (125)


3.1. Curriculum (20) 3.1.1. Describe the Structure of the Curriculum (5)
Course Code .. Total Course Title .. Total Number of contact hours

Lecture (L)

Tutorial (T)

Practical# (P)

Total Hours

Credits

#Seminars, project works may be considered as practical 3.1.2. Give the Prerequisite flow chart of courses (5) (Draw the schematic of the prerequisites of the courses in the curriculum)

3.1.3. Justify how the programme curriculum satisfies the program specific criteria (10) (Justify how the programme curriculum satisfies the program specific criteria specified by the American professional societies relevant to the programme under accreditation) 517

3.2.

State the components of the curriculum and their relevance to the POs and the PEOs (15) Programme curriculum grouping based on different components.
Curriculum Total Content (%of total Total number number of credits Number of of contact of the credits hours programme)
POs PEOs

Course Component Mathematics Science Computing Humanities Professional core ..

518

3.3. State core engineering subjects and their relevance to Programme Outcomes including design experience (60) (Describe how the core engineering subjects in the curriculum are giving the learning experience with the complex engineering problems) 3.4. Industry interaction/internship (10) (Give the details of industry involvement in the programme such as industry-attached laboratories and partial delivery of courses and internship opportunities for students)
519

3.5. Curriculum Development (15) 3.5.1. State the process for designing the programme curriculum (5) (Describe the process that periodically documents and demonstrates how the programme curriculum is evolved considering the PEOs and the POs) 3.5.2. Illustrate the measures and processes used to improve courses and curriculum (10) (Articulate the process involved in identifying the requirements for improvements in courses and curriculum and provide the evidence of continuous improvement of courses and curriculum)
520

3.6. Course Syllabi (5) (Include, in appendix, a syllabus for each course used. Syllabi format should be consistent and shouldnt exceed two pages.) The syllabi format may include: Department, course number, and title of course Designation as a required or elective course Pre-requisites Contact hours and type of course (lecture, tutorial, seminar, project etc.) Course Assessment methods (both continuous and semester-end assessment) Course outcomes Topics covered Text book and/or reference material 521

CRITERION: 4 STUDENTS PERFORMANCE (75)


ADMISSION INTAKE IN THE PROGRAMME
Item
Sanctioned intake strength in the programme (N) Total number of admitted students in first year minus number of students migrated to other programmes at the end of 1st year (N1) Number of admitted students in 2nd year in the same batch via lateral entry (N2) Total number of admitted students in the programme (N1 + N2)

CAY

CAYm1

CAYm2 CAYm3

522

4.1 Success Rate (20)


Provide data for the past 7 batches of students
Year of entry (in reverse chronological order) Number of Number of students who have Students successfully completed* admitted in 1st year + admitted via lateral entry 1st year 2nd year 3rd year 4th year in 2nd year (N1 + N2)

CAY
CAYm1 CAYm2 CAYm3

CAYm4 (LYG)
CAYm5 (LYGm1) CAYm6 (LYGm2)

*Successfully completed implies zero backlogs

523

Success Rate = 20 x mean of Success Index (SI) for past 3 batches SI = (Number of students who graduated from the programme in the stipulated period of course duration) / (Number of students admitted in the first year of that batch and admitted in 2nd year via lateral entry)
Item LYG (CAYm4) LYGm1 (CAYm5) LYGm2 (CAYm6)

Number of students admitted in the corresponding First Year + admitted via lateral entry in 2nd year
Number of students who have graduated in the stipulated period Success Index (SI)

Average SI = ................................................................... Success Rate = 20 x Average SI = ....................................


524

4.2 Academic Performance (20)


API = Academic Performance Index
= Mean of cumulative grade point average (CGPA) of all successful students on a 10-point CGPA system Or = (Mean of the percentage of marks of all successful students) / 10

Assessment = 2 x API

Average Assessment for three years


525

4.2.1 Placement and Higher Studies (20)


Assessment Points = 20 (x + 1.25y) / N where x = Number of students placed, y = Number of students admitted for higher studies with valid qualifying scores/ranks, and N = Total number of students who were admitted in the batch including lateral entry subject to maximum assessment points = 20.
526

Item
Number of admitted students corresponding to LYG including lateral entry (N) Number of students who obtained jobs as per the record of placement office (x1) Number of students who found employment otherwise at the end of the final year (x2) x = x1+ x2 Number of students who opted for higher studies with valid qualifying scores/ranks (y)

LYG

LYGm1

LYGm2

Assessment Points

Average Assessment Points = ________________

527

4.3 Professional Activities (15)


4.3.1. Professional societies/ chapters and organizing engineering events (3) (Instruction: The institution may provide data for past three years). 4.3.2. Organization of paper contests, design contests, etc. and achievements (3) (Instruction: The institution may provide data for past three years). 4.3.3. Publication of technical magazines, newsletters, etc. (3) (Instruction: The institution may list the publications mentioned earlier along with the names of the editors, publishers, etc.).

528

4.3.4. Entrepreneurship initiatives, product designs, innovations (3) (Instruction: The institution may specify the efforts and achievements.) 4.3.5. Publications and awards in inter-institute events
by students of the programme of study (3)

(Instruction: The institution may provide a table indicating those publications, which fetched awards to students in the events/conferences organised by other institutes. A tabulated list of all other student publications may be included in the appendix.)
529

CRITERION 5: FACULTY CONTRIBUTIONS (175)


List of Faculty Members: Exclusively for the Programme / Shared with other Programmes
Name of the faculty member Qualification, univers ity, and year of gradua -tion Design ation and date of joining the institution Distribution of teaching load (%) 1st Year UG PG Number of research publicatio ns in journals and conferen ces since joining IPRs R&D and consultancy work with amount Holding an incubation unit Interaction with outside world

(Instruction: The institution may complete this table for the calculation of the student-teacher ratio (STR). Teaching loads of the faculty member contributing to only undergraduate programme (2nd, 3rd, and 4th year) are considered to calculate the STR.)
530

5.1. Student-Teacher Ratio (STR) (20): STR is desired to be 15 or superior


Assessment = 20 x 15 / STR ; subject to maximum assessment of 20 STR = (x + y + z) / N1 where, x = Number of students in 2nd year of the programme y = Number of students in 3rd year of the programme z = Number of students in 4th year of the programme N1 = Total Number of Faculty Members in the programme (by considering fractional load)

Year
CAYm2 CAYm1 CAY

x+y+z

N1

STR

Assessment (max. = 20)

Average Assessment
531

For item nos. 5.2 to 5.8, the denominator term (N) is computed as follows:
N = N1 = N2 = Year Maximum {N1, N2}, Total Number of faculty members in the programme (considering the fractional load), Number of faculty positions needed for student-teacher ratio of 15. N1 N2 N = Max. (N1,N2)

CAYm2
CAYm1 CAY

5.2 Faculty Cadre Ratio (20)


Assessment = 20 x CRI where, CRI = Cadre ratio Index = 2.25 ( 2x + y ) / N; subject to max. CRI = 1.0 Where, x = Number of professors in the programme y = Number of associate professors in the programme Year
CAYm2 CAYm1 CAY

CRI

Assessment

Average Assessment
532

5.3. Faculty Qualifications (30)


Assessment where, FQI where, x y z = = 6 x FQI Faculty Qualification Index

=
= = =

(10x + 6y + 2z0) / N2 such that, x+y+z0 N2; and z0 z


Number of faculty members with Ph. D. Number of faculty members with M. E. / M. Tech. Number of faculty members with B. E. / B. Tech.

x CAYm2

FQI

Assessment

CAYm1
CAY Average Assessment
533

5.4. Faculty Competencies correlation Programme Specific Criteria (15)

to

(Provide evidence that program curriculum satisfies the applicable programme criteria specified by the appropriate American professional associations such as ASME, IEEE and ACM. You may list the programme specific criteria and the competencies (specialisation, research publication, course developments etc.,) of faculty to correlate the programme specific criteria and competencies)
534

5.5. Faculty as participants/resource persons in faculty development/

training activities (15) (Instruction: A faculty member scores maximum five points for a participation/ resource person.) Participant/resource person in two week faculty development programme: 5 points Participant/resource person in one week faculty development programme: 3 points
Name of the faculty Max. 5 per faculty

CAYm2

CAYm1

CAY

Sum
N (Number of faculty positions required for an STR Assessment = 3 x Sum/N Average assessment
535

5.6

Faculty Retention (15)


Assessment = where, RPI = = 3 x RPI / N Retention Point Index Points assigned to all faculty members

where points assigned to a faculty member = 1 point for each year of experience at the institute but not exceeding 5.
Item
Number of faculty members with experience < 1 year (x0) Number of faculty members with 1 to 2 years experience (x1) Number of faculty members with 2 to 3 years experience (x2) Number of faculty members with 3 to 4 years experience (x3) Number of faculty members with 4 to 5 years experience (x4) Number of faculty members with experience > 5 years (x5) N

CAYm2

CAYm1 CAY

RPI = x1 + 2x2 + 3x3 + 4x4 + 5x5 Assessment Average Assessment


536

5.7. Faculty Research Publications (FRP) (20)


Assessment of FRP = 4 (Sum of the research publication points scored by each faculty member) / N

(Instruction: A faculty member scores maximum five research publication points depending upon the quality of the research papers and books published in the past 3 years).

The research papers considered are those: (i) which can be located on Internet and/or are included in hard-copy volumes/ proceedings, published by reputed publishers, and (ii) the faculty members affiliation, in the published papers/books, is of the current institution.
537

Include a list of all such publications and IPRs along with details of DOI, publisher, month/year, etc.
Name of the faculty (contributing to FRP)
FRP points (Max. 5 per faculty) CAYm2 CAYm1 CAY

Sum N (Number of faculty positions required for an STR of 15)

Assessment FRP = 4x Sum/N


Average Assessment
538

5.8. Faculty Intellectual Property Rights (FIPR) (10)


Assessment of FIPR = 2(Sum of the FIPR points scored by each faculty member) / N (Instruction: A faculty member scores maximum five FIPR points each year. FIPR includes awarded national/international patents, design and copyrights.)
Name of faculty member (contributing to FIPR) ................. ................. ................. Sum N Assessment FIPR = 2x Sum/N Average Assessment
539

FIPR points (max. 5 per faculty member) CAYm2 CAYm1 CAY

5.9 Funded R & D Projects and Consultancy (FRDC) work (20)


Assessment of R&D and Consultancy projects = 4 (Sum of FRDC by each faculty member) / N.
(Instruction: A faculty member scores maximum 5 points, depending upon the amount). A suggested scheme is given below for a minimum amount of Rs. 1 lakh:

5 points for funding by national agency, 4 points for funding by state agency, 4 points for funding by private sector, and 2 points for funding by the sponsoring trust/society

Name of faculty member (contributing to FRDC)


.................

FRDC points (max. 5 per faculty member)


CAYm2 CAYm1 CAY

................. Sum N Assessment of FRDC = 4x Sum/N Average Assessment


540

5.10. Faculty Interaction with Outside World (10)


FIP = Faculty Interaction Points Assessment = 2 x (Sum of FIP by each faculty member) / N (Instruction: A faculty member gets maximum 5 Interaction Points, depending upon the type of Institution or R&D laboratory or industry, as follows)
5 points for interaction with a reputed institution abroad, institution of eminence in India, or National Research Laboratories, 3 points for interaction with institution/industry (not covered earlier).
541

Points to be awarded, for those activities, which result in joint efforts in publication of books/research paper, pursuing externally funded R&D / consultancy projects and / or development of semester-long course / teaching modules.
Name of faculty member (contributing to FIP)
.................

FIP CAYm2 CAYm1 CAY

.................
Sum N Assessment of FIP = 2 x Sum/N Average Assessment
542

CRITERION 6: FACILITIES AND TECHNICAL SUPPORT (75)

Description of class rooms, faculty rooms, seminar and conference halls: (Entries in the following table are sampler entries).
Room Description Usage Shared / Capacity Rooms Exclusive Equipped with PC, Internet, Book rack, meeting space

No. of Classrooms: Tutorial rooms: No. of Seminar rooms: No. of Meeting rooms: No. of Faculty rooms:

Classroom for 2nd Year

543

6.1. Classrooms in the Department (20) 6.1.1 Adequate number of rooms for lectures (core/ electives), seminars, tutorials, etc for the program (10) (Instruction: Assessment based on the information provided in the preceding table.) 6.1.2 Teaching aids multimedia projectors, etc. (5) 6.1.3 Acoustics, classroom size, conditions of
chairs/benches, air circulation, lighting, exits, ambiance, and such other amenities/facilities (5)

(Instruction: Assessment based on the information provided in the preceding table and the inspection thereof.)
544

6.2

Faculty Rooms in the Department (15)

6.2.1 Availability of individual faculty rooms (5) (Instruction: Assessment based on the information provided in the preceding table). 6.2.2 Room equipped with white/black board, computer, Internet, and such other amenities/facilities (5)

(Instruction: Assessment based on the information provided in the preceding table.)


545

6.2.3 Usage of room for counseling/discussion with students (5)


(Instruction: Assessment based on the information provided in the preceding table and the inspection thereof.)

The following table is required for the subsequent criteria.


Lab Description in the curriculum Exclusive use / shared Space, Number of Number of experiments students Quality of Laboratory instruments manuals

546

6.3.

Laboratories in the Department to meet the Curriculum Requirements as well as the POs (25)

6.3.1 Adequate, well equipped laboratories to meet the curriculum requirements and the POs (10) (Instruction: Assessment based on the information provided in the preceding table.) 6.3.2 Availability of department (5) computing facilities in the

(Instruction: Assessment based on the information provided in the preceding table.)


547

6.3.3. Availability of laboratories with technical support within and beyond working hours(5) (Instruction: Assessment based on the information provided in the preceding table.) 6.3.4. Equipments to run experiments and their maintenance, number of students per experimental setup, size of the laboratories, overall ambience, etc. (5)

(Instruction: Assessment based on the information provided in the preceding table.)


548

6.4. Technical Manpower Support in the Department (15)


Name of Designat Exclusive/ the ion (Pay- Shared Work technical scale) staff Date of Joining Qualification

At Joining

Now

Other Responsi Technica bility l Skills gained

6.4.1 Availability of adequate and qualified technical supporting staff for programme-specific labs (10)

(Instruction: Assessment based on the information provided in the preceding table.) 6.4.2 Incentives, skill upgrade and professional advancement (5) (Instruction: Assessment based on the information provided in the preceding table.)
549

CRITERION 7. ACADEMIC SUPPORT UNITS AND TEACHING-LEARNING PROCESS (75)


Students Admission Admission intake (for information only)
Item Sanctioned intake strength in the institute (N) Number of students admitted on merit basis (N1) Number of students admitted on management quota/otherwise (N2) Total number of admitted students in the institute (N1 + N2) CAY CAYm1 CAYm2 CAYm3

(Instruction: The intake of the students during the last three years against the sanctioned capacity may be reported here.)
550

Admission quality (for information only). Divide the total admitted ranks (or percentage marks) into five or a few more meaningful ranges.
Rank range More than 98 percentile 9598 percentile 9095 percentile CAY CAYm1 CAYm2 CAYm3

80 90 percentile
. . Admitted without rank

(Instruction: The admission quality of the students in terms of their ranks in the entrance examination may be presented here.)
551

Tabular data for estimating student-teacher ratio and faculty qualification for first year common courses. List of faculty members teaching first year courses:
Name of Qualifica Designa faculty tion -tion member Date of joining the institution Department with which associated
Distribution of teaching load (%) 1st year UG PG

(Instruction: The institution may list here the faculty members engaged in first year teaching along with other relevant data.)
552

7.1. Academic Support Units (35) 7.1.1. Assessment of First Year Student Teacher Ratio (FYSTR) (10) Data for first year courses to calculate the FYSTR:
Year Number of students (approved intake strength) Number of faculty members (considering fractional load) FYSTR Assessment = (10 x 15)/FYSTR (Max. is 10)

CAYm2 CAYm1 CAY

Average
553

7.1.2. Assessment of Faculty Qualification Teaching First Year Common Courses (15) Assessment of qualification = 3 (5x+3y + 2z0)/N where x + y + z0 N and z0 Z x = Number of faculty members with PhD y = Number of faculty members with ME/ MTech/ NETQualified/MPhil z = Number of faculty members with BE/Btech/MSc/ MCA/MA N = Number of faculty members needed for FYSTR of 25 Assessment of Year x y z N faculty qualification CAYm2 CAYm1 CAY Average assessment of faculty qualification
554

7.1.3. Basic science / engineering laboratories (adequacy of space, number of students per batch, quality and availability of measuring instruments, laboratory manuals, list of experiments) (8)
Space, Laboratory Software Type of number of description used experiments students Quality of instruments Laboratory manuals

(Instruction: The Institution needs to mention the details for the basic science / engineering laboratories for the first year courses. The descriptors as listed here are suggestive in nature). 555

7.1.4. Language Laboratory (2)


Language Space, Software Type of Quality of Guidance laborato- number of used experiments instruments ry students

(Instruction: The Institution may provide the details of the language laboratory. The descriptors as listed here are not exhaustive).
556

7.2 Teaching Learning Process (40) 7.2.1. Tutorial classes to address student questions: size of tutorial classes, hours per subject given in timetable (5)
Provision of tutorial classes in time-table ? YES / NO Tutorial Sheets provided: YES / NO Tutorial classes taken by faculty / teaching assistants / senior students / others ................... Number of tutorial classes per subject per week: Number of students per tutorial class : Number of subjects with tutorials : 1st year................ 2nd year............... 3rd Year............. 4th year...............
(Instruction: Here the institution may report the details of the tutorial classes that are being conducted on various subjects and also state the impact of such tutorial classes).
557

7.2.2. Mentoring system to help at individual levels (5) Type of mentoring: Professional guidance / career advancement / course work specific / laboratory specific / total development Number of faculty mentors: Number of students per mentor: Frequency of meeting: (Instruction: Here the institution may report the details of the mentoring system that has been developed for the students for various purposes and also state the efficacy of such system).
558

7.2.3 Feedback analysis and reward / corrective measures taken, if any (5)
Feedback collected for all courses Specify the feedback collection process Percentage of students participating Specify the feedback analysis process Basis of reward/corrective measures, if any : YES / NO : : : :

Number of corrective actions in the last three years: (Instruction: The institution needs to design an effective feedback questionnaire. It needs to justify that the feedback mechanism it has developed really helps in evaluating teaching and finally 559 contributing to the quality of teaching).

7.2.4. Scope for self-learning (5) (Instruction: The Institution needs to specify the scope for selflearning/learning beyond syllabus and creation of facilities for self learning / learning beyond syllabus.) 7.2.5. Generation of self-learning facilities, and availability of materials for learning beyond syllabus (5) (Instruction: The institution needs to specify the facilities for self-learning / learning beyond syllabus.)
560

7.2.6. Career Guidance, Training, Placement, and Entrepreneurship Cell (5) (Instruction: The institution may specify the facility and management to facilitate career guidance including counseling for higher studies, industry interaction for training/ internship/ placement, Entrepreneurship cell and incubation facility and impact of such systems)
561

7.2.7 Co-curricular and Extra-curricular Activities (5)


(Instruction: The institution may specify the Co-curricular and extra-curricular activities, e.g., NCC/NSS, cultural activities, etc) 7.2.8. Games and sports, facilities and qualified sports instructors (5) (Instruction: The institution may specify the facilities available and their usage in brief )
562

CRITERION 8: GOVERNANCE, INSTITUTIONAL SUPPORT, AND FINANCIAL RESOURCES (75)


8.1 Campus Infrastructure and Facility (10) 8.1.1 Maintenance of academic infrastructure and facilities (4) (Instruction: Specify distinct features) 8.1.2 Hostels (boys and girls), transportation facility and canteen (2)
Hostels
Hostel for Boys

No. of rooms

No. of Students accommodated

Hostel for Girls


563

8.1.3 Electricity, power backup, telecom facility, drinking water and security (4)
(Instruction Specify the details of installed capacity, quality, availability, etc.)

8.2
8.2.1

Organization, Governance Transparency (10)

and

Governing body, administrative setup and functions of various bodies (2) (Instruction: List the governing, senate, and all other academic and administrative bodies; their member ships, functions, and responsibilities; frequency of the meetings; and attendance therein, in a tabular form. A few sample minutes of the meetings and action taken reports should be annexed.) 564

8.2.2 Defined rules, procedures, recruitment, and promotional policies, etc. (2)
(Instruction: List the published rules, policies, and procedures; year of publications; and state the extent of awareness among the employees/ students. Also comment on its availability on Internet, etc.)

8.2.3

Decentralization in working including delegation of financial power and grievance redressal system (3)
(Instruction: List the names of the faculty members who are administrators/decision makers for various responsibilities. Specify the mechanism and composition of grievance redressal system, including faculty association, staff-union, if any.)565

8.2.4 Transparency and availability of correct/ unambiguous information (3)


(Instruction: Availability and dissemination of information through the Internet. Information provisioning in accordance with the Right To Information Act, 2005).

8.3

Budget Allocation, Utilization and Public Accounting (10) Summary of current financial years budget and the actual expenditure incurred (exclusively for the institution) for three preceding financial years
566

Item
Infrastructural built-up

Budgeted in CFY

Expense in CFY (till)

Expenses Expenses in CFYm1 in CFYm2

Library
Laboratory Equipment Laboratory consumables Teaching and non-teaching staff salary R&D Training and Travel Other, specify.....

Total

(Instruction: The preceding list of items is not exhaustive. One may add other relevant items if applicable.)

567

8.3.1 Adequacy of budget allocation (4) (Instruction: Here the Institution needs to justify that the budget allocated over the years was adequate.) 8.3.2 Utilization of allocated funds (5) (Instruction: Here the Institution needs to state how the budget was utilized during the last three years.) 8.3.3 Availability of the audited statements on the Institutes website (1) (Instruction: Here the Institution needs to state whether the audited statements are available on its Web site.) 8.4 Programme Specific Budget Allocation, Utilisation (10) Summary of budget for the CFY and the actual expenditure incurred in the CFYm1 and CFYm2 (exclusively for this programme in the department):
568

Items

Budgeted Acutal in CFY expenses in

Budgeted in CFYm1

CFY (till...)

Actual Budgeted Actual Expenses in CFYm2 Expenses in CFYm1 in CFYm2

Laboratory equipment

Software
R&D Laboratory consumables

Maintenance and spares


Training and Travel

Miscellaneous expenses for academic activities


Total
569

8.4.1 Adequacy of budget allocation (5) (Instruction: Here the institution needs to justify that the budget allocated over the years was adequate.)
8.4.2 Utilisation of allocated funds (5) (Instruction: Here the institution needs to state how the budget was utilised during the last three years.)
570

8.5 Library (20)


8.5.1 Library space and ambience, timings and usage, availability of a qualified librarian and other staff, library automation, online access, networking, etc. (5) (Instruction: Provide information on the following items).
Carpet area of library (in m2) Reading space (in m2 ) Number of seats in reading space Number of users (issue book) per day Number of users (in reading space) per day Timings: During working day, weekend and vacation Number of library staff Number of library staff with degree in Library Management Computerization for search, indexing, issue/return records Bar-coding used Library services on Internet/Intranet INDEST or other similar membership 571 Archives

8.5.2 Titles and volumes per title (4)


Number of titles .........................
Number of new titles added CFYm2

Number of volumes ........................


Number of new editions added Number of new volumes added

CFYm1
CFY

8.5.3 Scholarly journal subscription (3)


Details
Science Engg. And Tech.

CFY

CFYm1

CFYm2

CFYm3

As soft copy
As hard copy As soft copy As hard copy As soft copy As hard copy As soft copy As hard copy As soft copy

Pharmacy
Architecture Hotel Management

As hard copy

572

8.5.4 Digital library (3)


Availability of digital library contents: If available, then mention number of courses, number of e-books, etc. Availability of an exclusive server: Availability over Intranet/Internet: Availability of exclusive space/room: Number of users per day:

8.5.5 Library expenditure on books, magazines/journals, and miscellaneous contents (5)


Year
Book

Expenditure
Magazine / journals (for hard copy subscription) Magazine / journals (for soft copy subscription) Misc. Contents

Comments

CFYm2 CFYm1 CFY


573

8.6 Internet (5)


Name of the Internet provider: Available bandwidth: Access speed: Availability of Internet in an exclusive lab: Availability in most computing labs: Availability in departments and other units: Availability in faculty rooms: Institutes own e-mail facility to faculty/students: Security/privacy to e-mail/Internet users: (Instruction: The institute may report the availability of Internet in the campus and its quality of service.) 574

8.7

Safety Norms and Checks (5)

8.7.1 Checks for wiring and electrical installations for leakage and earthing (1) 8.7.2 Fire fighting measures (1) : Effective safety arrangements with emergency/ multiple exits and ventilation / exhausts in auditoriums and large class rooms/laboratories, fire fighting equipment and training, availability of water, and such other facilities. (1) 8.7.3 Safety of Civil Structure (1)
575

8.7.4

Handling of hazardous chemicals and such other activities (2) (Instruction: The institution may provide evidence that it is taking enough measures for the safety of the civil structures, fire, electrical installations, wiring, and safety of handling and disposal of hazardous substances. Moreover, the institution needs to show the effectiveness of the measures that it has developed to accomplish these tasks.)
576

8.8 Counseling and Emergency Medical Care and First-aid (5) Availability of counseling facility(1)
Arrangement for emergency medical care (2)

Availability of first-aid unit (2) (Instruction: The institution needs to report the availability of the facilities discussed here)
577

CRITERION 9: CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT (75)


This criterion essentially evaluates the improvement of the different indices that have already been discussed in earlier sections. From 9.1 to 9.5 the assessment calculation can be done as follows: If a,b,c are improvements in percentage during three successive years, assessment can be calculated as
Assessment = (b-a)/(100-min (b,a)) + (c-b)/(100-min(c,b))

9.1 Improvement in Success Index of Students (5) From 4.1


Items
Success Index (SI)
578

LYG

LYGm1

LYGm2

Assessment

9.2 Improvement in Academic Performance Index of Students (5)

From 4.2
Items
API (Academic Performance Index)

LYG

LYGm1

LYGm2

Assessment

9.3 Improvement in Student-Teacher Ratio (5) From 5.1


Items STR (StudentTeacher Ratio) CAY CAYm1 CAYm2 Assessment

579

9.4 Enhancement of Faculty Qualification Index (5) From 5.3


Items
FQI (Faculty Qualification Index)

LYG

LYGm1

LYGm2

Assessment

9.5 Improvement in Faculty Research Publications, R&D Work and Consultancy Work (10)
From 5.7 and 5.9
Items LYG LYGm1 LYGm2 Assessment

FRP (Faculty Research Publications)


FPPC
580

9.6 Continuing Education (10)


In this criterion, the Institution needs to specify the contributory efforts made by the faculty members by developing the course/laboratory modules, conducting short-term courses/ workshops, etc., for continuing education during the last 3 years.
Any other Resource Module contributory Developed/ Duration Persons Description institute/ organized by industry ................. .................. Target Audience Usage and citation, etc.

Assessment =

581

9.7 New Facility Created (15)


Specify new facilities created during the last 3 years for strengthening the curriculum and/or meeting the POs:
Any other Resource Module contributory Developed/ Duration Persons Description Institute/ organized by Industry In CAYm2 For whom* Usage and citation, etc.

...............
In CAYm1 ............... In CAY

*Students / faculty / staff / industry / other Assessment =

582

9.8 Overall Improvements since Accreditation, if any, otherwise, commencement of the Program (20)
Specify the overall improvement:
Specify the strengths/ weaknesses List the PO(s), which are strengthened

Last since

Improvements brought in

Contributed by

Comments, if any

CAY CAYm1 CAYm2 .. ..

Assessment =

583

Declaration
The head of the institution needs to make a declaration as per the format given below: This Self-Assessment Report (SAR) is prepared for the current academic year (__________) and the current financial year (_________________) on behalf of the institution. I certify that the information provided in this SAR is extracted from the records and to the best of my knowledge, is correct and complete.
584

I understand that any false statement/information of consequence may lead to rejection of the application for the accreditation for a period of two or more years. I also understand that the National Board of Accreditation (NBA) or its subcommittees will have the right to decide on the basis of the submitted SAR whether the institution should be considered for an accreditation visit.
585

If the information provided in the SAR is found to be wrong during the visit or subsequent to grant of accreditation, the NBA has right to withdraw the grant of accreditation and no accreditation will be allowed for a period of next two years or more and the fee will be forfeited. I undertake that the institution shall cooperate with the visiting accreditation team, shall provide all desired information during the visit and arrange for the meeting as required for accreditation as per the NBAs provision.

586

I undertake that, the institution is well aware of the provisions in the NBAs accreditation manual concerned for this application, rules, regulations and notifications in force as on date and the institute shall fully abide by them.
Place: Date: Signature, Name, and Designation of the Head of the Institution with seal
587

12. GUIDELINES AND OPERATING PRACTICES FOR ACCREDITATION VISIT AND EVALUATION FOR UG ENGINEERING PROGRAMMES (TIER-I) JANUARY, 2013
588

12. TIER I EVALUATION GUIDELINES, NBA


CRITERION 1: Vision, Mission and Program Educational Objectives 100

Minimum qualifying points: 60


Item Item no. description
1.1. Mission and Vision

Points
5

Evaluation guidelines/ award of points


1.1.1.Listing and articulation of the vision and mission statements of the institute and department (1) 1.1.2.Description of media (e.g. websites, curricula books) in which the vision and mission are published and how these are disseminated among stakeholders (2) 1.1.3.Articulation of the process involved in defining the vision and mission of the department from the vision and mission of the institute (2)
589

1.2. Program Educational Objectives

15

1.2.1. Listing and articulation of the program educational objectives of the program under accreditation (2) 1.2.2. Description of media (e.g. websites, curricula books) in which the PEOs are published and how these are disseminated among stakeholders (2) 1.2.3. Listing of stakeholders of the program under consideration for accreditation and articulation of their relevance (1) 1.2.4. Description of the process that documents and demonstrates periodically that the PEOs are based on the needs of the programs stakeholders (5) 1.2.5. Description as to how the Program Educational Objectives are consistent with the Mission of the department (5)
590

1.3. Achievement 30 1.3.1. Description of the of Program broad curricular Educational components that Objectives

contribute towards the attainment of the Program Educational Objectives (15) 1.3.2. Description of the committees and their functions, working processes and related regulations (15)
591

1.4. Assessment of achievement of Program Educational Objectives

40 1.4.1. Description of the assessment process that documents and demonstrates periodically the degree to which the Program Educational Objectives are attained (10) Information on: (a) listing and description of the assessment processes used to gather the data upon which the evaluation of each program educational objective is based. Examples of data collection processes may include, but are not limited to, employer surveys, graduate surveys, focus groups, industrial advisory committee meetings, or other processes that are relevant and appropriate to the program; (b) The frequency with which these assessment processes are carried out (15)
592

1.4.2. Details of evidence that the PEOs have been achieved:


a) The expected level of achievement for each of the program educational objectives; b) Summaries of the results of the evaluation processes and an analysis illustrating the extent to which each of the program educational objectives has been achieved ; and c) How the results are documented and maintained (15)
593

1.5.

Indicate 10 1.5.1. Articulation with how PEOs rationale as to how the have results of the been evaluation of the PEOs redefined have been used to review/redefine the PEOs (10)

594

CRITERION 2: Program Outcomes 225 TIER II : (150) Minimum qualifying points: 135 TIER II : ( - )
Item Item Points no. description 2.1. Definition and Validation of Course Outcomes and Program Outcomes 30 Evaluation guidelines/ award of points

2.1.1.Listing of the course outcomes of the courses in program curriculum and program outcomes of the program under accreditation (2) 2.1.2. Description of media (e.g. websites, curricula books) in which the POs are published and how these are disseminated among stakeholders (3) 595

2.1.3. Description of the process that documents and demonstrates periodically that the POs are defined in alignment with the graduate attributes prescribed by the NBA (5) 2.1.4. Details as to how the POs defined for the program are aligned with the Graduate Attributes of the NBA as articulated in the accreditation manual (10) 2.1.5. Correlation of the defined POs of the program with the PEOs (10)
596

2.2. Attainment of Program Outcomes

40 2.2.1. Correlation

outcomes outcomes. The strength of the correlation is to be indicated. (10) 2.2.2. Description of the different course delivery methods/modes (e.g. lecture interspersed with discussion, asynchronous mode of interaction, group discussion, project etc.) used to deliver the courses and justify the effectiveness of these methods for the attainment of the POs. This may be further justified using the indirect assessment methods such as course-end surveys. (10) 597

between the course and the program

2.2.3. Description of different types of course assessment and evaluation methods (both direct and indirect) in practice and their relevance towards the attainment of the POs. (10) 2.2.4. Justification of the balance between theory and practical for the attainment of the PEOs and the POs. Justify how the various project works (a sample of 20% best and average projects from total projects) carried as part of the program curriculum contribute towards the attainment of the POs. (10) 598

2.3.

Evaluation of attainment of Program


Outcomes

125 2.3.1. Description

of the Evaluation processes that documents and demonstrates periodically the degree to which the Program Outcomes are being attained. (25) 2.3.2. Information on: (a) listing and description of the evaluation processes used to gather the data upon which the evaluation of each program educational objective is based. Examples of data collection processes may include, but are not limited to, specific exam questions, student portfolios, internally developed evaluation exams, senior project presentations, nationallynormed exams, oral exams, focus groups, industrial advisory committee and (b) the frequency with which these assessment processes are carried out (50) 599

2.3.3. Information on: a) The expected level of attainment for each of the program outcomes; b) Summaries of the results of the evaluation processes and an analysis illustrating the extent to which each of the program outcomes are attained; and c) How the results are documented and maintained (50)
600

2.4. Use of 30 2.4.1. Articulation with rationale the evaluation curricular improvements results brought in after the review of towards the attainment of the POs (5) improvem 2.4.2. Articulation with rationale the ent of the curricular delivery and program evaluation improvements outcomes

brought in after the review of the attainment of the POs (10) 2.4.3. Articulation with rationale how the results of the evaluation of the POs have been used to review/redefine the POs in line with the Graduate Attributes of the NBA (15) 601

CRITERION 3: Program Curriculum 125 TIER II : (125)

Minimum qualifying points:


Item Item no. description 3.1. Curriculum Points 20

75 TIER II : ( - )

Evaluation guidelines/ award of points

3.1.1. Structure of the curriculum (5) 3.1.2. Drawing of the schematic of the prerequisites of the courses in the curriculum (5) 3.1.3. Evidence that program curriculum satisfies the applicable program criteria specified by the appropriate American professional associations such as ASME, IEEE and ACM (10) 602

3.2. Curriculum

15

component s and relevance to the POs and the PEOs


3.3.

Core engineering courses and their relevance to Program Outcomes including design experience

60

3.2.1.Detailing of program curriculum grouping based on different components and their relevance to program outcomes (15) 3.3.1. Core engineering subjects and their relevance to program outcomes (10) 3.3.2. Description as to how core engineering courses in the program curriculum helps in solving complex engineering problems (50)
603

3.4. Industry

10

interaction/ internship

3.4.1. Details of industrys involvement in the program such as industry-attached laboratories and partial delivery of courses and internship opportunities for students (10)

3.5. Curriculum

15

Develop ment

3.5.1. Description of the process that periodically documents and demonstrates periodically how the program curriculum is evolved considering the PEOs and the POs (5) 3.5.2. Details of the process involved in identifying the requirement for improvements in courses and curriculum and provide the evidence of continuous improvement of courses and curriculum (10)
3.6.1. Syllabus for each course and also provide the details of the syllabi format (5)

3.6. Course

Syllabi

604

CRITERION 4: Students Performance in the Program 75 TIER II : (100)

Minimum qualifying points: 45 TIER II : ( 60)


Item Item Points no. description
4.1 Success rate 20

Evaluation guidelines/ award of points


Success rate = 20 x Mean of success index (SI) for past three batches SI = (No. of students who cleared the program in the minimum period of course duration)/(No. of students admitted in the first year and students admitted in that batch via lateral entry) Assessment = 2 x API Where, API = Academic performance index = Mean of CGPA of all the students on a 10-point CGPA system or = (Mean of the percentage of marks of all students)/10
605

4.2

Academic performance

20

4.3. Placem ent and higher studies

20

Assessment = 20(x + 1.25 y)/N subject to max. assessment

points = 20
Where x = No. of students placed, y = No. of students admitted for the higher studies. N = No. of students admitted in the first year and students admitted via lateral entry in that batch
606

4.4.

Professional activities

15

4.4.1. Professional societies / chapters and organising engineering events (3) 4.4.2. Organisation of paper contests, design contests, etc., and their achievements (3) 4.4.3. Publication of technical magazines, newsletters. etc. (3) 4.4.4. Entrepreneurship initiatives, product designs, innovations (3) 4.4.5. Publications and awards in inter-institute events. (3)
607

CRITERION 5: Faculty Contributions 175 TIER II : (175) Minimum qualifying points: 105 TIER II : (105)
Item no. Item description Points Evaluation guidelines/ award of points

5.1.

Student Teacher Ratio

20

Assessment = 20 x 15/STR; subject to max. assessment at 20 Where, STR = (x + y + z)/N1 x = No. of students in 2nd year of the program y = No. of students in 3rd year of the program z = No. of students in 4th year of the program N1 = Total no. of faculty members in the program (considering the fractional load)
608

5.2. Faculty Cadre Ratio

5.3. Faculty Qualificati ons

20 Assessment = 20 x CRI Cadre Ratio Index (CRI) = 2.25(2x + y)/N; based on 1:2:6 subject to max. CRI = 1.0 X = No. of professors in the program Y = No. of associate professors in the program 30 Assessment = 6 x FQI Faculty qualification index (FQI) = (10x + 6y + 2z0)/N2 where, x + y + z0 N2, z0 Z X = No. of faculty members with PhD Y = No. of faculty members with M.E/M.tech. Z = No. of faculty members with B.E/B.tech.
609

5.4. Faculty Competenc ies correlation to Program Specific Criteria

15 5.4.1. Ability of the program curriculum

to meet the applicable program criteria specified by the appropriate American professional association such as ASME, IEEE and ACM 5.4.2. Listing of the program specific criteria and the competencies (specialisation, research publications, course developments etc. of faculty to correlate the program specific criteria and competencies)
610

5.5. Faculty as 15 Participant/resource person in two participan week faculty development program. (5) ts/resourc e persons Participant/resource person in one in faculty week faculty development program (3) developm Assessment = 3 x SUM / N ent/traini ng activities 5.6. Faculty 15 Assessment = 4 x RPI/N retention Retention Point Index (RPI) = Sum of the retention points to all faculty members One retention point for each year of experience at the institution, subject to maximum five points to a faculty member.
611

5.7. Faculty 20 Faculty points in Research Publications (FRP) Research Assessment of FRP = 4 x (Sum of the research Publications publication points scored by each faculty member)/N
(Instruction: A faculty member scores maximum five research publication points, each year, depending upon the quality of the research papers published in the past three years.) The research papers considered are those (i) which can be located on internet and/or are included in hard copy volumes/proceedings, published by well known publishers, and (ii) the faculty members affiliation, in the published paper, is of the current institution.
612

5.8. Faculty Intellectual Property Rights

10 Faculty points in IPR (FIPR) Assessment of FIPR = 2 (Sum of the FIPR points scored by each faculty member)/N

(Instruction: A faculty member scores maximum five FIPR points each year. IPR includes awarded national/international patents, books, and copyrights
613

5.9. Funded R&D Projects and consultancy (FRDC) work

20

Faculty Points in R&D and consultancy work (FRDC) Assessment of R&D and consultancy projects = 4(Sum of FRDC by each faculty member)/N Instruction: A faculty member gets maximum five points, each year, depending upon the amount of the funds and/or the contributions made. A suggestive scheme is given below for a minimum amount of Rs.1.0 lakh: Five points for funding by national agency Four points for funding by state agency Four points for funding by private sector Two points for funding by the sponsoring trust/society

614

5.10.

