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10.02.04 -

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1,

1.1.

11
11

1.2.

23

1.2.1.

23

1.2.2. :

28

1.2.3.
.

1.3.

31

1.2.4.

45

48

2.

.... 50
2.1.

50

2.2.

2.3.

54

2.4.

59
62

3
3.

3.1.
3.1.1. ..

63
67
75

3.1.2.

85

3.1.3.

88

3.1.4.

3.2.

94

99

3.2.1.

100

3.2.2.

109

3.2.3.

3.3.

118

127

3.3.1.

128

3.3.2.

139

3.3.3.

3.4.

145

154

156

162

174

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Kress, G. Leech, T. van Leeuwen, W.J.T. Mitchell, E. Panofsky, M. Short, M.
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^ Da Vinci, Leonardo. Paragone: of Poetry and Painting // Treatise on Painting, ed. A. Philip
McMahaon. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1974. . no [Mitchell, 1987: 78].
^ Shelley's Poetry and Prose. Ed. Donald H. Reinman, Sharon B. Powers. NY: W. W. Norton,
1977. . no [Mitchell, 1987: 78].
^ Laocoon: An Essay upon the Limits of Poetry and Painting (1766), trans. Ellen Frothingham.
NY: Farrar, Straus, and Giroux, 1969. . no [Mitchell, 1987:104-105]

25


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2.
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On the latrine wall, among lipsticked obscenities, she noticed the following
message, neatly indited in engineering lettering:
'Interested in sophisticated fun?

You, hubby, girlfriends. The more the

merrier. Get in touch with Kirby, through WASTE only. Box 7391, LA.'
WASTE? Oedipa wondered. Beneath the notice, faintly in pencil, was a
symbol, she'd never seen before, a loop, triangle and trapezoid, thus:... [Pynchon,
T. The Crying of Lot 49.2006, p. 52].

{triangle and trapezoid) ,

{loopf^.

,
. ,

^' round shape or curve made by a line curling back towards itself (Webster's Third New
International Dictionary of the English Language).

69


.
, (. 3 . 3.2),
{thus),
,

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), (faintly in pencil),
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.
Evil Mark stood up in the middle of the afternoon and said, "I'm about to
hand out sheets listing the 8,363 prime numbers between 10,000 and 100,000.
Embedded in this list of numbers is one non-prime. First person to find that -

70
prime number wins my Family Guy promotional sixteen-ounce beer cozy."
In less than five minutes I won.
[ (. 3 . 3.3,3.4)].
When I tapped the prime numbers to my cubicle wall and looked at them
from a distance, I could see darker and lighter patches within the body of the text
that formed interesting shapes and patterns [Coupland D. C. JPod. 2006, pp. 212229].
Ha
,

prime

number^^.

,
.

{8,362 prime numbers between 10,000 and 100,000),


a , ,


. (less than five minutes),
.
:
,
, ,
(shape, pattern, darker and lighter patches), a
(see).

,
: , '" positive integer not divisible without a remainder by any positive integer other than itself
and one (Webster's Third New International Dictionary of the English Language).

71

, .

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9,

(89839, 89849 ..)

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; . . "Breakfast
of Champions"
.

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So Dwayne Hoover now extended his right hand to Breedlove, and
Breedlove without thinking anything about it took that hand in his own. They
linked up like this
[ (. 3 . 3.5)]

72

That was a symbol of friendship between men. The feeling was, too, that a
lot of character could be read into the way men shook hands. [Vonnegut, K.
Breakfast of Champions. 2000, p. 276].

.
.
{Dwayne Hoover, Breedlove)
, : 1)
extended his right hand, 2) took that hand in his own, 3) they linked up.
{ symbol of friendship)
.
^^shook hands".

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Breedlove) ();

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.

,
( ) ,

. ,
, ;
.
,

.
"//, Ross. The guys here all look like Charles Manson," says Daniel as
he rights himself, "and the women all look like Sharon Tate"
[ (. 3 . 3.6, 3.7)]
"Certain archetypal dramas continue to replay themselves over and over,"
replies Ross, who plans to major in philosophy [Coupland, D. Polaroids from
the Dead. 1996, pp. 13-16].
,
^^
, .
. .
:

^' , , 8
, 8 1969 .
, ,
, .

74

60-. {The
guys here all look like Charles Manson; the women all look like Sharon Tate)
,
.

, to look
like, .
, (
) .

: 60-
( ,
; , ).

(dramas).
, . .
,
. . ,

(
: guys, women). ,

.

, archetypal
to replay, ,
(over and over).

,
,
, , ,

75

3.1.1.
, - ,

.

.
, .

/)

(/;

/;
(/;

/) .

.
Little Billy was small and slender, about twenty or twenty-one, and had a
straight white forehead veined with blue, large dark blue eyes, delicate, regular
features, and coal-black hair... And in his winning and handsome face there was
just a faint suggestion of some possible very remote Jewish ancestor... [Du
Maurier, G. Trilby. 1998, p. 6].

, ];

"Little Billy",


. ,
, delicate,
handsome, winning, faint suggestion of some possible very
remote Jewish ancestor

(,

),

76

(. 3 . 3.8).

, {veined with blue; dark blue eyes).


1 , ,

, ,
, - .
:
,
[Fauconier, Turner, 2002: 97-98].

.

