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Course Syllabus SPA 101 SPREADSHEET APPLICATIONS

Dates of Term: January 6, 2014 to February 13, 2014 Credit Hours: 3 Quarter Hours Course Length: 6 weeks Days: Monday-Thursday Hours: 12:15 2:05 Room: Instructor: Lisa Collingwood Durbin Email: ldurbin@wvjcmorgantown.edu or sydnee97@msn.com Website: letsspeakcomputer.net

REFERENCE MATERIALS: Student Text Companion site: http://bcs.wiley.com/he-bcs/Books?action=index&itemId=0470907673&bcsId=6601 Text: Microsoft Office Excel 2010: Exam 77-882, Updated 1st Edition Microsoft Official Academic Course (Microsoft Corporation) August 2012, 2012

This syllabus is subject to change in order to meet the needs of all students, and consequently, assist the school in producing employable students.
Revised: December 2013

PREREQUISITES: ITC 101 Introduction to Computers COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course is designed to introduce the student to spreadsheet application software commonly utilized in the business setting. Topics will include workbooks, linking files and worksheets, charting, database functions and formulas, and templates. Prerequisite: Introduction to Computers. COURSE OBJECTIVES: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: Navigate spreadsheets and perform various operations on spreadsheets in Microsoft Excel Create a workbook and populate data in a worksheet Create, edit and modify basic formulas and functions Create, edit and modify more advanced formulas and functions Create, edit and modify charts from data Create, edit and modify pictures and shapes to a worksheet Explore options to share and secure documents Week Week 1 COURSE OUTLINE: Learning Objective, Topic Chapter 1 Excel Essentials Chapter 2 Create and Editing a Workbook Access a workbook to change window views Create, Edit, Save and Prints workbooks and worksheets Assignments/Tests/Quizzes Time Allotment

Week 2

Chapter 3 Formatting Cells and Ranges Chapter 4 Worksheet Formatting Insert and delete cells in a worksheet Manually format text and apply formatting Edit rows and columns Insert and edit themes Insert page headers and footers Prepare the workbook for printing Assimilate and demonstrate skills using a spreadsheet project

1. Work on hands on tutorials in 1. 1 Hour lesson 1. 2. 1 Hour 2. Work on hands on tutorial in 3. 1 Hour lesson 2. 4. 1 Hour 3. Practice independently on all 5. 1 Hour end of chapter projects for 6. 1 Hour lesson 1 4. Practice independently on all Total end of chapter projects for 6 Hrs lesson 2 5. Review o Access a workbook to change window views o Create, Edit, Save and Prints workbooks and worksheets 6. Exam on chapters 1 and 2 1. Work on hands on tutorials in 1. 1 Hour lesson 3. 2. 1 Hour 2. Work on hands on tutorial in 3. 1 Hour lesson 4. 4. 1 Hour 3. Practice independently on all 5. 1 Hour end of chapter projects for 6. 1 Hour lesson 3. 4. Practice independently on all end of chapter projects for lesson 4 Total 5. Review 6 Hrs o Insert and delete cells in a worksheet o Manually format text and

Week 3

Circling Back 1 Chapter 5 Managing Worksheets Chapter 6 Working with Data Organize worksheets within a workbook Hide, unhide, insert, delete, find and replace worksheets within a workbook

Week 4

Chapter 7 Using Basic Formulas and Functions Chapter 8 Using More Advanced Formulas Circling Back 2 Build Basic Formulas Insert and manipulate cell references and name ranges in formulas Summarize data with functions Utilize formulas to summarize, look up, format, and modify data and text in a worksheet Convert text to columns Assimilate and demonstrate skills using a spreadsheet project