Faculty 10 Faculty Interaction Points (FIP) interacti assessment on with outside = 2(Sum of FIP by each faculty world member)/N

615

CRITERION 6: Facilities and Technical support 75 TIER II : (125)

Minimum qualifying points:


Item no. 6.1. Item description Classrooms in the department
Points

45 TIER II : ( 75)

Evaluation guidelines/ award of points

20

6.1.2. Adequate number of rooms for lectures (Core / electives), seminars, tutorial, etc., for the program (10) 6.1.3. Teaching aids multimedia projectors, etc. (5) 6.1.4. Acoustics, classroom size, conditions of chairs/benches, air circulation, lighting, exits, ambience, and such other amenities/facilities (5)
616

6.2. Faculty 15 rooms in the departme nt

6.2.1.Availability of individual faculty rooms (5) 6.2.2.Room equipped with white / black board, computer, Internet, and other such amenities/ facilities (5) 6.2.3.Usage of room for discussion / counselling with students (5)

617

6.3. Laboratori es in the departme nt to meet the curricular requireme nts and the POs

25

6.3.1. Adequate well -

equipped laboratories to run all the program-specific curriculum (10) 6.3.2. Availability of computing facilities for the department exclusively (5) 6.3.3. Availability of laboratories with technical support within and beyond working hours (5) 6.3.4. Equipments to run experiments and their maintenance, number of students per experimental setup, size of the laboratories, overall ambience, etc. (5) 618

6.4. Technical 15 6.4.1.Availability of adequate manpower and qualified technical support supporting staff for

program specific laboratories (10)


6.4.2.Incentives, skill upgrade,
and professional advancement

(5)

619

CRITERION 7: Academic Support Units and Teaching Learning Process 75 TIER II : (75) Minimum qualifying points: 45 TIER II : (45)
Item no. 7.1. Item Points description Academic Support Units 35 Evaluation guidelines/ award of points 7.1.1. Assessment of First Year Student Teacher Ratio (FYSTR) (10) 7.1.2. Assessment of Faculty Qualification Teaching First Year Common Courses (15) 7.1.3. Adequacy of space, number of students per batch, quality and availability of measuring instruments, laboratory manuals, list of experiments Basic science and Engineering Laboratory (8) 7.1.4. Adequacy of space, number of students per batch, software types and quality of instruments Language Laboratory (2)
620

7.2. Teaching Learning Process

40 7.2.1.Tutorial

classes to address student questions : size of tutorial classes, hours per subject in timetable (5) 7.2.2. Mentoring system to help at individual levels (5) 7.2.3.Feedback analysis and reward / corrective measures taken, if any (5) 7.2.4. Scope for self-learning (5) 7.2.5.Generation of self-learning facilities, and availability of materials for learning beyond syllabus (5) 7.2.6.Career Guidance, Training, Placement, and Entrepreneurship Cell (5) 7.2.7.Co-curricular and extra-curricular activities (5) 7.2.8.Games and sports, facilities, and qualified sports instructors (5)
621

CRITERION 8: Governance, Institutional Support and Financial Resources 75 TIER II : (75) Minimum qualifying points: 45 TIER II : (45)
Item no. 8.1. Item description Campus infrastructur e and facility
Points

Evaluation guidelines/ award of points

10

8.1.1. Maintenance of academic infrastructure and facilities (4) 8.1.2. Hostel (boys and girls), transportation facility and canteen (2) 8.1.3. Electricity, power backup, telecom facility, drinking water, and security (4)
622

8.2. Organisation, governance, and transparency

10

8.2.1.Governing body, administrative setup, and functions of various bodies (2) 8.2.2. Defined rules, procedures, recruitment, and promotional policies, etc. (2) 8.2.3. Decentralisation in working and grievance redressal system (3) 8.2.4. Transparency and availability of correct/ unambiguous information (3)
623

8.3.

Budget allocation, utilisation, and public accounting

10

8.4.

Program Specific Budget Allocation Utilisation

10

8.3.1. Adequacy of budget allocation (4) 8.3.2. Utilisation of allocated funds (5) 8.3.3. Availability of detailed audited statements of all the receipts and expenditures publicly (1) 8.4.1. Adequacy of budget allocation (5) 8.4.2. Utilisation of allocated funds (5)

624

8.5.

Library 20 8.5.1. Library space and ambience, timings and usage, availability of a qualified librarian and other staff, library automation, online access, and networking (5) 8.5.2. Titles and volumes per title (4) 8.5.3.Scholarly journal subscriptions (3) 8.5.4. Digital library (3) 8.5.5. Library expenditure on books, magazines / journals, and miscellaneous contents (5)
625

8.6. Internet

05

8.6.1. Sufficient and effective internet access facility with security and privacy (5) 8.7.1. Checks for wiring and electrical installations for leakage and earthing (1) 8.7.2. Fire-fighting measurements : Effective safety arrangements with emergency/ multiple exits and ventilation/exhausts in auditoriums and large classrooms/ labs, fire-fighting equipments and training, availability of water and such other facilities (1) 8.7.3. Safety of civil structures/ buildings/ catwalk/ hostels, etc. (1) 8.7.4. Handling of hazardous chemicals and such other hazards (2) 626

8.7. Safety norms and Checks

05

8.8. Counselling and emergency medical care and first-aid

05

8.8.1. Availability of counselling facility (1) 8.8.2. Arrangement for emergency medical care (2) 8.8.3. Availability of first-aid unit (2)

627

CRITERION 9: Continuous Improvement 75 TIER II :

(100)

Minimum qualifying points:


Item Item no. description 9.1. Improvement in Success Index of students Points 5

45

TIER II : ( - )

Evaluation guidelines

9.2. Improvement in Academic Performance Index of students

9.1.1. Points must be awarded in proportion to the average improvement in computed SI (in 4.1) over three years. 9.2.1. Points must be awarded in proportion to the average improvement in computed API (in 4.2) over three years.
628

9.3. Improvem 5 9.3.1. Points must be awarded in ent in STR proportion to the average improvement in computed STR (in 5.1) over three years. 9.4. Enhancem 5 9.4.1. Points must be awarded in ent of proportion to the average Faculty improvement in computed Qualificati FQI (in 5.3) over three on Index years.

629

9.5. Improvemen 10 9.5.1. Points must be awarded in t in faculty proportion to the combined research average improvement in publication, computed FRP (in 5.7) and FRDC R&D, and (5.9) over three years. consultancy
9.6. Continuing education 10 9.6.1. Points must be awarded

in proportion to participation in continuing education (contributing to course modules and conducting and attending short-term courses and workshops) programs to gain and/or disseminate their knowledge in their areas of expertise
630

9.7. New

15 9.7.1. New facilities in terms of facility infrastructure/ created equipment/ facilities added to augment the program. 9.8. Overall 20 9.7.2. Points must be awarded improvem based on the strengths ent since and weaknesses last mentioned in the last accreditati accreditation visit, and on, if any, how those were otherwise, since addressed and/or efforts establishm made.
ent
631

13. COMPARISON OF TIER-1 & TIER-II EVALUATION GUIDELINES, NBA, JANUARY 2013
Criterion 1. VISION, MISSION AND PROGRAM EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES (PEOs) MINIMUM QUALIFYING POINTS (60%) 2. PROGRAM OUTCOMES
MINIMUM QUALIFYING POINTS (60%)

POINTS

TIER I
100

TIER II
75

60

45

225
135

150

632

Criterion

POINTS

TIER I
125 75 75 45 175
105

TIER II
125 100 60 175 105
633

3. PROGRAM CURRICULUM
MINIMUM QUALIFYING POINTS (60%)

4. STUDENTS PERFORMANCE
MINIMUM QUALIFYING POINTS (60%)

5. FACULTY CONTRIBUTIONS
MINIMUM QUALIFYING POINTS (60%)

Criterion 6. FACILITIES AND TECHNICAL SUPPORT


MINIMUM QUALIFYING POINTS (60%)

POINTS

TIER I
75

TIER II
125

45
75 45

75
75

7. ACADEMIC SUPPORT UNITS AND TEACHING LEARNING PROCESS


MINIMUM QUALIFYING POINTS (60%)

45

8. GOVERNANCE, INSTITUTIONAL SUPPORT AND FINANCIAL RESOURCES


MINIMUM QUALIFYING POINTS (60%)

75

75

45

45
634

Criterion
9. CONTINUOUS

POINTS TIER I TIER II

75

100
1000

IMPROVEMENT MINIMUM QUALIFYING POINTS (60%) TOTAL POINTS Accredited for 5 years 45 1000

Score 750 Score 750 And Minimum Points : And Minimum Points : 60% in each criterion 60% in criteria : 1, 4, 5,6,7,8

600 score <750 Eligible for the status of prospective candidate for accreditation

600 score <750 And Minimum Points : 60% in criteria : 1, 4, 5,6,7,8 Eligible for accreditation for two years
635

14. ACCREDITATION MANUAL, FOR PG ENGINEERING PROGRAMS, NATIONAL BOARD OF ACCREDITATION (NBA), TIER I, JANUARY 2013.
636

14.1 INTRODUCTION
The objective of the NBA is to assess and accredit professional programmes offered at various levels by the technical institutions on the basis of norms prescribed by the NBA. The NBA works very closely with stakeholders (faculty, educational institutions, government, industries, regulators, management, recruiters, alumni, students and their parents) to ensure that the programmes serve to prepare their graduates with sound knowledge of fundamentals and to develop in them an adequate level of professional competence, such as would meet the needs of the engineering profession locally as well as globally. 637

NBAs Vision:

To be an accrediting agency of international repute by ensuring the highest degree of credibility in assurance of quality and relevance of professional education and come to the expectations of its stakeholders, viz., academicians, corporate, educational institutions, government, industry, regulators, students, and their parents.
638

NBAs Mission:
To stimulate the quality of teaching, self evaluation, and accountability in the higher education system, which help institutions realise their academic objectives and adopt teaching practices that enable them to produce high- quality professionals and to assess and accredit the programmes offered by the colleges or the institutions, or both, imparting technical and professional education.
639

The main objectives of the NBA are to: a) assess and grade colleges and/or institutions of technical and professional education, the courses and programmes offered by them, their various units, faculty, departments etc., b) stimulate the academic environment and quality of teaching and research in these institutions, c) contribute to the sphere of knowledge in its discipline ,
640

d) motivate colleges and/or institutions of technical and professional education for research, and adopt teaching practices that groom their students for the innovation and development of leadership qualities, e) encourage innovation, self-evaluation and accountability in higher education, f) promote necessary changes, innovation and reforms in all aspects of the working of the colleges / institutions of technical and professional education for the above purpose , and g) help institutions to realise their academic objectives.
641

14.3. ACCREDITATION
Accreditation is a process of quality assurance and improvement, whereby a programme in an institution is critically appraised to verify that the institution or the programme continues to meet and exceed the norms and standards prescribed by the appropriate designated authorities. Accreditation does not seek to replace the system of award of degree and diplomas by the universities/autonomous institutions.
642

But, accreditation provides quality assurance that the academic aims and objectives of the institution are honestly pursued, and effectively achieved by the resources available, and that the institution has demonstrated capabilities of ensuring effectiveness of the educational programmes over the validity period of accreditation. NBA accreditation is a quality assurance scheme for higher technical education.
643

NBA operates a two-tier system : TIER-I and TIER-II


TIER I System : For the engineering programs offered by autonomous institutions and university departments. TIER II System : Fine-tuned for the needs of the nonautonomous institutions affiliated to a university. In both TIER I and TIER II documents, the same set of criteria have been considered for accreditation.
644

In the TIER I document : Criteria based on outcome parameters have been given more weightage. In the TIER II document : The weightage for criteria based on outcome parameters has been reduced. thereby enhancing the weightage of the output-based criteria. However, a non-autonomous institution may also apply for accreditation on the basis of TIER I document, if they feel that their curriculum is capable of attaining the desired outcomes of a program.
645

14.3.1 Significance of Accreditation


To make the institute/department aware of the weaknesses of the programme offered by it and act on suggestions for improvement. To encourage the institute to move continuously towards the improvement of qualityof its programme, and the pursuit of excellence. To facilitate institutions for updating themselves in programme curriculum, teaching and learning processes, faculty achievements, students skills/abilities/knowledge.
646

To excel among stakeholders. (peers, students, employers, societies etc.)


To facilitate receiving of grants from Government regulatory bodies and institutions/agencies.

To attain international recognition of accredited degrees awarded. To facilitate the mobility of graduated students and professionals.
647

14.5. ACCREDITATION CRITERIA 14.5.1 General Information


The assessment and evaluation process of accreditation of a PG engineering programme is based on 9 broad criteria developed through a participatory process involving experts from reputed national-level technical institutions, industries, R&D organisations and professional bodies. Each criterion relates to a major feature of institutional activity and its effectiveness. The criteria has been formulated in terms of parameters, including quantitative measurements that have been designed for maximally objective assessment of each feature. 648

An engineering programme to be accredited or re-accredited has to satisfy all the criteria during the full term of accreditation. The educational institution should periodically review the strengths and weaknesses of the programme and seek to improve standards and quality continually, and to address deficiencies, if any aspect falls short of the standards set by the accreditation criteria.

During the full term of accreditation, the institutions are required to submit their annual self-assessment report to eNBA online.
649

CRITERION 1 VISION, MISSION AND PROGRAMME EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES (PEOs) Each engineering programme to be accredited or re-accredited should have: i. Published department vision and mission, and programme educational objectives that are consistent with the mission of the educational institution as well as criteria 2 to 9 listed below, and ii. The PEOs should be assessable and realistic within the context of the committed resources.
650

The comprehensive list of various stakeholders of the programme, who have been involved in the process of defining and redefining the PEOs, is to be provided. While framing the PEOs, the following factors are to be considered: The PEOs should be consistent with the mission of the institution. All the stakeholders should participate in the process of framing the PEOs. The number of PEOs should be manageable.
651

PEOs should be based on the needs of the stakeholders. PEOs should be achievable by the programme. PEOs should be specific to the programme and not too broad. PEOs should not be too narrow and similar to the POs. For example, the PEOs of an academic programme might read like this: Statement of areas or fields in which the graduates find employment Preparedness of graduates to take up higher studies.
652

The programme shall provide how and where the department vision and mission and the PEOs have been published and disseminated. It should also describe the process that documents and demonstrates periodically that the PEOs are based on the needs of the stakeholders of the programme. The programme shall demonstrate how the PEOs are aligned with the mission of the department / institution. The PEOs are reviewed periodically based on feedback of the programmes various stakeholders.
653

For this purpose, there should be in place a process to identify and document relationships with stakeholders (including students) and their needs, which have to be adequately addressed when reviewing programme curriculum and processes. Justifications shall be provided as to how the composition of the programme curriculum contributes towards the attainment of the PEOs defined for the programme.
654

Also, it is expected to expound how the administrative system helps the programme in ensuring the attainment of the PEOs. There should be enough evidence and documentation to show the achievement of the PEOs set by the institution with the help of the assessment (indicate tools and how they are used) and evaluation process that have been developed. . Also, show that this continuous process leads to the revision or refinement of the PEOs. The institute shall provide the required information for assessment, evaluation and review methods to evaluate the attainment of the PEOs as per the format given in the SAR. 655

CRITERION 2 PROGRAMME OUTCOMES


Graduate Attributes (GAs) form a set of individually assessable outcomes that are the components indicative of the graduates potential to acquire competence to practice at the appropriate level. The GAs of PG programmes are examples of the attributes expected from a graduate of an accredited programme. The Graduate Attributes of PG Programmes of the NBA are as following:
656

1. Scholarship of Knowledge:

Acquire in-depth knowledge of specific discipline or professional area, including wider and global perspective, with an ability to discriminate, evaluate, analyse and synthesise existing and new knowledge, and integration of the same for enhancement of knowledge.
2. Critical Thinking

Analyse complex engineering problems critically, apply independent judgement for synthesising information to make intellectual and/or creative advances for conducting research in a wider theoretical, practical and policy context.
657

3. Problem Solving Think laterally and originally, conceptualise and solve engineering problems, evaluate a wide range of potential solutions for those problems and arrive at feasible, optimal solutions after considering public health and safety, cultural, societal and environmental factors in the core areas of expertise. 4. Research Skill Extract information pertinent to unfamiliar problems through literature survey and experiments, apply appropriate research methodologies, techniques and tools, design, conduct experiments, analyse and interpret data, demonstrate higher order skill and view things in a broader perspective, contribute individually/in group(s) to the development of scientific/ technological knowledge in one or more 658 domains of engineering.

5. Usage of modern tools Create, select, learn and apply appropriate techniques, resources, and modern engineering and IT tools, including prediction and modelling, to complex engineering activities with an understanding of the limitations. 6. Collaborative and Multidisciplinary work Possess knowledge and understanding of group dynamics, recognise opportunities and contribute positively to collaborative - multidisciplinary scientific research, demonstrate a capacity for selfmanagement and teamwork, decision-making based on open-mindedness, objectivity and rational analysis in order to achieve common goals and further the learning of themselves as well as others. 659

7. Project Management and Finance Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of engineering and management principles and apply the same to ones own work, as a member and leader in a team, manage projects efficiently in respective disciplines and multidisciplinary environments after considerisation of economical and financial factors. 8. Communication Communicate with the engineering community, and with society at large, regarding complex engineering activities confidently and effectively, such as, being able to comprehend and write effective reports and design documentation by adhering to appropriate standards, make effective presentations, and give 660 and receive clear instructions.

9. Life-long Learning Recognise the need for, and have the preparation and ability to engage in life-long learning independently, with a high level of enthusiasm and commitment to improve knowledge and competence continuously. 10. Ethical Practices and Social Responsibility Acquire professional and intellectual integrity, professional code of conduct, ethics of research and scholarship, consideration of the impact of research outcomes on professional practices and an understanding of responsibility to contribute to the community for sustainable development of society. 11. Independent and Reflective Learning Observe and examine critically the outcomes of ones actions and make corrective measures subsequently, and learn from mistakes without depending on external 661 feedback.

The POs formulated for each PG programme by the institute must be consistent with the NBAs Graduate Attributes. The POs must foster the attainment of the PEOs. The programme shall indicate the process involved in defining and redefining the POs. It shall also provide how and where the POs are published and disseminated. It should also describe the process that periodically documents and demonstrates that the POs are based on the needs of the stakeholders of the programme.
662

The extent to which and how the POs are aligned with the Graduate Attributes (PG) prescribed by the NBA shall be provided. The correlation between the POs and the PEOs is to be provided as per the format given in the SAR in order to establish the contribution of the POs towards the attainment of the PEOs. Precise illustrations of how course outcomes, modes of delivery of the courses, assessment tools are used to assess the impact of course delivery / course content, and laboratory and project/thesis work are contributing towards attainment of the POs shall be given by the programme.
663

The attainment of POs may be assessed by direct and indirect methods. Direct methods of assessment are essentially accomplished by the direct examination or observation of students knowledge or skills against measurable performance indicators. On the other hand, indirect methods of assessment are based on ascertaining opinion or self-report.
664

Rubric is a useful tool for indirect assessment. A rubric basically articulates the expectations for students performance. It is a set of criteria for assessing students work or performance.
665

Rubric is particularly suited to program outcomes that are complex or not easily quantifiable for which there are no clear right or wrong answers or which are not evaluated with the standardised tests or surveys. For example, assessment of writing, oral communication, or critical thinking often require rubrics. The development of different rubrics and the achievement of the outcomes need to be clearly stated in the SAR.
666

The results of assessment of each PO shall be indicated as they play a vital role in implementing the Continuous Improvement Process of the programme. The institute shall provide the ways and means of how the results of assessment of the POs improve the programme in terms of curriculum, course delivery and assessment methods and processes of revising/redefining the Pos.
667

CRITERION 3 PROGRAMME CURRICULUM Programme curriculum that leads to the attainment of PEOs and Pos must be designed. The programme shall provide how its curriculum is designed, published, and disseminated. The structure of the curriculum is to be provided as per the illustrative format given in SAR. The course syllabi for each course shall be provided, as per the syllabus format given in the SAR in the appendix.
668

Each PG programme should cover general and specialised professional content of adequate breadth and depth, and should also include appropriate components in the Sciences and Humanities. The relevance of curriculum components including core engineering courses to the POs shall be given. The institute shall describe how the core engineering subjects/thesis work in the curriculum add to the research experience in solving the complex engineering problems.
669

The institution shall provide evidence for details of Research and Development (R&D) organisations and industry involvement in the programme such as industry-attached laboratories and partial delivery of courses and internship opportunities for students. The institution must ensure that the programme curriculum that was developed at the time of inception of the programme has been refined in the subsequent years to make it consistent with the PEOs and POs.

The institute shall provide the required information for assessment, evaluation and review methods to evaluate the attainment of the 670 COs.

CRITERION 4 STUDENTS PERFORMANCE


(i) Students admitted to the programme must be of a quality that will enable them to achieve the programme outcomes. The policies and procedures for student admission and transfer should be transparent and spelt out clearly. (ii) The educational institution should monitor the academic performance of its students carefully. The requirements of the programme should be made known to every student.
671

(iii) The educational institution must provide student support services including counselling/tutoring / mentoring. (iv) The institute shall provide the required information for three complete academic years for admission intake (GATE / State level PG entrance / others) in the programme, success rate, academic performance, placement and higher studies and professional activities as per the format given in the SAR. However, it shall provide the information in a suitable format, wherever necessary, in case the format is not provided in the SAR.
672

CRITERION 5 FACULTY CONTRIBUTIONS


(i) The faculty members should posses adequate knowledge / expertise to deliver all the curricular contents of the programme and to guide the students to carry out their thesis work. (ii) The number of faculty members must be adequate, so as to enable them to engage in activities outside their teaching duties, especially for the purposes of professional development, curriculum development, student mentoring/counselling, administrative work, training, and placement of students, interaction with industrial and professional practitioners.
673

(iii) The number of faculty members must be sufficiently large in proportion to the number of students, so as to provide adequate levels of facultystudent interaction. In any educational programme, it is essential to have adequate levels of teacher-student interaction, which is possible only if there are enough teachers, or in this case, faculty members.
674

(iv) The faculty must be actively involved in research and development. The programme must support, encourage and maintain such R&D activities. A vibrant research and development culture is important for any academic programme.

It provides curriculum.

new

knowledge

to

the

The students education is enriched by being part of such a culture, for it cultivates skills and habits for life-long learning and knowledge on contemporary issues.
675

(v) The academic freedom to steer and run the programme will be in the hands of members of the faculty. This includes the rights over evaluation and assessment processes and decisions on programme involvement. They should also engage themselves in the process of accreditation for the continuous improvement of the PEOs and the POs.
676

(vi) The faculty must have sound educational qualifications, and must be actively updating knowledge in their respective areas of interest. It is desirable that the members of the faculty possess adequate industrial experience, and be drawn from diverse backgrounds. In terms of teaching, the faculty must possess experience, be able to communicate effectively, and be enthusiastic about programme improvement. For courses relating to design, the faculty members in charge of the course must have good design experience and participate in professional societies. 677

(vii) The institute shall provide the required information for three complete academic years for Student-Teacher Ratio (STR), Faculty Cadre Ratio, faculty qualifications, faculty retention, Faculty Research Publications (FRP), Faculty Intellectual Property Rights (FIPR), Funded R&D Projects and Consultancy (FRDC), faculty interaction with outside world, faculty competence correlation with program curriculum and faculty as participants / resource persons in training and development activities as per the format given in the SAR. However, it shall provide the information in a suitable format, wherever necessary, in case 678 the format is not provided in the SAR.

CRITERION 6 FACILITIES AND TECHNICAL SUPPORT

(i) The institution must provide adequate infrastructural facilities to support the achievement of the course as well as programme outcomes. Classrooms, tutorial rooms, meeting rooms, seminar halls, conference hall, faculty rooms and state-of-the-art laboratories for conducting applied and advance research must be adequately furnished to provide an environment conducive to learning.
679

Modern teaching aids such as digital interactive boards, multimedia projectors etc., should be in place to facilitate the teaching-learning process so that course and programme outcomes can be achieved.
680

(ii)The laboratories must be equipped with computing resources, equipments, and tools relevant to the programme. The equipments of the laboratories should be properly maintained, upgraded and utilised so that the students can attain the programme outcomes.
681

There should be an adequate number of qualified technical supporting staff to provide appropriate guidance for the students for using the equipment, tools, computers, and laboratories.
The institution must provide scope for the technical staff for upgrading their skills and professional advancement.
682

(iii) The institute shall provide the required information for class rooms in the department, faculty rooms in the department, laboratories for conducting applied and advanced research in the department to meet the curriculum requirements as well as the POs, and technical manpower in the department as per the format given in the SAR. However, it shall provide the information in a suitable format wherever necessary, in case the format has not been provided in the SAR.
683

CRITERION 7 TEACHING LEARNING PROCESS

(i) The programme must employ effective teaching-learning processes. The modes of teaching used, such as lecture, tutorial, seminar, teacherstudent interaction outside class, peergroup discussion, or a combination of two or more of these, must be designed and implemented so as to facilitate and encourage learning.
684

Practical skills, such as the ability to operate computers and other technologically advanced machinery, must be developed through hands-on laboratory work. (ii) The effectiveness of the teaching-learning processes must be evaluated on a regular basis. The evaluation, besides reviewing the above mentioned factors, must also look at whether the academic calendar, the number of instructional days and contact hours per week, are maximally conducive to teaching and learning.
685

Student feedback on various aspects of the process must be carefully considered as well. Internal reviews of quality assurance procedures should be carried out periodically. III. The institute shall provide the required information for teaching and evaluation process of courses and thesis work, feedback system, self-learning, career guidance, training, placement and entrepreneurship cell and cocurricular and extra-curricular activities as per the format given in the SAR. However, it shall provide the information in a suitable format, wherever necessary, in case the format is not provided in the SAR.
686

CRITERION 8 GOVERNANCE, INSTITUTIONAL SUPPORT AND FINANCIAL RESOURCES

(i) The governance structure of the programme must clearly assign authority and responsibility for the formulation and implementation of policies that enable the programme to fulfill its mission. The programme must possess the financial resources necessary to fulfill its mission and the PEOs.
687

In particular, there must be sufficient resources to attract and retain wellqualified staff, and to provide them with opportunities for continuous development and career growth. The programmes budgetary planning process must also provide for the acquisition, repair, maintenance and replacement of physical facilities and equipment. (ii) The educational institution must have a comprehensive and up-to-date library and extensive educational, technological facilities.
688

(iii) The institute shall provide the required information for campus infrastructure and facility, organisation, governance and transparency, budget allocation (provide separately for R&D activities), incubation centre and public accounting (for both institutions and programme), library, internet, safety norms and checks, counseling, and emergency medical care and first-aid as per the format given in the SAR. However, it shall provide the information in a suitable format, wherever necessary in case the format is not provided in SAR.
689

CRITERION 9 CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT


Modifications in the programme curriculum, course delivery and assessment brought in from the review of the attainment of the PEOs and the POs will be helpful to the institutions for continuous improvement. The programme must develop a documented process for the periodic review of the PEOs, the POs and the COs. The continuous improvement in the PEOs and the POs need to be validated with proper documentation.
690

The institute shall provide the required information for improvement in the success index of students, improvement in academic performance index of students, improvement in student-teacher ratio, enhancement of faculty qualifications index, improvement in faculty research publications, R&D and consultancy work, continuing education, curricular improvement based on the review of attainment of the PEOs, and the POs, course delivery and assessment improvement
691

based on the review of the attainment of the PEOs, and the POs, new facility created, and overall improvement since last accreditation, if any, otherwise since the commencement of the programme, as per the format given in the SAR. However, it shall provide the information in a suitable format, wherever necessary, in case the format is not provided in the SAR.
692

14.5.3 Awarding Accreditation


Programmes of the institutions scoring a minimum of 750 points in aggregate out of 1000 points with minimum score of 60% in each criteria shall be eligible for accreditation for 5 years under TIER-I system. Whereas, the programme with the score of minimum 600 points in aggregate shall be eligible for provisional accreditation for 2 years under Tier-I system.
693

14.5.6. STEPS INVOLVED IN ACCREDITATION PROCEDURE

The accreditation process, whether for a first accreditation or re-accreditation, broadly involves the following activities. The institute shall submit the Self Assessment Report (SAR) which contains the required information in the prescribed format. The NBA shall appoint an Evaluation Team to assess the SAR. The Evaluation Team shall make an onsite accreditation visit and it shall prepare an evaluation report based on its findings.
694

The Evaluation Team shall share the strengths and weaknesses of the programme/institute with the members of the institution vis--vis accreditation process during the exit meeting. The evaluation report will be placed before the EAC for its recommendations. The recommendations of the EAC will be submitted to the EC for its final decision vis--vis granting accreditation. The NBA shall inform the outcome of accreditation to the institution.
695

14.5.7 DOs and DONTs for Preparing the SAR


DOs: The SAR must Be concise, pointed, and adequate in length and breadth for the purpose of accreditation. Provide relevant information as per the format specified for the individual programme. Be printed on one side of paper with double spacing, using font 12 Times New Roman, with at least one inch (2.54 cm) margin on all sides Contain carefully compiled and authentic data. Proper presentation of data in appendices with charts, graphics, and visuals wherever applicable. 696

Provide relevant data for the past three years, unless specified otherwise in the respective programme manual. The documents should be submitted as hard copy in a soft bound form and mailed to the NBA, New Delhi. The soft copy should be uploaded on the NBA website. DONTs: Dont send the following objects with the SAR: Original documents Publications such as books, journals, newsletters, thesis, etc.
697

14.6 ACCREDITATION VISIT


The Evaluation Team will visit the institution seeking accreditation of its programme(s) evaluate and validate the assessment of the institute/department through the SAR of the programme concerned as per specified accreditation criteria. The evaluators may obtain such further clarifications from the institution as they may deem necessary. Although it may not be possible to adequately describe all the factors to be assessed during the on-site visit, some of the common ones are the following:
698

(i) Outcome of the education provided; (ii) Quality assurance processes, including internal reviews; (iii) Assessment; (iv) Activities and work of the students; (v) Entry standards and selection for admission of students; (vi) Motivation and enthusiasm of faculty; (vii) Qualifications and activities of faculty members; (viii) Infrastructure facilities; (ix) Laboratory facilities; (x) Library facilities; (xi) Industry participation; (xii) Organisation
699

In order to assist the Evaluation Team in its assessment, the educational institution should arrange for the following: Discussions with a) The Head of the institute/Dean/Heads of Department (HOD)/Programme and course coordinators b) A member of the management (to discuss how the programme fits into the overall strategic direction and focus of the institution, and management support for continued funding and development of the programme) c) Faculty members d) Alumni (sans Alma Maters) e) Students 700 f) parents

(ii) Availability of the following exhibits a) Profile of faculty involved in the programme b) Evidence that the results of assessment of course outcomes and programme outcomes are being applied to the review and ongoing improvement of programme effectiveness c) List of publications, consultancy and sponsored/funded research projects by programme faculty d) Sample materials for theory and laboratory courses e) Sample test / semester examination question papers for all courses
701

f) Sample of test/semester examination answer scripts, projects, assignments, (including at least one excellent, one good and one marginal pass for each examination) question papers and evidences related to assessment tools for COs and POs g) Student records of three immediate batches of graduates h) Sample project and design reports (excellent, good and marginal pass) by students i) Sample student feedback form j) Sample for industry-institute interaction k) Results of quality assurance reviews
702

l) Records of employment/higher studies of graduates m) Records of academic support and other learning activities n) Any other documents that the Evaluation Team/NBA may request. (iii) Visits to a) Classrooms b) Laboratories pertaining to the programme c) Central and department library d) Computer centre e) Hostel and dispensary
703

The Evaluation Team should conduct an exit meeting with the Management Representative, the Head of the institute, the Head of Department and other key officials at the end of the on-site visit to present its findings (strengths, weaknesses, and scope for the improvement). The institution will be given a chance to withdraw one or more programmes from the process of accreditation. In this case, the Head of the institution will have to submit the withdrawal in writing to the Chairperson of the Evaluation Team during the exit meeting.
704

15. NATIONAL BOARD OF ACCREDIATION FORMAT FOR SELF ASSESSMENT REPORT (SAR) FOR ACCREDITATION OF PG ENGINEERING PROGRAMMES (TIER-I) JANUARY, 2013
705

PART A
I. INSTITUTIONAL INFORMATION I.1. Name and address of the institution and affiliating university: (Instruction: The name, address of the institution and the name of the university, which has given affiliation to this institution, are to be listed here.) I.2. Name, designation, telephone number, and email address of the contact person for the NBA: (Instruction: The name of the contact person, with other details, has to be listed here.)
706

I.3. History of the institution (including the date of introduction and number of seats of various programmes of study alongwith the NBA accreditation, if any) in a tabular form:
Year Description --------- Institution started with the following programmes (intake strength) --------- NBA accreditation visits and accreditation granted, if any --------- Addition of new programmes, increase in intake strength of the existing programs and/or accreditation status

(Instruction: History of the institution and its chronological development along with the past accreditation records need to be listed here.)
707

I.4. Ownership status: Govt. (central/state) / trust / society (Govt./NGO/private) / private/ other: (Instruction: Ownership status of the institute has to be listed here.) I.5. Mission and Vision of the Institution: (The institution needs to specify its Mission and Vision). I.6. Organisational Structure: Organisational chart showing the hierarchy of academics and administration is to be included I.7. Financial status: Govt. (central/state) / grants-inaid / not-for-profit / private self-financing / other: (Instruction: Financial status of the institute has to be mentioned here.)
708

I.8. Nature of the trust/ society: Also list other institutions/colleges run by the trust/society (Instruction: Way of functioning and activities of the trust/society has to be listed here.)
Name of the Institution Year Location

I.9. External sources of funds:


Name of the external source CFY CFYm1 CFYm2 CFYm3

(Instruction: The different sources of the external funds over the last three financial years are to be listed here.)
709

I.10 Internally acquired funds:


Name of the external source CFY CFYm1 CFYm2 CFYm3

(Instruction: The different sources of the internal funds over the last three financial years are to be listed here.) I.11 Scholarships or any other financial assistance provided to students (Instruction: If any scholarship or financial assistance is provided to the students, then the details of such assistance over the last three financial years has to be listed here. Also mention needs to be made of the basis for the award of such scholarship). 710

Details
Category Scholarship Assistance Amount

CFY

CFYm1

CFYm2

CFYm3

I.12 Basis/criterion for admission to the institution: All India entrance / statelevel entrance / university entrance / 12th standard mark sheet / others: (Instruction: The basis/criterion for student intake has to be listed here.)
711

I.13 Total number of engineering students:


CAY
Total no. of boys: Total no. of girls: Total no. of students:

CAYm1

CAYm2

CAYm3

Total number of other students, if any (Instruction: Total number of engineering students, both boys and girls, has to be listed here. The data may be categorised in a tabular form under graduate or post graduate engineering, or other programme, if applicable.)
712

I.14 Total number of employees (Instruction: Total number of employees, both men and women, has to be listed here. The data may be categorised in a tabular form as teaching and supporting staff.) Minimum and maximum number of staff on roll in the engineering institution, during the CAY and the previous CAYs (1st July to 30th June):
713

A. Regular Staff
CAY
Items Min Max M

CAYm1

CAYm2

CAYm3
Min Max

Min Max Min Max

Teaching staff in Engineering


Teaching staff in science & humanities Non-teaching staff

F
M

F
M F

(Instruction: Staff strength both teaching and nonteaching over the last three academic years has to be listed here.)
714

B. Contract Staff
CAY Items Min Max Teaching staff in Engineering M F M F Min Max Min Max Min Max CAYm1 CAYm2 CAYm3

Teaching staff in science & humanities


Non-teaching staff

M
F
715

II. Departmental Information


II.1 Name and address of the department II.2 Name, designation, telephone numbers and e-mail address of the contact person for the NBA : II.3 History of the department including date of introduction and number of seats of various programs of study along with the NBA accreditation, if any.
Program
UG in..............

Description
Started with ................seats in ............. Intake increased to ............. in ............. Intake increased to ............. in ............. ...................................... ......................................
716

PG in ..............

MCA..............

II.4 Mission and Vision of the Department (The department is required to specify its Mission and Vision). II.5 List of the programs / departments which share human resources and/or the facilities of these programs /departments (in %): (Instruction: The institution needs to mention the different programs being run in the department which share the human resources and facilities with this department / program being accredited.)
717

II.6. Total number of students UG: PG:


II.7. Minimum and maximum number of staff on roll during the current and three previous academic years (1st July to 30th June) in the department :
Items
Teaching staff in the department Non-teaching staff Total
718

CAY Min Max

CAYm1 Min Max

CAYm2 Min

CAYm3

Max Min Max

II.8 Summary of budget for the CFY and the actual expenditure incurred in the CFYm1, CFYm2 and CFYm3 (for the Department)
Items Budg eted in CFY Actual expense s in CFY (till..) Budgeted in CFYm1 Actual BudgeExpens ted in es in CFYm2 CFYm1 Actual Budge- Actual Expens ted in Expens es in CFYm3 es in CFYm2 CFYm3

Laboratory equipment Software Laboratory consumables Maintenance and spares

Training & Travel


Miscellaneous expenses for academic activities

Total
719

III. Program Specific Information


III.1. Name of the Programme PG in______________ (List name of the programme, as it appears on the graduates certificate and transcript, and abbreviation used for the programme.) III.2. Title of the Degree (List name of the degree title, as it appears on the graduates certificate and transcript, and abbreviation used for the degree.) III.3. Name designation telephone number, and e-mail address of the Programme coordinator for the NBA:
720

III.4. History of the programme along with the NBA accreditation, if any:
Program
PG in.