,
. , , Doggies.
And so out of nowhere, Ijust said what came into my head and I told you the
story of "Doggies."
"Doggies? "you asked.
"Yes - Doggies - the dog who wore goggles."
And then you asked me what did Doggies do, and I couldn't think of
anything else aside from the fact that he wore goggles.
You persisted and so I said to you, "Well, Doggies was supposed to have
had a starring role in the Cat in the Hat series of books except... "
"Except what?"
"Except he had a drinking problem," I replied [Coupland, D. Life after
God. 1994, p. 19-20].

,

dog,

'VAe dog who wore goggles"

77

(,
, ..). ,

(wore goggles; had


drinking problem)

.
Doggies

: ,

(. 3 . 3.9).
Doggies (. 3
. 3.10).
.
.


.

, ,
: borogove, toves, raths [Carroll, L.
Through the Looking Glass. 1994, pp. 102-104].
.
,
tove

: , ,
.
... "Toves " are something like badgers - they 're something like lizards - and
they are something like corkscrews [. ., . 102]

(,

78

),

,
(. 3 . 3.11, 3.12, 3.13). like
, ,

.
something
like (something like badgers; something like lizards).
,

.

,
(.
3 . 3.14 - ).
, -
( ,
, ,
), - (,

).


. ,
, , :
,
.
,
. -,

. -,

79

,
, , ,
, ,
:
they make their nests under sundials', they live on cheese [. ., . 102].
nests
, {cheese)
, ,
.
,
. ,

.
,
:
And "borogove " is thin shabby-looking bird with its feathers sticking out
all around - something like a live mop [. ., . 104].

^^orogove"
{is ... bird),
{its feathers). .

, , , , .
,

'^borogove".

"thin",

.
. {shabby-looking),

{sticking

out),

80

(all around), (like


live mob) - .
^^something like",
.


(. 3 . 3.14 - ),
.
, , , ,
. ,
thin ,

(,

) ,
, , ,
.
, ,
,
:
... "rath" is sort of green pig [. ., . 104].
"rath" ,
(green) ,

.
"sorf

, ( s ort of green pig).

,
,
.
,

81
(. . 3.14
- ). ,
,
, , ,
. ,
,
.

. ,

.
"Alice's
Adventures in Wonderland" (. 3 . 3.15, 3.16). ,
- .

. -
.
?
.
, :
...and turning to Alice, she went on, "what's your name, ?[\\, L.
Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. 1994, p. 95]
this curious child was very fond of pretending to be two people [Caroll, L.
Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. 1994, p. 19].
06

:
...how (she) would, in the after-time, be herself a grown woman [Caroll, L.
Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. 1994, p. 148].

82

to be {would be) (in the


aftertime),
, ,
.
.
, .
,
/, we, her
:
Alice had learnt several things of this sort in her lessons in the classroom
[Caroll, L. Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. 1994, p. 13]
I've been to a day school too... we learned French and music [Caroll, L.
Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. 1994, p. 114]
,
.
:
/ wonder what Latitude or what Longitude I've got to? [Caroll, L. Alice's
Adventures in Wonderland. 1994, p. 13]
/ daresay it's a French mouse, came over with William the Conqueror
[Caroll, L. Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. 1994, p. 28].

{Alice had idea what Latitude


was, or Longitude either [Caroll, L. Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. 1994, p.
13]; with all her knowledge of history, Alice had no very clear notion how long
ago anything had happened [Caroll, L. Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. 1994,
p. 28]),
.
, ,

83
. ,
,
.
:
...this curious child was very fond of pretending to be two people [CaroU,
L. Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. 1994, p. 19].
to pretend ,
,
(was very fond of)
.

-.


.
,
:
ought to be ashamed of yourself' said Alice, 'a great girl like you... to
go on crying in this way! Stop this moment, I tell you!' But she went on all the
same, shedding gallons of tears, until there was a large pool all around her...
[Caroll, L. Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. 1994, p. 19].
,

{Stop

this

moment),

{ought to),
{ great girl like you), . ,
,
. "to go on"
, "// the
same", {she went on all the same).
, ,

84

-,

{shedding gallons of tears).



.
,

:
She went on planning to herself how she would manage it [Caroll, L.
Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. 1994, p. 22].
[Caroll, L. Alice's Adventures in Wonderland.

Thought Alice to herself


1994, p. 19].

She was considering in her own mind [Caroll, L. Alice's Adventures in


Wonderland. 1994, p. 44].
She generally gave herself very good advice, (though she seldom followed
it), and sometimes she scolded herself so severely as to bring tears into her eyes;
and once she remembered trying to box her own ears for having cheated herself
in a game of croquet she was playing against herself... [Caroll, L. Alice's
Adventures in Wonderland. 1994, p. 19].

{planning to herself; thought... to herself),


-
,

{gave herself good


advice; cheated herself; playing against herself).
,
.

,
,

85

.
.
8 . , :
, . (, - ,
) , . ,
,
, , .
,
.

3. 1. 2.


,
.

.
. ,
, , ,
,
, ,
. , .
^^ XIX
,
.

86

, ,

.
"Where Have All the Bullets Gone?" C.
,
, , . . ,
,
. ,
.
,
(1985).
, .