apply formatting Edit rows and columns Insert and edit themes Insert page headers and footers o Prepare the workbook for printing o Assimilate and demonstrate skills using a spreadsheet project 6. Exam on chapters 3 and 4 1. Complete small project on tracking Joe Corbis pizza orders 2. Work on hands on tutorials in lesson 5. 3. Work on hands on tutorial in lesson 6. 4. Practice independently on all end of chapter projects for lesson 5. 5. Practice independently on all end of chapter projects for lesson 6. 6. Review o Organize worksheets within a workbook o Hide, unhide, insert, delete, find and replace worksheets within a workbook 7. Exam on chapters 5 and 6 1. Work on hands on tutorials in lesson 7. 2. Work on hands on tutorial in lesson 8. 3. Practice independently on all end of chapter projects for lesson 7 4. Practice independently on all end of chapter projects for lesson 8 5. Complete circling back on chapters 5-8 6. Review o Build Basic Formulas o Insert and manipulate cell references and name ranges in formulas o Summarize data with o o o

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. Total 7 Hrs

1 Hour 1 Hour 1 Hour 1 Hour 1 Hour 1 Hour 1 Hour

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. Total 7 Hrs

1 Hour 1 Hour 1 Hour 1 hour 1 Hour 1 Hour 1 hour

Week 5

Chapter 9 Creating Charts from Your Data Chapter 10 Adding Pictures and Shapes to a Worksheet Chapter 11 Securing and Sharing Documents Create and build charts Insert and modify, pictures, shapes, SmartArt, and objects in a worksheet Apply quick styles to a worksheet Protect, use document inspector, digitally sign, track changes, and add comments to a workbook

7. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

8. Week 6 Work and create a final Spreadsheet Project Assimilate and demonstrate skills using a spreadsheet project 1.

2. 3.

functions Utilize formulas to summarize, look up, format, and modify data and text in a worksheet o Convert text to columns o Assimilate and demonstrate skills using a spreadsheet project Exam on chapters 7 and 8 Work on hands on tutorials in lesson 9. Work on hands on tutorial in lesson 10. Work on hands on tutorial in lesson 11. Practice independently on all end of chapter projects for lesson 9. Practice independently on all end of chapter projects for lesson 10. Practice independently on all end of chapter projects for lesson 11. Review o Create and build charts o Insert and modify, pictures, shapes, SmartArt, and objects in a worksheet o Apply quick styles to a worksheet o Protect, use document inspector, digitally sign, track changes, and add comments to a workbook Exam on chapters 9, 10 and 11 Create a invoicing system for your mock business. This will require you to set up your invoicing system, track all details of customer orders, and customer balances (Final Project) Review Chapters 1-11 Complete Final Exam o

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. Total 8 Hrs

1 Hour 1 Hour 1 Hour 1 Hour 1 Hour 1 Hour 1 Hour 1 Hour

1. 3 Hours 2. 2 Hours 3. 1 Hours Total 6 Hours Course Total: 40 Hours

*The Department of Education requires one hour of classroom or direct faculty instruction and a minimum of two hours of out-of-class student work each week for ten to twelve weeks for one quarter hour of credit .