Description
Started with ..seats in . Intake increased to .. In . Intake increased to in . Accredited in

III.5. Deficiencies, weaknesses/concerns from previous accreditations: III.6. Total number of students in the programme:
721

III.7. Minimum and maximum number of staff for current and three previous academic years (1st July to 30th June) in the programme :
CAY
Items Min Max
Teaching staff with the program Non-teaching staff

CAYm1
Min Max

CAYm2
Min

CAYm3

Max Min Max

722

III.8 Summary of budget for the CFY and the actual expenditure incurred in the CFYm1, CFYm2 and CFYm3 (exclusively for this programme in the department):
Items Budge ted in CFY Actual Budgeexpenses ted in in CFY CFYm1 (till..) Actual BudgeExpens ted in es in CFYm2 CFYm1 Actual Budge- Actual Expens ted in Expens es in CFYm3 es in CFYm2 CFYm3

Laboratory equipment Software Laboratory consumables Maintenance and spares

Travel
Miscellaneous expenses for academic activities

Total

723

PART B
CRITERION 1: VISION, MISSION AND PROGRAM EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES (75)
1.1 Vision and Mission (5) 1.1.1 State the Vision and Mission of the institute and department (1) (List and articulate the vision and mission statements of the institute and department) 1.1.2 Indicate how and where the Vision and Mission are published and disseminated (2) (Describe in which media (e.g. websites, curricula, books) the vision and mission are published and how these are disseminated among stakeholders)
724

1.1.3 Mention the process for defining Vision and Mission of the department (2) (Articulate the process involved in defining the vision and mission of the department from the vision and mission of the institute). 1.2 Programme Educational Objectives (10) 1.2.1 Describe the Programme Educational Objectives (PEOs) (1) (List and articulate the programme educational objectives of the programme under accreditation)
725

1.2.2 State how and where the PEOs are published and disseminated (1) (Describe in which media (e.g. websites, curricula, books) the PEOs are published and how these are disseminated among stakeholders.) 1.2.3 List the stakeholders of the programme (1) (List stakeholders of the programme under consideration for accreditation and articulate their relevance) 1.2.4 State the process for establishing the PEOs (3) (Describe the process that periodically documents and demonstrates that the PEOs are based on the needs of the programmes various stakeholders.)
726

1.2.5 Establish consistency of the PEOs with the Mission of the institute (4). (Describe how the programme educational objectives are consistent with the Mission of the department.) 1.3. Achievement of the Programme Educational Objectives (20) 1.3.1 Justify the academic factors involved in achievement of the PEOs (10) (Describe the broad curricular components that contribute towards achievement of the Programme Educational Objectives.)
727

1.3.2 Explain how administrative system helps in ensuring the achievement of the PEOs (10) (Describe the committees and their functions, working process and related regulations.) 1.4 Assessment of the achievement of Programme Educational Objectives (35)
1.4.1 Indicate tools and processes used in assessment of the achievement of the PEOs (5) Describe the assessment process that periodically documents and demonstrates the degree to which the Programme Educational Objectives are attained.
728

Also Include information on: a) A listing and description of the assessment processes used to gather the data upon which the evaluation of each programme educational objective is based. Example of data collection process may include, but are not limited to, employer surveys, graduate surveys, focus groups, industrial advisory committee meetings, or other processes that are relevant and appropriate to the programme; b) The frequency with which these assessment processes are carried out.
729

1.4.2 Provide the evidences for the achievement of the PEOs (30) a) The expected level of attainment for each of the programme educational objectives; b) Summaries of the results of the evaluation processes and an analysis illustrating the extent to which each of the programme educational objective is being attained; and c) How the results are documented and maintained. 1.5. Indicate how the PEOs have been redefined in the past (5) (Articulate with rationale how the results of the evolution of PEOs have been used to review/redefine the PEOs) 730

CRITERION 2. PROGRAMME OUTCOMES (250)


2.1. Definition and Validation of Course Outcomes and Programme Outcomes (20) 2.1.1. List the Course Outcomes(COs) and Programme Outcomes (POs) (1) (List the course outcomes of the courses in programme curriculum and programme outcomes of the programme under accreditation) 2.1.2. State how and where the POs are published and disseminated (1) (Describe in which media (e.g. websites, curricula, books, etc.) the POs are published and how these are disseminated among 731 stakeholders)

2.1.3. Indicate processes employed for defining the POs (3) (Describe the process that periodically documents and demonstrates that the POs are defined in alignment with the graduate attributes prescribed by the NBA.) 2.1.4. Indicate how the defined POs are aligned to Graduate Attributes prescribed by the NBA (7) (Indicate how the POs defined for the programme are aligned with the Graduate Attributes of NBA as articulated in accreditation manual.) 2.1.5. Establish the correlation between the POs and the PEOs (8) (Explain how the defined POs of the programme 732 correlate with the PEOs)

2.2. Attainment of Programme Outcomes (75) 2.2.1. Illustrate how the course outcomes contribute to the POs (5) (Provide the correlation between the course outcomes and the programme outcomes. The strength of the correlation may also be indicated) 2.2.2. Explain how modes of delivery of courses help in attainment of the Pos (5) (Describe the different course delivery methods/ modes (e.g. lecture interspersed with discussion, asynchronous mode of interaction, group discussion, project etc.) used to deliver the courses and justify the effectiveness of these methods for the attainment of the POs. This may be further justified using the indirect assessment methods such as course-end surveys.) 733

2.2.3. Indicate how assessment tools used to assess the impact of delivery of course/course content contribute towards the attainment of course outcomes/programme outcomes (15) (Describe different types of course assessment and evaluation methods (both direct and indirect) in practice and their relevance towards the attainment of POs.) 2.2.4. Indicate the extent to which project work/thesis contributes towards attainment of the POs (50) (Justify how the project works/thesis works carried out as part of the programme curriculum contribute towards the attainment of the POs.)
734

2.3. Evaluation of the attainment of Programme Outcomes (125)


2.3.1. Describe assessment tools and processes used for assessing the attainment of each PO (25)

Describe the assessment process that periodically documents and demonstrates the degree to which the Programme Outcomes are attained.
735

Also include information on:


a) A listing and description of the assessment processes used to gather the data upon which the evaluation of each the programme outcome is based . Examples of data collection processes may include, but are not limited to, specific exam questions, student portfolios, internally developed assessment exams, project presentations, nationally-normed exams, oral exams, focus groups, industrial advisory committee; b) The frequency with which these assessment processes are carried out.
736

2.3.2. Indicate results of evaluation of each PO (100) c) The expected level of attainment for each of the program outcomes; d) Summaries of the results of the evaluation processes and an analysis illustrating the extent to which each of the programme outcomes are attained; and e) How the results are documented and maintained. 2.4. Use of evaluation results towards improvement of the programme (30)
737

2.4.1.Indicate how the results of evaluation used for curricular improvements (5) (Articulate with rationale the curricular improvements brought in after the review of the attainment of the POs) 2.4.1.1. Indicate how results of evaluation used for improvement of course delivery and assessment (10) (Articulate with rationale the curricular delivery and assessment improvement brought in after the review of the attainment of the POs)
738

2.4.2. State the process used for revising/ redefining the POs (15) (Articulate with rationale how the results of the evaluation of POs have been used to review/redefine the POs in line with the Graduate Attributes of the NBA.)
739

CRITERION 3. PROGRAMME CURRIUCLUM (75)


3.1. Curriculum (15) 3.1.1. Describe the Structure of the Curriculum (5)
Curricular Composition Theory courses Laboratory courses Seminars Project works ------------------------credits

3.1.2. Justify how the curricular structure helps for the attainment of the POs and the PEOs (10) (Articulate how the curricular structure helps in the attainment of each PO and PEO) 3.2. Indicate interaction with R&D organisations / Industry (40) (Give the details of R&D organisations and industry involvement in the programme such as industry-attached laboratories and partial 740 delivery of courses and internship opportunities for students)

3.3. Curriculum Development (15)


3.3.1. State the process for designing the programme curriculum (5) (Describe the process that periodically documents and demonstrates how the programme curriculum is evolved considering the PEOs and the POs) 3.3.2. Illustrate the measures and processes used to improve courses and curriculum (10) (Articulate the process involved in identifying the requirements for improvement in courses and curriculum and provide the evidence of continuous improvement of courses and curriculum)
741

3.4. Course Syllabi (5) (Include, in appendix, a syllabus for each course used. Syllabi format should be consistent and shouldnt exceed two pages.) The syllabi format may include: Department, course number, and title of course Designation as a required or elective course Pre-requisites Contact hours and type of course (lecture, tutorial, seminar, project etc.,.) Course Assessment methods (both continuous and semester-end assessment) Course outcomes Topics covered Text books, and/or reference material 742

CRITERION 4. Students Performance (100)


4.1. Admission intake in the programme (15)
YEAR Sanctioned Number of Strength of Students the Admitted Programme Percentage of seats filled Number of Students Admitted with Valid GATE Score/PG entrance of State Percentage of Students with Valid GATE Score/PG entrance of State

CAY CAYm1 CAYm2 CAYm3

Average percentage of seats filled through approved procedure = Average percentage of students admitted with valid GATE Score/PG entrance of state =
743

YEAR

Number of Students Admitted

API = Academic Performance Index = Average CGPA or Average Marks on a Scale of 10 (Compiled from the Graduation Records)

CAY CAYm1

CAYm2
CAYm3

Average API =

744

4.1.1 Number of seats filled through the admission procedure approved by the University (5) Assessment will be based on average percentage of seats filled through approved procedure and points awarded to be proportionate accordingly. Assessment = 4.1.2 Quality of students as judged from their complete graduation records (5) Assessment = 1.5 x Average API 4.1.3 Number of students admitted having a valid GATE score/PG entrance of state (5) Assessment = 10 x (Average percentage of students admitted with valid GATE score/PG entrance of state)
745

4.2. Success Rate (20)


Provide data for the past three batches of students GI = Graduation Index
= (Number of students graduated from the programme) / (Number of students joined the programme)
YEAR Number of Students Graduated from the Programme Number of Students Joined the Programme GI

LYG LYGm1 LYGm2

Average GI = Assessment = 20 x Average GI

746

4.3. Academic Performance (20)


Academic Performance = 2 x API Where API = Academic Performance Index = Mean of Cumulative Grade Point Average of all successful Students on a 10 point CGPA System OR = Mean of the percentage of marks of all successful students / 10

747

Item

LYG (CAYm4)

LYGm1 (CAYm5)

LYGm2 (CAYm6)

Approximating the API by the following mid-point analysis 9 < Number of students with CGPA < 10.0 0 0 0

8 < Number of students with CGPA < 9.0


7<=8 6<=7

18
42 36

29
63 28

7
28 17

5<=6 Total Approximating API by Mid-CGPA


Mean of CGPA/Percentage of all the students (API)

5 101
7.72

1 121
7.4

3 55
7.17

Av. API = 7.43 Academic Performance = 2 x Av. API = 14.86

748

4.4 Placement and Higher Studies (20)


Assessment Points = 20 X (x + 3y) / N where x = Number of students placed, y = Number of students admitted for higher studies with valid qualifying scores/ranks, and N = Total number of students who were admitted in the batch to maximum assessment points = 20.
Item Number of admitted students corresponding to LYG(N) Number of students who obtained jobs as per the record in the industry/academia Number of students who opted for higher studies with valid qualifying scores/ranks (y) Assessment Points LYG LYGm1 LYGm2

Average Assessment Points = ________________

749

4.5 Professional Activities (25)


4.5.1. Membership in Professional societies/ Chapters and organizing engineering events (5) (Instruction: The institution may provide data for past three years). 4.5.2. Participation and their outcomes in international/national events (5) (Instruction: The institution may provide data for past three years). 4.5.3. Publication and awards in international/ national events (10) (Instruction: The institution may list the publications mentioned earlier along with the names of the editors, publishers, etc.). 4.5.4. Entrepreneurship initiatives and innovations (5) (Instruction: The institution may specify the efforts and achievements.) 750

CRITERION 5: FACULTY CONTRIBUTIONS (200)


List of Faculty Members: Exclusively for the Programme / Shared with other Programmes
Name of the faculty member Qualification, univers ity, and year of gradua -tion Design ation and date of joining the institution Distribution of teaching load (%) 1st Year UG PG Number of research publicatio ns in journals and conferen ces since joining IPRs R&D and consultancy work with amount Holding an incubation unit Interaction with outside world

(Instruction: The institution may complete this table for the calculation of the student-teacher ratio (STR). Teaching loads of the faculty member contributing to only undergraduate programme (2nd, 3rd, and 4th year) are considered to calculate the STR.)
751

5.1. Student-Teacher Ratio (STR) (20):


U1 = Number of Students in UG 2nd Year U2 = Number of Students in UG 3rd Year U3 = Number of Students in UG 4th Year P1 = Number of Students in PG 1st Year P2 = Number of Students in PG 2nd Year N1 = Total Number of Faculty Members in the Parent Department S = Number of Students in the Parent Department = U1 + U2 + U3 + P1 + P2 Student Teacher Ratio (STR) = S / N1 Assessment = [20 x 13 /STR], subject to maximum of 20.
Year CAYm2 CAYm1 CAY Average Assessment
752

U1

U2

U3

P1

P2

STR

Assessment

5.2 Faculty strength in PG programme (20)


X = Number of faculty members with Ph.D available for PG Programme Y = Number of faculty members with Ph.D. / M.Tech. / M.E available for PG Programme Assessment will be done on the basis of the number of faculty members with Ph.D./M.Tech./ M.E., available for the PG programme. [Minimum number suggested: 4]
X CAY CAYm1 CAYm2 Y Assessment

Assessment = 20 x [X/Y] Average Assessment =

753

5.3. Faculty Qualifications (30)


Assessment where, FQI = = = 6 x FQI Faculty Qualification Index (10x + 6y + 4z0) / N2 such that, x+y+z0 N2; and z0 z

where, x
y z

=
= =

Number of faculty members with Ph. D.


Number of faculty members with M. E. / M. Tech. Number of faculty members with B. E. / B. Tech.

x
CAYm2 CAYm1

FQI

Assessment

CAY

Average Assessment

5.4. Faculty Competencies correlation to Programme Curriculum (15) (Indicate the faculty competencies (specialisation, research publication, course developments etc.) to 754 correlate the programme curriculum)

5.5. Faculty as participants/resource persons in faculty development/

training activities (15) (Instruction: A faculty member scores maximum five points for a participation/ resource person.) Participant/resource person in two week faculty development programme: 5 points Participant/resource person in one week faculty development programme: 3 points
Name of the faculty Max. 5 per faculty

CAYm2

CAYm1

CAY

Sum
N (Number of faculty positions required for an STR Assessment = 3 x Sum/N Average assessment
755

5.6

Faculty Retention (15)


Assessment = where, RPI = = 3 x RPI / N Retention Point Index Points assigned to all faculty members

where points assigned to a faculty member = 1 point for each year of experience at the institute but not exceeding 5.
Item
Number of faculty members with experience < 1 year (x0) Number of faculty members with 1 to 2 years experience (x1) Number of faculty members with 2 to 3 years experience (x2) Number of faculty members with 3 to 4 years experience (x3) Number of faculty members with 4 to 5 years experience (x4) Number of faculty members with experience > 5 years (x5) N

CAYm2

CAYm1 CAY

RPI = x1 + 2x2 + 3x3 + 4x4 + 5x5 Assessment Average Assessment


756

5.7. Faculty Research Publications (FRP) (30)


Assessment of FRP = 6 (Sum of the research publication points scored by each faculty member) / N

(Instruction: A faculty member scores maximum five research publication points depending upon the quality of the research papers and books published in the past 3 years).

The research papers considered are those: (i) which can be located on Internet and/or are included in hard-copy volumes/ proceedings, published by reputed publishers, and (ii) the faculty members affiliation, in the published papers/books, is of the current institution.
757

Include a list of all such publications and IPRs along with details of DOI, publisher, month/year, etc.
Name of the faculty (contributing to FRP)
FRP points (Max. 5 per faculty) CAYm2 CAYm1 CAY

Sum N (Number of faculty positions required for an STR of 15)

Assessment FRP = 6 x Sum/N


Average Assessment
758

5.8. Faculty Intellectual Property Rights (FIPR) (10)


Assessment of FIPR = 2(Sum of the FIPR points scored by each faculty member) / N (Instruction: A faculty member scores maximum five FIPR points each year. FIPR includes awarded national/international patents, design and copyrights.)
Name of faculty member (contributing to FIPR) ................. ................. ................. Sum N Assessment of FIPR = 2x Sum/N Average Assessment
759

FIPR points (max. 5 per faculty member) CAYm2 CAYm1 CAY

5.9 Funded R & D Projects and Consultancy (FRDC) work (30)


Assessment of R&D and Consultancy projects = 6 (Sum of FRDC by each faculty member) / N. (Instruction: A faculty member scores maximum 5 points, depending upon the amount). A suggested scheme is given below for a minimum amount of Rs. 1 lakh: 5 points for funding by national agency, 4 points for funding by state agency/private sector, 2 points for funding by the sponsoring trust/society

Name of faculty member (contributing to FRDC)


.................

FRDC points (max. 5 per faculty )


CAYm2 CAYm1 CAY

................. Sum N Assessment of FRDC = 4x Sum/N Average Assessment


760

5.10. Faculty Interaction with Outside World (15)


FIP = Faculty Interaction Points Assessment = 3 x (Sum of FIP by each faculty member) / N (Instruction: A faculty member gets maximum 5 Interaction Points, depending upon the type of Institution or R&D laboratory or industry, as follows)
5 points for interaction with a reputed institution abroad, institution of eminence in India, or National Research Laboratories, 3 points for interaction with institution/industry (not covered earlier).
761

Points to be awarded, for those activities, which result in joint efforts in publication of books/research paper, pursuing externally funded R&D / consultancy projects and / or development of semester-long course / teaching modules.
Name of faculty member (contributing to FIP)
................. ................. Sum N Assessment of FIP = 3 x Sum/N Average Assessment
762

FIP points
CAYm2 CAYm1 CAY

CRITERION 6: FACILITIES AND TECHNICAL SUPPORT (75)

Description of class rooms, faculty rooms, seminar and conference halls: (Entries in the following table are sampler entries).
Room Description Usage Shared / Capacity Rooms Exclusive Equipped with PC, Internet, Book rack, meeting space

No. of Classrooms: Tutorial rooms: No. of Seminar rooms: No. of Meeting rooms: No. of Faculty rooms:

Classroom for 2nd Year

763

6.1. Classrooms in the Department (15) 6.1.1 Adequate number of rooms for lectures (core/ electives), seminars, tutorials, etc for the program (5) (Instruction: Assessment based on the information provided in the preceding table.) 6.1.2 Teaching aids multimedia projectors, etc. (5) 6.1.3 Acoustics, classroom size, conditions of
chairs/benches, air circulation, lighting, exits, ambiance, and such other amenities/facilities (5)

(Instruction: Assessment based on the information provided in the preceding table and the inspection thereof.)
764

6.2

Faculty Rooms in the Department (15)


(Instruction: Assessment based on the information provided in the preceding table).

6.2.1 Availability of individual faculty rooms (5)

6.2.2 Room equipped with white/black board, computer, Internet, and such other amenities/facilities (5) (Instruction: Assessment based on the information provided in the preceding table.)
765

6.2.3 Usage of room for counseling/discussion with students (5)


(Instruction: Assessment based on the information provided in the preceding table and the inspection thereof.)

The following table is required for the subsequent criteria.


Lab Description in the curriculum Exclusive use / shared Space, Number of Number of experiments students Quality of Laboratory instruments manuals

766

6.3.

Laboratories in the Department to meet the Programme Curriculum Requirements and the POs (30)

6.3.1 Adequate, well equipped laboratories to meet the curriculum requirements and the POs (10) (Instruction: Assessment based on the information provided in the preceding table.) 6.3.2 Availability of department (5) computing facilities in the

(Instruction: Assessment based on the information provided in the preceding table.)


767

6.3.3. Availability of research facilities to conduct project works/thesis work (5) (Articulate the facilities provided to carry out the project works/thesis).

6.3.4. Availability of laboratories with technical support within and beyond working hours (5)
(Instruction : Assessment based on the information provided in the preceding table.) 6.3.5. Equipment to run experiments and their maintenance, number of students per experimental setup, size of the laboratories, overall ambience, etc. (5) (Instruction: Assessment based on the information 768 provided in the preceding table.)

6.4. Technical Manpower Support in the Department (15)


Name Designa of the tion technical staff Payscale
Exclusive/ Shared Work

Date of Joining

Qualification

At Joining

Now

Other Technic al Skills gained

Respon sibility

6.4.1 Availability of adequate and qualified technical supporting staff for programme-specific labs (10)

(Instruction: Assessment based on the information provided in the preceding table.) 6.4.2 Incentives, skill upgrade and professional advancement (5) (Instruction: Assessment based on the information provided in the preceding table.)
769

CRITERION 7. TEACHING-LEARNING PROCESS (75)


7.1. Evaluation process: course work (25) 7.1.1 Evaluation Process Class test / mid - term test schedules and procedures for systematic evaluation, internal assessments. (10) Assessment is based upon the efficacy of the evaluation process being followed. Relevant data may be inserted here. Assessment = 7.1.2 Seminar and Presentation Evaluation (10) Assessment is based upon the methodology being followed and its effectiveness Assessment =
770

7.1.3 Performance and Feedback (3) Assessment is based upon effective implementation of the following activities: Post-semester feedback to students on their performance Extra care for poor performers and remedial classes Comparison of mid and end semester performance Relevant data may be inserted here Assessment = 7.1.4 Mechanism for addressing evaluation related grievances (2) Assessment is based upon the efficacy of the mechanism being followed. Relevant data may be inserted here. Assessment = 771

7.2 Evaluation Process: Project Work / Thesis (25) Details of Thesis Allocation, Evaluation Presentation:
Year Name of Candidate Name of Supervisor/ Joint supervisor Title of Whether Thesis Evaluation Committee was Constituted (Yes/No) Name of the External Member

and

Thesis Presentation Dates

7.2.1 Allocation of Students to Eligible Faculty Members (supervisors) [10] Assessment = 7.2.2 Constitution of Evaluation Committee with at least One External Member [10] Assessment = 7.2.3 Schedule Showing Thesis Presentation at least twice during the semester [5] 772 Assessment =

7.3

TEACHING EVALUATION AND FEEDBACK SYSTEM [10] 7.3.1 Guidelines for Student Feedback System [3] Assessment is based upon the effectiveness of the guidelines for student feedback system. The design and effective implementation of the guidelines are essential for student feedback system. Assessment =
773

7.3.2 Analysis of Feedback by HOD and the Faculty [2]


Assessment is based upon the methodology being followed for analysis of feedback and its effectiveness. Assessment = 7.3.3 Corrective Measures and Implementation Followed [5] Assessment is based upon the effectiveness of the implementation of the corrective measures and subsequent follow-up. Assessment =
774

7.4

Self-learning beyond syllabus and outreach activities [15] 7.4.1. Scope for self-learning (5) (Instruction: The Institution needs to specify the scope for self-learning/learning beyond syllabus and creation of facilities for self learning / learning beyond syllabus.) 7.4.2. Generation of self-learning facilities, and availability of materials for learning beyond syllabus (5) (Instruction: The institution needs to specify the facilities for self-learning / learning beyond syllabus.)
775

7.4.3. Career Guidance, Training, Placement, and Entrepreneurship Cell (5) (Instruction: The institution may specify the facility and management to facilitate career guidance including counseling for higher studies, industry interaction for training/ internship/ placement, Entrepreneurship cell and incubation facility and impact of such systems)
776

CRITERION 8: GOVERNANCE, INSTITUTIONAL SUPPORT, AND FINANCIAL RESOURCES (75)


8.1 Campus Infrastructure and Facility (5) 8.1.1 Maintenance of academic infrastructure and facilities (2) (Instruction: Specify distinct features) 8.1.2 Hostels (boys and girls), transportation facility and canteen (1)
Hostels
Hostel for Boys

No. of rooms

No. of Students accommodated

Hostel for Girls


777

8.1.3 Electricity, power backup, telecom facility, drinking water and security (2)
(Instruction Specify the details of installed capacity, quality, availability, etc.)

8.2
8.2.1

Organization, Governance Transparency (10)

and

Governing body, administrative setup and functions of various bodies (2) (Instruction: List the governing, senate, and all other academic and administrative bodies; their member ships, functions, and responsibilities; frequency of the meetings; and attendance therein, in a tabular form. A few sample minutes of the meetings and action taken reports should be annexed.) 778

8.2.2 Defined rules, procedures, recruitment, and promotional policies, etc. (2)
(Instruction: List the published rules, policies, and procedures; year of publications; and state the extent of awareness among the employees/ students. Also comment on its availability on Internet, etc.)

8.2.3

Decentralization in working including delegation of financial power and grievance redressal system (3)
(Instruction: List the names of the faculty members who are administrators/decision makers for various responsibilities. Specify the mechanism and composition of grievance redressal system, including faculty association, staff-union, if any.)779

8.2.4 Transparency and availability of correct/ unambiguous information (3)


(Instruction: Availability and dissemination of information through the Internet. Information provisioning in accordance with the Right To Information Act, 2005).

8.3

Budget Allocation, Utilization and Public Accounting (10) Summary of current financial years budget and the actual expenditure incurred (exclusively for the institution) for three previous financial years
780

Item
Infrastructural built-up

Budgeted in CFY

Expense in CFY (till)

Expenses Expenses in CFYm1 in CFYm2

Library
Laboratory Equipment Laboratory consumables Teaching and non-teaching staff salary R&D Training and Travel Other, specify.....

Total

(Instruction: The preceding list of items is not exhaustive. One may add other relevant items if applicable.)

781

8.3.1 Adequacy of budget allocation (4) (Instruction: Here the Institution needs to justify that the budget allocated over the years was adequate.) 8.3.2 Utilization of allocated funds (5) (Instruction: Here the Institution needs to state how the budget was utilized during the last three years.) 8.3.3 Availability of the audited statements on the Institutes website (1) (Instruction: Here the Institution needs to state whether the audited statements are available on its web site.) 8.4 Programme Specific Budget Allocation, Utilisation (10) Summary of budget for the CFY and the actual expenditure incurred in the CFYm1 and CFYm2 (exclusively for this programme in the department): 782

Items

Budgeted Actual in CFY expenses in

Budgeted in CFYm1

CFY (till...)

Actual Budgeted Actual Expenses in CFYm2 Expenses in CFYm1 in CFYm2

Laboratory equipment

Software
R&D Laboratory consumables

Maintenance and spares


Training and Travel

Miscellaneous expenses for academic activities


Total
783

8.4.1 Adequacy of budget allocation (3) (Instruction: Here the institution needs to justify that the budget allocated over the years was adequate.) 8.4.2 Budget allocation for Research facilities (4) (Instruction : Articulate the provisions in the budget to carry out the research by post graduate students.) 8.4.3 Utilisation of allocated funds (3) (Instruction: Here the institution needs to state how the budget was utilised during the last three years.)
784

8.5 Library (20)


8.5.1 Library space and ambience, timings and usage, availability of a qualified librarian and other staff, library automation, online access, networking, etc. (5) (Instruction: Provide information on the following items).
Carpet area of library (in m2) Reading space (in m2 ) Number of seats in reading space Number of users (issue book) per day Number of users (reading space) per day Timings: During working day, weekend, and vacation Number of library staff Number of library staff with degree in Library Management Computerization for search, indexing, issue/return records Bar-coding used Library services on Internet/Intranet INDEST or other similar membership 785 Archives

8.5.2 Titles and volumes per title (4) Number of titles ......................... volumes ........................
Number of new titles added CFYm2 CFYm1 CFY Number of new editions added

Number of
Number of new volumes added

8.5.3 Scholarly journal subscription specific to the programme (3)


(Instruction: Indicate the journals subscribed/ available specifically for this programme)
786

8.5.4 Digital library (3)


Availability of digital library contents: If available, then mention number of courses, number of e-books, etc. Availability of an exclusive server: Availability over Intranet/Internet: Availability of exclusive space/room: Number of users per day:

8.5.5 Library expenditure on books, magazines/journals, and miscellaneous contents (5)


Year
Book

Expenditure
Magazine / journals (for hard copy subscription) Magazine / journals (for soft copy subscription) Misc. Contents

Comments, if any

CFYm2 CFYm1 CFY


787

8.6

Incubation facility (5) (Instruction: Specify the details of incubation facility in terms of capacity, utilisation terms and conditions, usage by students) 8.7 Internet (5) Name of the Internet provider: Available bandwidth: Access speed: Availability of Internet in an exclusive lab: Availability in most computing labs: Availability in departments and other units: Availability in faculty rooms: Institutes own e-mail facility to faculty/students: Security/privacy to e-mail/Internet users: (Instruction: The institute may report the availability of Internet in the campus and its quality of service.) 788

8.8

Safety Norms and Checks (5)

8.8.1 Checks for wiring and electrical installations for leakage and earthing (1) 8.8.2 Fire fighting measures : Effective safety arrangements with emergency/ multiple exits and ventilation / exhausts in auditoriums and large class rooms/laboratories, fire fighting equipment and training, availability of water, and such other facilities. (1) 8.8.3 Safety of Civil Structure (1)
789

8.8.4

Handling of hazardous chemicals and such other activities (2) (Instruction: The institution may provide evidence that it is taking enough measures for the safety of the civil structures, fire, electrical installations, wiring, and safety of handling and disposal of hazardous substances. Moreover, the institution needs to show the effectiveness of the measures that it has developed to accomplish these tasks.)
790

8.9 Counseling and Emergency Medical Care and First-aid (5) Availability of counseling facility
Arrangement for emergency medical care

Availability of first-aid unit (Instruction: The institution needs to report the availability of the facilities discussed here)
791

CRITERION 9: CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT (75)


This criterion essentially evaluates the improvement of the different indices that have already been discussed in earlier sections. From 9.1 to 9.5 the assessment calculation can be done as follows: If a,b,c are improvements in percentage during three successive years, assessment can be calculated as
Assessment = (b-a)/(100-min (b,a)) + (c-b)/(100-min(c,b))

9.1 Improvement in Success Index of Students (5) From 4.2


Items
Success Index (SI)
792

LYG

LYGm1

LYGm2

Assessment

9.2 Improvement in Academic Performance Index of Students (5)

From 4.3
Items
API (Academic Performance Index)

LYG

LYGm1

LYGm2

Assessment

9.3 Improvement in Student-Teacher Ratio (5) From 5.1


Items STR (StudentTeacher Ratio) CAY CAYm1 CAYm2 Assessment

793

9.4 Enhancement of Faculty Qualification Index (5) From 5.3


Items
FQI (Faculty Qualification Index)

LYG

LYGm1

LYGm2

Assessment

9.5 Improvement in Faculty Research Publications, R&D Work, Consultancy and Testing Work (10)
From 5.7 and 5.9
Items LYG LYGm1 LYGm2 Assessment

FRP (Faculty Research Publications)


FRDC
794

9.6 Continuing Education (10)


In this criterion, the Institution needs to specify the contributory efforts made by the faculty members by developing the course/laboratory modules, conducting short-term courses/ workshops, etc., for continuing education during the last 3 years.
Any other Resource Module contributory Developed/ Duration Persons Description institute/ organized by industry ................. .................. Target Audience Usage and citation, etc.

Assessment =

795

9.7 New Facility Created (15) Specify new facilities created during the last 3 years for strengthening the curriculum and/or meeting the POs:
9.8 Overall Improvements since last accreditation, if any, otherwise, since commencement of the Program (20) Specify the overall improvement:
Specify the strengths/ weaknesses
Improvements brought in Contributed by

List the PO(s), which are strengthened

Comments, if any

CAY CAYm1 CAYm2 .. ..


796

Declaration
The head of the institution needs to make a declaration as per the format given below: This Self-Assessment Report (SAR) is prepared for the current academic year (__________) and the current financial year (_________________) on behalf of the institution. I certify that the information provided in this SAR is extracted from the records and to the best of my knowledge, is correct and complete.
797

I understand that any false statement/information of consequence may lead to rejection of the application for the accreditation for a period of two or more years. I also understand that the National Board of Accreditation (NBA) or its subcommittees will have the right to decide on the basis of the submitted SAR whether the institution should be considered for an accreditation visit.
798

If the information provided in the SAR is found to be wrong during the visit or subsequent to grant of accreditation, the NBA has right to withdraw the grant of accreditation and no accreditation will be allowed for a period of next two years or more and the fee will be forfeited. I undertake that the institution shall cooperate with the visiting accreditation team, shall provide all desired information during the visit and arrange for the meeting as required for accreditation as per the NBAs provision.

799

I undertake that, the institution is well aware of the provisions in the NBAs accreditation manual concerned for this application, rules, regulations and notifications in force as on date and the institute shall fully abide by them.
Place: Date: Signature, Name, and Designation of the Head of the Institution with seal
800

16.
GUIDELINES AND OPERATING PRACTICES FOR ACCREDITATION VISIT AND EVALUATION

FOR
PG ENGINEERING PROGRAMMES

(TIER-I)
JANUARY, 2013
801

TIER I EVALUATION GUIDELINES, NBA


CRITERION 1: Vision, Mission and Program Educational Objectives 75

Minimum qualifying points: 45


Item Item no. description
1.1. Mission and Vision

Points
5

Evaluation guidelines/ award of points


1.1.1.Listing and articulation of the vision and mission statements of the institute and department (1) 1.1.2.Description of media (e.g. websites, curricula, books) in which the vision and mission are published and how these are disseminated among stakeholders (2) 1.1.3.Articulation of the process involved in defining the vision and mission of the department from the vision and mission of the institute (2)
802

1.2. Program Educational Objectives

10

1.2.1. Listing and articulation of the program educational objectives of the program under accreditation (1) 1.2.2. Description of media (e.g. websites, curricula books) in which the PEOs are published and how these are disseminated among stakeholders (1) 1.2.3. Listing of stakeholders of the program under consideration for accreditation and articulation of their relevance (1) 1.2.4. Description of the process that documents and demonstrates periodically that the PEOs are based on the needs of the programs stakeholders (3) 1.2.5. Description as to how the Program Educational Objectives are consistent with the Mission of the department (4)
803

1.3. Achievement 20 1.3.1. Description of the of Program broad curricular Educational components that Objectives

contribute towards the achievement of the Program Educational Objectives (10) 1.3.2. Description of the committees and their functions, working processes and related regulations (10)

804

1.4. Assessment of achievement of Program Educational Objectives

35 1.4.1. Description of the assessment process that documents and demonstrates periodically the degree to which the Program Educational Objectives are attained Information on: (a) listing and description of the assessment processes used to gather the data upon which the evaluation of each program educational objective is based. Examples of data collection processes may include, but are not limited to, employer surveys, graduate surveys, focus groups, industrial advisory committee meetings, or other processes that are relevant and appropriate to the program; (b) The frequency with which these assessment processes are carried out (5)
805

1.4.2. Details of evidence that the PEO have been achieved:


a) The expected level of achievement for each of the program educational objectives; b) Summaries of the results of the evaluation processes and an analysis illustrating the extent to which each of the program educational objectives has been achieved ; and c) How the results are documented and maintained (30)
806

1.5.

Indicate how PEOs have been redefined

1.5.1. Articulation with rationale as to how the results of the evaluation of the PEOs have been used to review/redefine the PEOs (5)

807

CRITERION 2: Program Outcomes 250 Minimum qualifying points: 150


Item Item Points no. description 2.1. Definition and Validation of Course Outcomes and Program Outcomes 20 Evaluation guidelines/ award of points

2.1.1.Listing of the course outcomes of the courses in program curriculum and program outcomes of the program under accreditation (1) 2.1.2. Description of media (e.g. websites, curricula, books) in which the POs are published and how these are disseminated among stakeholders (1) 808

2.1.3. Description of the process that documents and demonstrates periodically that the POs are defined in alignment with the graduate attributes prescribed by the NBA (3) 2.1.4. Details as to how the POs defined for the program are aligned with the Graduate Attributes of the NBA as articulated in the accreditation manual (7) 2.1.5. Correlation of the defined POs of the program with the PEOs (8)
809

2.2. Attainment of Program Outcomes

75 2.2.1. Correlation

outcomes outcomes. The strength of the correlation is to be indicated. (5) 2.2.2. Description of the different course delivery methods/modes (e.g. lecture interspersed with discussion, asynchronous mode of interaction, group discussion, project etc.) used to deliver the courses and justify the effectiveness of these methods for the attainment of the POs. This may be further justified using the indirect assessment methods such as course-end surveys. (5) 810

between the course and the program

2.2.3. Description of different types of course assessment and evaluation methods (both direct and indirect) in practice and their relevance towards the attainment of the POs. (15) 2.2.4.Justify how the various project works carried as part of the program curriculum contribute towards the attainment of the POs. (50)
811

2.3.

Evaluation of attainment of Program


Outcomes

125 2.3.1. Description

of the Evaluation processes that documents and demonstrates periodically the degree to which the Program Outcomes are being attained. Information on: (a) listing and description of the evaluation processes used to gather the data upon which the evaluation of each program outcome is based. Examples of data collection processes may include, but are not limited to, specific exam questions, student portfolios, internally developed assessment exams, senior project presentations, nationallynormed exams, oral exams, focus groups, industrial advisory committee and (b)the frequency with which these evaluation processes are carried out (25) 812

2.3.2. Information on: a) The expected level of attainment for each of the program outcomes; b) Summaries of the results of the evaluation processes and an analysis illustrating the extent to which each of the program outcomes are attained; and c) How the results are documented and maintained (100)
813

2.4. Use of 30 2.4.1. evaluation results towards improvem 2.4.2. ent of


programme

Articulation with rationale the curricular improvements brought in after the review of the attainment of the POs (5) Articulation with rationale the curricular delivery and evaluation improvements brought in after the review of the attainment of the POs (10) 2.4.3. Articulation with rationale how the results of the evaluation of the POs have been used to review/redefine the POs in line with the Graduate Attributes of the NBA (15) 814

CRITERION 3: Program Curriculum 75

Minimum qualifying points:


Item Item no. description 3.1. Curriculum Points

45

Evaluation guidelines/ award of points

15

3.1.1. Structure of the curriculum (5) 3.1.2. Articulation with rationale how the structure of curriculum helps in attainment of the Pos and the PEOs(10)

3.2.

Indicate interaction with Industry/ R&D organisatio n

40

3.2.1. Details of industrys/ R&D organization involvement in the program such as industry-attached laboratories and partial delivery of courses and internship opportunities for students (40)
815

3.3. Curriculum

15

Develop ment

3.3.1. Description of the process that periodically documents and demonstrates periodically how the program curriculum is evolved considering the PEOs and the POs (5) 3.3.2. Details of the process involved in identifying the requirement for improvement in courses and curriculum and provide the evidence of continuous improvement of courses and curriculum (10)

3.4. Course

Syllabi

3.4. Syllabus for each course and also provide the details of the syllabi format (5)
816

CRITERION 4: Students Performance 100 Minimum qualifying points: 60


Item Item Points no. description
4.1 Admission intake in the programme 15

Evaluation guidelines/ award of points


Assessment will be based on average percentage of seats filled through approved procedure (5) Assessment will be based on quality of the students from their UG/graduation records (5) Assessment will be based on average percentage of students filled through state/GATE entrance exam (5) Success rate = 20 x Mean of success index (SI) for past three batches SI = (No. of students who cleared the program in the minimum period of course duration)/(No. of students admitted in the first year and students admitted in that batch via lateral entry)
817

4.2

Success rate

20

4.3. Academic performance

4.4. Placement and higher studies

Assessment = 2 x API where, API = Academic performance index = Mean of CGPA of all the students on a 10-point CGPA system or = (Mean of the percentage of marks of all students)/10 20 Assessment = 20(x + 3 y)/N where x = No. of students placed, y = No. of students admitted for the higher studies. N = No. of students admitted in the first year and students admitted via lateral entry in that batch subject to max. assessment points = 20
818

20

4.5.