. , ,
, , :
Within week jeep arrives and takes me away. The girls all cried and the
men cheered. Looking through my diary I found a note I made at that time)
[Milligan, S. Where Have All the Bullets Gone? 1986, p. 53].
,
, ,

1- / {
diary; I found; I made) .
that {at that time)
.
,
, (. 3 .
3.17). :
Translation. "Posted 2 Maddaloni on 8/8/44. Very depressed, same
feeling as before [Milligan, S. Where Have All the Bullets Gone? 1986, p. 54].

87

Translation,
, -

,
. (8/8/44),
{at that time).
- to be ,
, (8/8/44)
{Very depressed) .
, ,


.
.
,

Baiano. :
"The farming village ofBaino lay NE of Naples, by about twenty kilometers,
on a bad day thirty" [Milligan, S. Where nave All the Bullets Gone? 1986, p. 30].
Baiano ,
{village),
farming,

Baiano {NE of Naples, by


about twenty kilometers).
{on bad day thirty).
,
,
.
(. 3 . 3.18) ,

,
(Baiano ; ).

88

(, ,
,

),

( :
, ). ,

"Baiano", :
Baiano,
1945 .

3. 1. 3.

, .
,

.
, .
: , ,
, . . ,
[, 1989: 309].

.

( ) .
.

89

"Life after God".



:
But it wasn 't other animals who invented machines, it was humans. So what
is it about our essential humanity that we are expressing with our inventions?
What is it that makes us us?
I thought of how odd it is for billions of people to be alive, yet not one of
them is really quite sure of what makes people people.
The only activities I could think of that humans do that have no other
animal equivalent were smoking, body-building, and writing. That's not much,
considering how special we seem to think we are [Coupland, D. C. Life after God.
1994, p. 12].
,
.
,
to be ,

(it

wasn't

animals

who....,

it

was

humans).

^''humans'^ ,
,

(people)

. , {So what
is it about our essential humanity that we are expressing with our inventions?
What is

it that

makes

us

us?),

. ,
,

1-


{we are expressing; our inventions; us), a
,

90

{what makes us us) ""people'' {what makes


people people), .
,

: smoking, body-building, and writing.


,
,
, ,
,
.

. ,
{smoking, body-building, writing),

, (. 3 . 3.19). ,

, ,

. ,

,
, "writing',
,
,
. ,
,

, ,

91


.
( ).
, ,

.
,
: That's not much.
, ,
,

.
. .
:
/ turned around and she had frozen in mid-motion. She said, "I bet if we
froze right here and didn 't move and didn 't breathe we could stop time." And so
we stood there, deep in the woods, frozen in mid-motion, trying to stop time
[Coupland, D. Life after God. 1994, p. 47].

: (/ turned
around and she had frozen in mid-motion), {if we froze
right

here

and

didn't

move

and

didn't

breathe)

{we could stop time).


.
,
{didn't move - stood; froze - frozen).
trying
.
,

92

(. 3 . 3.20). , ,

(. 3 . 3.21).
,
.
,
,
.

, ,
.


,
. ,
,

, ,
, -
.
.
,
.
,
:
...And then she will hung up and I am alone again and try to understand
what she is telling me. I try to understand where this change in her came from. I
walk through the house but it now makes no sense - stairs run into the ceiling;
rooms are walled off. The phone will maybe ring again or sometimes it will live
me lonely for the night. I sit at the kitchen table in my flannel housecoat eating

93

toast with peanut butter while I think these thoughts. The neighbour's German
sheperd barks at ghosts and the occasional redneck guns an engine down
Lonsdale Avenue a few blocks away. But otherwise the world is quiet here in this
assuming grey-and-pink 1950s box which overlooks the lights of the ships in the
harbour and the tall buildings downtown [Coupland, D. Life after God. 1994,
p. 140].
, home,

. house box,

,
grey-and-pink, 1950s,
(stairs, rooms, kitchen table)

(/ am alone again; it will leave me lonely for


the night) ,
, . ,
, are walled off
,
, {the world is quiet here),
, {German sheperd
barks; guns an engine).
(. 3 . 3.22)

.
, ,

, (1- ),
- .
,
.

94

( 2- , ) .
,

, .
,
{neighbour's
German sheperd down; Lonsdale Avenue a few blocks away; overlooks the lights
of the ships in the harbour and the tall buildings downtown),
.

3. 1. 4.

^^

.
,

), ,

,
), -

[Rimmon-Kenan,

2001]^'*.

"Alice's Adventures in Wonderland".

.
:

" . 1.2.2. .
^^ . - , ,
[, 2000].

95

:
,
.
, .
.
,

. (.
3 . 3.23), (. 3 . 3.24).
As she said these words her foot slipped, and in another moment, splash!
She was up to her chin in salt water. Her first idea was that she had somehow
fallen into the sea...
"/ wish I hadn't cried so much!" said Alice, as she swam about, trying to
find her way out. "I shall be punished for it now, I suppose, by being drowned in
my own tears!'^ [Carroll, L. Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. 1994, pp. 26-27]

. to slip (her foot


slipped) splash!, .
,
(7 wish I hadn't cried so much!' said Alice).
(7 wish I hadn't cried so much!)
(7 shall be punished for it now, I suppose, by being drowned in my
own tears!) .