DEFINITION OF QUARTER CREDIT HOUR/ACADEMIC YEAR: The School measures and awards credits using quarter credit hours. The School operates on a quarter term calendar year. A quarter term is between 10 and 12 weeks in length. A credit hour is an amount of work represented in intended learning outcomes and verified by evidence of student achievement that is an institutionally established equivalency that reasonably approximates not less than (1) One hour of classroom or direct faculty instruction and a minimum of two hours of out of class student work each week for approximately 10 to 12 weeks for one quarter hour of credit, or the equivalent amount of work over a different amount of time; OR (2) At least an equivalent amount of work as required in paragraph (1) of this definition for other academic activities as established by the institution including laboratory work, internships, practicum, studio work, and other academic work leading to the award of credit hours. Credit will be calculated based on the ACICS credit hour equivalencies: One quarter credit hour equals, at a minimum, 10 classroom hours of lecture, 20 hours of laboratory, and 30 hours of practicum. A standard contact/class hour is generally 50 minutes in length and appropriate breaks. A student is considered to be full-time when carrying 12 or more credit hours per term. The definition of an academic year for Title IV purposes is 36 quarter credit hours and 30 weeks. HOUR REGULATION: The Accrediting Council for Independent Schools and Schools (ACICS) criteria for quarter hour conversion is as follows: 10 hours (lecture) = 1 credit hour 20 hours (lab) = 1 credit hour 30 hours (externship) = 1 credit hour Therefore, a lecture course consisting of 4 credits mandates 40 hours (10 hours of lecture x 4 credits) of instruction. Each class is scheduled as follows: 100 minutes of instructions four days per week. A classroom hour is defined as 50 minutes of instruction, so each day there are 2.0 hours of instruction. The course runs six weeks, so 2.0 hours per day x 4 days x 6 weeks = 48 hours of instruction. Scheduling classes in this manner exceeds the requirement by 8 hours, which provides an allowance for vacation, holidays, cancellations of classes, etc. CLASS SCHEDULE: Classes may be held during the day and also at night. Day classes may be held anytime between 8:00 a.m. and 6:00 p.m. Night classes may be held anytime between 5:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m. Programs offered at night normally take one extra quarter to complete. Please see the Campus Director for a complete schedule.

LECTURE TIME ALLOCATION: A standard contact (class hour) generally is 50 minutes in length and the appropriate break(s). A student is considered to be full time when carrying 12 or more credit hours per quarter term. The definition of an academic year for Title 4 purposes is 36 quarter credit hours and 30 weeks. FULL TIME COURSE LOAD EXPLANATION: Any student who is taking a full time course load from the academic institution can expect the following time dedication. Students are advised that a full course load is equivalent to a full time job. 12-15 Class Hours + 24-30 Hours of Homework = 36-45 Hours of Work Each Week

RESPONSIBILITY OF STUDENT & ACADEMIC INSTITUTION: The student and academic institution have an underlying responsibility to each other. The academic institution prides itself on providing quality education to each student with consistent academic support and professional integrity. The commitment of the academic facility is valued on fairness, consistency, reliability, and student support. To ensure a successful experience the student must allocate sufficient time, practice academic integrity, and seek academic proficiency in both instruction and provided training. The dedication of both student and academic institution will result in academic accomplishment. EVALUATION OF HOMEWORK: All homework assignments will receive a qualitative grade and be factored into the final course grade. TEACHING METHODS: This class will facilitate learning through a variety of methods that may include but not limited to: cooperative learning, presentation, and direct instruction, various in class and out of class assignments, worksheets, quizzes, examinations, projected based learning, discussion, dialog journals, multimedia instruction, guest speakers, peer tutoring, and demonstration. ASSIGNMENTS, QUIZZES, ASSESSMENTS, AND/OR EXERCISES: IMPORTANT: The instructor reserves the right to assign or modify exercises, quizzes, and/or evaluations at his/her discretion. Modifications will only be done with due notice to the students. GRADING SYSTEM: GRADE A B C D F WF W I NUMERICAL EQUIVALENT 90 100% 80 89% 70 79% 60 69% Below 60% EVALUATION Excellent Good Average Poor Failure Withdrawal-Failure Withdrawal Incomplete QUALITY POINTS PER QUARTER HOUR 4 3 2 1 0 0 * *

TR Transfer CBE Credit by Examination NA Not Attempted * Not used to calculate Grade Point Average GRADING EVALUATION: Your grade will be calculated as follows: Category Exercises (11 x 20 points) Activities (7 at 30 points) Tests (4 x 50 points) Final (1 x 100 points) Final Project (1 x 100 points) Participation Total