Professional activities

25

4.4.1. Membership in Professional societies/ chapters and organising engineering events (5) 4.4.2. Participation and awards in international/national events (5) 4.4.3. Publications and awards in international / national events (10) 4.4.4. Entrepreneurship initiatives, innovations (3)
819

CRITERION 5: Faculty Contributions 200 Minimum qualifying points: 120


Item no. 5.1. Item description Student Teacher Ratio Points 20 Evaluation guidelines/ award of points

Assessment = 20 x 13/STR; subject to max. assessment at 20 Where, STR = (U1 + U2 + U3 + P1 + P2)/N1 U1 = No. of students in 2nd year of the program U2 = No. of students in 3rd year of the program U3 = No. of students in 4th year of the program P1 = No. of students in PG first year P2 = No. of students in PG second year
N1 = Total no. of faculty members in the program (considering the fractional load)
820

5.2. Faculty 20 Assessment = 20 x (X/Y) strength in X = Number of faculty members with PG Ph.D available for PG programme programme Y = Number of faculty members with Ph.D./Mech./M.E available for PG Programme
5.3. Faculty 30 Assessment = 6 x FQI Qualificatio Faculty qualification index (FQI) = ns (10x + 6y + 4z0)/N2 where, x + y + z0 N2, z0 Z X = No. of faculty members with PhD Y = No. of faculty members with M.E/M.tech. Z = No. of faculty members with B.E/B.tech/MSc
821

5.4. Faculty Competenc ies correlation to Program curriculum

15 5.4.1. Programme curriculum satisfies

the applicable program criteria specified by the appropriate American professional association such as ASME, IEEE and ACM

5.4.2. Listing of the program specific criteria and the competencies (specialisation, research publications, course developments etc. of faculty to correlate the program specific criteria and competencies)

822

5.5. Faculty as 15 Participant/resource person in two participant week faculty development program. (5) s/resource persons in Participant/resource person in one faculty week faculty development program (3) developme Assessment = 3 x SUM / N nt/training activities 5.6. Faculty retention 15 Assessment = 3 x RPI/N Retention Point Index (RPI) = Sum of the retention points to all faculty members One retention point for each year of experience at the institution, subject to maximum five points to a faculty member.
823

5.7. Faculty 30 Faculty points in Research Publications (FRP) Research Assessment of FRP = 6 x (Sum of the research Publications publication points scored by each faculty member)/N
(Instruction: A faculty member scores maximum five research publication points each year, depending upon the quality of the research papers published in the past three years.) The research papers considered are those (i) which can be located on internet and/or are included in hard copy volumes/proceedings, published by well known publishers, and (ii) the faculty members affiliation, in the published paper, is of the current institution.
824

5.8. Faculty Intellectual Property Rights

10 Faculty points in IPR (FIPR) Assessment of FIPR = 2 (Sum of the FIPR points scored by each faculty member)/N

(Instruction: A faculty member scores maximum five FIPR points each year. IPR includes awarded national/international patents, books, and copyrights
825

5.9. Funded R&D Projects and consultancy (FRDC) work

30

Faculty Points in R&D and consultancy work (FRDC) Assessment of R&D and consultancy projects = 6(Sum of FRDC by each faculty member)/N Instruction: A faculty member gets maximum five points each year, depending upon the amount of the funds and/or the contributions made. A suggestive scheme is given below for a minimum amount of Rs.1.0 lakh: Five points for funding by national agency Four points for funding by state agency/private sector Two points for funding by the sponsoring trust/society

826

5.10.

Faculty interaction with outside world

15 Faculty Interaction Points (FIP) assessment = 3(Sum of FIP by each faculty member)/N

827

CRITERION 6: Facilities and Technical support 75

Minimum qualifying points:


Item no. 6.1. Item description Classrooms in the department
Points

45

Evaluation guidelines/ award of points

15

6.1.2. Adequate number of rooms for lectures (Core / electives), seminars, tutorial, etc., for the program (5) 6.1.3. Teaching aids multimedia projectors, etc. (5) 6.1.4. Acoustics, classroom size, conditions of chairs/benches, air circulation, lighting, exits, ambience, and such other amenities/facilities (5)
828

6.2. Faculty 15 rooms in the departme nt

6.2.1.Availability of individual faculty rooms (5) 6.2.2.Room equipped with white / black board, computer, Internet, and other such amenities/ facilities (5) 6.2.3.Usage of room for discussion / counselling with students (5)

829

6.3. Laboratori es in the departme nt to meet the program curriculum requireme nts and the POs

30

6.3.1. Adequate well equipped laboratories to run all the program-specific curriculum (10) 6.3.2. Availability of computing facilities for the department exclusively (5) 6.3.3. Availability of research facilities to conduct project works/ thesis (5) 6.3.4. Availability of laboratories with technical support within and beyond working hours (5) 6.3.5. Equipments to run experiments and their maintenance, number of students per experimental setup, size of the laboratories, overall ambience, etc. (5) 830

15 6.4.1. Availability 6.4. Technical of adequate manpower and qualified technical support in supporting staff for the program specific department laboratories (10)

6.4.2. Incentives, skill upgrade, and professional advancement (5)

831

CRITERION 7: Teaching Learning Process 75 Minimum qualifying points: 45


Item no. 7.1. Item Points description Evaluation process: course work 25 Evaluation guidelines/ award of points Evaluation Process Class test / mid-term test schedules and procedures for systematic evaluation, internal assessments (10) Performance and Feedback (3) Mechanism for addressing evaluation related grievances (2) Seminar and Presentation Evaluation (10) Allocation of Students to Eligible Faculty Members (supervisors) (10) Constitution of Evaluation Committee with at least One External Member (10) Schedule Showing Thesis Presentation at least twice during Semester (5) 832

7.2.

Evaluation process: Project work / Thesis

25

10 Assessment is based on the effectiveness evaluatio of the guidelines for student feedback n and system. (3) feedback Assessment is based on the methodology system being followed for analysis of feedback and its effectiveness (2) Assessment is based on the effectiveness of the implementation of the corrective measures (5) 7.4. Self15 Scope for self-learning (5) learning Generation of self-learning facilities, and beyond availability of materials for learning syllabus beyond syllabus (5) and Career Guidance, Training, Placement, and outreach Entrepreneurship Cell (5) activities
7.3. Teaching
833

CRITERION 8: Governance, Institutional Support and Financial Resources 75 Minimum qualifying points: 45
Item no. 8.1. Item description Campus infrastructur e and facility
Points

Evaluation guidelines/ award of points

8.1.1. Maintenance of academic infrastructure and facilities (2) 8.1.2. Hostel (boys and girls), transportation facility and canteen (1) 8.1.3. Electricity, power backup, telecom facility, drinking water, and security (2)
834

8.2. Organisation, governance, and transparency

10

8.2.1.Governing body, administrative setup, and functions of various bodies (2) 8.2.2. Defined rules, procedures, recruitment, and promotional policies, etc. (2) 8.2.3. Decentralisation in working and grievance redressal system (3) 8.2.4. Transparency and availability of correct/ unambiguous information (3)
835

8.3.

Budget allocation, utilisation, and public accounting

10

8.4.

Program Specific Budget Allocation Utilisation

10

8.3.1. Adequacy of budget allocation (4) 8.3.2. Utilisation of allocated funds (5) 8.3.3. Availability of detailed audited statements of all the receipts and expenditures publicly (1) 8.4.1. Adequacy of budget allocation (3) 8.4.2. Budget allocation for research facilities (4) 8.4.3. Utilisation of allocated funds (3)

836

8.5.

Library

8.6.

Incubati on facility

20 8.5.1. Library space and ambience, timings and usage, availability of a qualified librarian and other staff, library automation, online access, and networking (5) 8.5.2. Titles and volumes per title (4) 8.5.3. Scholarly journal subscriptions specific to the programme (3) 8.5.4. Digital library (3) 8.5.5. Library expenditure on books, magazines / journals, and miscellaneous contents (5) 5 8.6.1 Details of the specification of the incubation facility in terms of capacity, utilisation terms and conditions, usage by students point mission (5) 837

8.7. Internet

05

8.6.1. Sufficient and effective internet access facility with security and privacy (5) 8.7.1. Checks for wiring and electrical installations for leakage and earthing (1) 8.7.2. Fire-fighting measures : Effective safety arrangements with emergency/ multiple exits and ventilation/exhausts in auditoriums and large classrooms/ labs, fire-fighting equipments and training, availability of water and such other facilities (1) 8.7.3. Safety of civil structures/ buildings/ catwalk/ hostels, etc. (1) 8.7.4. Handling of hazardous chemicals and such other hazards (2) 838

8.8. Safety norms and Checks

05

8.9. Counselling and emergency medical care and first-aid

05

8.8.1. Availability of counselling facility 8.8.2. Arrangement for emergency medical care 8.8.3. Availability of first-aid unit

839

CRITERION 9: Continuous Improvement 75

Minimum qualifying points:


Item Item no. description 9.1. Improvement in Success Index of students Points 5

45
Evaluation guidelines

9.2. Improvement in Academic Performance Index of students

9.1.1. Points must be awarded in proportion to the average improvement in computed SI (in 4.2) over three years. 9.2.1. Points must be awarded in proportion to the average improvement in computed API (in 4.3) over three years.
840

9.3. Improvem ent in STR

5 9.3.1. Points must be awarded in proportion to the average improvement in computed STR (in 5.2) over three years.

9.4. Enhancem 5 9.4.1. Points must be awarded in ent of proportion to the average Faculty improvement in computed Qualificati FQI (in 5.3) over three years. on Index
841

9.5. Improvemen 10 9.5.1. Points must be awarded in t in faculty proportion to the combined research average improvement in publication, computed FRP (in 5.7) and FRDC R&D, and (5.9) over three years. consultancy
9.6. Continuing education 10 9.6.1. Points must be awarded

in proportion to participation in continuing education (contributing to course modules and conducting and attending short-term courses and workshops) programs to gain and/or disseminate their knowledge in their areas of expertise
842

9.7. New

15 9.7.1. New facilities in terms of facility infrastructure/ created equipment/ facilities added to augment the program. 9.8. Overall 20 9.7.2. Points must be awarded improvem based on the strengths ent since and weaknesses last mentioned in the last accreditati accreditation visit, and on, if any, how those were otherwise, since addressed and/or efforts establishm made.
ent
843

17. LIST OF DOCUMENTS / RECORDS TO BE MADE AVAILABLE DURING THE VISIT (Instruction: Records of three years to be made available, wherever applicable) The following list is just a guideline. The Institution may prepare its own list of documents in support of the SAR that it is submitting. The soft copy of these documents (in the form of statements and list only) may be appended with SAR.
844

Institute Specific
I.1. Land papers, built-plan and approval etc. I.2. Composition of governing, senate and other academic and administrative bodies; their functions; and responsibilities. List of all the meetings held in the past 3 years along with the attendance records. Representative minutes and action taken reports of a few meetings of such bodies along with the list of current faculty members who are members of such bodies.
845

I.3. Rules, policies and procedures published by the Institution including service book and academic regulations and others along with the proof that the employees/students are aware of the rules and procedures. I.4. Budget allocation and utilization, Audited statement of accounts. I.5. Informative web site. I.6. Library resources books and journal holdings.
846

I.7. Listing of core, computing and manufacturing, etc., labs. I.8. Records of T & P and career and guidance cells. I.9. Records of safety checks and critical installations. I.10. Medical care records and usages of ambulance, etc. I.11. Academic calendar, schedule of tutorial and makeup classes.
847

I.12. Handouts/files along with outcomes, list of additional topics to meet the outcomes. I.13. Set of question papers, assignments, evaluation schemes etc. I.14. Feedback form, analysis of feedback, and corrective actions. I.15. Documented feedback received from the stakeholders (e.g., Industries, Parents, Alumni, Financiers etc.) of the Institution. I.16. List of faculty who teach first year courses along with their qualifications. I.17. Results of the First Year students.
848

Program Specific
Each program for which an institution seeks accreditation or reaccreditation must have in place the following:
P.1 NBA accreditation reports of the past visits, if any P.2 Department budget and allocations of the (past 3 years data) P.3 Admission seats filled and ranks (last 3 years data) P.4 List/Number of students who have cleared the program in 4years (last 3 years data) P.5 Average Grade point (CGPA) (last 3 years data of students CGPA/ percentage) P.6 Placement and higher studies data (last 3 years data)
849

P.7 Professional society activities, events, conferences organized, etc. P.8 List of students papers along with hardcopies of the publications; professional society publications/ magazines, etc. P.9 Sample best and average project reports/theses P.10 Details of student-facutly ratio P.11 Faculty details with their service books, salary details, sample appointment letters, promotion and award letters/certificates
850

P.12 Faculty list with designation, qualification, joining date, publication, R & D, interaction details P.13 List of faculty publications along with DOIs and publication/citation details P.14 List of R & D and consultancy projects along with approvals and project completion reports
P.15 List and proofs of faculty interaction with outside world
851

P.16 List of class rooms, faculty rooms P.17 List of program-specific laboratories and computing facility within the department. P.18 List of non-teaching staff with their appointment letters etc. P.19 List of short-term courses, workshops
arranged and course modules developed.

P.20 Records of new program-specific facility created, if any


852

P.21 Records of overall program-specific improvements, if any P.22 Curriculum, POs, PEOs, Mission, and Vision statements P.23 Correlation of Outcomes with PEOs P.24 Correlation of Course Outcomes with the POs P.25 Course files, plan of course delivery, question papers, answer scripts, assignments, reports of assignments, project reports, report of design projects, list of laboratory experiments, reports of laboratory experiments, etc.
853

P.26. Rubrics developed to validate the POs. P.27. Continuous improvement in the PEOs P.28. Improvement in curriculum for correlating the POs and the PEOs P.29. Direct and indirect assessment methods to show attainment of the POs P.30. Stakeholders involvement in the process of improvement of the PEOs and the POs P.31. Collected forms of various indirect assessment tools (e.g. alumni survey, employer survey) P.32. Any other documents which may be necessary to evaluate the SAR.
854

18. SAMPLE QUESTIONS BY THE EVALUATION TEAM FOR NBA ACCREDITATION TO THE HEAD OF INSTITUTION

How is equitable distribution of funds to departments ensured? How does research activity have linkages and benefits to undergraduate program? Are research scholars and PG students used in tutorials and laboratory demonstration? Do they receive any training?
855

What are faculty workloads like? How do you balance the workload between teaching and research? What are the strategic directions for engineering? In which direction is engineering headed at your institution? Is the level of industry input to program design and targeted graduate outcomes adequate?
856

TO THE DEAN / HEAD OF DEPARTMENT/ PROGRAM COORDIANTORS How are academic faculty involved in the program design? What is the level of faculty development adapted to improve quality of teaching? How many are involved? How many members of the faculty are involved in the internship scheme?
857

What happens if somebody is ill or wants to take a period of study leave? How many members of faculty are involved in the Foundations of Teaching and Learning program? Describe your role and responsibilities. How many of you are involved in the academic leadership course for Course Coordinators? How is program review initiated and implemented? When does industry interaction begin?

858

How much does program review involve academic faculty? Tell us about the balance between the coverage of discipline specific and engineering practice in the First Year. What are the strategic directions for engineering? How do you feel about the quality of laboratories and the level of student engagement?
859

To what extent are laboratories and facilities useful for practical learning and project work? What might be development directions and prioritization? Is the quantum and quality of laboratory practice consistent with the needs of an engineering graduate? Are the laboratory equipment and computers properly maintained? Is supporting staff adequate for these activities?
860

Are you aware of the specified program outcomes? What progress has been made on tracking the development, throughout the program, of graduate attributes? What do you see as the positives associated with this program? What are the characteristics that make this program good or unique? What are your views of the capabilities of your students at the time they complete their studies?

861

What are your views on the employability of your students? Where is professional development being delivered (writing, communication and research skills, teamwork, project management, etc)? Is it embedded throughout the program? Is there sufficient student elective choice in the program? Would more be better?
862

Is the development of engineering design skills adequate? How is design embedded into the program? How are the issues of engineering ethics, sustainability and the environment covered throughout the program? Are the students exposed to issues related to globalisation and changing technologies?

863

What proportion of final year projects are industry based? How are they supervised and managed? What proportion of final year projects is research-oriented? Is the course material made available to students? Where do students perform their assignment work? Are separate working spaces for group work available?

864

What are the modern tools used for teaching? Are students able to learn better from power point presentations? How much exposure is to local industry practice such as guest presentations, teaching by visiting faculty, site visits, industry problem solving, case studies, and industry projects occurring?
865

Are these events prescribed as part of the overall educational design, or simply included on the initiative of the local program/course coordinator? How is exposure to professional practice monitored and assessed? What site visits are offered? Are site visits active for the students?
866

What opportunities are being grasped in industrial design and project work to take advantage of industry topics or input? Are industry based projects supervised or co-supervised by industry people? Does industry sponsor the project work? Do all students undertake an internship or industrial training? Describe the reporting mechanisms and assessment requirements.
867

What are the overall quality mechanisms that ensure appropriateness of outcomes? How are academic faculty involved in achieving Graduate Attributes? What is the evidence of progress being made on mapping student learning outcome to POs, including mapping of the outcomes to the Graduate Attributes?
868

What efforts are made to ensure that assessment truly assesses the student learning outcomes in each subject? How are course outcomes and assessment measures at the unit level tracked to close the loop, on delivery of targeted graduate outcomes? What are the roles of the Program Coordinator, course coordinators and academic faculty in program review and quality improvement?
869

How often does the faculty meet as a teaching team to discuss program improvement issues? To what extent is improvements made from student feedback? Are course outcomes demonstrating closure of the quality loop at course and program levels? State the level of industry input to program design and targeted graduate outcomes.

870

What is the impact of the advisory committee on contextualising the program to local and global needs? What are the mechanisms available for formal/documented student feedback? How is student feedback obtained? Do students receive feedback on actions taken? Are issues of graduate outcomes, curriculum design and improvement discussed?

871

What are other consultation mechanisms? How does the faculty respond to the outcomes of student/unit surveys? What changes have been made to the program as a result of your evaluation? What is the process used for making changes to the program outcomes? How does the faculty credentials relate to the PEOs and POs?
872

Is the quantum and quality of laboratory practice consistent with the needs of an engineering graduate? How active is the industry-institute interaction partnership cell? What program changes have been made from the input by industry-institute interaction partnership cell? What are the strengths and weaknesses of your department and support departments? Are any major curriculum changes planned? What? When?

873

What are the major needs for growth and development of the curriculum? Do you make recommendations for faculty salary and increments? How much time is available to the faculty for professional development? What is the budget for faculty professional development? Are faculty sent abroad under faculty exchange program?
874

TO FACULTY
How does research activity have linkages and benefits to undergraduate program? Are research scholars and PG students used in tutorials and laboratory demonstration? Do they receive any training? How do you ensure that appropriate assessment techniques are being used? What assessment moderation processes are used? Is there any senior project work?

875

What professional development (Teaching & Learning related) have you received? What are faculty workloads like? How do you balance your load between teaching and research? What are the good things that are happening in the program? What are the unwanted things that are happening in the program? What program educational objectives and program outcomes do the courses you teach support?

876

Are you involved in the assessment/evaluation of program educational objectives and program outcomes? How? Are you involved in program improvements? How? Is there sufficient student elective choice in the programs? Would more choice be advisable?
877

How is the Honors' program different from the graduate program? Is the development of engineering design skills adequate? How is design embedded into the program? How are the issues of engineering ethics, sustainability and the environment, and business studies covered throughout the program? Are the students exposed to issues related to globalization and changing technologies?
878

What proportion of final year projects are industry based? How are they supervised and managed? Are lectures recorded and made available to students? How do you ensure that appropriate assessment techniques are being used? How much time do you spend on professional development? What professional society are you a member of? Are you active? Do you hold any office?

879

Does the same instructor usually teach both lecture and laboratory portions of related courses? If not, how do they coordinate? Is the salary structure satisfactory? What additional benefits are included? What unique or unusual teaching methods are used in your department?
880

Do you maintain regular contacts with industry? How? How has the industry institute partnership cell affected POs? Are the support departments providing appropriate educational services for your students? Is there adequate secretarial and technician service available to you?
881

How do you balance your load between teaching and research? Have you acquired any additional qualification to provide effective teaching? How is your industrial experience, if any, relevant to this program? What is your role in the continuous improvement of the program?
882

What are the roles of the Head of the Department, Course coordinators and staff members in program review and quality improvement? How often does the staff meet as a teaching team to discuss program improvement issues? What are other consultation/ grievances mechanisms available?
883

TO STUDENTS How has your educational experience measured up to your expectations? Comment on facilities such as laboratory, IT access, information resources and project work. Are you providing feedback as part of a quality/program improvement mechanism? To what extent does the program provide for your personal and professional capabilities development?
884

Are there measures of your personal development and performance such as team-work, leadership, management, communication and presentation skills, self learning capacity etc? Are these systematically addressed in courses studied? Have issues such as globalization, ethics and sustainable practices been addressed yet? What improvement would you make if you had a magic wand?

885

Did you make use of online learning facilities? What are they? Do they make a difference? Do you feel that you have an understanding of the targeted outcomes for your program and the real nature of engineering practice in your chosen domain?
How was this understanding established?
886

How successful are faculty members as role models of the professional engineer? How accessible are faculty? Did you get exposure to sessions or guest lectures by practising professionals? Are these well organised and well presented? What do you think are the key attributes an employer would be looking for in a graduate engineer?

887

How effective are subject/unit outline documents in communicating and interlinking objectives, learning outcomes, activities and assessment strategies within individual units? Is assessment well coordinated with objectives and targeted learning outcomes within academic units?
888

Are there other avenues of embedded professional practice exposure other than placement activities such as industry visits, field trips, industry assignments, case studies, industry based projects etc? Is there sufficient exposure to professional practice? How effective is laboratory learning? Are experiments prescriptive or open ended?

889

What has been the nature of project-based learning activity in the program? Have you been confronted with multidisciplinary, open-ended, complex projects? Has it been necessary to consider factors such as social, environmental, safe practices and ethical matters? Have you been involved in any team based learning activities yet? Have you become a good team player and/or team leader? Are you assessed for your team performance?
890

What input do you have to the quality system, through surveys, input to the processes of educational design and continuous improvement? Is your feedback effective? Does it bring about change? Do you hear about improvement made? What skills are you expected to acquire at the time of graduation? Comment on attainment of program educational objectives.

891

To what extent does the program provide for your personal and professional capabilities development? Are there measures of your personal development and performance such as team-work, leadership, management, communication and presentation skills, self learning capacity etc? Are these systematically addressed in subjects studied?
892

Are you acquiring the expected/ required skills? Are the faculty members competent in the subjects they teach? Are faculty members available and helpful to you at times convenient to you? Why did you choose this institution/ department/ program? Are the laboratory equipment/tools/ accessories well-maintained?

893

How good is the hands-on experience? Do you plan to continue your education after graduation? Where? When? Do you plan to accept a job after graduation? Where ? When?
894

What type of job can you get as a graduate of this program? At what salary? What is your overall view of the program? Would you recommend it to a friend? Are you providing feedback as part of a quality/ program improvement mechanism?
895

16. Case Study Self Assessment Report (SAR) for Accreditation of B.Tech. programme in Mechanical Engineering by NBA Tier - I

896

PART A
No.

Sub No.

Particulars

Page No.

I. Institutional I.1. Information

Name and address of the institution and affiliating university

I.2.
I.3.

Name, designation, telephone number, and email address of the contact person for the NBA
History of the institution (including the date of introduction and number of seats of various programmes of study along with the NBA accreditation, if any) in a tabular form Ownership status: Government (central/state) / trust / society (Government/NGO/private) / private/ other Mission and Vision of the Institution

1
1

I.4.

I.5

3
897

No.

Sub No. I.6. I.7.

Particulars Organisational Structure Financial status: Government (central/state) / grants-in-aid / not-for-profit /private selffinancing / other Nature of the trust/society External sources of funds Internally acquired funds Scholarships or any other financial assistance provided to students? Basis/criterion for admission to the institution Total number of engineering students Total number of employees Declaration

Page No. 4 5

I.8. I.9. I.10. I.11. I.12. I.13. I.14.

5 5 5 6 6 6 6 8
898

No.

Sub No.

Particulars
Name and address of the department Name, designation telephone number, and e-mail address of the contact person for interaction with NBA History of the department including date of introduction and number of seats of various programmes of study along with the NBA accreditation, if any and Vision of the Department List of the programmes/ departments which share human resources and/or the facilities of this department/programme (in %) Total number of students Minimum and maximum number of staff on roll during the current and two previous academic years (1st July to 30th June) in the department

Page No.
9 9

II. II.1. Departmental II.2. Information II.3.

II.4. II.5.

9 10

II.6. II.7.

10 10

899

III. Programme Specific information

III.1. III.2. III.3.

Name of the Programme Title of the Degree Name, designation, telephone numbers, and email address of the Programme coordinator for the NBA

11 11 11

III.4. III.5. III.6. III.7.

History of the programme along with the NBA accreditation, if Deficiencies, weaknesses/concerns from previous accreditations Total number of students in the programme Minimum and maximum number of staff for the current and three previous academic years (1st July to 30th June) in the programme Summary of budget for the CFY and the actual expenditure incurred in the CFYm1 and CFYm2 (exclusively for this programme in the department)

12 12 12 12

III.8.

13

900

PART B
No. Sub No. Particulars
and Vision (5) 1.1.1. State the Vision and of the institute and department 1.1.2. Indicate how and where the Vision and are published and disseminated 1.1.3. Mention the process for defining Vision and of the department Programme Educational Objectives (15) 1.2.1. Describe the Programme Educational Objectives (PEOs) 1.2.2. State how and where the PEOs are published and disseminated 1.2.3. List the stakeholders of the programme 1.2.4. State the process for establishing the PEOs 1.2.5. Establish consistency of the PEOs with the 1. Vision, and 1.1. Programme Educational Objectives(PE O) (100) Page No. 13 13

14
14 14 14 15 15 15 15
901

1.2.

No.

Sub No. 1.3.

Particulars Attainment of Programme Educational Objectives (30) 1.3.1. Justify the contributions of the Programme Curriculum towards attainment of the PEOs 1.3.2. Explain how administrative system helps in ensuring the attainment of the PEOs

Page No. 16 16

17

1.4.

Assessment of the attainment of Programme Educational Objectives (40) 1.4.1. Indicate tools and processes used in assessment of the attainment of the PEOs 1.4.2. Give evidence for the attainment of the PEOs

18 18

21
902

2. Programme 2.1. Definition and Validation of Course Outcomes and Outcomes () Programme Outcomes(30) (225) 2.1.1. List the Course Outcomes(COs) and Programme Outcomes (POs) 2.1.2. State how and where the POs are published and disseminated 2.1.3. Indicate processes employed for defining the Pos 2.1.4. Indicate how the defined POs are aligned to the Graduate Attributes prescribed by the NBA 2.1.5. Establish the correlation between the POs and the PEOs 2.2. Attainment of Programme Outcomes (40) 2.2.1. Illustrate how course outcomes contribute to the POs 2.2.2. Explain how modes of delivery of courses help in attainment of the Pos 2.2.3. Indicate how assessment tools used to assess the impact of delivery of course/course content contribute towards the attainment of course outcomes/programme outcomes 2.2.4. Indicate the extent to which the laboratory and project course work are contributing towards attainment of the POs

22 22 23 23 23 26 26 26 26 26

27
903

2.3.

Assessment of the attainment of Programme Outcomes (125) 2.3.1. Describe assessment tools and processes used for assessing the attainment of each

28 28

2.4.

2.3.2. Indicate results of assessment of each Use of assessment results towards improvement of programme (30)

28 29
29

2.4.1. Indicate how results of assessment used for curricular improvements

2.4.2. Indicate how results of assessment used for improvement of course delivery and assessment
the process used for revising/redefining the Pos

31

31
904

3. 3.1. Programme 3.1.1. Curriculum 3.1.2. (125) 3.1.3. 3.2.

Curriculum (20) Describe the structure of curriculum Give the prerequisite flow chart of courses Justify how the programme curriculum satisfies the programme specific Criteria State the components of the curriculum and their relevance to the POs and the PEOs (15) core engineering courses and their relevance to POs including design experience (60)

32 32 40 42 42 49 52 53 53 53

3.4. 3.5.

3.6.

Indicate Industry interaction / internship (10) Curriculum Development (15) 3.5.1. State the process of designing the programme curriculum 3.5.2. Illustrate the measures and processes used to improve curriculum Course Syllabi (5)

53
905

4. Students 4.1. Performance 4.2. (75) 4.2.1 4.3.

Success Rate (20) Academic Performance (20)

61 62

Placement and Higher Studies (20) Professional Activities (15) 4.3.1. Professional societies / chapters and organising engineering events
4.3.2. Organisation of paper contests, design contests, etc. and achievements 4.3.3. Publication of technical magazines, newsletters, etc. 4.3.4 Entrepreneurship initiatives, product designs and innovations

63 63 63
63

66 67

4.3.5. Publications and awards in interinstitute events by students of the programme of study

68

906

5. Faculty 5.1. Contributions 5.2. (175) 5.3. 5.4. 5.5.

Student-Teacher Ratio (STR) (20) Faculty Cadre Ratio (20) Faculty Qualifications (30) Faculty Competencies correlation to Programme Specific Criteria (15) Faculty as participants/resource persons in faculty development training activities (15) Faculty Retention (15) Faculty Research Publications (FRP) (20)

71 76 76 76 78

5.6. 5.7.

79 80

5.8.
5.9.

Faculty Intellectual Property Rights (FIPR) (10)


Funded R&D Projects and Consultancy (FRDC) Work (20)

81
81 82
907

5.10. Faculty Interaction with Outside World (10)

6. Facilities 6.1. Classrooms in the Department (20) and 6.1.1. Adequate number of rooms for lectures Technical (core/electives), seminars, tutorials, etc., for Support (75) the program 6.1.2. Teaching aids---multimedia projectors, etc. 6.1.3. Acoustics, classroom size, conditions of chairs/benches, air circulation, lighting, exits, ambience, and such other amenities/facilities 6.2. Faculty Rooms in the Department (15) 6.2.1. Availability of individual faculty rooms 6.2.2. Room equipped with white / black board, computer, Internet, and such other amenities/facilities 6.2.3. Usage of room for counselling/ discussion with students 6.4.2. Incentives, skill-upgrade, and professional advancement

84 86

86 86

86 86 86

86 89
908

6.3. Laboratories in the Department to meet the Curriculum Requirements and the POs (25) 6.3.1. Adequate, well-equipped laboratories to meet the curriculum requirements and the POs 6.3.2. Availability of computing facilities in the department 6.3.3. Availability of laboratories with technical support within and beyond working hours 6.3.4. Equipments to run experiments and their maintenance, number of Students per experimental setup, size of the laboratories, overall ambience, etc. 6.4. Technical Manpower Support in the Department (15) 6.4.1. Availability of adequate and qualified technical supporting staff for programmespecific laboratories 6.4.2. Incentives, skill-upgrade, and professional advancement

87 87

87 87 88

88 89

89
909

7. Academic 7.1. Academic Support Units (35) Support Units 7.1.1. Assessment of First Year Student Teacher Ratio (FYSTR) and Teaching 7.1.2. Assessment of Faculty Qualification Teaching First Learning Year Common Courses Process (75) 7.1.3. Basic science/engineering laboratories (adequacy of space, number of students per batch, quality and availability of measuring instruments, laboratory manuals, list of experiments) 7.1.4. Language laboratory 7.2. Teaching Learning Process (40) 7.2.1. Tutorial classes to address student questions: size of tutorial classes, hours per subject given in the time table 7.2.2. Mentoring system to help at individual levels 7.2.3. Feedback analysis and reward / corrective measures taken, if any 7.2.4. Scope for self-learning 7.2.5. Generation of self-learning facilities, and availability of materials For learning beyond syllabus 7.2.6. Career Guidance, Training, Placement, and Entrepreneurship Cell 7.2.7. Co-curricular and Extra-curricular Activities 7.2.8. Sports grounds, facilities, and qualified sports instructors

91 93 93 93

94 94 94

95 95 96 96 96 97 97 910

8. Governance, 8.1. Institutional Support and Financial Resources (75) 8.2.

8.3.

8.4.

Campus Infrastructure and Facility (10) 8.1.1. Maintenance of academic infrastructure and facilities 8.1.2. Hostel (boys and girls), transportation facility and canteen 8.1.3. Electricity, power backup, telecom facility, drinking water and security Organisation, Governance and Transparency (10) 8.2.1. Governing body, administrative setup and functions of various bodies 8.2.2. Defined rules, procedures, recruitment and promotional policies, etc. 8.2.3. Decentralisation in working including delegation of financial power And grievance redressal system 8.2.4. Transparency and availability of correct/unambiguous information Budget Allocation, Utilisation, and Public Accounting (10) 8.3.1. Adequacy of budget allocation 8.3.2. Utilisation of allocated funds 8.3.3. Availability of the audited statements on the institutes website Program Specific Budget Allocation, Utilisation (10) 8.4.1. Adequacy of budget allocation 8.4.2. Utilisation of allocated funds

97 98 98 99 99 99 108 109 111 112 113 113 113 113 113 113

911

8.5.

8.6. 8.7.

Library (20) 8.5.1. Library space and ambience, timings and usage, availability of a Qualified librarian and other staff, library automation, online access, networking etc. 8.5.2. Titles and volumes per title 8.5.3. Scholarly journal subscription 8.5.4. Digital library 8.5.5. Library expenditure on books, magazines/journals, and miscellaneous contents Internet (5) Safety Norms and Checks (5) 8.7.1. Checks for wiring and electrical installations for leakage and earthing and such other facilities 8.7.2. Fire - fighting measurements: Effective safety arrangements with emergency / multiple exits and ventilation/ exhausts in auditorium and large classrooms/ laboratories, fire fight equipment and training, availability of water and such b other facilties. 8.7.3. Safety of civil structure 8.7.4. Handling of hazardous chemicals and such other activities Counselling and Emergency Medical Care and First-aid (5)

113 113

114 114 114 115 115 115 115

115

116 116

8.8.

116 912

9. Continuous Improvement (75)

117 9.1. Improvement in Success Index of Students (5)


9.2. Improvement in Academic Performance Index of Students (5) 9.3. Improvement in Student-Teacher Ratio (5) 9.4. Enhancement of Faculty Qualification Index (5) 9.5. Improvement in Faculty Research Publications, R&D Work and Consultancy Work (10) 9.6. Continuing Education (10) 9.7. New Facility Created (15) 9.8. Overall Improvements since last accreditation, if any, otherwise, since the commencement of the program me (20)

117
117 117 117 118 119 131 132

Criterion X

Program Outcomes and Assessment (100)

133
913

II. Departmental Information II.1. Name and address of the department: Department of Mechanical Engineering, (Name of the Institute) _______________________, (Name of the Place) _______________________, II.2. Name, designation, telephone number, and e mail address of the contact person for the NBA: (Name of the Principal) _______________________, (Name of the Institute and Place) _______________, Telephone No. (College): Telephone No. (City Office): Cell Number: Fax No: E-mail: 914

II.3. History of the department including dates of introduction and number of seats of various programmes of study along with the NBA accreditation, if any:
Program
B.Tech in Mechanical Engineering

Description
Started with 60 seats in the year 1997 Intake increased to 120 in 2005 Intake increased to 180 in the year 2012

M.Tech in CAD/CAM
M.Tech in Nano Technology

Started with 18 seats in the year 2004


Started with 24seats in the year 2012
915

II.4. Mission and Vision of the Department VISION OF THE DEPARTMENT:


1. To become a deemed university for effectively responding to skills in demand in the industry and R & D Organizations. 2. To emerge as a premier centre of CAD/CAM by 2015

MISSION: To excel as a centre of Higher Education in the field of Mechanical Engineering. Producing highly motivated, technically competent, morally strong graduates with deep roots in our culture and with ability to respond to global challenges, thereby delighting all stakeholders namely parents, employers and humanity at large.
916

II.5. List of the programmes/ departments which share human resources and/or the facilities of this programmes/ departments (in %): Human resources and other facilities are exclusively for the department. However the department deputes faculty members for service courses of other department and also services from other departments namely: 1. Electronics and Communication Engineering Department 2. Electrical and Electronics Engineering Department
917

II.6. Total number of students: B.Tech Program in Mechanical Engineering: 540 II.7. Minimum and maximum number of staff on roll during the current and three previous academic years (1st July to 30th June) in the department:
CAY 2012 Items CAYm1 CAYm2 CAYm3

Min

Max

Min

Max

Min

Max

Min

Max

Teaching staff in the department

36

40

36

41

29

37

25

30

Non-teaching staff

12

12

12

12

12

12

12

12
918

II.8. Summary of budget for the CFY and the actual expenditure incurred in the CFYm1, CFYm2 and CFYm3 (for the Department):
Actual expenses in CFY (till ) Rs. Budgeted in CFY Actual expenses RS. Actual Expenses in CFYm1 Rs. Actual Expenses in CFYm2 Rs.

Items
Laboratory equipment Software

760840 72000 72000 75000 75000 80000 80000

Laboratory consumable 174406 Maintenance and spares Travel Miscellaneous expenses for academic activities Total

919

Actual Expenses in CFYm3 Rs.

Budgeted in CFYm1 Rs.

Budgeted in CFYm2 Rs.

Budgeted in CFYm3 Rs.

III. Programme Specific information III.1. Name of the Programme B.TECH in MECHANICAL ENGINEERING III.2. Title of the Degree: B.TECH (MECHANICAL RNGINEERING) III.3. Name, designation, telephone number, and email address of the Programme coordinator for the NBA: Name:____________________ PROF & HEAD, MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
Telephone:

Email:
920

III.4. History of the programme along with the NBA accreditation, if any:
Program B.Tech. Mechanical Engineering Description Started with 60 seats in year 1997 Intake increased to120 in 2005 Intake increased to 180 in 2012 Accredited in 2003 Accredited in 2007

III.5. Deficiencies, weaknesses / concerns from previous accreditations: 1. The administration needs to be more transparent and younger faculty should be involved in decisionmaking.
921

2. Powers should be decentralized and delegated in order to bring more transparency and effective utilization of resources. 3. Residential accommodation for faculty and hostel facilities need to be constructed in the campus. 4. The budget for maintenance and consumables needs to be enhanced. 5. Other resources viz., departmental offices, canteen, transport and medical facilities need to be improved. 6. The supporting staff with adequate qualifications should be appointed in adequate numbers.
922

7. Proper transparent policy for recruitment, scales, promotion and awards for supporting staff should be designed and implemented. 8. Students should be motivated to appear in competitive examinations like GATE, CAT and GRE. 9. Syllabus needs to be qualitatively revised by including tutorial, basic science and humanities component. 10.Campuswide computer network facility needs to be developed.
923

III.6. Total number of students in the programme: 540 III.7. Minimum and maximum number of staff for the current and three previous academic years (1st July to 30th June) in the programme:
Items Teaching staff in the program Non-teaching staff CAY Min 36 Max 40 CAYm1 Min 36 CAYm2 CAYm3 Max Min Max Min Max 41 29 37 25 30

12

12

12

12

12

12

12

12
924

III.8. Summary of budget for the CFY and the actual expenditure incurred in the CFYm1, CFYm2 and CFYm3 (exclusively for this programme in the department):
Actual expenses in CFY (till ) RS

Actual Expenses in CFYm1 Rs.

Actual Expenses in CFYm2 Rs.

Items
Laboratory equipment Software Laboratory consumable Maintenance and spares Travel Miscellaneous expenses for academic activities Total

760840 174406 145000

72000

72000

75000

75000

80000

80000

935246 145000

72000

72000

75000

75000

80000

80000
925

Actual Expenses in CFYm3 Rs.

Budgeted in CFY 2012 Rs.

Budgeted in CFYm1 Rs.

Budgeted in CFYm2 Rs.

Budgeted in CFYm3 Rs.