(. 3 . 3.23). ,
.
, , .
,

96


.
Just then she heard something splashing about in the pool a little way off,
and she swam nearer to make out what it was: at first she thought it must be a
walrus or hippopotamus, but then she remembered how small she was now, and
she soon made out that it was only a mouse that had slipped in like herself
[Carroll, L. Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. 1994, p. 27].
{a little way off),
{she heard) {she swam nearer^, a
{at first she thought..., but then she remembered
that...). . ,
.
, :
something,

about {she heard something splashing about).
,

{she thought it must be a walrus or


hippopotamus - , ,
), to think
. , something-it-walrus or
hippopotamus-it- mouse {she soon made out
that it was only a mouse). to make out

.
, ,
(. 3 . 3.24).
,
.
. .

97

, , ,
, ,
.
,

. ,

,
,
(. 3 . 3.25).
,

, .
,

-.
The next moment soldiers came running through the wood, at first in twos
and threes, then ten or twenty together, and at last in such crowds that they
seemed to fill the whole forest. Alice got behind a tree for fear of being run over,
and watched them go by.
She thought that in all her life she had never seen soldiers so uncertain on
their feet: they were always tripping over something or other, and whenever one
went down, several more always fell over him, so that the ground was soon
covered with little heaps of men.
Then came horses. Having four feet, these managed rather better than the
foot-soldiers: but even they stumbled now and then; and it seemed to be a regular
rule that, whenever a horse stumbled, the rider fell off instantly. The confusion
got worse every moment, and Alice was very glad to be out of the wood into an
open place... [Carroll, L. Through the Looking Glass. 1994, p. 110]

98

.
,
.
,
(Alice got behind tree for
of being run over, and watched them go by).

fear

,
{behind tree)

{through the wood) -


.
(
),
.
. .
, ,
{stumbled, tripping over, fell off), a
{confusion, heaps of men, uncertain on their feet).
,
{seemed), such {in such
crowds), .
{seemed to fill

the whole forest).

so {they were
so uncertain on their feet) Past Continuous
always {they were always tripping over something or other).

{was very glad)


{to get out of the wood into an open
place)

, ,

.
{out; into),

99

.
(. 3 . 3.26)
.
- ,
. :
.
. ,
-
, . ,
, , ,
. , - .
,
.

,
3-
.
,
.

,
.
,
.

3.2.
,

100


.

.

, ,

,
,
, .

.

,
.

(. 4 . 4.1):
,

.
, ,
.

3. 2. 1.


- [, 1996: 86-58].

, , : ,
, , -.

101

. , . ,
, ,

{topical),
{asymmetric topicality) [Grady, Oakley, Coulson, 1999].

-.

.
.
,
.
I am quiet man. I tend to think things through and try not to say too much.
But here I am, saying perhaps too much. But there are these feelings inside me
which need badly to escape, I guess. And this makes me feel relieved because one
of my big concerns these past few years is that I've been losing my ability to feel
things with the same intensity - the way I felt when I was younger. It's scary to
feel your emotions floating away and just not caring. I guess what's really scary
is not caring about the loss [Coupland D. C , Life after God. 1994, p. 150].
-

102

, , ,
1- , ,
to feel {feeling)
- : emotions, concerns, relieved, scary, (not)
caring. , ,
,
{to lose, loss, to escape, to float away). ,
( to lose
),
{to float away),
,
. .
{...the way I felt when I was younger)
. ,
, , .
to feel
^'owwg.
- .
to float away

. -
.

(. 4 . 4.2).
, to float away .

. ,
, , (
) . .
- ,

103

- .
, ,
. -
; ;; .
.
The nomadic lifestyle had taken its toll I had been feeling permanently on
the cusp of a flue, feeling at that point where I just wanted to borrow somebody
else's coat - borrow somebody else's life - their aura. I seemed to have lost the
ability to create any more aura of my own [Coupland D. C, Life after God. 1994,
p.3].
{nomadic
lifestyle; on the cusp of a flue)
.
,
/
{to borrow somebody else's coat - borrow somebody else's life - their
aura).

, ,
:
, , ,
, ,
, .

/ ,
.
(. 4 4.3). ,
,
. , (
), .
. ,
( ),

104

( ,
; ) - ,
, , .
.
, ,
, - -
.

.
: , .
; ;
.
And then Ifelt sad because I realized that once people are broken in certain
ways, they can't ever be fixed, and this is something nobody tells you when you are
young and it never fails to surprise you as you grow older as you see people in
your life break one by one. You wonder when your turn is going to be, or if it's
already happened [Coupland D. C , Life after God. 1994, p. 207].
to breaJ^^.
,
.
,
.

(. 4 . 4.4). ,
,

to break,

" Break - to diminish in or lose physical or spiritual strength; weaken or succumb (Webster's
Third New International Dictionary of the English Language).

105

, .
.
, .
,
, , , ,
.

, .
,
, , , ,
. -
, , ,
,

, .
,
, ,
.

, ,
.
,

2- (you wonder when your


turn is going to be).

- -.
closed his draperies. adjusted the heating and ventilating system. He
slept like a lamb.
A lamb was a young animal which was legendary for sleeping well on
planet Earth. It looked like this: ( )... [Vonnegut, .
The Breakfast of Champions. 2000, p. 82].

106

-
, .
,
(legendary for sleeping well), ,
: (young),
{planet Earth),
{animal).