* * *

Points 220 210 200 100 200 120 1050

Instructor requirements for this class are contained in the following sections. Each student is responsible for following the requirements listed in the syllabus and found in the schools official catalog. REQUIRED MATERIALS 1 USB Drive Notebook for class notes and study notes COURSE/CAMPUS REQUIREMENTS, POLICIES, AND PROCEDURES ACADEMIC ADVISING: If you are in need of academic advising for issues involving grades, classes, scheduling, academic progress, conflicts, etc. or for personal issues revolving around transportation difficulties, professional services referrals, drug and alcohol abuse, family crisis, etc. the Campus Director, Robin Addis, is the designated person to approach regarding these matters. Students in need of assistance should feel free to notify her at any time during the term. TUTORING: If you are in need of help, ask for it immediately. There are several sources of help that are available to you regarding this course. Tutoring is available and it is free of charge. DISABILITY: If you have a disability and anticipate needing any type of accommodation in order to participate in this class, please advise me and your campus liaison so that we can make appropriate arrangements. SOCIAL JUSTICE POLICY: Pennsylvania Institute of Health and Technology does not discriminate on the basis of race, sex, age, disability, veteran status, religion, sexual orientation, color or national origin. Any suggestions as to how to further a positive and open environment in this course will be appreciated and given serious consideration.

ATTENDANCE (PARTICIPATION) POLICY Students are expected to attend EVERY class EVERY day. An absence is defined as being absent for a class hour for ANY reason; Attendance will be taken each hour of class. Habitually arriving late or leaving early shows a lack of consideration for your fellow classmates and instructor and is disruptive to the classroom environment. Three tardies will result in a full class absence. Upon the 8th absence from class, the student will be dropped from the course, without exception, receiving an F as the final grade. This may impact your graduation date and/or your financial aid. In addition, students are cautioned that in most courses, if a student misses classes, he/she will fall behind very quickly and will have to put forth a great deal of effort to get caught up. Once a student gets behind it is very difficult to catch up as the class continues to move forward.

CLASSROOM (PARTICIPATION) POLICIES From this day forward, your job is to come to class and be ready to participate in any activity that we are doing on that day. You are expected to be courteous to staff, faculty, and fellow students and to conduct yourself in a manner appropriate in a professional work environment.

Disruptive behavior will not be tolerated. Examples of distractive behavior are as


follows: casual talk among students, keyboard chatter, Internet surfing/game playing during class time, sleeping, or any other inappropriate and unprofessional behavior toward fellow students and/or the instructor. You will be asked to leave, and you will be marked absent for the entire class.

No other applications are permitted to be running during class lectureThis includes Facebook and Twitter.

No food or drink in the classroom.


Cell phones are a disruption. However, I do recognize the importance in receiving an emergency call. Please be courteous and place your phone on vibrate so the class will not be disrupted. Do not have your phone in plain sight. If you must answer the call,

please leave the room. Do not text message in class. This is rude and will not be tolerated under any circumstances. You will be asked leave, and you will be marked absent for the entire class. Be aware of your grades and the status of the assignments owed at all times throughout the class. Textbooks must be turned in on the last day of class. Any student not turning in the assigned books for the class will not be permitted to take the final exam. In addition to the classroom policies and procedures stated above, in this class you will observe the same rules of conduct that you will have to follow in the workplace. From this day forward your job is to come to class and be ready to participate in any activity that we are doing on that day. On the job you will have to come to work on time, stay for the entire day, be prepared, and give 100% all day. I will expect the same from you in this class. Being prepared means, reading the chapter we are to cover BEFORE coming to class. I will not read everything in class, I will hit the highpoints, but the tests will cover everything in the chapter. Being prepared also means having written assignments ready to be turned in at the start of class the day they are due.

MAKE-UP POLICIES It is your responsibility to obtain all missed assignments. They will be posted on Engrade and on the instructors Website. Students must complete the required work within two class days of returning to school. Students must submit such work for grading. All assignments MUST be labeled appropriately. Points will be deducted from late work at the instructors discretion. Assigned work that the student was aware of is due upon return to class. Absolutely no outstanding assignments will be accepted week six of the module. NO excuses regarding technology will be accepted for late projects. Please plan ahead for all types of computer problems.