PART B
CRIETRION 1: Vision, Mission and Programme Educational Objectives (100) 1.1 Vision and Mission (5) 1.1.1 State the Vision and Mission of the institute and department (1)

Vision of the institute: To emerge as a leading world-class institution of higher education by way of realizing excellence in the chosen fields of technical and other disciplines through teaching, research and consultancy steeped in values.
926

Mission of the institute: 1. To continue to be a continuous learning organization through rigorous and exciting research environment for expanding knowledge in chosen fields. 2. To offer world-class education, research, training programmes and consultancy activity reflecting the superior quality of the faculty and students in the chosen fields of technical & other disciplines with emphasis on culture and to respond to the changing global competitive environment. 3. To serve the industry, other institutions and the society through norms and highest professional standards.
927

4. To offer assistance to nearby villages, thereby help them to come out of their economic and social botherations and also offer training to improve their employability. Mission of the Department: To excel as a centre of Higher Education in the field of Mechanical Engineering. Producing highly motivated, technically competent, morally strong graduates with deep roots in our culture and with ability to respond to global challenges, thereby delighting all stakeholders namely parents, employers and humanity at large.
928

Vision of the department: 1. To become a deemed university for effectively responding to skills in demand in the industry and R & D Organizations. 2. To emerge as a premier centre of CAD/CAM by 2015 1.1.2. Indicate how and where the Vision and Mission are published and disseminated (2) Displayed in all the class rooms, laboratories, staff rooms, and offices of the department. Displayed on the department notice boards. Published in college website, department newsletters, and course files.
929

Explained to students and their parents as part of the induction programme. Explained to newly joined faculty and staff members during a staff orientation programme. 1.1.3. Mention the process for defining Vision and Mission of the department (2) Based on the needs of local and global employers, industry, advances in Technology and opportunities for higher studies, the department has defined the Vision and Mission.
930

1.2. Programme Educational Objectives (15) 1.2.1. Describe the Programme Educational Objectives (PEOs) (2)

I. Preparation: To prepare students to excel in postgraduate programs or to succeed in industry / technical profession through global, rigorous education. II. Core Competencies: To provide students with a solid foundation in mathematical, scientific and engineering fundamentals required to solve engineering problems and also to pursue higher studies.
931

III. Breadth: To train students with good scientific and engineering breadth so as to comprehend, analyze, design, and create novel products and solutions for the real life problems. IV. Professionalism: To inculcate in students professional and ethical attitude, effective communication skills, teamwork skills, multidisciplinary approach, and an ability to relate engineering issues to broader social context V. Learning Environment: To provide student with an academic environment aware of excellence, leadership, written ethical codes and guidelines, and the life-long learning needed for a successful professional career.
932

1.2.2. State how and where the PEOs are published and disseminated (2) Displayed in the offices of the department. Published in college website and student handbooks. Explained to students and their parents as part of the induction programme. 1.2.3. List the stakeholders of the programme (1) Students Alumni Faculty and Staff members Employers (Government, Industry, Universities)
933

1.2.4. State the process for establishing the PEOs (5) The PEOs were designed keeping in view the vision, mission of the Institute and the department. Continuous feedback mechanism from the stakeholders has been designed to validate the relevance and effectiveness of established PEOs. The college academic committee identifies the need for improving the PEOs based on the feedback obtained from the stakeholders. The changes proposed by the college academic committee are recommended to the college governing body for approval. The modified PEOs are implemented after they are approved by the governing council.
934

1.2.5. Establish consistency of the PEOs with the Mission (5)


Learning Environment Professionali sm Core Competence Preparation Breadth
Programme Educational Objectives

Components of Mission To excel as a centre of Higher Education in the field of Mechanical Engineering.
Producing highly motivated, technically competent, morally strong graduates with deep roots in our culture and with ability to respond to global challenges, thereby delighting all stakeholders namely parents, employers and humanity at large.

935

1.3. Achievement of the Programme Educational Objectives (30)


1.3.1. Justify the academic factors involved in the achievement of the PEOs (15)

The Mechanical Engineering Programme Curriculum is broadly composed of: Foundational education in Engineering Physics, Engineering Chemistry, Mathematics, IT and Engineering Workshop, English, Computer Programming and Data Structures, and Engineering Drawing during the 1st year. Focused study of the theoretical aspects of the core discipline and multi disciplinary courses like Electrical and Electronics Engineering
936

Core courses on the theoretical aspects in the 3rd year. Students are also required to undertake group and industry based mini-project in the 3rd year. Application based courses, professional and open electives in the fourth year A major project in the area of interest of the student in the final semester. Conduct of student seminars in all years / semesters. Focus of seminars in the initial year is to develop communication skills and over time to graduate to more technical content culminating in a research oriented seminar in the final semester.
937

Mapping of course groups to the PEOs is shown in the matrix below:


Professionalism Learning Environment X X X Core Competence Preparation
Programme Educational Objectives

Course Groups
Science &Humanities Courses

Core courses
Applications based Courses Group project and Mini Project Final Project

X
X X X X X X

Seminars

Breadth

X
938

1.3.2. Explain how administrative system helps in ensuring the attainment of the PEOs (15)
Activity Committee
Time Table Industrial Visits organizing committee Project Review Committee Technical Fests organizing committee

Functions
To prepare time table at the beginning of each semester course To schedule and conduct regular visits to industries in the vicinity and other states To allot projects to the group of students and regularly monitor the progress and evaluate the quality of projects To conduct various technical events on emerging trends from time to time To contact various reputed persons from R&D and Industries for arranging guest lectures for the benefit of the students and faculty To train and prepare the students for placement To solve problems faced by the students To guide and motivate faculty to apply various funded projects

Guest Lectures organizing Committee


Soft Skills enhancing Training Committee Grievances Committee R&D Advisory Committee

To monitor the progress of class work , syllabus coverage and to Class Review Committee from time to time To plan remedial class slow learners
939

Professionalis m

Core Competence

Activity Committee
Time Table Industrial Visits organizing committee Project Review Committee Technical Fests organizing committee Guest Lectures organizing Committee Soft Skills enhancing Training Committee Grievances Committee R&D Advisory Committee Class Review Committee

X X X X X X

X X
940

Learning Environment

Preparation

Breadth

Programme Educational Objectives

1.4 Assessment of the achievement of programme Educational Objectives (40) 1.4.1 Indicate tools and processes used in assessment of the achievement of the PEOs (25)
SNo PEOs Tools used to Assess Course surveys Exit surveys Employer surveys Alumni surveys Assignments Internal exams External exams Mini Project Major Project Course surveys Exit surveys Employer surveys Alumni surveys Frequency of Process of Assessing Assessment (yearly) Refer to (h) below Twice per course Refer to (i) below Once Refer to (j) below Once Refer to (k) below Once Refer to (a) below Eight per course Refer to (b) below Twice per course Refer to (c) below Once per course Refer to (d) below Once Refer to (e) below Once Refer to (h) below Twice per course Refer to (i) below Once Refer to (j) below Once Refer to (k) below Once
941

Preparation

Core Competence

S.No

PEOs

Tools used to Assess

Process of Assessing
Refer to (d) below Refer to (e) below Refer to (g) below Refer to (i) below Refer to (j) below Refer to (k) below Refer to (f) below Refer to (d) below Refer to (e) below Refer to (i) below Refer to (j) below Refer to (k) below

Frequency of Assessment (yearly)


Once Once Twice Once Once Once Twice Once Once Once Once Once
942

Mini projects Final projects Industry surveys Breadth Exit surveys Employer surveys Alumni surveys Student seminars Mini projects Major projects Professionalism Exit surveys Employer surveys Alumni surveys

Course surveys Exit surveys Learning Employer surveys Environment Alumni surveys Student seminars

Refer to (h) below Refer to (i) below Refer to (j) below Refer to (k) below Refer to (f) below

Twice per course Once Once Once Twice

Process followed in assessing the PEOs using the tools mentioned in the above table is explained below: a. Assignments Assignments are given to students in every unit of syllabus for each course and are evaluated for 3marks. The average of class average marks obtained in each course is used to assess the objectives. The objectives are assumed to be met if the class 943 average is above 3.

b. Internal exams Internal exams are conducted for 30 marks thrice in first year and thrice in a semester for each course. The average of class average marks obtained in each course is used to assess the objectives. The objectives are assumed to be met if the class average is above 18 out of 30. c. External exams External theory exams are conducted for 70 marks once in a year/semester in each course. The average of class average marks obtained in each course is used to assess the objectives. The objectives are assumed to be met if the class average is above 40 out of 70.
944

d. Group / Mini projects


Group Project and Mini projects are conducted in third year first and second semester respectively. The quality of the projects, the type of projects, project seminar presentations, and team work are all used to assess the objectives.

e. Major projects
Major projects are conducted during final year second semester for all students. The quality of the projects, the type of projects, project seminar presentations, and team work are all used to assess the objectives.
945

f. Student seminars Apart from project seminars, and technical seminars conducted as per the syllabus, student seminars are also conducted on a regular basis as part of the time table. Every student is encouraged to present at least one seminar every semester. The quality of the seminar presented, topic selected, communication skills, response to queries, and body language are used to assess the objectives.
946

g. Industry survey Industry survey form is used to collect feedback from industries visited by the students as part of industrial visits. The feedback is collected on a 5-point scale on all relevant PEOs the industry can give their opinion about. The PEOs are assumed to be met if the average points secured is above 3. h. Course survey (Student Feedback) Course survey is collected from all current students twice every semester on all courses to assess some of the PEOs on a 5-point scale. The PEOs are assumed to be met if the average points secured is above 3. 947

i. Exit survey Input from final year students is obtained on all aspects of the program during their second semester. The PEOs are evaluated and assessed based on the feedback collected form the students on 5-point scale. The PEOs are assumed to be met if the average points secured is above 3. j. Skills in demand Survey and Employer survey Assessment of PEOs is also done by obtaining feedback from the industry by way of employer survey at the end of every academic year. The PEOs are assumed to be met if the average 948 points secured in the survey is above 3.

k. Alumni survey Alumni are especially important in the assessment of PEOs since they have intimate knowledge of the program and, at the same time, also have experience in industry. Input from alumni is obtained by means of an alumni survey. The survey is sent to alumni who graduated either one or two years prior to the survey date. Thus the approach lets us gather input from alumni who graduated relatively recently and hence have more or less current knowledge of the program but also have some experience in the job market and hence can comment on how well the program prepared them for the profession. 949

The PEOs are assumed to be met if the average points secured in the survey is above 3.

l. Group discussions

On a regular basis the department conducts group discussions as part of the timetable and students are encouraged to take part in at least two group discussions per semester.
The PEOs are assessed based on their performance in these discussions by judging their team work, leadership skills, communication skills, etc.
950

1.4.2 Provide the evidences for the achievement of the PEOs (15)
a. The expected level of attainment for each of the programme educational objectives.
S No Programme Educational Objectives Expected Level of Attainment (on a scale of 5) 3 or above 3 or above

PEO I Preparation PEO II Core Competence

PEO III Breadth


PEO IV Professionalism PEO V Learning Environment

3 or above
3 or above 3 or above
951

b. Summaries of the results of the evaluation processes and an analysis illustrating the extent to which each of the programme educational objectives is being attained.
Programme S No Educational Objectives
Objectives Attained

Student Seminars

Employer Survey

Group Discussions

Industry Survey

External Exams

Internal Exams

Alumni Survey

Course Survey

Final Projects

Mini Projects

Assignments

PEO I Preparation PEO II

3.6 3.6 3.0 4.0 3.3 4.1

--

---

--

3.7 3.2 4.3 3.64 Yes

Core 4.4 3.7 3.2 -- -- -- -Competence PEO III Breadth ---- 3.8 3.8 -- -ProfessionaPEO IV ---- 4.4 4.5 4.5 -lism Learning PEO V ---- 4.1 4.2 4.3 4.1 Environment

3.5 3.5 3.2 3.8 3.61 Yes

----

----

3.6 3.5 3.9 3.72 Yes


4.3 3.9 4.1 4.28 Yes 4.1 3.6 4.2 4.09 Yes
952

Final Result

Exit Survey

Illustration of the extent to which each of the PEOs is attained:

953

c) How

the results are documented and maintained. All the tools and processes used to assess the programme educational objectives are well documented and all the relevant forms including results of the assessment are maintained in the department office. The results of the assessment are shared with all the stakeholders including students, parents, faculty, employers, alumni, management, and the Governing Body members by way of publishing them in the college website.
954

1.5. Indicate how the PEOs have been redefined in the past (10) As the process of assessment of PEOs was initiated only in the academic year 2011-12, and as the results of assessment have indicated that the PEOs have been met, they were not redefined in 2011-12.

955

CRITERION 2: Programme Outcomes (225)


2.1.
Definition and Validation of Course Outcomes and Programme Outcomes (30)

2.1.1. List the Course Outcomes(COs) and Programme Outcomes (POs) (2) All the courses in the curriculum along with outcomes are given in Annexure-1 The programme outcomes(POs) are listed below:
956

a. Graduates will understand and demonstrate basic fundamentals in mathematics, science and engineering fields. b. Graduates will demonstrate the ability to design a product, conduct experiments on that and interpret, analyze data and optimize the results.
c. Graduates will understand and demonstrate the ability to design the mechanical system via thermal, design, manufacturing systems and their processes to meet desired specifications and requirements.
957

d. Graduates will demonstrate the ability to identify, formulate and solve mechanical engineering related problems. e. Graduates will demonstrate the ability to function on science and engineering laboratories teams as well as on multi disciplinary design teams.
f. Graduates will understand their professional and ethical responsibilities. g. Graduates will be able to communicate effectively in both verbal and written forms.
958

h. Graduates will have the confidence to apply engineering solutions in global and social environment contexts. i. Graduates should be capable of self education and clearly understand the ethical requirements of successful professional life. j. Graduates will be broadly educated and will have understanding of the impact of engineering on society and environmental issues. k. Graduates will be familiar with modern engineering software tool and equipments to optimize mechanical engineering problems.
959

2.1.2. State how and where the POs are published and disseminated (3)
Displayed in the offices of the department. Published in college website and student handbooks. Explained to students and their parents as part of the induction programme. Explained to newly joined faculty and staff members during a staff orientation programme.

2.1.3. Indicate processes employed defining of the POs[5]

for

The programme outcomes (a-k) are defined so as to meet the PEOs mentioned earlier
960

The NBA specified Graduate Attributes are Engineering Knowledge, Problem Analysis, Design/development of solutions, Investigation, Modern Tool Usage, The Engineer and Society, Environment and Sustainability, Ethics, Individual and Team work, Communication, Project Management and Finance and Life-long Learning. The POs are defined in alignment with the Graduate Attributes as specified by NBA to achieve the PEOs
961

2.1.4. Indicate how to defined POs are aligned to the Graduate Attributes prescribed by the NBA (10)
POs Programme Outcomes
a Graduates will understand and demonstrate basic fundamentals in mathematics, science and engineering fields.

Mapp Graduate Attribute Profiles by NBA -ing


a-1 Engineering Knowledge: Apply knowledge of mathematics, science, engineering fundamentals and an engineering specialization to the solution of complex engineering problems Problem Analysis: Identify, formulate, research literature and analyse complex engineering problems reaching substantiated conclusions using first principles of mathematics, natural sciences and engineering sciences. Design/development of solutions: Design solutions for complex engineering problems and design systems, components or processes that meet specified needs with appropriate consideration for public health and safety, cultural, societal, and environmental considerations.
962

Graduates will demonstrate the ability to design a product, conduct experiments on that and interpret, analyze data and optimize the results.

d-2

Graduates will understand and demonstrate the ability to design the mechanical system via thermal, design, manufacturing systems and it processes to meet desire specifications and requirements.

c-3

POs
d

Programme Outcomes

Mapp -ing

Graduate Attribute Profiles by NBA

Graduates will demonstrate the ability to b-4 Investigation: identify, formulate and solve mechanical Conduct investigations of complex problems engineering related problems. using research-based knowledge and research methods including design of experiments, analysis and interpretation of data, and synthesis of information to provide valid conclusions. Graduates will demonstrate the ability to k-5 Modern Tool Usage: function on science and engineering Create, select and apply appropriate techniques, laboratories teams as well as on multi resources, and modern engineering and IT tools, disciplinary design teams. including prediction and modelling, to complex engineering activities, with an understanding of the limitations.

Graduates will understand their J,l,m-6 The Engineer and Society: professional and ethical responsibilities. Apply reasoning informed by contextual knowledge to assess societal, health, safety, legal and cultural issues and the consequent responsibilities relevant to professional engineering practice. Graduates will be able to communicate h-7 Environment and Sustainability: effectively in both verbal and written Understand the impact of professional forms. engineering solutions in societal and environmental contexts and demonstrate knowledge of and need for sustainable 963 development.

POs
h

Programme Outcomes
Graduates will have the confidence to apply engineering solutions in global and social environment contexts.

Mapp- Graduate Attribute Profiles by NBA ing


f-8

Ethics: Apply ethical principles and commit to professional ethics and responsibilities and norms of engineering practice. Graduates should be capable of self e-9 Individual and Team work and Life-long learning education and clearly understand the Function effectively as an individual, and as a ethical requirements of successful member or leader in diverse teams and in multiprofessional life. disciplinary settings. Graduates will be broadly educated and g-10 Communication: will have understanding of the impact Communicate effectively on complex of engineering on society and engineering activities with the engineering environmental issues. community and with society at large, such as being able to comprehend and write effective reports and design documentation, make effective presentations, and give and receive clear instructions. Graduates will be familiar with modern e-11 Project Management and Finance: engineering software tool and Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of equipments to optimize mechanical engineering and management principles and engineering problems. apply these to ones own work, as a member and leader in a team, to manage projects and in multidisciplinary environments.
964

2.1.5. Establish the correlation between the POs and the PEOs (10)
PEOs a I X b X c d e X f g h i j k X

II
III IV V

X
X

X
X

X
X X X X X X X X X X

X
X

2.2. Attainment of Programme Outcomes (40) 2.2.1. Illustrate how course outcomes contribute to the POs (10) The courses outcomes with POs are given in Annexure-1.
965

2.2.2. Explain how modes of delivery of courses help in attainment of the POs (10) Class room teaching is designed to utilize modern audio visual equipment like LCD projector with internet facility along with chalk board and OHP to improve the effectiveness of teaching (a). An industry expert lecture is arranged towards the end of the course completion to expose the students to practical industry applications and latest trends (d, h, e). Assignments are given to students with problems ranging from simple concepts to average and more difficult design problems (b,c).
966

Students are asked to present seminars related to the course to improve their presentation skills (f,g,i). Technical quizzes, group discussions are organised to educate the students about the impact of engineering on society and environment (j). Students are divided in groups of 6 each and group tasks and assignments are given to encourage peer learning and multi-disciplinary skills (e). Some topics which were not prescribed by the syllabus are included to prepare students for wide range of industrial surveys (a,d).
967

2.2.3. Indicate how assessment tools used to assess the impact of delivery of course/course content contribute towards the attainment of course outcomes/programme outcomes (10) The students are required to do one mini-project work at the end of 3rd year and a main project in 4th year 2nd semester The students are encouraged to do in-house design projects and multi-disciplinary projects. During the project duration the project groups have to present three seminars about the progress of the work
968

The laboratory courses are so designed as per the affiliating university instructions and also over and above the prescribed university syllabus A one-to-one interaction with the students is followed during the laboratory course work to measure and record the students performance and the extent to which the POs are achieved
969

2.2.4 Indicate the extent to which the laboratory and project course work are Contributing towards attainment of the POs (10)
Lab
English Language Lab I Engineering physics Lab I Engineering Chemistry Lab Computer Programming Lab IT Workshop I Engineering Workshop-I English Language Lab-II IT Workshop II Engineering Physics Lab-II Data structures and C++ Lab Basic Electrical Engineering lab Basic Electronics Engineering lab Metallurgy lab Mechanics Of Solids Lab

Attainment of
g b b k b b g b b k d d b b

970

Lab
Fluid Mechanics and Hydraulic Machinery lab Manufacturing Processes lab Applied Thermodynamics lab Instrumentation Lab Metrology Machine Tools Lab Heat transfer lab

Attainment of
b b b b b b

Oops Through Java lab


Production Drawing Practice Lab Group Projects Mini Projects Main Project Percentage

k
k b b abcdk 45.54
971

2.3. Assessment of the attainment of the Programme Outcomes (125) 2.3.1 Describe assessment tools and processes used for assessing the attainment of each PO (25) The following tools are used for assessing the attainment of each PO Mid-term examinations Assignments University examinations Student technical seminars Comprehensive Viva-Voce Quality of project work
972

Quiz contests
Design Contests Technical paper presentations Performance in GRE/TOEFL/IELTS/CAT/GATE Placements Awards/Gold medals won by the students Students feedback on faculty, infrastructure, course coverage Alumni Survey Employer feedback Exit students survey
973

2.3.2. Indicate results of assessment of each PO (100)


c) The expected level of attainment for each of the program outcomes;
S Programme Outcomes No 1 a 2 b 3 c 4 d 5 e 6 f 7 g 8 h 9 i 10 j 11 k Expected Level of Attainment (on a scale of 5) 3 or above 3 or above 3 or above 3 or above 3 or above 3 or above 3 or above 3 or above 3 or above 3 or above 3 or above 974

d) Summaries of the results of the evaluation processes and an analysis illustrating the extent to which each of the programme outcomes are attained:
S No
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Programme Outcomes
a b c d e f g h i j k

Final Result
3.0 3.5 3.7 4.5 3.9 3.7 3.0 3.0 3.4 3.4 3.0

Attained
Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

975

e) How the results are documented and maintained.


All the tools and processes used to assess the programme outcomes are well documented and all the relevant forms including results of the assessment are maintained in the department office. The results of the assessment are shared with all the stakeholders including students, parents, faculty, employers, alumni, management, and the Governing Body members by way of publishing them in the college website.
976

2.4.

Use of assessment results towards improvement of the programme (30) 2.4.1. Indicate how the results of assessment used for curricular improvements (5) Curriculum updates and PEO reviews: Review of curriculum: JNTU mode (2009-10): Curriculum is reviewed once in two years by the JNTU University Autonomous mode(2010-11): Curriculum is reviewed once in two years . The members of BOS are drafted from reputed industries (BHEL R&D,ARCI,) and Universities (JNTUH,OU )
977

The following subjects have been incorporated in Autonomous mode : 1. Human values, Ethics & IPR 2. Functional and Communicative Written English 3. Effective English Communication and Soft Skills 4. Logical Reasoning 5. Quantitative Aptitude 6. Engineering Chemistry-II 7. Probability & Statistics Flexibility in the academic years to introduce new elective subjects in between revision. The following elective subjects have been incorporated in Regulation 2010-11 Autonomous mode:
978

PROFESSIONAL ELECTIVE I
Nano Technology

PROFESSIONAL ELECTIVE III


Computational Fluid Dynamics and Composite Materials

OPEN ELECTIVE I
Basic Spanish language/ Basic French language/ Basic German language/ Computer Graphics Data Base Management System Total Quality management

OPEN ELECTIVE II
Banking Operations, Insurance and Risk Management, Entrepreneurship Logistics and Supply Chain Management 979

As stated above JNTU updates syllabus every two years. The institute, in association with other Engineering colleges, takes proactive action to come up with a document on improvements proposed in syllabus and submit to JNTU for consideration during syllabus revisions by JNTU. We are happy to inform that many of our suggestions are accepted and included in revised syllabus. Copies of our proposals to JNTU are available in the college for verification.
980

On our part, at college level as students move from semester to semester, we review changes in syllabus and plan to address the syllabus requirement every semester, where PEOs also get updated. Based on the needs identified, we draw our implementation program. We also conduct many programs beyond curriculum, for students to meet the Program Educational Objectives.
981

National events on students paper contest, poster presentation etc are conducted every year. College has established an Entrepreneurship development cell which conducts National level Innovation contests every year where students demonstrate products development by them and their applications in real life. In the Institute, we regularly conduct survey of JOB advertisement in national newspapers subscribed by the central library and identify the technical demand profile in the market. This information is used to identify the gaps in the curriculum of each branch. These gaps are filled through specific course modules by internal faculty or technical talks/lectures by experts from outside. 982

2.4.2. Indicate how results of assessment used for improvement of course delivery and assessment (10) Additional content to improve the course delivery
Course Training in Auto CAD Evaluation of Reliability Training in PROE and ANSYS Effective Teaching Workshop on Learning skills Soft Skills Enhancement PEOs strengthened II,V II II,V II II II Comments Awareness in on Auto CAD Introduction of different reliability evaluation techniques Awareness in CAD/CAM Preparing the students for competitive exams preparing the students for better understanding of courses Preparing the students for competitive exams

2.4.3. State the process used for revising/redefining the POs (15) Based on the needs of local and global employers, industry, advances in Technology and opportunities for higher studies, the department shall redefine POs. 983

CRITERION 3: Programme Curriculum (125)


3.1. Curriculum (20) 3.1.1. Describe the Structure of the Curriculum (5)
Course code
----

Course Title
----

Total Number of contact hours


Lectures (L) 2 3 3 2 2
3 2 0

Credits

51001 English 51002 Mathematics I 51003 Engineering Mechanics 51004 Engineering Physics 51007 Engineering Drawing 51006 Computer Programming & data structures 51005 51609 Engineering Chemistry Engineering Physics and Chemistry lab 51608 Computer Programming Lab 51611 Engineering Workshop / IT Workshop Practice

Tutorials (T) 0 1 1 1 0
0 0 0

Practical* (P) 0 0 0 0 3
0 0 3

Total Hours 2 4 4 3 5
3 2 3

4 6 6 4 4 6 4 4

0
0

0
0

3
3

3
3

4
4
984

English Language 51610 Communication Skills Lab 53013 Environmental studies 54013 Production technology 57031 CNC technology Electrical and 53015 Electronics engineering 53016 Mechanics of Solids 53017 Thermodynamics 53018 Metallurgy and Materials Science Electrical and 53604 Electronics engineering lab 57029 Composite materials

0 3 4 3 4 3

0 0 0 1 1 1 1 1

3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

3 3 4 4 5 4 5 5

4 3 4 3 3 3 4 4

4
4

3985

53014

Probability and Statistics

3 3 3

1 1 1

0 0 0

4 4 4

3 3 3

54014 Kinematics Of Machinery 54015 Applied Thermodynamics-1

54016

Mechanics Of Fluids and


Hydraulic Machines

4 3 0 0

0 1 0 0

0 0 6 3

4 4 6 3

4 3 4 2

57027 Mechanical vibrations 54017 Machine Drawing 54604 Production technology lab Mechanics of Solids and

53605

Metallurgy Lab
55015 Managerial economics and Financial Analysis 56022 Automobile Engineering

986

55017

Dynamics of Machinary

4
3

1 1

0 0

5 4

4 3

55018 Machine Tools

55019

Design Of Machine Members -I

4
4

1
1

0
0

5
5

4
4

56020 Heat Transfer Mechanics Of Fluids 54605 and Hydraulic Machines lab 55605 Thermal Engineering

lab
56016 Industrial Management

4
987 4

57024 Cad/Cam

55016

Metrology and surface engineering

56018

Refrigeration And Air conditioning

56019

Design of Machine
Members -II

55020

Applied Thermodynamics-II

55604

Metrology and Machine tools Lab

56605

Advanced English

Communication Skills Lab


57022 Operation Reserch 58023 Gas Dynamics 56017 Finite Element Methods

0 4 3 3

0 1 0 1

3 0 0 0

3 5 3 4

2 4 3 3
988

57025

Instrumentation and Control Systems

4
3 3 3 3

0
1 0

0
0 0

4
4 3

4
3 3

57026 Robotics 58022 Computational Fluid Dynamics

57028 Mechatronics
58021 Jet propulsion &Rocket Engineering 57030 Unconventional Maching Processes 58020

1
0

0
0

4
3

3
3

Renewable energy
sources

3 0 0

0 0 0

0 3 3

3 3 3

3 2 2
989

56604 Heat Transfer Lab 57606 Production Practice And Instrumentation Lab

57023 Power plant Engineering

58019

Plant layout & Material Handling

58015

Production planning and Control

3 3 3 3 0 0 3 0

1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 6 0 0 15

4 4 4 4 6 0 3 15

3 3 3 3 2 2 3 10
990

58016 Artificial Neural networks 58017 Reliability Engineering 58018 Maintenance & Safety Engineering 58610 Seminar 58609 Industry Oriented Mini Project 58020 Renewable energy sources 58611 Project Work

58612 Comprehensive Viva 57032 57033

0 3 3

0 1 1

0 0 0

0 4 4

2 3 3

Automation in Manufacturing
Design for manufacturing Computer Aided Design & Manufactureing lab

57605

56014 Nanotechnology 56021

Engineering Optimizaion
3 1 0 4 3

54018 Numerical methods

* Seminars, project works may be considered as practical


991

A-10
Course code ---101EN01 English-I Course Title ---Total Number of contact hours Lectures Tutorials Practicals* (L) (T) (P/D) 3 0 0 Total Hours 3 3 Credits

101MA01 Engineering Mathematics I 101PH01 Engineering Physics I


101CH01 101IT01 Engineering Chemistry Computer Programming English Language Lab I Engineering Physics Lab I Computer Programming Lab Engineering Chemistry Lab

3
3 2 3 2 0

1
1 1 1 0 0

0
0 0 0 4 2

4
4 3 4 6 2

3
3 2 3 4 1

101ME01 Engineering Drawing-I 101EN71

101PH71
101IT71 101CH71

0
0 0

0
0 0

3/2
3 3/2

3/2
3 3/2

1
2 1992

101ME71 Engineering Workshop -I 101IT72 IT Workshop I

0 0 3 3 3 1 3 3 4 0 0 0

0 0 0 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 0

3/2 3/2 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 2 3/2 3

3/2 3/2 3 4 4 4 4 4 5 2 3/2 3

1 1 2 3 3 2 3 3 4 1 1 2
993

101EN02 English-II 101MA03 Engineering Mathematics II 101PH03 Applied Physics 101ME02 Engineering Drawing -II 101CS01 Data Structures and C++ 101EE41

Basic Electrical Engineering

101ME03 Engineering Mechanics 101EN72 English Language Lab II 101PH72 Engineering Physics Lab II 101CS71 Data structures and C++ Lab

101ME72 Engineering Workshop II


101MA06 Mathematical Methods 101EC01 Electronics for Mechanical Engineering

0
3 3 3 3 3 1 0 0

0
2 1 1 1 1 0 0 0

3/2
0 0 0 0 0 6 2 3/2

3/2
5 4 4 4 4 7 2 3/2

1
3 3 3 3 3 4 2 1
994

101ME06 Thermodynamics 101ME07 Mechanics of Solids 101ME08 Material Science &Metallurgy 101ME09 Machine Drawing Functional and 101EN73 Communicative Written English 101EE91 Basic Electrical Engineering lab

101EC84 101ME73 101ME74

101CH03

101MA09

101ME10

101ME11
101ME12 101EN74 101ME13

Basic Electronics Engineering lab Metallurgy lab Mechanics Of Solids Lab Environmental Studies Probability and statistics for Mechanical Engineering Applied Thermodynamics-I Manufacturing Processes Fluid Mechanics and Hydraulic Machinery Effective English Communication and Soft skills Kinematics of machinary

0 0 0

0 0 0

3/2 3/2 3/2

3/2 3/2 3/2

1 1 1

3
3 0 3

1
1 0 1

0
0 2 0

4
4 2 4

3
3 2 3
995

101ME77 101ME76

101ME75

101ME14

101ME15
101ME16 101ME17 101ME18

Fluid Mechanics and Hydraulic Machinery lab Manufacturing Procesess lab Comprehensive Viva Open Elective(Foreign Language) Dynamics Of Machinery Metal Cutting &Machine Tools Applied Thermodynamics-II Design of Machine Members -I Metrology Instrumentation

0 0

0 0

3 3

3 3

2 2

0
2 3

0
2 1

0
0 0

0
4 4

1
2 3

3
3 4 3

1
1 0 1

0
0 0 0

4
4 4 4

3
3 4 3
996

101ME78 Group Project 101ME79 Applied Thermodynamics lab 101ME80 Metrology Machine Tools Lab 101MA71 Logical Reasoning-I 101FL01 Basic Spanish Language 101FL02 Basic French Language 101FL03 Basic German Language 101IT06 Computer Graphics 101IT03 Data Base Management System 101MB57 Total Quality Management Managerial 101MB01 economics and Financial Analysis

0 0 0 0 2 2 2

0 0 0 2 2 2 2

3 3 3 0 0 0 0

3 3 3 2 4 4 4

1 2 2 2 2 2 2

2
2 2 3

2
2 2 1

0
0 0 0

4
4 4 4

2
2 2 3
997

101CS03 Oops Through Java 101ME19 Design of Machine Members -II 101ME20 Heat transfer 101ME21 CAD/CAM 101BT37 Human Values, ethics & IPR 101MA72 Quantitative Aptitude 101ME81 Comprehensive Viva 101ME72 Heat transfer lab 101CS74 Oops Through Java lab 101ME22 Operation Reaserch 101ME23 Principle of Finite Element Method 101ME24 Automobile Engineering 101ME25 Refrigeration&Air Conditioning 101ME26 Nanotechnology 101MA73 Logical Reasoning II 101ME83 Pre Project Seminar

4
3 3 2 0 0 0 0 3 3 3 3

0
1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1

0
0 0 0 2 0 3 3 0 0 0 0

4
4 4 2 2 0 3 3 4 4 4 4

4
3 3 2 2 1 2 2 3 3 3 3

3 0 0

1 2 0

0 0 0

4 2 2

3 2 2 998

101ME84 Industry Oriented Mini Project 101ME86 Production Drawing Practice Lab 101ME87 Instrumentation Lab 101ME27 Non conventional Sources Of Energy 101ME28 Robotics 101ME29 Mechatronics 101ME30 Automation in Manufacture Banking Operations, 101MB56 Insurance And Risk Management 101MB55 Entrepreneurship 101ME88 Project 101ME89 Comprehensive Viva 101ME90 Technical Seminar Logistics and 101MB54 Supply Chain Management

0 0 0 3 3 3 3 3 3 0 0 0 3

0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 3/2 3/2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

2 3/2 3/2 4 4 4 4 3 3 0 0 0 3

2 1 1 3 3 3 3 3 3 10 2 2 3
999

101MB01 Management Science

Jet Propulsion 101ME31 and Rocket Engines

101ME32 Computational Fluid Dynamics

101ME33 Composite Materials

4
1000

3.1.2 Give the prerequisite flow chart of courses [5] R09

1001

Subject Code 51003 51006 51007 53013 53014 53015 53016 53017 53018 54013 54014 54015

Course

Core/ Elective

Pre-Requisites to the subject Physics Computer Knowledge

Scope of the Subject for Electives

I Year
Engg.Mechanics CPDS Engg.Drawing Environmental Studies P &S Electrical and electronic engg. MOS Thermodynamics Core Core Core HSS HSS Breadth Core Core Core Core Core Core

II Year I Sem
Chemistry Maths-I &II Physics Maths-I &II, Physics Maths-I & II, Physics, Chemistry Chemistry, Physics Chemistry, Physics Maths-I & II, Physics Chemistry, Physics
1002

Metallurgy and material science


PT KOM Applied thermodynamics-I

II Year II Sem

54016
54017 54018

MF&HM
Machine Drawing Numerical Methods

Core
Core HSS

Maths-I & II, Physics


Engg.Drawing Maths-I & II, and P&S

III Year I Sem


55015 55016 55017 55018 55019 55020 MEPA Metrology and Surface Engg. DOM Machine Tools DMM-I Applied thermodynamics-II HSS Core Core Core Core Core Maths-I & II, and P&S Maths-I & II, Physics, Chemistry
1003

Commerce Chemistry, Physics Maths-I & II, and P&S

III Year II Sem 56015 56016 56017 56018 56019 56020 57024 57025 57026 Industrial Management FEM Automobile Engg. R &AC DMM-II HT OR Power plant engg. CAD/CAM Instrumentation and Control System Robotics Mechanical Vibrations Mechatronics Composite materials UCM CNC Technologies Automation in Manufacturing Design for manufacturing Breadth Core Core Core Core Core Maths-I & II, Physics Physics, Chemistry Maths-I & II, Physics, Chemistry Maths-I & II, Physics Maths-I & II, Physics, Chemistry

IV Year I Sem Core Maths-I & II Core Physics, Chemistry Core Physics, Maths-I & II

57027
57028 57029 57030 57031 57032 57033 57034 57035

Breadth
Elective Elective Elective Elective Elective Elective Elective Elective

Physics, Maths-I & II


Physics Physics, Maths-I & II Physics, Maths-I & II Physics, Chemistry Chemistry Physics, Chemistry Physics, Chemistry Physics, Maths-I & II
1004

IV Year II Sem
58018
58012 58019 58020 58021 58022 58023 Production Planning and control Neural networks and fuzzy logic Reliability Engg. Maintenance and safety Engg. Plant layout and material handling

Core
Elective Elective Elective Elective Elective Elective

PT
Physics, Maths-I & II MEPA MEPA MMS Chemistry FM & HS

Renewable Energy sources


Jet propulsion and rocket Engg.