(. 4 . 4.5). ,
, (

),

{young). , ^"
,
, , .
like
- .
{looked like this), -
-, ,
. ,

.
,
,
.
...Otis's comfort was short lived, for he soon after had a scary realization a realization triggered by shopping malls, of all things. It happened this way: he
was driving home to California on Interstate 10 and passing by a shopping mall
outside Phoenix. He was idly thinking about the vast, arrogant block forms of
shopping mall architecture and how they make as little visual sense in the
landscape as nuclear cooling towers. He then drove past a new yuppie housing
development - one of those strange new developments with hundreds of blockish,
equally senseless and enormous coral pink houses, all of them with an inch of

107

space in between and located about three feet from the highway. And Otis got to
thinking: "Hey! These aren't houses at all - these are malls in disguise."
[Coupland, D.C. Generation X. Tales for an Accelerated Culture. 1996, p. 79-80].

.
{
{house). ,
, {block - blockish; little visual
sense - equally senseless). .

. {they make as little visual seme
in the landscape as nuclear

cooling towers)

(
-

),

nuclear {nuclear cooling towers).


block
forms, - ,
.
,
,
hundred (with an inch of space in
between).

, ,
.
,
{arrogant blockforms; blockish).
,

108

. (. 4 . 4.6),
,
,
(we're), ,
, .

.
,
,
.
.

. ,
. coral,
,

, .


,
. ,
(we)
-,
.

-,
,

109
.

3. 2. 2.

,

, .
. "Alice's Adventures

in

Wonderland"

^^.
They very soon came upon a Gryphon, lying fast asleep in the sun. (If you
don't know what a Gryphon is, look at the picture.) 'Up, lazy thing!' said the
Queen, 'and take this lady to see the Mock Turtle and hear his history. I must go
back and see after some executions I have ordered'; and she walked off, leaving
Alice alone with the Gryphon. Alice didn't quite like the look of the creature, but
on the whole she thought it would be quite as safe to stay with it as to go after the
savage Queen: so she waited [Carroll, L. Alice's Adventures in Wonderland.
1994, p. 110].

, creature
.
, ,
{Up, lazy thing!) ,
- {take this
lady to see the Mock Turtle).

. ,
^^ (. griffon, . gryphus, . gryps),
,
.
, .
- (
, 1, , 126).


, .

,
, ,
(. 4 . 4.7). ,
.
,
, .
( , ,
Dear Child ), , ,
. {If you don't know what a Gryphon is, look at the
picture.) .
(the picture) ,
. 2- ,
, , ,
,
,

.

, , ,
(didn 't quite like the
look) , ,
savage,
(see after some executions I have
ordered), (as
safe to stay with it as to go after the savage Queen).

,

.
And then I looked up at the celling and I saw that there was a long box
which was a sign and it said

Ill

[ (. 4 . 4.8)]
And then the bottom line scrolled up and disappeared and a different line
scrolled up in its place and the sign said
[ (. 4 . 4.9)]
And then it changed again and it said
[ (. 4 . 4.10)]
And then I heard the sound like sword fighting and the roaring of a train
coming into the station and I worked out that there was a big computer somewhere
and it knew where all the trains were and it sent messages to the black boxes in the
little stations to say when the trains were coming, and that made me feel better
because everything had and order and a plan [Haddon, M. The Curious Incident
of the Dog in the Night-Time. 2003, pp. 180-181].
"The Curious Incident of the Dog in the
Night-Time"

14-

, ,
- ,
. ,

.
,

, ,
,

then,

. ,

.

( ,
, ). ,

112

{scrolled up). ,
,
{at the ceiling; long box which was a sign),
, .

(. 4 . 4.8, 4.9, 4.10)
,
. ,
{like sword fighting)
{roaring of train) ,
,
,
.
, (
order, plan ,
to work out) ,
(feel better). . , , .
,
, ,
, ,
,
. -, ,
, .

:
And there was pattern on the walls which was like this
[ (. 4 . 4.11)]
And there was a pattern on the seats like this [naddon, M. The Curious

113

Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time. 2003, p. 185]


[ (. 4 . 4.12)]

.

(like this) ,
(
,
). ,
, , .

, ,
.
.
And Mother said, "Go on or you'll catch your death," but I didn 't know
what you'll catch your death meant, and went inside.
And then she said, "I'll run you a bath," and I walked round the flat to
make a map of it in my head so I felt safer, and the flat was like this [Haddon, M.
The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time. 2003, p. 192]
(. 4 . 4.13)
,
, .

(you'll

catch

your

death)


, .

114


.
. ,
-, {to walk round) - Past Simple,
,
, .
-,

( of it in head), -
.
,
.

(felt safer).
. ,

, ,
, .

, ,

:
/ have entered the Art Contest, and I win!
[ (. 4 . 4.14)]
The prize is given to me by a new man, Major Rodes of the Highland Light
Infantry who was a professional artist in Civvy Street! [Milligan, S. Where Have
All the Bullets Gone? 1985, p. 66-67]
,

(-

), {Art Contest), {the

115

prize), , a
: . to win
.
, (the
prize is given to me). ,
, ,
. ,
, (the Civvy Street),
. professional
,
, .
(. 4 . 4.14) (
)
:
,
.

.

. "Generation X".

:
,

,
.
, ,
: ,
, ,

116

.