TESTING PROCEDURES There is NO make-up for a missed test. One test grade will be dropped at the end of the term.

Since the final exam is comprehensive, all students MUST take the final, and it will not be considered for as a dropped grade. Since cell phones have been used to text exam questions/answers, cell phones of any type are prohibited during assessments.

ACADEMIC HONESTY In cases of academic dishonesty and cheating, the grade for the assignment will be an F. Cheating of any form will not be tolerated. In addition, plagiarism is never acceptable and must be avoided. Plagiarism means attempting to give your reader the impression that words and ideas are your own. Yet in fact, they are someone elses.

ASSIGNMENT SUBMISSION Unless otherwise stated, all assignments for the week are due by 11:59 on the Saturday of the week it was assigned. Assignments received later will be penalized by 25 percent for each day the assignment is late. Each assignment must be properly labeled. This label includes your name and the assignment name. The instructor reserves the right to not grade assignments which are submitted without the label. The label is to be placed in a header unless otherwise directed. o For example: Lisa Collingwood Durbin, Activity A

COMMUNICATION When e-mailing your instructor, be sure to do the following: o Send a new message each time. o Add an appropriate subject line for each new message. Your instructor will respond as soon as possible; therefore, there is no need to send the same message multiple times through multiple sources.

COPYRIGHT COMPLIANCE POLICY It is the policy of PIHT to comply with all copyright laws. All faculty, staff, and students are expected to be aware of and follow these requirements. General information on copyright law is provided below. For further information, refer to www.copyright.gov.

Any member of the campus community practicing unauthorized use or distribution of copyrighted material will be subject to sanctions by the college up to dismissal from school or termination of employment. Individuals would also be subject to Federal criminal offenses for copyright law violations. For a full list of these offenses, visit: http://www.copyright.gov/(title17/92)chap5.html. COPYRIGHT DEFINED According to the U.S. Copyright Office of the Library of Congress, copyright is a form of protection provided by the laws of the United States (Title 17/92) to the authors of original works of authorship. Copyrightable works include the following categories: Literary works, Musical works, including any accompanying words, Dramatic works, including any accompanying music, Pantomimes and choreographic works, Pictorial, graphic, and sculptural works, Motion pictures and other audiovisual works, Sound recordings, Architectural works, and Computer programs. It is best to assume that anything published after 1920 is protected by copyright, even if it does not contain the copyright notice. The Library of Congress Copyright Office Circular 22 explains how to determine the copyright status of a work, when in doubt. PUBLIC DOMAIN Older materials or U.S. Government publications are considered to lie in the public domain and may not be subject to copyright restrictions. This material may be used without permission, but the original source should still be credited.

COPYRIGHT SYMBOL The absence of a copyright symbol does not indicate that material is without copyright restrictions. Most nations follow the Berne copyright convention recognizing works created after April 1, 1989 to be protected whether or not a copyright notice is present. FAIR USE The Fair Use Doctrine allows certain materials to be used for nonprofit, educational purposes without fees or permission and balances the exclusive protection of copyright law. The 1976 Copyright Act put forth these criteria to determine fair use: purpose and character of the use, nature of the work, amount used and effect of the use on the works potential market value. PEER TO PEER FILE SHARING A recent amendment to the Higher Education act of 1965 requires colleges to have a plan to combat the illegal downloading of music, videos and other copyrighted works (otherwise known as Peer to Peer File Sharing, or P2P) on college campus networks. Pennsylvania Institute of Health and Technology takes this responsibility seriously. Campus computers will be monitored closely to address copyright violations related to illegal downloads. Each computer user at the college should understand what material is illegal or legal and what sites are authorized distributors of copyrighted material. For example, popular sites such as iTunes, Rhapsody, Amazon, etc. have downloads available for a fee. Any unauthorized or