58024 58025

System design and optimization of thermal systems


Gas dynamics

Elective Elective

OR, Maths-I & II Physics, Maths-I & II


1005

3.1.3. Justify how the programme curriculum satisfies the programme specific criteria:
Programme specific criteria specified by ASME The ability apply principles of Engineering, basic science, and mathematics to model, analyze, design,and realize physical systems, components or processes; and work professionally in mechanical systems areas POs a,b,c,e,k

3.2 State the components of the curriculum and their relevance to the POs and the PEOs:
Course Component Curriculum Content (%of total number of credits of the programme) Total Total number of number contact of credits hours
8 8 6 15 4 9 12 10 17 6

POs

PEOs

Mathematics Science Computing Humanities Professional core Engineering Mechanics

a a k f a,c,d,e,h

II I,II II,III IV II
1006

Production technology Kinematics Of Machinary Applied Thermodynamics-I Mechanics Of Fluids and Hydraulic Machines Production technology lab Mechanics Of Fluids and Hydraulic Machines lab` Machine Drawing Numerical methods Metrology and surface engineering

4 4 4 4

4 3 3 4

d a,b,c,e a,b,d,f,h,i.j, k b,e,d,k,j

II,I I,II,III II II,I

3
3 6 4 4

2
2 4 3 3

b,e,d
b,d,e C,d,e,f,g,j a,k A,b,c,d,i.j

II
II III III I,II
1007

Dynamics Of Machinary Machine Tools Design of Machine Members -I Applied ThermodynamicsII Engineering Drawing IT Workshop /Engineering Workshop Electrical and Electronics engineering

5 4 5

4 3 4

A,d,f,h,j B,d,e,k,j A,b,c,e

II,III I,II,III I,II

4 5 3

3 4 4

B,c,d,e, A,b,c,d,f A,c,d,i

I,II,III II II,IV

D,a

III

1008

Mechanics of Solids Thermodynamics Metallurgy and Materials Science Electrical and Electronics Engg lab

4 5 5 3 3 3 3 4 4 5

3 4 4 2 2 2 2 4 3 4

A,b,d,g,h,I,k A,b,d,e,f,h,I,j,k A,b,c,d,f,g,h B,d B,d B,c,d B,d F,g A,b,c,d,e,f,h B,c,d,e

I,II II I,II III,IV III,IV I,II,IV I,IV III,V I,II I,II


1009

Mechanics of Solids and Metallurgy Lab


Thermal Engineering lab Metrology and Machine tools Lab Industrial Management Finite Element Methods Refrigeration And Air conditioning

Design of Machine Members -II Heat Transfer Heat Transfer lab Power plant Engineering Operation Research Cad/Cam Instrumentation and Control Systems Robotics Mechanical Vibrations Mechatronics Composite Materials Unconventional Machining Processes

4 5 3 4

3 4 2 3

A,b,c,e A,b,c,d,e,h, k B,c,d A,b,c,d,e,h, I,k A,b,e A,b,c,d,e,h

I,ii I,II III,IV II,III

5 5 4
4 4 4 4 4

4 4 4
3 3 3 3 3

III,IV,V I,II I,II


I,II,III,IV I,II III,I,IV I,II II,IV
1010

A,b,c,k
A,b,d B,e,k A,b,e,f,i A,b,c,e B,c,d,e

CNC Technology Automation in Manufacturing Design for Manufacturing Computer Aided Design &Manufacturing lab Production Drawing Practice and Manufacturing Lab Production planning and Control Artificial Neural Networks Reliability Engineering

4 4

3 3

B,d,k A,b,g,h,I,j

IV,I II,I

4
3

3
2

B,c,d,e
B,d

I,II
II,III

3 4

2 3

B,d B,f,e,h,I,j,k

II,III III,IV

4
4

3
3

D,e,h,I,j,k
J,e,f,g,h,I,j,k

V.IV
III
1011

Maintenance and Safety Engineering

4
4 3 3 3 3

3
3 3 3 3 3 2

C,e,h,j,k
B,c,e,I,j,k H,j C,e,I,j,k A,c,e,I,k B,d,e,k B,c,d,f,g,h,I,k B,c,d,f,g,h,I,k B,c,d,f,g,h,I,k B,c,d,f,g,h,I,k

III,V
III,V V III,I III,II III,II V,IV,III,I,II V,IV,III,I,II V,IV,III,I,II V,IV,III,I,II
1012

Plant Layout&Material Handling


Renewable Energy sources

Jet Propulsion &Rocket Engineering


Computational fluid Dynamics Gas Dynamics Industry oriented Mini Project Seminar Project Work Comprehensive Viva

6 15

2 10 2

A10
Course Component Curriculum Content (%of total number of credits of the programme) Total Total number of number of contact credits hours
18 20 24 18 6 3/2 12 11 16 15 4 1

POs

PEOs

Mathematics Science Computing Humanities Professional core Engineering Drawing-I Engineering Workshop -I Engineering Drawing -II Basic Electrical Engineering Engineering Mechanics

A a k F C,d,e,f,g,j A,c,d,i

II I,II II,III IV III II,IV

4
5 5

2
3 4

C,d,e,f,g,j
A,d A,c,d,e,h

III
III II
1013

Engineering Workshop II Electronics for Mechanical Engineering Thermodynamics Mechanics of Solids Material Science &Metallurgy Machine Drawing Basic Electrical Engineering lab Basic Electronics Engineering lab Metallurgy lab Mechanics Of Solids Lab Environmental Studies

3/2 4 4 4 4 7 3/2 3/2

1 3 3 3 3 4 1 1

A,c,d,i A,d A,b,d,e,f,h,I,j,k A,b,d,g,h,I,k A,b,c,d,f,g,h C,d,e,f,g,j D,a D,a

II,IV III II I,II I,II III III III

3/2
3/2 4

1
1 3

D,a
D,a F,h,j

III
III V
1014

Applied Thermodynamics-I Manufacturing Processes Fluid Mechanics and Hydraulic Machinary Fluid Mechanics and Hydraulic Machinary lab Manufacturing Procesess lab Comprehensive Viva Dynamics Of Machinery Kinematics Of Machinery Metal Cutting &Machine Tools Applied Thermodynamics-II

4 4 4

3 3 3

A,b,d,e,f,h,I,j,k d b,e,d,k,j

II II,I II,I

3 3

2 2 1

b,d,e b,d,e B,c,d,f,g,h,I,k A,d,f,h,j

II II V,IV,III,I,II II,III

4
4 4

3
3 3

a,b,c,e
B,d,e,k,j A,b,d,e,f,h,I,j,k

I,II,III
I,II,III II
1015

Design of Machine Members -I Metrology Instrumentation Basic French Language Basic German Language Computer Graphics Data Base Management System Total Quality Management Managerial economics and Financial Analysis

4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4

4 3 2 2 2 2 2 3

A,b,c,e A,b,c,d,i.j g g A,j,k, K,j,I, F,I,j,k,e H,h,I,j,k

I,II I,II IV IV IV IV II,I V,IV


1016

Design of Machine Members -II Heat transfer CAD/CAM Quantitative Aptitude

4 5 4 2

4 3 3 2 1

A,b,c,e

I,ii

A,b,c,d,e,h,k I,II A,b,c,d,e,h I,II A,e,f,g,h,i IV,I

Comprehensive Viva Heat transfer lab Operation Reaserch


Principle of Finite Element Method Automobile Engineering Refrigeration&Air Conditioning

B,c,d,f,g,h,I,k V,IV,III,I,II b,d,e A,b,e II III,IV,V

3 4

2 3

4
4 4

3
3 3

A,b,c,d,e,f,h
A,b,c B,c,d,e

I,II
I,II I,II
1017

Group Project Applied Thermodynamics lab Metrology Machine Tools Lab

3 3

1 2

B,c,d,f,g,h,I,k b,d,e

V,IV,III,I,II II

b,d,e

II

Logical Reasoning-I
Basic Spanish Language Production Drawing Practice Lab Instrumentation Lab Nanotechnology Logical Reasoning II Pre Project Seminar

2
4 3/2 3/2 4 2

2
2 1 1 3 2 2

A,e
g b,d,e b,d,e B,c,d,I,j,k A,e B,c,d,f,g,h,I,k

III
IV II II I,II,III III V,IV,III,I,II
1018

Industry Oriented Mini Project Non conventional Sources Of Energy Robotics Mechatronics Automation in Manufacture Banking Operations, Insurance And Risk Management Entrepreneurship Project Comprehensive Viva-II Technical Seminar

B,c,d,f,g,h,I,k

V,IV,III,I,II

4 4 4 4

3 3 3 3

B,c,d,e A,b,d A,b,e,f,i A,b,g,h,I,j

II,IV I,II,III,IV III,I,IV II,I

3 3

3 3 10 2 2

F,g,h,j,k F,g,h,j,k B,c,d,f,g,h,I,k B,c,d,f,g,h,I,k B,c,d,f,g,h,I,k

IV,V IV,V V,IV,III,I,II V,IV,III,I,II V,IV,III,I,II


1019

Logistics and Supply Chain Management Management Science Jet Propulsion and Rocket Engines Computational Fluid Dynamics Composite Materials

F,I,j,k,e

II,I

F,I,j,k,e

II,I

C,e,I,j,k

III,I

A,c,e,I,k

III,II

A,b,c,e

I,II
1020

3.3 State core engineering subjects and their relevance to Programme Outcomes including design experience(60): R09
Course Component
Mathematics Science Computing Humanities Professional core Engineering Mechanics Production technology Kinematics Of Machinary Applied Thermodynamics-I Mechanics Of Fluids and Hydraulic Machines Production technology lab Mechanics Of Fluids and Hydraulic Machines lab Machine Drawing Numerical methods

POs
a a k f
a,c,d,e,h d a,b,c,e a,b,d,f,h,i.j,k b,e,d,k,j b,e,d b,d,e c,d,e,f,g,j 1021 a,k

Metrology and surface engineering Dynamics Of Machinary Machine Tools Design of Machine Members -I Applied Thermodynamics-II Engineering Drawing IT Workshop /Engineering Workshop Electrical and Electronics engineering Mechanics of Solids Thermodynamics Metallurgy and Materials Science Electrical and Electronics Engg lab Mechanics of Solids and Metallurgy Lab Thermal Engineering lab Metrology and Machine tools Lab Industrial Management Finite Element Methods

a,b,c,d,i.j a,d,f,h,j b,d,e,k,j a,b,c,e b,c,d,e, a,b,c,d,f a,c,d,i d,a a,b,d,g,h,I,k a,b,d,e,f,h,I,j,k a,b,c,d,f,g,h b,d b,d b,c,d b,d f,g a,b,c,d,e,f,h 1022

Refrigeration And Air conditioning Design of Machine Members -II Heat Transfer Heat Transfer lab Power plant Engineering Operation Research Cad/Cam Instrumentation and Control Systems Robotics Mechanical Vibrations Mechatronics Composite Materials

b,c,d,e a,b,c,e a,b,c,d,e,h,k b,c,d a,b,c,d,e,h,I,k a,b,e a,b,c,d,e,h a,b,c,k a,b,d b,e,k a,b,e,f,i a,b,c,e
1023

Refrigeration And Air conditioning Design of Machine Members -II Heat Transfer Heat Transfer lab Power plant Engineering Operation Research Cad/Cam Instrumentation and Control Systems Robotics Mechanical Vibrations Mechatronics Composite Materials Refrigeration And Air conditioning Design of Machine Members -II Heat Transfer Heat Transfer lab Power plant Engineering Operation Research Cad/Cam

b,c,d,e a,b,c,e a,b,c,d,e,h,k b,c,d a,b,c,d,e,h,I,k a,b,e a,b,c,d,e,h a,b,c,k a,b,d b,e,k a,b,e,f,i a,b,c,e b,c,d,e a,b,c,e a,b,c,d,e,h,k b,c,d a,b,c,d,e,h,I,k a,b,e a,b,c,d,e,h 1024

A 10
Course Component Mathematics Science Computing Humanities Professional core Engineering Drawing-I Engineering Workshop -I Engineering Drawing -II Basic Electrical Engineering Engineering Mechanics Engineering Workshop II Electronics for Mechanical Engineering Thermodynamics Mechanics of Solids Material Science &Metallurgy POs a a k F c,d,e,f,g,j a,c,d,i c,d,e,f,g,j a,d a,c,d,e,h a,c,d,i a,d a,b,d,e,f,h,I,j,k a,b,d,g,h,I,k a,b,c,d,f,g,h 1025

Machine Drawing Basic Electrical Engineering lab Basic Electronics Engineering lab Metallurgy lab Mechanics Of Solids Lab Environmental Studies Applied Thermodynamics-I Manufacturing Processes Fluid Mechanics and Hydraulic Machinary Fluid Mechanics and Hydraulic Machinary lab Manufacturing Procesess lab Comprehensive Viva Dynamics Of Machinery Kinematics Of Machinery Metal Cutting &Machine Tools Applied Thermodynamics-II Design of Machine Members -I Metrology Instrumentation

c,d,e,f,g,j d,a d,a d,a d,a f,h,j a,b,d,e,f,h,I,j,k d b,e,d,k,j b,d,e b,d,e b,c,d,f,g,h,I,k a,d,f,h,j a,b,c,e b,d,e,k,j a,b,d,e,f,h,I,j,k a,b,c,e a,b,c,d,i.j

1026

Basic French Language Basic German Language Computer Graphics Data Base Management System Total Quality Management Managerial economics and Financial Analysis Design of Machine Members -II Heat transfer CAD/CAM Quantitative Aptitude Comprehensive Viva Heat transfer lab Operation Reaserch Principle of Finite Element Method Automobile Engineering Refrigeration&Air Conditioning Group Project Applied Thermodynamics lab Metrology Machine Tools Lab Logical Reasoning-I

g g a,j,k, k,j,I, f,I,j,k,e h,h,I,j,k a,b,c,e a,b,c,d,e,h,k a,b,c,d,e,h a,e,f,g,h,I b,c,d,f,g,h,I,k b,d,e a,b,e a,b,c,d,e,f,h a,b,c b,c,d,e b,c,d,f,g,h,I,k b,d,e b,d,e a,e

1027

Basic Spanish Language Production Drawing Practice Lab Instrumentation Lab Nanotechnology Logical Reasoning II Pre Project Seminar Industry Oriented Mini Project Non conventional Sources Of Energy Robotics Mechatronics Automation in Manufacture Banking Operations, Insurance And Risk Management Entrepreneurship Project Comprehensive Viva-II Technical Seminar Logistics and Supply Chain Management Management Science Jet Propulsion and Rocket Engines Computational Fluid Dynamics Composite Materials

g b,d,e b,d,e B,c,d,I,j,k a,e b,c,d,f,g,h,I,k b,c,d,f,g,h,I,k b,c,d,e a,b,d a,b,e,f,I a,b,g,h,I,j f,g,h,j,k f,g,h,j,k b,c,d,f,g,h,I,k b,c,d,f,g,h,I,k b,c,d,f,g,h,I,k f,I,j,k,e f,I,j,k,e c,e,I,j,k a,c,e,I,k a,b,c,e

1028

3.4 Industry interaction /internship (10)


S.No. 1 2 3 Name of Industry attached lab INNOVATION&INCUBATION CENTRE Technology Development centre CNC and Robotics MTAB CHENNAI Name of the supporting industry

S.No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

Details of internship Name of the industry Student Mini Project ITW SIGNODE NUCLEAR FUEL COMPLEX,HYD HITECH HYDRAULIC ENGINEERS NTPC SAT VENI Engg SCIENCE BDL Lokesh Machine tools APGENCO Secunderabad Diesel loco shed NFC BHEL NTPC

1029

3.5 Curriculum Development (15): 3.5.1 State the process for designing the programme curriculum (5): The process of designing a curriculum program that includes components that meet the PEOs. The curriculum program design committee, with representatives of various stakeholders in the University system and industry , will be responsible for the design process. The process sequence is as fallows: Department curricula Design Committee Board of studies members Academic Council University approval.
1030

3.5.2. Illustrate the measures and processes used to improve courses and curriculum (10):
Following measures are taken to improve the courses and curriculum Suggestions from Academicians from Universities , NITS and IIT taken Industry Survey is carried out to find the gaps between existing course and industry requirements Skills in Demand survey from the job Advertisements Suggestions from Academicians from R&D institution taken Additional Contents to Bridge Curriculum Gaps Content beyond syllabus
1031

3.6 Course Syllabi (5):


Course Code Course Title
Total Number of contact hours

Lecture Tutorial Practical# (P) (L) (T) I year

Total Hours

Credits

51001 51002 51003 51004 51005 51006 51007 51608 51609 51610 51611

English Maths-I Engg.Mechanics Engg. Physics Engg. Chemistry CPDS Engg.Drawing CP Lab EP/EC lab ELCS lab WS/IT lab Total

2 3 3 2 2 3 2 17

1 1 1 3

3 3 3 3 3 15

2 4 4 3 2 3 5 3 3 3 3 35

4 6 6 4 4 6 4 4 4 4 4 50
1032

II Year I Sem
53013

53014
53015 53016 53017

53018 53604
53605

Environmental Studies P &S Electrical and electronic engg. MOS Thermodynamics Metallurgy and material science Electrical and electronic engg lab Metallurgy / MOS lab Total

3
4 3 4

1
1 1 1

4
5 4 5

3
4 3 4

4 21

1 5

3
3 6

5 3
3 32

4 2
2 25
1033

54013 PT 54014 KOM

II Year II Sem 4 3 1 3 4 1 -

4 4 4 4 6

4 3 3 4 4

Applied 54015 thermodynamics-I


54016 FM&HM 54017 Machine Drawing

Numerical 54018 Methods


54604 PT lab 54605 FM & HM lab Total

3
17

1
3

3 3 12

4
3 3 32

3
2 2 25 1034

III Year II Sem


56015 56016 56017 56018 56019 56020 56605 56606 Industrial Management FEM Automobile Engg. R &AC DMM-II HT HT lab Advanced English Communication lab Total 4 3 3 4 3 4 21 1 1 1 1 1 5 3 3 6 4 4 4 5 4 5 3 3 32 4 3 3 4 3 4 2 2 25
1035

IV Year I Sem
57024 57025 57026 OR Power plant engg. CAD/CAM Instrumentation and Control System Elective - I Robotics Mechanical Vibrations Mechatronics Composite materials Elective - II UCM CNC Technologies Automation in Manufacturing Design for manufacturing CAD/CAM lab Production drawing/ Instrumentation lab Total 4 3 4 1 1 1 5 4 5 4 3 4

57027
57028 57029 57030 57031 57032 57033

57034
57035 57604 57605

21

3 3 6

3 3 32

2 2 25 1036

IV Year II Sem
58018 Production Planning and control Elective - I Neural networks and fuzzy logic Reliability Engg. Maintenance and safety Engg. Plant layout and material handling Elective - II Renewable Energy sources Jet propulsion and rocket Engg. Computational Fluid Dynamics Gas dynamics Industry oriented mini project Seminar Project work Comprehensive viva Total 3 1 4 3

58012 58019 58020 58021

58022 58023 58024 58025 58608 58609 58610 58611

6 15 21

6 15 32

2 2 10 2 25 1037

I Year I Semester
S.No. Subject Code Subject L T P/D C Max. Marks INT EXT 30 70 30 70 30 30 30 30 25 25 25 25 25 25 330 70 70 70 70 50 50 50 50 50 50 720 1038

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

121EN01 English-I 121MA01 Engineering Mathematics-I 121PH01 121CH01 1211IT01 121ME01 Engineering Physics-I Engineering Chemistry-I Computer Programming Engineering Drawing-I

3 3 3 2 3 2 ------------16

--2 1 1 1 --------------5

----------4 2 3/2 3/2 3 3/2 3/2 15

3 3 3 2 3 4 1 1 1 2 1 1 25

121EN71 English Language Lab-I 121PH71 Engineering Physics Lab I 121CH71 Engineering Chemistry Lab Computer Programming Lab 121ME71 Engineering Workshop - I 121IT72 IT Workshop - I Total 121IT71

I Year II Semester
S.No. 1 2 Subject Code 121EN02 English-II Max. Marks Subject L 2 3 T 1 2 P/D -----C 2 3 INT 30 30 EXT 70 70 70 70

121MA03 Engineering Mathematics-II

3
4 5 6 7 8 9 10

121CS01
121ME02 121CH02 121ME03 121PH03 121EN72 121CS71 121ME72

Data Structures and C++


Engineering Drawing-II Engineering Chemistry-II Engineering Mechanics Applied Physics English Language Lab-II Data Structures and C++ Lab Engineering Workshop-II

4
1 2 4 3 -------

1
--1 1 1 -------

--3 ------2 3 3/2

4
2 2 4 3 1 2 1

30
30 30 30 30 25 25 25

70
70 70 50 50 50 50

11

121PH73

Applied Physics Lab

---

---

3/2

25

Total

19

11

25

310

690
1039

II Year I Semester
S.No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Subject Code Subject L 3 3 4 3 3 3 --T 2 1 1 1 1 2 --P/D ------------2 C 3 3 4 3 3 3 2 Max. Marks

121MA05 Engineering Mathematics -III 121EC01 121ME06 121ME07 121ME08 121EE41 121EN74 Electronics for Mechanical Engineering Thermodynamics Mechanics of Solids Metallurgy & Material Science Basic Electrical Engineering Effective English Communication and Soft Skills

INT 30
30 30 30 30 30 25

EXT 70
70 70 70 70 70 50

8
9 10 11

121EE91
121EC84 121ME73 121ME74

Basic Electrical Engineering Lab


Basic Electronics Lab Metallurgy Lab Mechanics of Solids Lab

---------

---------

3/2
3/2 3/2 3/2

1
1 1 1

25
25 25 25

50
50 50 50
1040

Total

19

25

305

670

II Year II Semester
S.No. Subject Code Subject L T P/D C Max. Marks

INT

EXT

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

121BT06 121MA09 121ME09 121ME10 121ME11

Environmental Studies Probability and Statistics Applied Thermodynamics-I Manufacturing processes Fluid Mechanics & Hydraulic Machinery

3 3 3 3 3 1 ---

1 2 1 1 1 -----

----------6 2

3 3 3 3 3 3 2

30 30 30 30 30 30 25

70 70 70 70 70 70 50

121ME12 Machine Drawing 121EN74 Effective English Communication and Soft Skills 121ME75 Comprehensive Viva 121ME76 Manufacturing Processes Lab 121ME77 Fluid Mechanics & Hydraulic Machinery Lab

8 9 10

-------

------6

--3 3 14

1 2 2 25

--25 25 255

50 50 50 620
1041

Total 16

III Year I Semester


Subject S.No. Code
1

Subject
Open Elective-I

L
3

T P/D
----

C
3

Max. Marks INT


30

EXT
70

2
3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

121ME13 Kinematics of Machinery


121ME14 Metal Cutting & Machine Tools 121ME15 Applied Thermodynamics-II 121ME16 Design of Machine MembersI 121ME17 Metrology & Instrumentation 121MA71 Quantitative Aptitude 121ME78 Group Project 121ME80 Machine Tools Lab

3
3 3 3 3

1
1 1 1 1

----------3 3 3 3 12

3
3 3 3 3 2 1 2 2 25

30
30 30 30 30 25 25 25 25 280

70
70 70 70 70 50 50 50 50 620
1042

--- ----- ----- --Total 17 5

121ME79 Applied Thermodynamics Lab --- ---

Open Elective I
121FL01 121FL02 121FL03 121IT06 121IT03 121CS03
S.No. 1 Subject Code 121MB49

Spanish French German Computer Graphics Data Base Management Systems Object oriented programming through Java

III Year II Semester


Subject Managerial Economics and Financial Analysis Operation Research Design of Machine Members-II Heat Transfer CAD/CAM Dynamics of Machinery Logical Reasoning Comprehensive Viva Heat Transfer Lab Metrology & Instrumentation Lab Total L 3 T 1 P/D --C 3 Max. Marks INT EXT 30 70

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

121ME18 121ME19 121ME20 121ME21 121ME22 121MA72 121ME81 121ME82 121ME83

3 3 3 3 3 --------18

1 1 1 1 1 --------6

----------3 --3 3 9

3 3 3 3 3 2 1 2 2 25

30 30 30 30 30 25 -25 25 255

70 70 70 70 70 50 50 50 50 620

*** Industry Oriented Min Project will be conducted by all students in summer vacation of III/IV B.Tech, II semester for a period of One month. The report must be submitted in IV/IV B.Tech I-Semester 1043 and will have to be defended. Marks allotted are 75 and Two Credits are provided.

IV Year I Semester
S.No. Subject Code Subject L T P/D C Max. Marks INT EXT 30 70 30
30 30 30 30 30 50 25 25 25

121ME23

2
3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

121ME24
121ME25

121BT37 121ME84 121ME85 121ME86 121ME87

Principle of Finite Element Method Refrigeration & Air Conditioning Power Plant Engineering Professional Elective-I Professional Elective-II Open Elective-II Culture, Values, and Professional Ethics Pre Project Seminar Industry Oriented mini Project CAD/CAM Lab Production Drawing Practice Lab

---

---

4
3 3 3 3 2 ---------

--1 1 1 --1 ---------

----------------3 3

4
3 3 3 3 2 1 2 2 2

70
70 70 70 70 70 --50 50 50

Total 22

29

335

1044 640

Professional Elective I
121ME26 121ME27 121ME28 121ME29 Production Planning and Control Automobile Engineering Non-conventional Source of energy Jet propulsion and Rocket Engines

Professional Elective II
121ME30 121ME31 121ME32 121ME33 Robotics Mechatronics Design for Manufacturing Rapid Proto typing

Open Elective II
121MB54 121MB55 121MB56
121MB57

Logistics and Supply chain management Entrepreneurship Banking operations, Insurance and Risk Management Total Quality Management 1045

IV Year II Semester
S.No . Subject Code Subject L T P/D C Max. Marks INT EXT 3 30 70 4 30 70 10 50 150 2 --- 50 2 25 --21 135 340

1 2 3 4 5

121MB50 Management Science Professional Elective - III 121ME88 Project 121ME89 Comprehensive Viva 121ME90 Technical Seminar Total

3 4 ------7

1 --------1

-------------

Professional Elective III


121ME34 121ME35 121ME36 121ME37 Automation in Manufacturing Computational Fluid Dynamics Quality control and Reliability Engineering Nano Technology

1046

CRITERION 4: Students Performance (75) Admission intake in the programme


Item Sanctioned intake strength in the programme (N) Total number of admitted students in first year minus number of students migrated to other programmes at the end of 1st year (N1) Number of admitted students in 2nd year in the same batch via lateral entry (N2) Total number of admitted students in the (N1+N2) CAY 180 CAYm1 CAYm2 CAYm3 120 120 120 120 120 117

24

24

12

144

144

129
1047

4.1. Success Rate (20) Provide data for the past seven batches of students
Year of entry (in reverse chronological order CAY(12-13) CAYm1(11-12) CAYm2(10-11) CAYm3(09-10)
Number of students admitted in 1st year + admitted via lateral entry in 2nd year (N1 + N2)

Number of students who have successfully completed*


1st year 2nd year 3rd year 4th year

CAYm4 (LYG)(08-09) CAYm5 (LYGm1)(07-08)


CAYm6 (LYGm2) (06-07)

180+0 120+24=144 120+24=144 117+12=129 120+12=132 128+12=140 119+13=132

82 74 77 62 75 82

111 80 105 106 106

96 113 116 102

126 140 119

*successfully completed implies zero backlogs


1048

Success rate = 20 mean of success index (SI) for past three batches SI = (Number of students who graduated f r o m the programme in the stipulated period of course duration)/ (Number of students admitted in the first year of that batch and admitted in 2nd year via lateral entry)

Item
Number of students admitted in the corresponding First Year + admitted via lateral entry in 2nd year Number of students who have graduated in the stipulated period

LYG (CAYm4) (08-09)


132 116

LYGm1 LYGm2 (CAYm5) (CAYm6) (07-08) (06-07)


140 123 132 121

Success index (SI)

0.8787

0.8785

0.91667

Average SI = 0.8912 Success rate = 20 Average SI = 17.825

1049

4.2. Academic Performance (20)


API = = = Academic performance index Mean of cumulative grade point average (CGPA) of all successful students on a 10 point CGPA system (Mean of the percentage of marks of all successful students)/10 Or

Assessment = 2 API Average Assessment for three Years= 13.8

4.2.1. Placement and Higher Studies (20)


Assessment Points = 20(x + 1.25y)/N where, x = Number of students placed y = Number of students admitted for higher studies with valid qualifying scores/ranks, and N =Total number of students who were admitted in the batch including lateral entry subject to maximum assessment points = 20. 1050

Item Number of admitted students corresponding to LYG including lateral entry (N) Number of students who obtained jobs as per the record of placement office (x1) Number of students who found employment otherwise at the end of the final year (x2) x=x1+x2 Number of students who opted for higher studies with valid qualifying scores/ranks (y) Assessment points

LYG LYGm1 LYGm2 (08-09) (07-08) (06-07) 132 140 132

65
5

85
2

53
15

70 30

87 25

68 30

16.28

16.89

15.98
1051

Average assessment points = 16.385

4.3 Professional Activities (15) 4.3.1 Professional societies / chapters and organizing engineering events (3) (Instruction: The institution may provide data for past three years).
Professional Societies/Chapters
IEEE Students Chapter ISTE Students chapter Robotics Club
1052

organizing engineering events (annually)

4.3.2. Organisation of paper contests, design contests, etc. and achievements (3) (Instruction: The institution may provide data for past three years).
Student awards and achievements in the year 2011-2012
S.No. Name of the student Roll No. Year Participant Institution/Organizati on Prize

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011

Ist prize 2nd prize 2nd prize Participation Participation Participation Participation Participation Participation
1053

10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19

2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011

Participation Participation Participation Participation Participation Participation Participation Participation Ist (800 m), IInd (400 m) Ist (100 m)
1054

20

2011

IInd (Group dance) IInd (Group dance) Ist (Group dance) Ist (paper presentation) Ist (Volleyball) 2nd prize Ist prize 2nd prize 1st prize Special prize Special prize 1st prize 1st prize 2nd prize Ist prize Iind Prize Ist Prize IInd place
1055

21 22 23 24 25 26

2011 2011 2011

27. 28. 29.

2011 2011 2011

S.No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

Name of the student

Year 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012

Participation Institution/Organization

Prize Runnerup First prize First prize 1st prize 1st prize Goldmedal IInd carom IInd (Volleyball) IIIrd (800m) IIIrd (200m) IInd (Volleyball) IInd (table tennis) IInd carom IInd volleyball 1st (Poster presentation) 1st (Poster presentation) IInd (Volleyball)
1056

9 10 11 12

2012 2012 2012 2012

13

2012

Ist (Volleyballa) IInd (Volleyball)

14

2012

Ist (Volleyball)
IInd Volleyball

15

2012

Ist (group dance) Ist (oous) 1st prize IInd prize Ist prize Participation Participation Ist prize Participation 1st prize
1057

16 17

2012 2012

18 19

2012 2012

20.

2012

4.3.3. Publication of technical magazines, newsletters, etc. (3) (Instruction: The institution may list the publications mentioned earlier along with the names of the editors, publishers, etc.).
Name of the Technical magazines/ Newsletters/ Activities Editorial Board Members Publishers

IEEE Student Chapter Robotics Club


1058

Name of the Technical magazines/ Newsletters/ Activities

Editorial Board Members

Publishers

Arts Club

1059

4.3.4. Entrepreneurship initiatives, product designs, and innovations (3) (Instruction: The institution may specify the efforts and achievements.)
S.No
1

Date

Venue of college/Institute

No. of Students

2 3

4
1060

4.3.5 Publications and awards in inter-institute events by students of the programme of study (3) (Instruction: The institution may provide a table indicating those publications, which fetched awards to srudents in the events/conferences organized by other institutes. A tabulated list of all other students publications may be included in the appendix.)
S. No.
1 2 3 4

Name of the student

Roll No.

Year
2011 2011 2011 2011

Participant Institution/Organization

Prize
2nd prize Participation Participation Participation
1061

2011

Participation

6
7 8 9 10

2011
2011 2011 2011 2011

Participation
Participation Participation Participation Participation

11
12

2011
2011

Participation
Participation

13

2011

Participation
1062

14
15 16 17 18 19

2011
2011

Participation
Participation 2nd prize Ist prize 2nd prize 1st prize

2011

Special prize
Special prize 1st prize 1st prize 2nd prize

20

2011

Ist Prize
1063

Student awards and achievements in the year 2009 to 2010


S.No.
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15

Name of the student

Year
II/IV II/IV II/IV II/IV II/IV II/IV II/IV II/IV II/IV II/IV II/IV II/IV II/IV II/IV II/IV

Participant Institution/Organization
Robotics club, March 2009

Prize
Ist Prize

Robotics club

Ist Prize

Robotics club

Ist Prize

Robotics club

Ist Prize
1064

16 17 18 19 20

II/IV II/IV II/IV II/IV II/IV

Robotics club

Ist Prize

Idea and Innovation club

Ist Prize

21 22 23

II/IV II/IV II/IV

Sports meet 09

Ist Prize

Robotics club i) ii) iii) iv) v) vi) Robotics club i)

Participation 2nd Prize Participation Co-ordinator

24

II/IV

2nd Prize

ii)

Ist Prize
1065

CRITERION 5: Faculty Contributions (175)


List of Faculty members: Exclusively for the Program / Shared with other Programs
Distribution of teaching load (%) Qualification, Name of University and the Faculty year of graduation Designation and Date of joining the Institution No of research Intera R & D and Holdpublication ction Consultanc ing an s in journals with IPRs y work incuba and outsid with tion conferences e amount unit since world joining

1st Year

UG

PG

1066

5.1 Student-Teacher Ratio (STR) (20) :


STR is desired to be 15 or superior
Assessment = 20 * 15 / STR ; subject to Max. Assessment of 20

STR = Student Teacher Ratio = (x + y + z) / N1


X = Number of students in 2nd year of the program Y = Number of students in 3rd year of the program Z = Number of students in 4th year of the program N1 = Total Number Faculty Members in the program (by considering fractional load)
Year CAYm2 (2010-11) CAYm1 (2011-12) x y z x+y+z N1 STR Assessment (Max. is 20) 20 20

127
141

134
126

140
134

401
401

34
34

11.79
11.79

CAY (2012-13)

144

143

125

412

28

14.71

20 20
1067

Average Assessment

For Item Nos. 5. 2 to 5. 8, the denominator term (N) is computed as follows: N = Maximum {N1, N2}, N1 = Total Number of Faculty Members in the Program (considering the fractional load), N2 = Number of Faculty positions needed for Student Teacher Ratio (STR) of 15.
Year

CAYm2
CAYm1

N1 34 34

N2 27 27

N = Max. (N1,N2) 34 34

CAY

28

28

28

5.2 Faculty Cadre Ratio (20)


Assessment Where CRI
where x y

= = = = =

20 * CRI Cadre Ratio Index 2.25 ( 2x + y ) / N; subject to Max. CRI = 1.0 Number of professors in the program Number of associate professors in the program

1068

Year CAYm2 CAYm1 CAY

x 14 13 11

y 6 6 4

N 34 34 28

CRI 1.0 1.0 1.0

Assessment 20 20 20

Average Assessment

20

5.3 Faculty Qualifications (30)


Assessment Where FQI = = = = = = 6 * FQI Faculty Qualification Index (10x + 6y + 2z0) / N2, such that x+y+z0 N2; and z0z Number of Faculty Members with Ph. D. Number of Faculty Members with M. E / M. Tech Number of Faculty Members with B. E / B. Tech./M.Sc. x y z N FQI Assessment 14 28 0 34 11.40 68.44 13 29 0 34 11.26 67.55 11 17 0 28 7.57 45.43 Average Assessment 60.47
1069

where

x y z

CAYm2 CAYm1 CAY

5.4 Faculty Competencies Correlation to Programme Specific Criteria (15) Sl. No.
1

Name of staff member

Qualifications & Specialization

Experience a. Teaching b. Industry (As on 30-06-2011)

3 4 5

6
1070

7 8 9 10 11 12 13
14
15 16 17 18 19 20
1071

5.5 Faculty as participants/resourse persons in faculty development / training activities (15)


Max. 5 per faculty
Name of the faculty CAY m2 CAY m1 CAY

Sum N Assessment = 3 x sum/N

9 34 0.8

21 34 1.86 Average assessment

90 28 9.64 4.10
1072

5.6 Faculty Retention (15)


Assessment where RPI = = = 3 x RPI / N Retention Point Index Points assigned to all faculty members

where points assigned to a faculty = 1 point for each year of experience at the Institute but not exceeding 5.
Item CAYm2 2009-10 19 CAYm1 CAY 2010-11 2011-12 6 9 7 4 2 1 13 36 90 9.64 9.28
1073

Number Number Number Number Number Number N

of faculty with of faculty with of faculty with of faculty with of faculty with of faculty with

experience < l year (x0) 1 to 2 years experience (x1) 2 to 3 years experience (x2) 3 to 4 years experience (x3) 4 to 5 years experience (x4) experience > 5years (x5)

RPI = x1 + 2x2 + 3x3 + 4x4 + 5x5

7 9 1 2 5 0 0 2 9 13 34 34 69 86 Assessment 8.11 10.11 Average Assessment

5.7 Faculty Research Publications (20)


Assessment of FRP = 4 * Sum of the research publication points scored by each faculty member / N. (Instruction: A faculty member scores maximum five research publication points depending upon the quality of the research papers and books published in the past 3 years). The research papers considered are those: i. which can be located on Internet and/or are included in hard-copy volumes/ proceedings, published by reputed publishers, and ii. the faculty members affiliation, in the published papers/books, is of the current institution. Include a list of all such publications and IPRs along with details of DOI, publisher, month/year, etc. 1074

Name of faculty (contributing to FRP)

Sum N (Number of faculty positions required for an STR of 15) Assessment FRP = 4x Sum/N

FRP Points (Max. 5 per faculty) CAYm2 CAYm1 CAY 1 5 1 2 3 1 1 3 1 3 1 1 1 2 5 0 0 1 1 1 5 1 1 1 8 24 10 34 34 28 1.43 1.731075

0.94 2.82 Average Assessment

5.8 Faculty Intellectual Property Rights (FIPR)(10)


Assessment of FIPR = 2 * Sum of the FIPR points scored by each Faculty member / N (Instruction: A faculty member scores at most 5 FIPR points each year. FIPR includes awarded national/international patents, design and copyrights).
Name of faculty member (contributing to FIPR) FIPR Points (max. 5 per faculty) CAYm2 CAYm1 CAY

................. ................. ................. Sum N Assessment FIPR = 2x Sum/N

Average Assessment

1076

5.9 Funded R & D Projects and Consultancy (FRDC) Work(20)

FRDC = Faculty R&D and Consultancy work Assessment of R&D and Consultancy Projects = 4 * Sum of FRDC by each faculty / N. (Instruction : A faculty member scores maximum 5 points, depending upon the amount). A suggestive scheme is given below for a minimum amount of Rs. 1 lakh) 5 points for funding by National Agency, 4 points for funding by State Agency, 4 points for funding by private sector, and 2 points for funding by the sponsoring Trust/Society
1077

Name of faculty (contributing to FRDC)

FRDC Points CAYm2 5 5 CAYm1 5 5 10 18 2.2 CAY

5
5 15 1.33 1.88
1078

Sum N (Min. N is 3) (excluding Asstt Prof.) Assessment FRDC = 4 x Sum/N

10 19 2.1

Average Assessment

5.10 Faculty Interaction with Outside World (10)


FIP = Faculty Interaction Points
Assessment = 2 x Sum of FIP by each faculty member / N. (Instruction: A faculty member gets at the most 5 Interaction Points, depending upon the type of Institution or R&D Lab or Industry, as given below: 5 points for interaction with a reputed Institution abroad, Institution of Eminence in India or National Research Labs, 3 points for interaction with Institution/Industry (not covered earlier). Points to be awarded, for those activities, which result in joint efforts in publication of books/research paper, pursuing externally funded R&D/ consultancy projects and / or development of semesterlong course/ teaching modules. 1079

Name of faculty (contributing to FIP)

CAYm2 (10-11)
3 3 3 3 3 5

FIP CAYm1 (11-12) CAY (12-13)


3 5 3 5 3 3 3 3 5 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

3 3

3 3

Sum N (Min. N is 3) (excluding Asstt Prof.) Assessment of FIP = 2 x Sum/N

26 19
2.73

34 18
3.77 Average Assessment

3 29 15 3.86
1080 3.45

CRITERION 6:Facilities and Technical Support (75)


Description of Class rooms, faculty rooms, seminar and conference halls: (Entries in the following table are sample entries)
Room Description
Class Room No 4305

Usage
I year MECH(A)

Shared / Exclusive
Exclusive

Capacity
75

Rooms Equipped with PC, Internet, Book rack, meeting


Black board,White screen, Multimedia projector, , CPU with Internet and 2 ACs. Black board, White screen, Multimedia projector, , CPU with Internet and 2 ACs. Black board, White screen, Multimedia projector, OHP, CPU with Internet and 2 ACs. Black board, White screen, Multimedia projector, OHP, CPU with Internet and 2 ACs. Black board, White screen, Multimedia projector, OHP, CPU with Internet and 2 ACs.

Class Room No 4306


Class Room No 2105 Class Room No 2106

I year MECH(B)
II year MECH(A) II year MECH(B)

Exclusive
Exclusive Exclusive Exclusive

75
75 75 75

Class Room No III year MECH(A) 2109

1081

Class Room No III year 2404 MECH(B)

Exclusive 75 Exclusive

Class Room No IV year 4205 MECH(A)

75
Exclusive

Black board, White screen, Multimedia projector, OHP, CPU with Internet and 2 ACs. Black board, White screen, Multimedia projector, OHP, CPU with Internet and 2 ACs. Black board, White screen, LCD, OHP, CPU with Internet and 2 ACs. Black board, White screen, Multimedia projector, OHP, CPU with Internet and 2 ACs.
1082

Class Room No IV year 4206 MECH(B)

75
Exclusive 38

Tutorial Room No 2203B Tutorial room No 2203B,2214A.

I year MECH

Tutorial Room No 2203B

III year MECH

Exclusive

38

Tutorial Room IV year MECH No 2214A Seminar Hall 7102 For MECH Students

Exclusive

38

Exclusive

132

Meeting room No ( Seminar Room) 7102

For MECH Students

Exclusive

132

Black board, White screen, Multimedia projector, OHP, CPU with Internet and 2 ACs. Black board, White screen, Multimedia projector, OHP, CPU with Internet and 2 ACs. Dias, White screen, Black board, Multimedia projector, OHP, CPU with Internet, Microphone with speakers, fully air conditioned. Dias, White screen, Black board, Multimedia projector, OHP, CPU with Internet, Microphone with speakers, fully air conditioned.
1083

Faculty Rooms
Room Description
Usage

Shared / Exclusive
Exclusive

Executive Executive Director room, Director 5102

Principal room,5103

Principal

Exclusive

HOD Room, 2111

HOD

Exclusive

Professor Room1 2127

Professor

Exclusive

Rooms Equipped with Capacity PC, Internet, Book rack, meeting space 1+ 20(for Centralized AC, Internet staff with PC- 1 No. , Printer, meeting) Scanner, land phone, intercom, mini library( two cup boards) 1+ 10(for Centralized AC, Internet staff with PC- 1 No. , Printer, meeting) Scanner, land phone, intercom, mini library( two cup boards) 1+ 5(for staff Centralized AC, Internet meeting) with PC- 1 No. , Printer, Scanner, land phone, intercom, mini library( two cup boards) 2+5 PC with Internet- 1 No. , (students Mini Library (in two cup interaction) boards)
1084

Professor Room-2 2125

Professor

Exclusive

2+5 (students interaction)

Professor Room-3 2129

Professor

Exclusive

Professor Room-4 2124

Professor

Exclusive

Professor Room-5 2123

Professor

Exclusive

Professor Room-6 2117

Professor

Exclusive

PC with Internet1 No. , Mini Library (in two cup boards) 2+5 (students PC with Internetinteraction) 1 No. , Mini Library (in two cup boards) 2+5 (students PC with Internetinteraction) 1 No. , Mini Library (in two cup boards) 2+5 (students PC with Internetinteraction) 1 No. , Mini Library (in two cup boards) 1+5(students PC with Internet interaction) 1 No. , Mini Library (in two cup boards)
1085

Professor Room-7

Professor

Exclusive

1+5(students interaction)

Associate Professor Room-1 2128 Associate Professor Room-2 2107 Associate Professor Room-3 TDTC room Staff room MOS Lab/MMS lab TE Lab Staff room-2214C

Associate Professor

Exclusive

1+5(students interaction)

2-Associate Professor 1 Assoc. Prof and 1 Asst. Prof . 1 Assoc. Prof. 3-Asst. Prof. 1-Asst. Prof 8-Asst. Prof.