.
...And some them have bought houses, which has to be a kiss of death,
personality-wise. When someone tells you they've just bought a house, they might
as well tell you they no longer have a personality. You can immediately assume so
many things: that they're locked into jobs they hate; that they are broke; that they
spend every night watching videos; that they are fifteen pounds overweight; that
they no longer listen to new ideas. It's profoundly depressing. And the worst part
of it is that people in their houses don't even like where they are living. What few
happy moments they possess are those gleanedfrom upgrading...
The world has become one great big house like Deirdre 's house in Texas.
Life doesn 't have to be this way [Coupland, D. C. Generation X. 1996, p. 166].

,
.
{ kiss of death).
, , , ,
{they 're locked into
the jobs they hate; they are broke; they no longer listen to new
,

ideas).

, -
:
,
, ; .

" 1991 [Coupland, D. . Generation X, - Little Brown & , 1992]


,
, .
[Coupland, D. . Generation X. - London:
Abacus, 1996] , .

117
to lock into,

, ,
.

{depressing), profoundly.

.
{they),
.
(. 4 .
4.15), , .
: , Dad, - you can either have a house or a
life... I'm having a life.
{Real Estate)
{News:

Housing

prices

soar).


, .

-,

,
.
,
- .
.
- , -

118

, - , ,
. ,
, ,

, ,
.

, , ,
, ,

,

3. 2. 3.

,
.
,

.
,

, ,
,

.
3-
.
.

119

,
. ,

,
, ,

, ,
, .
,
.
.
, ,
,
[Turner, 1996: 116-120].
,
, ,
[, 1996: 200].
,

,
,

.

.
"Trilby" .
, , .
,

,
, .

120

, .
,
.

.

,
, 1- (nor,
indeed, am I pleading for such a subversive and revolutionary measure as the wholesale
abolition of clothes... And here let me humbly apologize to the casual reader...; as a matter of
fact, however, nothing of this kind happened. Nothing ever happens but the unforeseen.
Pazienzal). ,
, .
, . , ,
, .
to kill,
,
(.../ might kill off his cousin sir Oscar, and sir Oscar's five sons...,
and his seventeen grandsons, and the fourteen cousins..., that stand between Taffy and the
baronetcy, so that he might be Sir Taffy....[). to kill :
.
, ,

(This Shakespearian holocaust would scarcely cost me a pangt).


, .
,
, ,
,
(their pinnacles are twin, I venture to believe...; in another fortnight or so the pair of
them will very possibly be sitting to breakfast opposite each other...).
, ,
, (It is great
temptation when you have duly slain your first hero, to enrich hero number two beyond the
dreams of avarice and provide him with a title and a castle and park, as well as a handsome wife
and a family! But the truth is inexorable - and, besides, they are just as happy as they are).

-
. ,
, ,
(he is quite the least conceited art-duffer I ever met - and I have met
far worse duffers than Taffy. For myself, I can only speak of Trilby as I have seen her - clothed
and in her right mind. She never sat to me for any Phryne...).
,
, (Zola, Maupassant,
Loti, Joachim, Madame Schumann), (Place
StAnatole desArts) ,
(Notre Dame; Rue Paradis de Poisonniere).
, ,
.

121


- ,
Meudon:
And the happiest day of all was when the trios Angliches took Trilby and
Jeannot (for so the mite was called) to spend the Sunday in the woods at Meudon,
and breakfast and dine at the garde champetre 's. Swings, peep-shows, donkeyrides; shooting at a mark with crossbows and little pellets of clay, and smashing
little plaster figures and winning macaroons; losing oneself in the beautiful
forest; catching newts and tadpoles and young frogs; making music on mirlitons
[Du Maurier, G. Trilby. 1998, p. 69].
Ha
, ,

. - .
,
, ( ,
).
, swings, donkey-rides, shooting at a mark with crossbows and little
pellets of clay . peep-shows

. , ,
{it is always fine weather in the courtyard of the Grand Hotel)
.
( )
.
. ,
, , .
.
,
,
. , ,
,
,
, , , , ,
.

122

.
. -,
, -, ,
, .

{losing oneself in the beautiful forest),

.

.
(. 4 .
4.16). ,
. ,

, , -
,
. :
. ,
. ,
.
,

,
.

.
She waited for some time without hearing anything more: at last came a
rumbling of little cartwheels, and a sound of a good many voices all talking
together: she made out the words: 'Where's the other ladder?- Why, I hadn't to

123

bring but one; Bill's got the other - Bill! Fetch it here, lad! - Here, put'em up at
this corner - No, tie'em together first - they don't reach half high enough yet Oh! They'll do well enough; don't be particular - Here, Bill! Catch hold of this
rope - Will the roof bear? - Mind that loose slate - Oh, it's coming down! Heads
below' (a loud crash) - 'Now, who did that?' - It was Bill, I fancy - Who's to go
down the chimney? - Nay, I shan 't! You do it! - That I won't, then! - BiiVs to go
down - Here, Bill! The master says you*re to go down the chimney!'
'Oh! So Bill's got to come down the chimney, has he?' said Alice to herself.
'Why, they seem to put everything upon Bill! I wouldn 't in Bill's place for a good
deal: this fireplace is narrow, to be sure; but I think I can kick a little!'
She drew her foot as far down the chimney as she could, and waited till she
heard a little animal (she couldn't guess of what sort it was) scratching and
scrambling about in the chimney close above her: then saying to herself 'This is
Bill,' she gave one sharp kick, and waited to see what would happen next.
The first thing she heard was a general chorus of 'There goes Bill!' then the
Rabbit's voice alone - 'Catch him, you by the hedge!'... [Carroll, L. Alice's
Adventures in Wonderland, 1994, pp. 46-47].