Shared

1+5(students interaction) 1+5(students interaction) 1+5(students interaction) 1+5(students interaction) 1+5(students interaction) 1+2 (students interaction)

PC with Internet 1 No. , Mini Library (in two cup boards) PC with Internet 1 No. , Mini Library (in two cup boards) PC -2 Nos with internet facility PC -2 Nos with internet facility PC -1 Nos with internet facility PC -2 Nos with internet facility PC -1 Nos with internet facility

Shared

Shared Shared Exclusive Shared

1086

6.1 Class Rooms in the Department (20)


6.1.1 Adequate number of rooms for lectures (core/electives), seminars, tutorials, etc for the program (10) Adequate number of rooms for lectures Core/Electives/Tutorial : 8 Seminars : 2

6.1.2 Teaching aids black / white-board, multimedia projectors, etc. (5)


Teaching aids: Black board : 1 (In every room) White Screen : 1 (In every room
PC with Internet and Multimedia projector : 1 (In every room)

OHP : 1 (In every room)


1087

6.1.3 Acoustics, class room size, conditions of chairs/benches, air circulation, lighting, exits, ambience, and such other amenities/facilities (5) Acoustics : Good. Class room size : 7.32 X 11 sq-meters. Conditions of Chairs / Benches : Good Air circulation : Good (6 Windows, Air conditioners, 6 fans) Lighting : 9 Numbers florescent tubes each of 40 watts. Exit : Entry and exit same door Ambience : Good. Internet : Wifi facility of Bandwidth 24 Mbps. Safety Equipment : Fire Extinguisher.
1088

6.2 Faculty Rooms in the Department (15)


6.2.1 Availability of individual faculty rooms (5)

6.2.2 Room equipped with white/black board, computer, internet, and such other amenities/facilities (5) Yes, Equipped with black board, computer and Internet 6.2.3 Usage of room for discussion/counseling with students (5)

Yes, students counseling


1089

The following table is required for the subsequent criteria.


Laboratory description in the curriculum Exclusive use/Shared? Space, number of Students Number Quality of of instruments experime nts
Good and working condition Good and working condition Good and working condition Good and working condition

Lab manuals

Metrology Lab

1 labs, each 71.23 sq.m/25 Exclusive use students 60 Sq.m/18 students 130.43Sq.m

Available and provided to the students Available and provided to the students Available and provided to the students Available and provided to the students
1090

Basic workshops Exclusive use Mechanics of Solids Thermal Engineering Laboratory

21

Exclusive use

130.43Sq,m

Exclusive use

130.43Sq,m

12

Manufacturing processes 230.76Sq.m Exclusive use 230.76Sq.m Lab


Fluid Mechanics & Hydraulics Machines & systems Lab Metallurgy Lab Exclusive use 130.43Sq,m Exclusive use 130.43Sq,m Exclusive use 46.45Sq.m Exclusive use 56.85Sq.m Exclusive use 139.35Sq.m Exclusive use 230.76Sq.m

12

10

Heat Transfer Lab Instrumentation & Control Systems Lab

10

CAD / Lab

12

Machine Tools Lab

12

Good and working condition Good and working condition Good and working condition Good and working condition Good and working condition Good and working condition Good and working condition

Available and provided to the students Available and provided to the students Available and provided to the students Available and provided to the students Available and provided to the students Available and provided to the students Available and provided to the students
1091

6.3 Laboratories in the Department to meet the


Curriculum requirements and the POs (25) 6.3.1 Adequate, well equipped labs to meet the curriculum requirements and the POs (10)

Adequate 6.3.2 Availability of computing facilities in the department (5) Adequate 6.3.3 Availability of laboratories with technical support within and beyond working hours (5) Yes, upto 7.00 P.M
1092

6.3.4 Equipments to run experiments and their maintenance, Number of students per experimental set up, Size of the laboratories, overall ambience etc. (5) Equipment : student = 1:3 Total Area of 2102 LAB 213.69 sq.m. Total Area of 2203 LAB 177.7 sq.m. Overall ambience Good
1093

6.4 Technical Manpower Support in the Department (15)


Name of the Designation Technical (Pay-scale) Staff Exclusive / Shared Work Date of Joining Qualification At Now Joining Other Technical skills gained Responsibility

Metrology and Engineering ITI Inspection, (Draughtsman Industrial Overall Foreman Exclusive 14.02.2000 -Mechanical) Hydraulic and Authority. Rs.16372 1971; Pneumatic LME-1978 control Certifications at ATI Metrology and Engineering Responsible for Lab Inspection SSC,ITI(Fitter)Black smithy Technician Shared 20.10.1997 certification and 1992-94 and sand Rs.12658 workshop on testing shop TIG welding at ATI Calibration and Dimensional Responsible for Lab SSC; ITI Pursuing Instrument and molding, house Technician Shared 22.10.1997 DraughtsmanDiploma measurement wiring, and Rs.12658 Civil-1986, certification at fitting shop ATI
1094

6.4.1. Availability of adequate and qualified technical supporting staff for program specific labs (10) Adequate 6.4.2. Incentives, skill up grade and professional advancement (5)
Name of the Staff Year 4 times 3 times 5 times 3 times 4 times 3 times 2012 2012 Award Best Staff Best Staff Best Staff Best Staff Best Staff Best Staff Best Staff Best Staff
1095

Skill up grade and Professional advancement


1. ------------- was sent to Advanced Training Institute to upgrade skills on Metrology and Engg Inspection and Industrial Hydraulics and pneumatics controls. 2. ------------- was sent to Advance Training Institute to upgrade skills on Calibration and Dimensional Instrument and measurement. He is presently pursuing Diploma in Mechanical Engineering 3. -------------- was sent to Advance Training Institute to upgrade skills on Mechanical Maintenance of plants and machines and on TIG welding 4. --------------- is presently pursuing Diploma in Mechanical Engineering. He was sent to Advanced Training Institute on Bearings and Lubrication 5. --------------- is presently pursuing MBA Course and PGDCA 6. -------------- was sent to Advanced Training Institute to upgrade skills on Metrology and Engineering Inspection and TIG welding. 1096

CRITERION 7: Academic Support Units and TeachingLearning Process (75)


Students Admission Admission intake (for information only)
Item CAY CAYm1 Sanctioned intake strength in the institute 180 120 (N) 121 84 Number of students admitted on merit basis (N1) 56 36 Number of students admitted on management quota/otherwise (N2)
Total number of admitted students in the institute (N1+N2) 177 120

CAYm2 CAYm3 120 120


84 84

36

34

120

118

Instruction: The intake of the students during the last three years against the sanctioned capacity may be reported here.)
1097

Admission quality (for information only) Divide the total admitted ranks (or percentage marks) into five or a few more meaningful Ranges
Rank range CAY 00 58 70 46 3 CAYm1 CAYm2 00 43 37 38 02 00 44 36 37 03 CAYm3 01 47 32 34 04

0-1000
1001-10000 10001--50000 > 50000 Admitted without rank

(Instruction: The admission quality of the students in terms of their ranks in the entrance examination may be presented here.)
1098

Tabular data for estimating student-teacher ratio and faculty qualification for first year common Courses List of faculty members teaching first year courses:
Name of faculty Qualifica Designation tion Professor Professor Professor Associate Professor Date of joining 24-03-2011 11-08-2011 03-03-2003 23-10-2006

Distribution of Department teaching load with which (%) associated 1st UG PG year
Mech Mech Mech Mech 50 50 50 33 50 50 33 33
1099

50 -

Associate Professor
Assistant Professor Assistant Professor Assistant Professor
Assistant Professor

23-10-2006
20-04-2001 19-07-2006 16-10-2006
23-10-2006

Mech
Mech Mech Mech

50
50 50 50 50

50
50 50 50 50

Mech

Assistant Professor
Assistant Professor Assistant Professor

29-07-2010
06-08-2011 21-12-2011

Mech
Mech Mech

50
50 50

50
50 50

(Instruction: The institution may list here the faculty members engaged in first year teaching along with other relevant data.) 1100

7.1. Academic Support Units (35)


7.1.1. Assessment of First Year Student Teacher Ratio (FYSTR) (10) Data for first year courses to calculate the FYSTR:
Year
Number of students (approved intake strength) 120 120 180 10
1101

Number of faculty members (considering fractional load) 10 10 12

FYSTR

Assessment = (10 x 15) / FYSTR (Max. is 10) 10 10 10

CAYm2 CAYm1 CAY Average

12 12 15

7.1.2.

Assessment of Faculty Qualification Teaching First Year Common Courses (15)

Assessment of qualification = 3(5x + 3y + 2z0)/N, where x + y + z0 N and z0 z x = Number of faculty members with PhD y = Number of faculty members with ME/MTech/NET-Qualified/MPhil z = Number of faculty members with BE/BTech/MSc/MCA/MA
N = Number of faculty members needed for FYSTR of 25
Year
CAYm2 CAYm1 CAY Assessment of faculty qualification 3 7 0 5 15 3 7 0 5 15 3 9 0 8 15 Average assessment of faculty qualification 15 1102

7.1.3. Basic science/engineering laboratories (adequacy of space, number of students per batch, quality and availability of measuring instruments, laboratory manuals, list of experiments) (8)
Laboratory description Basic Engineering workshop Engg. Physics Lab Engg. Chemistry Lab Computer Lab-4

Space , number of students


132 Sq.m/60

Software used

Type of experime nts


11

Quality of instruments ISO certified ISO Certified ISO Certified ISO Certified

Laboratory manuals Available (distributed to all students Available (distributed to all students) Available (distributed to all students) Available (distributed to all students) Available (distributed to all students) Available (distributed to all students) 1103

158 Sq.m/60

12

161 Sq.m/60

12

278 Sq.m

Computer Lab-5

278 Sq.m

Computer Lab-6

102 Sq.m

Turbo C+ MS office 2003 Fedora 8.0 Turbo C+ MS office 2003 Fedora 8.0 Turbo C+ MS office 2003 Fedora 8.0

70

70

ISO Certified

70

ISO Certified

7.1.4. Language laboratory (2)


Language Laboratory Space , number of students Software Type of Quality of Guidance used experiments instruments Lab manuals and systems made available along with two faculty Lab manuals and systems made available along with two faculty

ELCS Lab

238 Sq.mt/60

Phonetics

By using visual software

AECS Lab

238 Sq.mt/60

LS

By using visual software

(Instruction: The institution may provide the details of the language laboratory. The descriptors as listed here are not exhaustive). 1104

7.2. Teaching Learning Process(40)


7.2.1. Tutorial classes to address student questions: size of tutorial classes, hours per subject given in the timetable (5) Provision of tutorial classes in timetable: YES/NO Tutorial sheets provided: YES/NO Tutorial classes taken by faculty / teaching assistants / senior students / others................... Number of tutorial classes per subject per week: Number of students per tutorial class: Number of subjects with tutorials: 1st year 2nd year........... 3rd year........... 4th year...............
1105

a) b) c) d) e) f)

Provision of Tutorial classes in time table Tutorial sheets provided Tutorial classes taken by Number of tutorial classes per subject Number of students per tutorial class Number students with tutorials 1st year

YES YES Faculty 1 per week 20

2nd year
3rd year 4th year

6
6 5

(Instruction: Here the institution may report the details of the tutorial classes that are being conducted on various subjects and also state the impact of such tutorial classes).
1106

7.2.2. Mentoring system to help at individual levels (5) Type of mentoring: Professional guidance / career advancement / course work specific / laboratory specific / total development

Number of faculty mentors: all faculty members Number of students per mentor: Frequency of meeting: 20 students per mentor Frequency of meeting : monthly 4 times per semester (Instruction: Here the institution may report the details of the mentoring system that has been developed for the students for various purposes and also state the efficacy of such system).
1107

7.2.3. Feedback analysis and reward / corrective measures taken, if any (5)
Feedback collected for all courses: YES/NO Specify the feedback collection process: YES Percentage of students participating: Specify the feedback analysis process: All students Basis of reward / corrective measures, if any: YES Best Teacher awards for the faculty are presented. It is based on students feedback, university results of the subject taught along with opinion of the Head of the Department and Head of the Institution. 1108

Number of corrective actions taken in the last three years: Thrice per semester (Instruction: The institution needs to design an effective feedback questionnaire. It needs to justify that the feedback mechanism it has developed really helps in evaluating teaching and finally contributing to the quality of teaching).

7.2.4. Scope for selflearning (5)


Group projects, Mini Projects, Major Projects, assignments, Teaching Club, Seminars, Project competitions. Communication Skills, Soft skills, Personality Development Entrepreneurship etc. are also arranged.
1109

7.2.5. Generation of selflearning facilities, and availability of materials for learning beyond syllabus (5) (Instruction: The institution needs to specify the facilities for self-learning / learning beyond syllabus.) Studying for competitive exams such as GATE, CAT, GRE and TOEFL. Preparations for employability enhancement and participation in national level events in Technical and extra curricular activities. Availability of eJournals, ebooks, videos on demand and cassettes, CDs prepared by various agencies such as APSONET and variety of library books for self learning.
1110

7.2.6. Career Guidance, Training, Placement, and Entrepreneurship Cell (5)


(Instruction: The institution may specify the facility and management to facilitate career guidance including counselling for higher studies, industry interaction for training/internship/placement, Entrepreneurship cell and incubation facility and impact of such systems)

Institution offers placement and counseling services through the established Career Guidance, Training and Placement Cell which organizes all the programs of employability enhancement, personality development and campus recruitment.
1111

The training and Placement Cell is established with Dean and three other officers. It is equipped with internet and other facilities for better efforts for employment of students. It organizes training programs to improve the competitiveness of the students for better employability through skill development and career planning. Employability Enhancement Program is organized to improve language skills, soft skills, attitude, refining aptitude, and developing skills in quantitative analysis and logical reasoning, basic computer skills and technical skills in domain areas besides conducting mock interviews. 1112

Entrepreneurship cell and incubation facility


1. Organized Eight (8) Entrepreneurship Awareness camps for engineering, management and polytechnic students in addition to unemployed rural youth. 2. Organized National Level Competition on Innovation for Engineering Students in 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011 and 2012. 3. Completed Research Project on Entrepreneurship in Tiny, Small and Medium industries of Hyderabad 4. In addition to the above, six (6) skills development programmes were organized for rural community under TEQIP. 5. Six National Level Innovative Idea & solution in Competitions in 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011 and 2012 were conducted. Dr. A.S.Rao, Advisor, Department of Scientific & Industrial Research, Govt. of India, appreciated students efforts and addressed the students & faculty on the possibility of 1113 patenting some excellent innovations.

7.2.7. Cocurricular and Extracurricular Activities (5) (Instruction: The institution may specify the Cocurricular and extra-curricular activities, e.g., NCC/NSS, cultural activities, etc) Co-curricular and extra-curricular activities, e.g., NCC/ NSS, cultural activities etc. Specify facilities and usages in brief? NSS, Blood donation camp, AIDS awareness programme, Literacy programme, Musi river clean-up survey programme, etc. Students and staff were very actively involved in various extra and co-curricular activities. Application for NCC is in process.
1114

7.2.8. Games and sports facilities and qualified sports instructors (5)
(Instruction: The institution may specify the facilities available and their usage in brief)

Specify-facility, management and usages? There are facilities for indoor and outdoor games.
College has got sports grounds and facilities for sports and games. College has got cricket ground, volley ball court, Basket ball court, shuttle court, Gym and ample space for indoor games. Three hours per week slot is provided for sports and games in time table.
1115

CRITERION 8 : Governance, Institutional Support and Financial Resources (75) 8.1 Campus Infrastructure and Facility (10) Land, built-up area and academic infrastructure Physical resource available
A. Exclusive for this Built-up floor space Shared with other Colleges in this campus, if any Land No. of acres Built-up floor space No. of sq.m 25 acres 38425 sq.m. Nil

Nil

1116

The academic infrastructure facilities available are given below. For Academic activities (Classrooms, Labs, Workshops, Seminar Halls) For Co-curricular activities (Student activities clubs, Professional societies, Technical Associations, open-air theatre) For General Computer Education (computers, software) For Library, Internet with Wifi facility (Books, Journals, Digital Library)
1117

8.1.1 Maintenance of academic infrastructure and facilities (4)


Classrooms are fully air-conditioned and equipped with OHP & L.C.D. projectors Maintenance Section frequently visits and rectifies the problems if any and also on the complaint of faculty & students. Staff rooms are air-conditioned. Equipped with internet & Telephone facility. Each department is self sufficient with departmental Libraries and Lab facilities. Laboratories are well-equipped to carryout R&D activities apart from basic facilities to have practical classes as per curriculum of UG/PG courses.
1118

There are 1414 computers in the campus and licensed software to carry out practical classes, and R&D activities. Wi-Fi connectivity, intranet, and internet connection of 24 mbps and digital library are available. Library with about 1,10,000 books, printed and on line Journals, National & International are available. The entire campus of 25 acres is provided with road links and all buildings are built nicely planned. The college has developed beautiful landscape and lawns with green ambience. The architecture and the frontage of administrative buildings are beautifully designed with two water pools and fountain. The total ambience of the college is serene and congenial for academic activities. 1119

8.1.2 Hostel (boys and girls), transportation facility, and canteen (2) a) Hostel for Boys ? YES
1. 2. Number of Rooms Number of students accommodated 45 134

b)

Hostel for Girls? YES


1. 2. Number of Rooms Number of students accommodated

Exclusive
31 66

Hosted capacity is increased to 174 for boys and 100 for girls.
1120

c) College owned buses and Exclusive State Transport facilities are available.
1. Number of Buses (owned by the college) 2. Transport buses besides General route buses 3. Cars used for Teaching Staff for pickup and dropping 4. Buses for faculty and staff 35 14 07 06

d) Number of Canteen: 2
1. Sitting space for students 2. Daily usage for students 200 600
1121

8.1.3. Electricity, power backup, telecom facility, drinking water, and security (4) Electrical Supply: The institution has high tension 11 KV power supply with two transformers of 250 KVA and 500KVA. To avoid power cuts and fluctuations in power supply two generators with the following specifications are installed. Cummins make water cooled 125 KVA Generator Caterpillar make water cooled 360 KVA Generator Telecom facility: The institution has land lines. A separate tower is installed by Idea and important staff members are covered with economical group coverage. Students day to day activities will be communicated to parents through internet and SMS. 1122

Drinking water facility: The college has its own water supply system with 3 bore wells of 6 dia and two overhead tanks of 2.5 lakhs liters storage capacity each to meet the requirement like labs, water for toilets, gardening and construction activities etc. The institution provides for 3000 liters of mineral water for every day for drinking purpose of students and staff. The college has provided, Coolers of large capacity in different convenient locations covering departments and administration. Security: Well and vigilant trained 42 security persons are guarding the Institution to see that the infrastructure is well-protected and there will not be any ragging & 1123 indiscipline incidents among the students.

8.2 Organisation, Governance, and Transparency (10) 8.2.1 Governing body, administrative setup, and functions of various bodies (2) Governing Body Governing body is highest authority of the institution to take decision from time to time with the following members.
List of Members of Governing Body : -------------------------- -------------------------- -------------------------- -------------------------- ------------------------- -------------------------- -------------------------- ---------------------------

1124

Functions: Subject to the existing provision in the byelaws of the respective college and rules laid down by the state government, the governing body of the college shall have powers to : fix the fees and other charges payable by the students of the college on the recommendations of the Finance Committee. Institute scholarships, fellowships, studentships, medals, prizes and certificates on the recommendations of the Academic Council.
1125

Approve institution of new programmes of study leading to degree and/or diplomas. Perform such other functions and institute committees, as may be necessary and deemed fit for the proper development, and fulfill the objectives for which the college has been declared as autonomous. Various critical and important issues relating to Finance, Administration etc. are discussed and finalized in Governing body meetings. The Decision will be implemented in the institution.
1126

College Academic Committee: This is the policy making body at the college level. With the membership of all senior Professors, Head of Departments, Deans & Directors. All Academic & Administrative aspects for smooth functioning of the institution are discussed and finalized for further implementation. In autonomous mode College constituted boards of studies and Academic Council as per UGC Guide lines. The syllabus revision is taken up and approved by them. Boards of Studies : Boards of Studies are constituted for each branch of engineering at UG and PG level and also for different subjects of Sciences and Humanities including foreign languages. The Minutes of these Boards of Studies meetings are submitted to Academic Council for its 1127 final approval.

Academic Council
College Academic Council is the policy making body at the college level with regard to curriculum. The list of members is given hereunder: List of the Academic Council Members
Sl. No. Name of the Member Designation

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22

Principal Principal, OU Engg. College Registrar, JNTUH Principal, JNTUH Sr. Manager, HR, Infosys, Hyderabad Executive Director Dean (Admin. & R&D) Dean (Academic) Director, SMS HoD, MCA HoD, S&H HoD, BT HoD, ECE I/c HoD, ECM HoD, Mech. HoD, EEE HoD, IT HoD, CSE Assoc. Prof. S&H Asst. Prof. S&H Principal, of Engg. Karimnagar Additional G.M. (R&D), BHEL

1128

All academic aspects for smooth functioning of the institution are discussed and finalized for further implementation. In autonomous mode College constituted boards of studies and Academic Council as per UGC Guide lines. The syllabus revised is taken up and approved by them. Functions: Without prejudice to the generality of functions mentioned, the Academic Council will have powers to :
1129

a) Scrutinize and approve the proposals with or without modification of the Boards of Studies with regard to courses of study, academic regulations, curricula, syllabi and modifications thereof, instructional and evaluation arrangements, methods, procedures relevant thereto etc. provided that where the Academic Council differs on any proposal, it will have the right to return the matter for reconsideration to the Board of Studies concerned or reject it, after giving reasons to do so. b) Make regulations regarding the admission of students to different programmes of study in the college.
1130

c) Make regulations for sports, extra-curricular activities, and proper maintenance and functioning of the playgrounds and hostels. d) Recommend to the Governing Body proposals for institution of new programmes of study. e) Recommend to the Governing Body institution of scholarships, studentships, fellowships, prizes and medals, and to frame regulations for the award of the same. f) Submit to the Governing Body on suggestion(s) pertaining to academic affairs made by it. g) Perform such other functions as may be assigned by the Governing Body.
1131

Finance Committee List of the Finance Committee Members


Sl. No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Name of the Member Designation Secretary Finance Officer, JNTUH Auditor (CA) Executive Director Principal Finance Consultant Accounts Officer, Special Invitee

Functions: The Finance Committee will be an advisory body to the Governing Body to consider
a. Budget estimates relating to the grant received / receivable from UGC, and income from fees, etc. collected for the activities to undertake the scheme of autonomy and Audited accounts for the above. b. The sample minutes of the finance committee is enclosed 1132 herewith Annexure-III.

The dates on which various committees held meetings are given below:
Sl. No. Nature of Meeting Date on which Total No. of Total No. of meeting held members members present absent

1 2 3 4 5

Governing Body meeting I Governing Body meeting - II Academic Council I Meeting Academic Council II Meeting Academic Council III Meeting

08-08-2010 25-03-2012 23-08-2010 27-09-2010 12-08-2011

8 9 21 21 20

4 4 1 1 2

6 7
8

Academic Council IV Meeting Finance Committee Meeting - I


Finance Committee Meeting - II

24-02-2012 29-04-2011
14-03-2012

20 7
7

2 1133

Board of Studies Composition of the Board of Studies and its functions in an autonomous college as per UGC norms: a. Head of the department concerned (Chairman) b. The entire faculty of each specialization. c. Two experts in the subject from outside the college to be nominated by the Academic Council. d. One expert to be nominated by the ViceChancellor from a panel of six recommended by the college Principal.
1134

e. One representative from industry / corporate sector / allied area relating to placement. f. One postgraduate meritorious alumnus to be nominated by the Principal. The Chairman, Board of Studies, may co-opt with the approval of the Principal of the college. i. Experts from outside the college whenever special courses of studies are to be formulated. ii. Other members of staff of the same faculty.
1135

Functions:
The Board of Studies of a department in the college shall : a. Prepare syllabi for various courses keeping in view of the objectives of the college, interest of the stakeholders and national requirement for consideration and approval of the Academic Council. b. Suggest methodologies for innovative teaching and evaluation techniques. c. Suggest panel of names to the Academic Council for appointment of examiners, and d. Coordinate research, teaching, extension and other academic activities in the department / college. 1136

The Executive Director/Principal of the institution frames plans and policies in accordance with the decision and directives from the Govt., the Board of Governors and the Secretary/ correspondent provides overall guidance to the principal in implementing them. The responsibilities of various dignitaries involved in the organizational structure of the institution are detailed hereunder:
1137

Flow Chart of Academic and Administrative decision making body: Board of Governors
Secretary/Correspondent Statutory Bodies Finance Committee Academic Council Executive Director Directors Deans

Principal
College Academic Committee

BOS

Heads of Depts.

Heads of Sections, Chief Admin.Officer, Library, Physical Dir. etc

Staff
Departmental Committees

Office Staff

Faculty inc. Lab Incharge

Non-Teaching Technical Staff

1138

a) Functions of the Secretary / Correspondent


1. He is the Chief Executive Officer of the Society and Custodian of all records relating to the Society. 2. He shall correspond on behalf of the Society in all matters pertaining to it. He has to take on record all the minutes of the Society meetings (General Body / Executive body). 3. He shall be responsible to convene the meetings of both the bodies with the permission of the President. 4. He will guide the Treasurer in preparing the budget and expenditure statement in order to put it before the Executive Committee and the General Body for approval. 1139

b) Functions of the Executive Director 1. To maintain cordial relationship between the management and the administration 2. To arrange employability enhancement programs for students 3. To ensure quality of educational programs and smooth functioning of administration 4. To advise and guide on overall development of the institution 5. To liaise between the top management and college administration
1140

c) Functions of the Head of Institution 1. To plan and execute the academic programs and functioning of the administrative system 2. To motivate various functionaries to maintain high morale 3. To coordinate various co-curricular and extra-curricular activities 4. To initiate and promote R&D, Consultancy and developmental activities 5. To liaise with the Government, Institutional collaborators, top management, Foreign Universities and blending them with internal operations, in managing the activities and monitor effective implementation 6. To project the image of the institution which enable to achieve global reputation 7. To motivate the students and faculty for effective 1141 teaching learning process

d) Functions of Heads of Departments 1. To ensure regular and punctual functioning of academic activities as per almanac 2. To motivate the faculty and staff to achieve the goals and objectives of the Institute. 3. To motivate students for effective learning 4. To initiate, promote and sustain R&D and consultancy activities 5. To encourage the students to participate and organize various co-curricular and extracurricular activities 6. To coordinate with the Head of the institution for smooth functioning of academic and administrative activities
1142

e) Functions of Deans Dean, Administration 1. To coordinate with the principal in organizing various administrative activities such as admissions to various courses to ensure effectiveness in teaching learning process, establishment, accounts, students guidance and counseling, proctorial work, sports, games, cultural activities, etc.
1143

Dean, Academics
1. To ensure regular and scheduled functioning of academic activities as per the almanac 2. To coordinate with the principal and heads of the departments in organizing various academic activities such as curriculum design, organizing BOS and Academic Council meetings 3. To motivate students and faculty 4. To maintain records of students attendance and sessional marks and have liaison with the universities on all academic matters like schemes of instructions, syllabi, rules and regulations, effective implementation of regular class work, teaching, etc.
1144

Dean, Students Welfare


1. To guide and organize induction programs for freshers and to take effective steps to create ragging free environment. 2. To coordinate the activities connected with the freshers day, annual day celebrations and take effective steps for maintaining overall discipline in the institute. 3. To identify and recommend scholarships for deserving students 4. To conduct remedial classes for slow and nonperformers 5. To encourage fast learners to develop into an all-round personality
1145

Dean, Research & Development 1. To coordinate all the proposals for research schemes for internal R&D and those submitted to various funding agencies 2. To initiate plans to encourage R & D activities in various departments 3. To monitor the progress of on-going research projects and doctoral programs
1146

Dean, Industrial Consultancy


1. To coordinate all activities connected with students training and placement for projects, and subsequent professional employment 2. To organize presentations of outside experts and industry-institution interaction meets 3. To coordinate with industries to arrange industrial visits to students 4. To coordinate with departments and outside organizations for initiating consultancy activities.
1147

Dean, Examinations
1. To coordinate the conduct of mid sessional and all university/institution end-examinations and lab examinations as per the almanac 2. To send the award lists received from the various departments to the University/Exam Branch. 3. To get the papers set, get answer scripts evaluated, processing and declaration of results.
1148

Dean, Career Guidance, Training & Placement 1. To expose the students to different career opportunities and to coordinate and conduct placement activities 2. To enhance employability of students through programs such as soft skills, logical reasoning, quantitative aptitude, technical skills are organized by inviting expertise from reputed institutions 3. To coordinate the conduct of mock tests, interviews before commencement of campus recruitment 4. To coordinate with various potential recruiters
1149

f) Functions of Directors of Schools


1. To initiate and monitor the recruitment process of faculty and non-teaching staff based on the work schedules of the departments 2. To inspire the faculty members to take up research and consultancy activities 3. To coordinate with the Heads of the various departments and Head of the institution for smooth functioning 4. To develop linkage with Industry and Research and Development (R&D) organizations
1150

Faculty (Professors/ Associate Professors/ Assistant Professors)


The faculty members involve in various student development activities and contribute to the fair image building and reputation of the college. They cooperate in students counseling, give support to the administration and involve themselves in R & D / consultancy and extension services. A tentative distribution of the time spent in a week as per the AICTE guide lines for professors, associate professors and assistant professors is given below.
1151

8.2.2. Defined rules, procedures, recruitment, and promotional policies, etc. (2) List of the published rules, policies and procedures, year of publications, awareness among the employees/students, availability on web etc. Recruitment Procedure and its effectiveness Recruitments are done in two ways. 1. on adhoc basis at college level for urgent requirements 2. on Regular basis (JNTU selection) The requirements of faculty are arrived based on AICTE norms and specific requirements to arrive at specializations. AICTE norms for UG courses of 1: 15 ratio and for PG courses three faculty members are the guiding criteria. 1152

Procedure for Adhoc Appointments: For urgent requirements, advertisements are released in newspapers and selections are made based on written test, oral interview and demonstration lessons. Minutes of the selection committee are maintained cadre wise. Based on the minutes, the recommendations are submitted to college management for releasing appointment orders. This process is usually completed much before commencement of class work so that there is enough time to the new faculty for their preparations for effective instructions.
1153

Procedure for Regular Appointment: The overall requirements with regard to numbers, cadres, and specializations required are assessed and advertised in national / regional newspapers inviting applications from eligible candidates. The applications received are scrutinized by the HOD and the lists of the short listed candidates are sent to registrar of JNTU for conducting interviews.
1154

A duly constituted selection committee appointed by the university selects the candidate. Minutes of the selection committee are communicated to the college. Based upon minutes regular appointment orders are released by college management. The appointment letters, joining reports are maintained in the personal files of the faculty. Formula for Number of teachers faculty required for I year
Number of teachers appointed from the 1155 department for the I year = Students intake / 15

Promotional Policy and Procedure All appointments including promotions are based on advertisements and selection in open competition. Any person can respond to advertisement given in reputed National and regional Newspaper. The Department works out number of positions to be filled on cadre basis based on AICTE Norms. A proposal will be sent to college management for its consideration and to release advertisement.
1156

Internal candidate can also respond to the advertisement and appear for interview. Promotions are not based on seniority but are based on satisfying prescribed qualifications, experience, paper published and performance in the interview conducted by duly constituted selection committee. However deserving internal candidates are promoted on ADHOC basis based on the recommendations of the concerned departments to satisfy the AICTE norms. These candidates however have to get ratified by duly constituted selection committee appointed by JNTU. The Proceedings of the university selection committee are forwarded to college management for their perusal approval and for issue of appointment orders, including delegation of financial power. 1157

8.2.3. Decentralisation in working including delegation of financial power and grievance redressal system (3) Decentralization Delegation and participation of Faculty A number of departments are constituted branch wise for effectiveness in decision making process, functioning of the department, academic issues, and purchase process. The powers and responsibilities of the Principal, Head of the department and lab incharges are defined. There are adequate financial powers to principal, HOD and lab incharges.
1158

The financial powers are as detailed under: Principal - Rs. 25000/HOD - Rs. 5000/Lab in charges - Rs. 500/ Imprest registers are maintained by each department. Reimbursement is done by college office to replenish the expenditure incurred. However departments are to follow the purchase procedures scrupulously through calling of quotations whenever the cost of the item exceed Rs. 1000/1159

Powers of Lab - In charges


Purchase Process: Lab in-charges will study the experimental setup with regard to curriculum requirements and propose for the purchase of the equipments and consumables . A departmental purchase committee considers and recommends the purchase and the HOD authorizes for the calling of quotations based on which comparative statements are made for placing the orders at department or college level.
1160

Various responsibilities of faculty


A. Institutional Development I. Library Committee II. TEQIP Committee III. Academic Committee IV. Anti - Ragging Committee V. Sports and games Committee VI. Cultural events Committee VII. Industry Interaction Committee Responsibilities assigned, orders to be defined and issued to committee members
1161

B. Departmental Activity
I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. IX. X. XI. XII. Lab in charges Time Tables Budget Research Curriculum Development Course Material Examination Sessional Marks Attendance Counselling and parent interaction Technical Association Alumni Association

1162

C. Student Development Activities


I. Technical Association, II. Technical clubs III. Professional societies

D. Academic Matters
I. Counseling II. Curriculum development III. Course Material IV. Examination V. Sessional Marks VI. Attendance VII. Research and Development
1163

These committees are to maintain the records of the activity and submit to the HOD from Time to Time for his perusal and necessary action if any. List of faculty members who are administrators/decision makers for various assigned jobs
S.No 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. Name of the faculty member Designation Professor Professor Professor Professor Professor Professor Professor Professor Professor Professor Professor Professor Professor Professor Professor Professor Professor Professor Professor Professor Assoc. Professor Asst. Professor Asst. Professor Asst. Professor Asst. Professor Asst. Professor Asst. Professor Administrative Position Director of Institution Principal Dean, Academic Dean, ADMN. R&D, Director, Science & Informatics Dean, Examinations & Student Welfare, Advisor- Library & Head, S&H Dean, Dean, Curriculum Development Director, School of Electrical & Electronics Engineering Director, Head & Director, SMS Head, EEE Head, Mechanical Head, ECE Head, CSE Head, IT Head, BT Head, ECM Head, Computer Applications Chief of Examinations Chief Superintendent of Examinations Asst. Controller of Examinations Asst. Controller of Examinations Asst. Controller of Examinations Asst. Controller of Examinations Asst. Controller of Examinations Asst. Controller of Examinations Asst. Controller of Examinations 1164

Specify the mechanism and composition of grievance addressal system, including faculty association, and staff-union, if any. Grievance redressal mechanism - College level Committee constituted to go into grievances submitted by students and staff. List of faculty members in grievance cell
S.No 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. Name of the Staff Position Chairman Member Member Member Member Member Member Member Member, Convener

1165

8.2.4. Transparency and availability of correct/ unambiguous information (3)


Policy Making: Service rules are formulated and circulated to all departments and a copy is placed in the central library and Departmental Library. The service rules contain the applicability, power to implement and amend the rules, power to delegate, appointment, probation, and terms to terminate service, joining formalities, retirement, vacation rules, personal records, appraisal, code of conduct, EPF benefit, grievance handling procedure leave rules etc. All employees are aware of these rules. Executive action and monitoring: If any employee is aggrieved of decision taken by the Head of the Department, he/she can submit his grievance in the form I (Annexure I of service rules) to the Principal of the 1166 college.

The college has duly constituted grievance redressal cell to look into grievances and takes appropriate decision based on the facts. Such decision is to intimate the employee accordingly. If the employee is not satisfied with the decision of the committee, he will submit his grievance in Form II (Annexure II of service rules) Such then it will be submitted to the Head of the institution, he may then constitute enquiry committee to go into the matter. The decision of the head of institution will be final. It is very interesting to note that there were no cases occurred in the college so far, where the grievances are submitted in Form-I. All the grievances are resolved through discussions by the Head of the Department with college 1167 administration.

8.3

Budget Allocation, Utilisation, and Public Accounting (10) Summary of current financial years budget and the actual expenditures incurred (exclusively for the College/Institute) for three preceding financial years
Budgeted Expense in Expenses in in CFY CFY (till...) CFY m1 (Lakhs) (Lakhs) (Lakhs) 732 183 290.4 Expenses in CFY m2 (Lakhs) 245.74

Item

Acquisition of land; new buildings and infrastructural built-up Library Laboratory Equipment Laboratory consumables Teaching and Non-Teaching staff salary Travel Other, specify..... (Miscellaneous) Total Total expenditure per student

30 120 20 1709.8 32 1899 4542.8 2012-13

7.5 30 5.0 427.4 8 474.9 1135.8

56.11 41.62 1.76 1436.13 42.31 1314.4 3182.73 2011-12

41.52 43.48 1.63 1123.60 12.42 949 2417.39 2010-12


1168

8.3.1 Adequacy of budget allocation (4) 8.3.2 Utilisation of allocated funds (5) 8.3.3 Availability of the audited statements on the institutes website (1) No 8.4. Programme Specific Budget Allocation, Utilisation (10) Summary of budget for the CFY and the actual expenditure incurred in the CFYm1 and CFYm2 (Exclusively for this programme in the department)
Items Budgeted in Actual Budgeted in Actual Budgeted in Actual CFY expenses in CFYm1 Expenses in CFYm2 Expenses in Rs. CFY (till) Rs. CFYm1 Rs. Rs. CFYm2 Rs.

Laboratory equipment Software 760840 R&D 174406 Laboratory consumable Maintenance and spares Travel Miscellaneou s expenses for academic activities Total 935246

145000 72000 72000 75000 75000

145000

72000

72000

75000

75000

1169

8.4.1. Adequacy of budget allocation (5) 8.4.2. Utilisation of allocated funds (5) 8.5 Library (20) 8.5.1. Library space and ambience, timings and usage, availability of qualified librarian and other staff, library automation, online access, networking, etc (5) Carpet area of library (m2) : 5000 Reading space (m2): 400 Number of seats in reading space : 200 Number of users (issue book) per day :350-450 Number of users (in reading space ) per day : 300-400
1170

Timings: During working day, weekend : 9 am - 8 pm vacation : 10am - 5pm Number of library staff : 6 Number of library staff with degree in Library management : 5 Computerization for search,indexing: Yes Issue/return records : Yes Bar-coding used: Yes
1171

Library services on Internet/Intranet : Online Journal, ebooks.etc INDEST or other similar membership : Syllabus for subjects, old question papers, video courses on 40 desktop and 19 laptops Archives : ASME : Mechanical Engineering 25 Journals McGrahill General Engineering and Reference access Engineering library : 290 ELSEIVER: e Journals for Engg : 275 JGate : Engineering and Technology : 4700 Indexed E Journals Mandatory Package 2012
1172

8.5.2 Titles and volumes per title (4) Number of titles : 11676 - Number of volumes : 109816
CFYm2 (2010-11) CFYm1 (2011-12) CFY (2012-13) Number of new titles added 694 1020 497 Number of new additions added 33 50 35 Number of new volumes added 13051 11668 11092

8.5.3. Scholarly journal subscription (3)


Details
Science Engg. And Tech As soft copy As hard copy As soft copy As hard copy As soft copy As hard copy As soft copy As hard copy As soft copy As hard copy

CFY

CFYm1

CFYm2

CFYm3

Pharmacy
Architecture Hotel Management

12 ( AICTE Mandatory Package) 206 -------------------------------

253 192 -------------------------------

253 90 ------------------------------1173

8.5.4. Digital Library (3)


Availability of digital library contents: NPTEL, IUCEE, SONET, Ebooks, (CDs 1700) If available, then mention number of courses Volumes : 5918( Subjects , Magazines , and general ) Number of e-books : Titles: 1700 Availability of an exclusive server: yes Availability over Intranet/Internet: NPL Video Courses in DVD Form : 226 IUCEE Video Lectures : 22 IIT Kharagpur Video Courses : 23 SONET Video on demand : 236 Availability of exclusive space/room: yes Number of users per day: 150
1174

8.5.5: Library expenditure on books, magazines/ journals, and miscellaneous contents (5)
Year Expenditure Magazine/jour Magazine/jour Misc. nals nals contents (for hard copy (for soft copy DELNET subscription) subscription) 199495 473414 484548 566920 571880 1682053 16500 Comments

Book 2283717 2942919 2317183

CFYm2 CFYm1 CFY

Budget Summary of library : CFY : Rs.52.5 Lakhs Expenditure in CFY(till date ) : Rs. 2321716 Expenditure in CFY M1 : Rs. 3938961 Expenditure in CFY M2 : Rs. 3595968
1175

8.6 Internet(5)
Name of the Internet provider: Apollo Online 12-13-387 Lane no 1 Tarnaka Secundrebad Available bandwidth: 35 Mbps Access speed: 100 Mbps Availability of Internet in an exclusive lab: Yes Availability in most computing labs: Yes Availability in departments and other units: Yes Availability in faculty rooms: Yes Institutes own e-mail facility to faculty/students: Yes Security/privacy to e-mail/Internet users: Yes (Instruction: The institute may report the availability of Internet in the campus and its quality of service) 1176

8.7. Safety Norms and Checks (5)


8.7.1. Checks for wiring and electrical installations for leakage and earthing (1) 8.7.2. Fire-fighting measures: Effective safety arrangements with emergency / multiple exists and ventilation/ exhausts in auditoriums and large classrooms/laboratories: Yes Fire-fighting equipment:
S No 1 2 3 4 5 Equipment Stored pressure type 5 kg Capacity fire extinguisher CO2 2 kg capacity fire extinguisher Water CO2 9 lts capacity fire extinguisher Dry Chemical powder (DCP) 5 kg capacity fire extinguisher Dry Chemical powder (DCP) 50 kg capacity fire extinguisher Quantity 27 03 02 16 01

Training, availability of water, and such other facilities (1) Each floor in all academic blocks are being provided 1177 filtered cool water. The supply is 24 hours.

8.7.3. Safety of civil structure (1)


Fire Extinguishers are being provided in each floor of academic blocks

8.7.4. Handling of hazardous chemicals and such other activities (2)


(Instruction: The institution may provide evidence that it is taking enough measure for the safety of civil structures, fire, electrical installations, wiring, and safety of handling and disposal of hazards substances. Moreover, the institution needs to show the effectiveness of the measures that it has developed to accomplish these tasks.)
1178

8.8 Counselling and Emergency Medical Care and First-aid (5)


Availability of counseling facility (1) A counseller is serving the institution to cater the needs of students. Arrangement for emergency medical care (2) In case of emergency college is providing 4 wheeler to take the student/faculty & non teaching staff to the nearby hospital. An ambulance maintained by Govt. of AP i.e 108 services will be called
1179

Availability of first-aid unit (2) (Instruction: The institution needs to report the availability of the facilities discussed here.) List of First aid kit : 1. Stethescope 2.B.P Apparatus 3.Thermometer 4.Torch 5.I.V.Stands 6.Weighing Machines 7.Examination Tables 8.Fridge 9.Wheel chair 10.Stretcher 11.Walker 12.Autoclave 13.Dressing material 1180 14.Nebulizer.

CRITERION 9 : Continuous Improvement (75)

This criterion essentially evaluates the improvement of the different indices that have already been discussed in earlier sections.
From 9.1 to 9.5 the assessment calculation can be done as follows.

If a, b, c are improvements in percentage during three successive years, assessment can be calculated as :
Assessment = (b-a)/(100-min (b,a)) + (c-b)/(100-min(c,b))
1181

9.1 Improvement in Success Index of Students (5) From 4. 1


Item LYG Success 0.716 Index (SI) LYGm1
0.856

LYGm2 Assessment
0.966

9.2 Improvement in Academic Performance Index of Students (5) From 4. 2


Item API (Academic Performance Index) LYG LYGm1 3.5 LYGm2 3.25 Assessment

1182

9.3 Improvement in Student-Teacher Ratio (5) From 5. 1


Item STR (StudentTeacher Ratio) LYG 14.71 LYGm1 11.79 LYGm2 Assessment 11.79 20.00

9.4 Enhancement of Faculty Qualification Index (5)

From 5. 3
Item FQI (Faculty Qualification Index) LYG 7.57 LYGm1 11.26 LYGm2 11.4 Assessment 60.47

9.5 Improvement in Faculty Research Publications, R & D Work and Consultancy Work (10) From 5.7 and 5.9
Item FRP (Faculty Research Publications) FRDC LYG 3.05 1.5 LYGm1 0.58 0.0 LYGm2 1.925 0.0 Assessment 1.85 0.5 1183

9.6 Continuing Education (10)


In this criterion the Institution needs to specify the contributory efforts made by the faculty members by developing the course/lab modules, conducting short-term courses/ workshops etc., for continuing education during the last three years.
1184

DETAILS OF COURSE/ LAB MODULES:MODULE DESCRIPTION Engineering Drawing Engineering Mechanics Engineering workshop Mechanics Of Solids Thermodynamics Metallurgy& Material Science MOS & Metallurgy Lab Metrology surface Engineering DESIGN OF MACHINE MEMBERS- I Applied THERMODYNAMICS--II DYNAMICS OF MACHINERY MACHINE TOOLS Metrology and Machine Tool Lab THERMAL ENGINEERING LAB CAD/CAM OPERATION RESEARCH INSTRUMENTATION&CONT ROL SYSTEMS POWER PLANT ENGG CAD/CAM Lab PRODUCTION DRAWING PRACTICE & instrumantaion lab Robotics Automation in Manufacturing ANY OTHER CONTRIBUTORY INST./INDUSTRY NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO ACADEMIC YEAR 2009 2010, 1st SEMESTER DEVELOPED / ORGANIZED DURATION RESOURCE PERSONS BY 32 WEEKS 32 WEEKS 32 WEEKS 16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS TARGET AUDIENCE UG students UG students UG students UG students UG students UG students UG students UG students UG students UG students UG students UG students UG students UG students UG students UG students UG students UG students UG students USAGE AND CITATION

NO NO

16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS

NO

16 WEEKS

UG students UG students PG & UG students

1185

ACADEMIC YEAR 2009 2010, 2nd SEMESTER


MODULE DESCRIPTION Applied THERMODYNAMICS--I Production Technology Kinematics of Machinery Machine Drawing Production Technology Lab FLUID MECHANICS & HYDRAULIC MACHINERY FLUID MECHANICS & HYDRAULIC MACHINERY LAB DESIGN OF MACHINE MEMBERS- II Finite Element Methods REFRIGERATION & AIR CONDITIONING AUTOMOBILE ENGINEERING HEAT TRANSFER HEAT TRANSFER Lab Production Planning and control Tribology Automation in Manufacturing CAD/CAM Lab Industrial Robotics Computer Aided Manufacturing Design of Hydraulics & Pneumatic systems Design and Optimization Flexible Manufacturing Systems Computer Aided Machinig & Robotics Lab ANY OTHER CONTRIBUTORY INST./INDUSTRY NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO DEVELOPED / ORGANIZED BY DURATION 16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS RESOURCE PERSONS TARGET AUDIENCE UG students UG students UG students UG students UG students UG students USAGE AND CITATION

UG students UG students PG & UG students UG students UG students UG students UG students UG students PG students UG students UG students PG students PG students PG students PG students PG students PG students

NO NO
NO NO

16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS
16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS

1186

ACADEMIC YEAR 2010 2011, 1st SEMESTER ANY OTHER DEVELOPED / CONTRIBUTORY ORGANIZED MODULE DESCRIPTION INST./INDUSTRY BY Engineering Drawing--I NO Engineering workshop --I NO Mechanics Of Solids NO Thermodynamics NO Metallurgy&Material Science NO MOS & Metallurgy Lab NO Metrology surface Engineering NO DESIGN OF MEMBERS- I MACHINE NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO 16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS UG students UG students UG students UG students UG students UG students UG students UG students UG students UG students UG students TARGET AUDIENCE UG students UG students UG students UG students UG students UG students UG students USAGE AND CITATION

DURATION RESOURCE PERSONS 16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS

Applied THERMODYNAMICS--II DYNAMICS OF MACHINERY MACHINE TOOLS Metrology and Machine Tool Lab THERMAL ENGINEERING LAB CAD/CAM OPERATION RESEARCH INSTRUMENTATION&CONTRO L SYSTEMS POWER PLANT ENGG CAD/CAM Lab PRODUCTION DRAWING PRACTICE & instrumantaion lab Robotics Automation in Manufacturing

NO NO

16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS

UG students UG students PG & UG students

NO

16 WEEKS

1187

ACADEMIC YEAR 2011 2012, 1st SEMESTER


MODULE DESCRIPTION Engineering Drawing--I Engineering workshop --I ANY OTHER CONTRIBUTORY INST./INDUSTRY NO NO DEVELOPED / ORGANIZED BY DURATION RESOURCE PERSONS 16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS TARGET AUDIENCE UG students UG students USAGE AND CITATION

Mechanics Of Solids Thermodynamics Metallurgy& Material Science

NO NO NO

16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS

UG students UG students UG students UG students UG students UG students UG students

Machine Drawing MOS Lab


Metallurgy Lab Metrology surface Engineering DESIGN OF MACHINE MEMBERS- I Applied THERMODYNAMICS-II DYNAMICS OF MACHINERY

NO NO
NO NO

16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS
16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS

NO

16 WEEKS

UG students

NO

16 WEEKS

UG students

NO

16 WEEKS

UG students

1188

MACHINE TOOLS Metrology and Machine Tool Lab THERMAL LAB CAD/CAM ENGINEERING

NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO

16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS

UG students UG students

UG students PG & UG students

OPERATION RESEARCH INSTRUMENTATION&CONT ROL SYSTEMS POWER PLANT ENGG CAD/CAM Lab PRODUCTION DRAWING PRACTICE & instrumantaion lab Robotics Automation in Manufacturing CNC Machines and Robotics Advanced Mechanics of Solids Manufacturing Methods and Mechanics of Composites CAD/CAM & Robotics Lab

UG students UG students UG students UG students

NO NO NO NO NO

16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS

UG students UG students PG & UG students PG students PG students PG students

NO

16 WEEKS

NO

16 WEEKS

PG students

1189

ACADEMIC YEAR 2011 2012, 2nd SEMESTER


MODULE DESCRIPTION Engineering Drawing--II Engineering Mechanics Engineering workshop --I I Applied THERMODYNAMICS-I Manufacturing Processes FLUID MECHANICS & HYDRAULIC MACHINERY Kinematics of Machinery FLUID MECHANICS & HYDRAULIC MACHINERY LAB Manufacturing Processes Lab DESIGN OF MACHINE MEMBERS- II Finite Element Methods REFRIGERATION & AIR CONDITIONING AUTOMOBILE ENGINEERING HEAT TRANSFER HEAT TRANSFER Lab
ANY OTHER CONTRIBUTORY INST./INDUSTRY NO NO NO

DEVELOPED / ORGANIZED BY

DURATION 32 WEEKS 32 WEEKS 16 WEEKS

RESOURCE PERSONS

TARGET AUDIENCE
UG students UG students UG students

USAGE AND CITATION

NO NO

16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS

UG students UG students UG students

NO NO

16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS UG students

NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO

16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS

UG students UG students

UG students
PG & UG students UG students UG students UG students UG students

1190

Production Planning and control Tribology Automation in Manufacturing CAD/CAM Lab Industrial Robotics Computer Aided Manufacturing Design of Hydraulics & Pneumatic systems Design and Optimization Flexible Manufacturing Systems Computer Aided Machinig & Robotics Lab Optimum Design of Mechanical Elements Mechanical Vibrations & Condition Monitoring

NO NO NO

16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS

UG students PG students PG& UG students UG students PG students PG students PG students PG students PG students PG students PG students PG students

NO NO NO NO NO NO

16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS

NO NO NO

16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS

1191

ACADEMIC YEAR 2012 2013, 1st SEMESTER


MODULE DESCRIPTION Engineering Drawing--I Engineering workshop --I Mechanics Of Solids Thermodynamic s Metallurgy& Material Science Machine Drawing MOS Lab Metallurgy Lab Metrology & Instrumentation DESIGN OF MACHINE MEMBERS- I Applied Thermodynamic s--II DYNAMICS OF MACHINERY Metal Cutting and Machine Tools ANY OTHER CONTRIBUTORY INST./INDUSTRY NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO DEVELOPED / ORGANIZED BY DURATION 16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS RESOURCE PERSONS TARGET AUDIENCE UG students UG students UG students UG students UG students UG students UG students UG students UG students USAGE AND CITATION

NO

16 WEEKS

UG students

NO NO

16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS

UG students UG students

NO

16 WEEKS

UG students

1192

Metrology and Machine Tool Lab THERMAL ENGINEERING LAB CAD/CAM OPERATION RESEARCH INSTRUMENTATION&CONTRO L SYSTEMS POWER PLANT ENGG CAD/CAM Lab PRODUCTION DRAWING PRACTICE & instrumantaion lab Robotics Automation in Manufacturing

NO NO NO NO NO NO NO

16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS

UG students UG students PG & UG students UG students UG students UG students UG students UG students UG students PG & UG students PG students PG students PG students PG students

NO NO NO

16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS

Mechanical Vibrations & Condition Monitoring NO Flexible Manufacturing Systems & CAPP NO Optimum Design of Mechanical Elements NO Design for Manufacturing & Assembly NO CAE Lab NO

PG students

1193

MODULE DESCRIPTION Applied Thermodynamics I (ATD-I)


Manufacturing Processes (MP) Probability & Statistic (P&S) Fluid Mechanics & Hydraulic Machinery (FM&HM) Kinematics of Machinery (KOM) Heat Transfer (HT) Design of Machine Members-II (DMMII) CAD/CAM Renewable Energy Sources (RES) Production Planning and Control (PPC) Plant Layout & Material Handling (PL & MH)

ANY OTHER CONTRIBUTORY INST./INDUSTRY NO

DEVELOPED / ORGANIZED BY DURATION 16 WEEKS

RESOURCE PERSONS

TARGET AUDIENCE
UG students

USAGE AND CITATION Dr. C.M.Vara Prasad (CMVP)

NO NO

16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS

UG students UG students

NO

16 WEEKS

UG students

NO NO NO NO NO NO

16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS 16 WEEKS

UG students UG students UG students UG students UG students UG students

NO

16 WEEKS

UG students
1194

DETAILS OF WORKSHOPS/SHORT TERM COURSES:ANY OTHER CONTRIBUTORY DEVELOPED / INST./INDUSTRY ORGANIZED BY

MODULE DESCRIPTION
Nanotechnology Engineering Perspective Emerging trends in Mechanical Engineering CNC Programming & Machining

DURATION

RESOURCE PERSONS

TARGET AUDIENCE Teaching staff , UG and PG students

USAGE AND CITATION

One day

-------

Two days

Teaching staff Teaching staff , UG and PG students Teaching staff , UG and PG students Teaching staff , UG and PG students Teaching staff , UG and PG students Teaching staff , UG and PG students Diploma Engineers(STAs) of DRDL,

----------

three days Hydraulics and Pneumatic Control The application of C F D tools for modeling and analysis of turbo machinery components. Synthesis And Characterization Of Nano- Materials Quality & Reliability Engineering Rowan university, Training on Orientation Programme for Diploma Engineers DRDL,

----------

three days

----------

three days

----------

three days

----------

two days

Five days

1195

9.7 New Facility Created (15) Specify new facilities created during the last 3 years for strengthening the curriculum and/or meeting the POs:
Module Description Any other contributory Inst./ Industry Developed Duration / organized by Resource Persons Target Audience Usage and citation etc.

Wear Testing Machine Experimental setup for Nano fluids

No

One month Three months

Main Projects Main Projects

Ph.D & P.G projects Ph.D , P.G & U.G projects

No

IC Engine Test Rig

Modrobs

One month

Main Projects

Ph.D & U.G projects


1196

9.8 Overall Improvements since Last Accreditation, if any, otherwise, since the commencement of the programme (20)
Specify the overall improvements since commencement of Programme:
Specify the strengths/ Improvement weakness brought in Design, Fabrication and Thermal, Turbo Testing of an energyMachinery efficient Centrifugal fan for Industrial and Power Plant Application Including Erection of a Suitable Test Rig Development of EnergyThermal, Turbo Efficient CentrifugalMachinery compressor stages for typical Industrial/Process Applications through CFD Studies Modernization of Thermal Thermal Engineering Laboratory Engineering Modernization of Production Production Technology Technology Laboratory Photo Elastic Stress Strength of Analysis in composites materials and with Polaris cope NDT Contributed by List the , which are Comments, strengthened if any UG & PG Projects AICTE-- Projects In area of Centrifugal fan

UG & PG Projects In area of Modeling and analysis of Centrifugal compressor

AICTE-- Projects

Improvement of thermal AICTE Engineering Labs Improvement of AICTE Production Technology Labs UG & PG Projects In the area of stress AICTE-- Projects analysis for composites
1197

Program Outcomes and Assessment


Demonstration of Attainment of the Mandatory a-to-k outcomes. Here the evaluation is based on attainment of mandatory a-k outcomes. Program Outcomes of B.Tech Mechanical Engineering: After completion of B.Tech Program in Mechanical Engineering,

Evaluation of outcomes by students attainment


Academic and professional attainments by students which are satisfying the Program Outcomes (at least some of those) need to be evaluated as per documented processes.
1198

Evaluation of outcomes due to faculty contributions and Achievements


Academic and professional contributions of the faculty leading to a-to-koutcomes and their achievements need to be evaluated as per documented processes.
Units Course

Theory

Lab

Area of Specialization

Mapping

PEOs

Mandator y

Program

Faculty

English

IV

g,h,i

English Language Lab Managerial Economics and Financial Analysis Environmental Studies

g,h,i,j,k

a,b,c

a,g,i
1199

Industrial Management
Advanced English Communicatio n Skills Lab Engineering Physics Numerical methods and partial differential equations Engineering Chemistry C Programming Engineering Drawing

e,g,i

g,h,j, k

a,b,d,h,i

a,b,c,e,j,k

T
T T

A
C C

a,b
a, b,c,e,f,i,j b,d
1200

Computer Programming Lab Engineering Physics & Fuels and Lubricants lab Engineering Workshop Probability and Statistics Production Technology Electrical and Electronics Engineering Mechanics of Solids Thermodynamics Object Oriented Programming through Java Metallurgy & Material Science Metallurgy and Mechanics of Solids Lab

Programming Languages, Computer Science

a, b,c,e,f,i,j

L Mechanical Engineering Proficiency in Mathematics Production Engineering Fundamentals In Electrical and Electronics Non linear vibrations and buckling analysis of structural elements, Heat Transfer , Thermal Engineering Fundamentals in Computing Analysis of Algorithms, Object orientation and Java language Metallurgy L Metallurgy

a,f,h,g

L T T T

I II, I II I,

C C B C

b a, b, c a,b,e,f,g,i a,f,h,g

T T

II II,III

C C

b a, b, c

e,f,g,i

I, II I,II C, F

a,b,e,f,i e,f,g,i

1201

Object Oriented Programming through Java Lab Kinematics of Machinery Thermal Engineering Fluid Mechanics and Hydraulic Machinery

Fundamentals in Computing Analysis of Algorithms, Object orientation and Java languages Machine Design PhD in Thermal Engineering R& AC Non linear vibrations and buckling analysis of structural elements,& Production Engineering Mechanical Engineering Metallurgy

I,II

C,F

e,f,g,i

T T T

II II I,

C C,F C

a,b,e,f,i e,f,g,h,i a,b.c.f.g,i

Machine Drawing
Production Technology Lab Mechanics of Solids and Metallurgy Lab Automobile Engineering Dynamics of Machinery Machine Tools

II

b.c.g.h,i

L L T T T

II,III I I, II

C, F C

,c,g,h a,g,h,i e,f,g,i

Pursuing Phd on Mechanical Engineering Welding Optimization

II I,

C,F C,F

a,b,e,f,i e,f,g,i
1202

Design of Machine Members Heat and Mass Transfer Fluid Mechanics and Hydraulic Machinery Lab Thermal Engineering Lab

Production Engineering , Machine Design Thermal Engineering , & Energy Systems Refrigeration & Air Conditioning Refrigeration & Air Conditioning , Thermal Engineering Refrigeration & Air Conditioning, Energy Systems

II

e,f,g,i

II,III

a,b,e,f,i

e,f,g,h,i

I, II

C,F

a,b.c.f.g,i

Refrigeration and Air Conditioning

b.c.g.h,i
1203

CAD/ Mechatronics Operation Research Finite Element Methods

T T

CAD/CAM Automation and Robotics Welding optimization PhD in Mechanical Engineering Automation and Robotics Energy Systems , Refrigeration & Air Conditioning Mechanical Engineering L CAD/

II I,II

,c,g,h a,g,h,i

III

C, F

e,f,g,i

II

C,F

a,b,e,f,i

Robotics

I,

e,f,g,i

Instrumentati on and Control System Power Plant Engineering CAD/ Lab

II

C,F

e,f,g,i

II,III I

C C

a,b,e,f,i e,f,g,h,i
1204

Evaluation of outcomes from placement


Graduate can Participate and succeed in competitive examinations like GATE, GRE, IELTS, NET, TOFEL and Engineering Services Examinations Program outcomes need to be evaluated through placement data (type of jobs, nature of companies, higher studies etc.)

2011-2012 placements
Sl. No 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Name of the company Wipro technologies Cognizant Infosys L&T Prokarma Cummins InfoTech enterprises TASL JLL No.of students selected 33 48 24 04 01 01 02 02 01 Salary (Lakhs) 3.0 3.35 3.25 3.32 3.0 4.15 2.75 3.20 1.80

1205

2010-2011
Sl. No Name of the company No. of students selected Salary (Lakhs)

1 2

Wipro technologies Cognizant

37 56

3.25 3.35

3
4 5 6 7 8 9

Infosys
Capegemini UHGIS TASL Schwingstetters L&T Asian Motor Works

24
05 02 02 01 04 01

3.25
3.05 3.41 3.2 2.40 3.32 3.5

10
11

Kennametal
NTPC

01
01

4.0
3.5
1206

2009-2010
Sl.no Name of the company 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 Accenture ADP ANU Labs HCL Hyundai L&T Pennar Industries Intergraph Rock well Collins TASL Thyshnekrup Industries InfoTech Navy No.of students selected 02 01 02 04 24 07 06 03 03 03 01 01 Salary (Lakhs) 2.76 3.65 1.8 1.39 2.66 3.0 1.85 3.30 3.00 3.20 2.10 2.75 5.00

1207

Evaluation of achievements as disseminated in media/public forum


College submits its profile to various media publishers such as CSR,DC, Outlook ,carrier 360 etc., For their activity of rating of various engineering colleges in the country. Some of the results are given below: Ranked 30th in India by Outlook in the Years 2007 and 2008. Ranked 25th among all engineering colleges in the country in 2009 by CSR. In 2010 college ranked 14th by CSR, in both the occasions college rated 2nd in AP. In Careers 360 college rated as AAA status in AP in the year 2010 and 2011. Ranked 8th in the AP State Universities/Affiliated 1208 colleges by Careers 360, in `2012.

College also submitted itself to ISTE AP section for rating. It is given best engineering college award in 2008 Recently South Asian Academy of Education New Delhi has given the following distinctions in 2011. Academic Excellency in Engineering Education. Academic Excellency in Management Education Special award for Industry Institution Interaction. The fact that top students are joining the college through EAMCET is an indication of public perception about the institution.
1209

Evaluation of Outcomes by External Stakeholders Documented process and evaluation by Industries


The Institution has designed well structured questionnaire covering curriculum aspects and circulated among leading industrialists, practicing managers, to obtain their views on the above aspect. Some of the managers from leading industry are members of Board Of Studies, Academic Council, and Board of Governance. They have been continuously interacting and monitoring with the faculty and students and giving suggestions time to time. 1210

Documented process and assessment from Alumni


The Institution has designed well structured questionnaire covering curriculum aspects and circulated among Alumni occupied in higher positions in esteemed organization to obtain their views on the above aspect. They have been continuously interacting with the students and giving suggestions time to time.

Documented process and assessment from Professional Bodies


The Institution has designed well structured questionnaire covering curriculum aspects and circulated among professional bodies to obtained 1211 their views on the above aspect

Effectiveness and Efficiency of the Mechanism/Procedure for Continuous Review and Outcome Measurements The evaluation of outcomes by various stake holders (i.e.) Industry, Alumni, Professional bodies is carried out and necessary review based on the observation is taken up. Besides this the inputs from skill in demand analysis carried out on a continuous basis are utilized for the review. The outcomes measured are also fine tuned accordingly.
1212

COURSE OUTCOMES OF DIFFERENT COURSES Course Name: Engineering Physics I


After attending the course the student should be able to : 1. Define, represent, classify the arthogonal crystal systems and analyze the type of structures based on packing factor. 2. Study the experimental techniques to determine the crystal structures using Braggs Law. Understand the essence of doping mechanism and advantages with crystals structures. 3. Understand the Macro and Micro states of matter, density of states and importance of F-D statistics.
1213

4. Distinguish dual nature of matter by experimental confirmation, concept of quantum free particle from wave mechanics. 5. Know classical free electron theory and quantum free electron theory, advantages and disadvantages. Variation of F-D distribution functions with temperature. 6. Analyze the constant potential and varying potential experienced by electron in periodic lattice and origin of energy band formation in solids and classification of materials.
1214

Course Name : Engineering Physics II After attending the course the student should be able to : 1. Know the concept of Fermi level, calculation of carrier concentrations in semi conductors, and Hall Effect. 2. Know the entire information of P-N junction diode and its significance. 3. Define, distinguish and calculations of different types of polarizations, generation of dipoles by Piezo, Pyro and Ferro electricity.
1215

4. Classify the magnetic materials, significance of hysteresis curve, Hard and Soft magnetic materials, superconductors based on perfect diamagnetism. 5. Show the basic principle and working of different Lasers and their applications in day to day life, optical fiber communication system, the transmission of audio video signals without any loss of energy. 6. Know the basics of nano technology, fabrication methods by bottom up and top down mechanisms and important properties.
1216

Course Name: Applied Physics (Only for B.Tech, ME)

After attending the course the student should be able to : 1. Differentiate Undamped, Damped, forced vibrations and resonance, production of Ultrasonics by using principle of resonance and applications. 2. Division of Wave front, division of amplitude, importance of grating, different types of polarized lights. 3. Know the classification of magnetic materials, significance of hysteresis curve hard and soft magnetic materials, superconductors based on perfect diamagnetism.
1217

4. Know the significance of Einsteins coefficients in lasers, basic principle and working of different lasers and their application in day to day life. 5. Know the optical fiber communication system and the transmission of audio video signals without any loss of energy. 6. Know the basics of nano technology, fabrication methods by bottom up and top down mechanisms and few important properties.
1218

Course Name : ENGINEERING PHYSICS LAB I

After attending the course the student should be able to :


1. Error Estimation Determination of error and percentage of error from actual value. 2. Meldes Experiment Determination of frequency of vibrating bar using electro magnet. 3. Times constant of R-C circuit Study of decay current and determination of time constant.
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4.

AC Sonometer Determination of frequency of AC power supply using Flemings principle. 5. Resonance in L-C-R circuit Study of resonance effect in series and parallel combination and finding of quality facter. 6. Plancks Constant Determination of value of planks constant by using Photo Emissive Cell.
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Course Name : ENGINEERING PHYSICS LAB II


After attending the course the student should be able to : 1. Stewarts and Gees Experiment Study of variation of magnetic field along the axis of a circular coil(Biot-Savart law) using Tangent law. 2. Numerical Aperture and Loses in Optical Fibre Determine the Numerical Aperture and study of losses in (dB) optical fibres. 3. Energy Band Gap of Semiconductors. Determine the Energy gap of Semiconductor (Ge or Si) from graph (Log10R Vs 1/T).
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4. Dielectric constant Find out the Dielectric constant and phase transition temperature of given material (PZT). 5. L.E.D. Characteristics Study of V-I characteristics of given LED and finding of forward resistance. 6. Characteristics of Thermister. Study of variation of resistance with temperature and determination of Thermister constance.
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Course Name: Engineering Mathematics-I

After attending the course the student should be able to :


1. The basic knowledge of sequences and series, different techniques of finding the convergence of series using different tests, a mean value for a given function in the given interval and expanding a function as an infinite series. 2. The total differentiation for a composite function, the transformation function called Jacobian transformation and the maxima and minima for functions of two variables. 3. The solutions for the system of linear equations, the concepts of linearly dependent and linearly 1223 independent vectors.

4. Evaluation of the Eigen values and Eigen vectors for a matrix, finding the higher powers of a matrix using Calyey-Hamilton Theorem and to Diagonalizable a matrix. 5. Evaluation of the double and triple integrals, change of order of integration, the changing the variables, find the length of a curve, area of a region and volume of solid of revolution. 6. The concepts of gradient of a scalar function, directional derivative, the divergence and curl for a vector function. Evaluation of the line, surface and volume integrals. To transform one form of integral to another form of integral using the vector transformations.
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Course Name: Engineering Mathematics-II


After attending the course the student should be able to : 1. Different types of methods to solve first order and first degree ordinary differential equations and several applications like Natural law of growth and decay, Newtons law of cooling and orthogonal trajectories. 2. How to solve second and higher order ordinary linear differential equations with constant coefficients, method of variation of parameters and method to solve system of ordinary linear differential equations with constant coefficients.
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3. Introduction to partial differential equations, formulation of partial differential equations. Methods to solve linear, some special non-linear partial differential equations of first order and the method of separation of variables to solve partial differential equations. 4. Laplace transforms of different functions and its existence. Properties, theorems. The methods to find inverse Laplace transforms by using different techniques. Application to solve ordinary linear differential equations with constant coefficients. 5. Definition of Z-transform. Z-transforms of several sequences, properties and theorems. Inverse Z-transforms. Application to solve difference equations. 6. How to find the Fourier series expansion of different functions over an arbitary interval [C, C+2l]. Finding Fourier transforms, finite Fourier transforms of different functions.
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Course Name: Engineering Mathematics-III


After attending the course the student should be able to : 1. Definitions of gamma, beta functions followed by how to evaluate proper/improper definite integrals. Legendres, Bessels polynomials. 2. Definition of analytic functions. How to test whether the given function is analytic or not followed by complex integration techniques. 3. Expansion of a given function in the form of Taylors and Laurents series followed by calculus of residues.
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4. Finding the roots of a given equation by using different numerical methods and Evaluation of certain definite integrals by using numerical integration techniques. 5. Finding the interpolating polynomial by using different techniques. 6. Solving the first order and first degree ordinary differential equations by using different numerical methods.
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Course Name: Probability and Statistics


After attending the course the student should be able to :

1. Basic definitions and axioms of probability, finding the probability of an event using the elementary theorems, multiplication theorem of probability and Bayes theorem. 2. Random variables, types of random variables, expectation and probability distributions. 3. Basic definitions of sampling distribution, forming the sampling distribution of means, proportions, sums and differences. How to estimate the population parameters using sampling statistics.
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4. Testing the hypothesis concerning means and proportions for large samples. 5. Testing of hypothesis using Student t test, test for the goodness of fit, testing the hypothesis for independence of attributes. 6. Introduction to linear programming, formulating the LPP and solving the LLP using graphical method and simplex method.
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Course Name : Engineering Chemistry After attending the course the student should be able to : Topics: water, Electro chemistry, corrosion, surface chemistry, Energy resources, phase rule, materials. Contribution to Outcomes: 1. Examines basic fundamentals of laboratory analysis with emphasis on applied chemical and microbiological procedures for water plant operators. Designed to give students a broad overview of the water fields and issues like boiler troubles and control & protection confronting the industry. Students will learn how source waters are obtained, treated and distributed.
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2. Student can able to know the chemistry of cells are used in industries follow the principles of electrolysis. Explain Batteries and their charging and discharging processes. Develop many different technologies that use redox reactions. 3. Student knows the basic Concepts in Corrosion, cause for the problem of corrosion, methods to be adopted to control Corrosion and the processes to protect the corrosion 4. Student follows the existence of materials in different form and the methods of separation of the materials. By adsorption technique student learns the applications of indicators and purification of solvents in the industries.
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5. The Polymer Chemistry course builds upon the basic concepts of polymerisation introduced on day one. Synthetic techniques in common use in both academic and industrial laboratories for making a wide variety of polymers will be covered. Conductivity of polymers also helps in electro chemistry. If a company works with plastics, rubbers, resins, adhesives, composites, coatings, fibres or packaging, a good understanding of polymer chemistry will benefit. The Polymer Chemistry course will give you a deeper understanding and a good overview of the different aspects of polymer chemistry. 6. Emerging methodologies that facilitate greater control over the final product, and as a consequence enable novel polymer architectures, will also be considered. Explains about fuels and their extraction, synthesis analysis. Estimates of pressure and temperature 1233 (geothermobarometry)

Course Name : Engineering Chemistry Lab


After attending the course the student should be able to : 1. Estimation of hardness of water: From this experiment student understands the purity of water by determining it. 2. Estimation of mno2 in pyrolusite : It helps the students to evaluate the quality of the ore in terms of % by using titration method 3. Estimation of Mn+2/Cu+2 ions by colorimetry: It helps in estimation of metals concentration of metal ions by using Beers law.
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4. Estimation of acid by conductometric titrations: It is designed for the Students to evaluate the concentration of the unknown solution by Conductometer. 5. Estimation of acid potentiometric titration: It helps students to determine concentration through potential values. 6. Determination of viscosity: It helps students to select a lubricant for different machinery. 7. Preparation of asprin: It helps students to know the preparation of medicinal compounds and mechanism of action.
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8. Determination of flash and fire point: It is especially designed for Mechanical students to take safety measures in extraction, use and storage of low volatile solvents. 9. Determination of calorific value of a solid fuel by bomb colorimeter: It helps students to determine the calorific value of solid/liquid fuels. 10. Grease penetration test: It tells the students about the action of semi solid lubricants in high pressure lubrication
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Course Name: ENGLISH I


ENGLISH LANGUAGE TEACHING THROUGH LITERATURE After attending the course the student should be able to : 1. NOBLE THOUGHT To enable the students to understand the tender feelings and values in life through OHenrys story The last Leaf, apart from LSRW skills. 2. BIOGRAPHY The students learn the nuances of grammar and the biography of Sir C.V.Raman. 3. HUMAN INTEREST The students learn the art of summarizing and grammar, apart from analyzing the character Ms Krishna, in the lesson The Connoisseur by Nergis 1237 Dalal.

4. DISASTER MANAGEMENT The students are made aware of managing a disaster through the lesson The Cuddalore Experience by Anu George and the basics of Essay Writing. 5. HUMOUR The students learn the art of note making and interview skills and improve their vocabulary by reading Somerset Maughams The Luncheon. 6. OUTLOOK The students are made aware of the typical outlook of Indians in general, for a better understanding through the lesson, Indian Crowds by Nirad C.Choudary.
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Course Name: ENGLISH II


ENGLISH LANGUAGE TEACHING THROUGH LITERATURE After attending the course the student should be able to : 1. To enlighten the students through Swami Vivekanandas preachings and messages. 2. To improve students comprehensive skills through the short story Ha Penny by Alan Paton. 3. To inculcate values and imbibe the right conduct of behaviour in students through Abraham Lincolns Letter to His Sons Teacher.
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4. To instill morals and values through the short story The Only American From Our Village by Arun Joshi. 5. To introduce Francis Bacon, the great essayist, through the essay Of Studies and teach the students, the importance of studies and education. 6. To encourage the students to improve their vocabulary and appreciate the greatest dramatist, William Shakespeares work through Polonious Speech an extract from Hamlet.
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Course Name: ENGLISH III


FUNCTIONAL AND COMMUNICATIVE WRITTEN ENGLISH After attending the course the student should be able to : 1. TECHNICAL WRITING To introduce students to techniques and objectives in technical writing. 2. GROUP DISCUSSION To enhance students skills in Group Discussion, emphasizing upon communication skills, group dynamics and leadership qualities. 3. CORRESPONDENCE To teach students the methodology of writing Memos, Letters and Resume. 4. BODY LANGUAGE To bring awareness of the importance of body language to the students. 5. REPORT STRATEGIES To equip students with the skills of writing technical reports 1241 and proposals.

Course Name: ENGLISH IV


EFFECTIVE ENGLISH COMMUNICATION AND SOFT SKILLS After attending the course the student should be able to : 1. ELECTRONIC COMMUNICATION To train the students in using electronic communication for e-correspondence and emailing. 2. SOFT SKILLS To enrich the students with five aspects of soft skills communication skills, problem solving skills, leadership skills, work ethics and team work. 3. DEVELOPING POSITIVE ATTITUDE To help students internalize and develop positive attitude and positive thinking.
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4. ETIQUETTE AND MANNERS To guide the students in following proper etiquette and developing good manners. To train students in becoming aware of modern etiquette and types of etiquette. 5. INTERVIEW SKILLS To equip the students with the knowledge of preparing, attending and being successful in interviews.
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Course Name: ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMMMUNICATION SKILLS LAB-(ELCS LAB) After attending the course the student should be able to : Ist Year Ist Semester 1. Introduction to the Sounds of English Vowels, Diphthongs & Consonants. To help students learn correct pronunciation, a key to successful conversation. 2. Situational Dialogues/Role Play To train them to converse effectively and use appropriate language for functional usage.
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3. Oral Presentations-Prepared and Extempore Enables to enhance their confidence levels and prepare them to actively participate in Paper Presentations. 4. Just A Minute Sessions (JAM) To develop their creative thinking ability and time management. 5. Describing Objects/Situations/People To help them use their active vocabulary effectively. 6. Information Transfer To enable the student to comprehend and present the information in the required format.
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Ist Year IInd Semester 1. Introduction to Stress and Intonation. To help the learner speak with the right stress & tone for correct speech production. 2. Functional English To help students use relevant and appropriate language useful for different situations. 3. Vocabulary building To enhance their vocabulary and enable them to use it aptly. 4. Reading Comprehension To help them improve their comprehending skills and develop reading habits. 5. Debate To help learners to express their views assertively, 1246 build confidence and team spirit.

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