. ,

.
,
. (
), , .
, ,
, , :
, . ,
,

,
,

124

, .
, ,
.

{hearing; rumbling; sound; voices).
,
.
{go) {)
{Bill's to go down - Here, Bill! The master
says you're to go down the chimney!'; So Bill's got to come down the chimney,
has he?). To
, .

{down the chimney) ,


. ,
to see.
. 1
(. 4 . 4.17),
.
. ,
.
{in the chimney close above her),
,
( ,
, ,
). .
,
, .
, ,
{Bill),

125

.

.
,
,
, .
, , -
.
,

.
, .
. - .
"Where Have All the Bullets Gone" C.

.

, ,
.
.
.
,
. ,
,
.

.
/ chose dark blue corduroy jacket and a lighter pair of trousers, a black
and white check sporting jacket with 'British 'flannels, three white silk shirts and
a blue satin tie, a white polo-neck sweater, all of which would hide my post-war

126

back-up army underwear. One thing I never bought - shoes. I had a pair of huge
'sensible* brown brogues that made my feet look five times the size, shaped like
marrows, apparently infiated and about to burst.


.
, .

.
{silk shirts; satin tie)
{post-war back-up army underwear).
{ dark blue corduroy jacket and a lighter pair of trousers),
{ dark jacket; lighter pair of
trousers) {huge brown
brogues). ,
: {shaped like marrows)
{made feet look five times the size; marrows, apparently infiated and about to
burst), a {huge 'sensible' brown brogues).
.
, , ,
(. 4 . 4.18),
.

.
:

127

- -,

, ,

3.3.

,
,
.

,
, ,
, .
,

. , ,
.
( . cohaerentio - , )

: 1)
, ; 2)

; 3)


[., Halliday, ].

(. 5 . 5.1). ,
, , ,

. ,

128

) (
).

3. 3. 1.

,
.
,
3.1 - . "The Crying of Lot 49".
Then, by accident (Dr Hilarius, if asked, would accuse her of using
subliminal cues in the environment to guide her to a particular person) or
howsoever, she came on one Stanley Koteks, who wore wire-rim bifocals, sandals,
argyle soch, and at first glance seemed too young to be working here. As turned
out he wasn't working, only doodling with a fat felt pencil this sign...[
(. 5 . 5.2)]
'Hello there,' Oedipa said, arrested by this coincidence. On a whim, she
added, 'Kirby sent me,' this having been the name on the latrine wall. It was
supposed to sound conspiratorial, but came out silly [Pynchon, T. The Crying of
Lot 49. 2006, p. 84].

, ,
,
, ,
.
, ,
.
(. . 3 . 3.2),

129

.
,
, (wore wire-rim bifocals, sandals,
argyle socks).

{the sign; the name; on the latrine wall; Kirbyf^


.
, ,
Oedipa.
particular,
-
. coincidence,
, ,
.
.
: Doggies, Squirelly
Clappy the Kitten [Coupland, D. C. Life after God. 1994, pp. 19-24].
.
,
: ,
{was supposed to have had a starring role; was
going to have an exhibition; was going to be a movie star)
, {except that he had a
drinking problem; except Mrs Squirelly had baby squirrels and so Squirelly had
to get a job at the peanut butter factory and was never able to finish his work; but
she rang up too many bills on her MasterCard and had to get a job as a teller at
the Hongkong Bank of Canada to pay them off. Before long she was simply too old
to
39

try

becoming

star).

, 3.1 .

except

but.

130



{...stories of these beautiful little creatures who were all supposed to have been
part of a fairy tale but who got lost along the way).
Ha
these beautiful creatures, ;

{supposed to have been) but;


( ) (
) tale;
( ), to lose.
(. 5 .
5.5),

(. 3 . 3.9; . 5 . 5.3, 5.4),


.

.
,
,
, . "In the
Desert" "Life after God",
,
(. 5 . 5.6, 5.7), .

.
/ had been driving south from Las Vegas to Palm Springs and the
Nothingness was very much on my mind. I kept being surprised by the brightness
of the landscape -just how far nothing can extend to - in my rental car, climbing
up and falling down the slopes and sinks of the Mojave desert, counting the

131

Rothkos of skid marks of long-dead car collisions on Interstate 15's white cement
lanes, watching an old woman apply lipstick inside a Lincoln Town car while a
man at the wheel coughed up oysters, just past the Hoover Dam offramp
[Coupland, D. Life after God. 1994, p. 167].

. ,
{driving south from Las Vegas to Palm Springs, the
slopes of the Mojave desert; Hoover Dam offramp).

{watching an old woman apply lipstick inside a Lincoln Town car while a man at
the wheel coughed up oysters), {inside a
Lincoln Town car; at the wheel; in my rental car).
{the brightness of the landscape; Interstate 15 's white cement lanes).
,

{counting, watching, kept being surprised),


, , ,
,
, ,
{had been driving; climbing up and
falling down).
(. 5 . 5.6)

( ),
, , ,
"Interstate 15". .
:
, .
,
. .
, .

132

.
, ,
; ,
.

.
It is with these thoughts in mind that I now see the drifter's

windbumedface

when I now consider my world - his face that reminds me that there's still
something left to believe in after there's nothing left to believe in. A face for people
like me - who were pushed to the edge of loneliness and who maybe fell off and
who when we climbed back on, our world never looked the same [Coupland, D. C.
Life after God. 1994, p. 213].

, {thoughts, in mind,
consider, reminds, believe).
. ,
,
{our world; we climbed back)
:
, ,
, ,
{were pushed; fell off; climbed back; never looked the same).
, Past Simple,
.
-
.
, :
{were ushed t t he edge of loneliness; fell off), {climbed back).
- .

133

(our

world never

looked the same).

to look,
,

.
.
, (. 5 . 5.7),
. ,
"Interstate 15", . :
, , , ,
- , ,

, .
,
, ,
,
.
"Interstate 15 " ,
.

, ,

,
.
At any other time, Alice would have felt surprised at this, but she was far too
much excited to be surprised at anything now. ^As for you,' she repeated, catching
hold of the little creature in the very act of jumping over a bottle which had just
lighted upon the table, 77/ shake you into a kitten, that I will!'
THE SHAKING

134

She took her off the table as she spoke, and shook her backwards and
forwards with all her might.
The Red Queen made no resistance whatever: only her face grew very small,
and her eyes got large and green: and still, as Alice went on shaking her, she kept
on growing shorter - andfatter - and softer - and rounder - and THE WAKING
- and it really was a kitten, after all [Carroll, L. Through the Looking Glass.
1994, pp. 165-169].

"Through the Looking Glass".


: ,
1-2 , .
,
.
,
: .
, ,
(got, grew), ,
, ,
, , (large and green; shorter; fatter).
,
,
(shorter -fatter - softer - rounder),


.
(. 5 . 5.8) ,
,
.
(The Waking) .

135

, .
,
, , and,
.
, ,
, -
. to be (it... was a kitten)
,
.
: she
it,
.
(. 5 . 5.9)
(. 5 . 5.8).

.
,

, ,


).

, :
.

,
.
(The Shaking; The Waking), a

136

kitten. 'Vo shake into

kitten"

.

,
,
.

.
Between the roof of the shed and the big plant that hangs over the fence from
the house next door I could see the constellation Orion.
People say that Orion is called Orion because Orion was a hunter and the
constellation looks like a hunter with a club and a bow and arrow, like this
[ (. 5 . 5.10)]
But this is really silly because it is just stars, and you couldjoin up the dots
in any way you wanted, and you could make it look like a lady with an umbrella
who is waving, or the coffeemaker which Mrs, Shears has, which is from Italy,
with a handle and steam coming out, or like a dinosaur
[ (. 5 . 5.11)]

.
, ,
, .
(. 5 . 5.10)

, .
{like hunter with club and

137

a bow and arrow).


,
- ( lady
with an umbrella who is waving, or the coffeemaker which Mrs. Shears has, which
is from Italy, with a handle and steam coming out, or like a dinosaur).
,
, , , .
, to look
like.
,
silly
.

{people say that),


,
.

(.

5.11),

(.

5.10),

. (,
) (
) ,
.


, .
Mother died two weeks later.
I had not been into hospital to see her but Father had taken in lots of food
from Marks and Spencer's. He said that she had been looking OK and seemed to
be getting better. She had sent me lots of love and had my Get Well card on the
table beside her bed. Father said she liked it very much.

138

The card had pictures of cars on the front. It looked like this
[ (. 5 . 5.12)]
[Haddon, . The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time. 2003, p.
27].
Ha , (. 5 . 5.11),
9 . ,
:
4 red cars in row made it a Good Day, and 3 red cars made it Quite Good
Day, and 5 red cars in a row made it a Super Good Day, 4 yellow cars in a row
made it a Black Day, which is the day when I don't speak to anyone and sit on my
own reading books and don't eat my lunch and Take No Risks [Haddon, M. The
Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time. 2003, p. 24].
-,
, , ,
. ,
: 3 - Quite Good Day^
4 - Good Day, 5 - Super Good Day.
good

super

quite,
-


,
. 5 ,
,
, 9

.
, ,
,
.

139

3. 3. 2.

, ,

.
,
.
.
"Life after God", ,


.
, ,
. ,
,

- ,
.
Now - here's secret; I tell it to you with an openness of heart that I
doubt I shall ever achieve again, so I pray that you are in a quiet room as you
hear these words. My secret is that I need God - that I am sick and can no longer
make it alone. I need God to help me give, because I no longer seem to be capable
of giving; to help me be kind, as I no longer seem capable of kindness; to help me
love, as I seem beyond being able to love [Coupland, D. C. Life after God. 1994, p.
359].

140

(/ tell it to you), a (an
openness of heart that I doubt I shall ever achieve again).

, {
longer make it alone; I no longer seem to be capable of giving; I no longer seem
capable

of

kindness).

, ,

{you're the first generation raised without religion),


. ,
{pray, God)
need.

, ,
.

, ,
.
,
'*^:

,
.

.
-
.
, - ,
[. , 1981b].

.

141
Snapshot. Laurie has borrowed Adam's (my older brother's) cordless
phone, has dialed it from the kitchen phone, and then stuck the cordless phone in a
beehive inside a rotting cedar stump in the backyard forest. The two of us are
sitting in the kitchen with our ears to the receiver, listening to the bees buzz
[Coupland, D. C. Life after God. 1994, p. 233].
Another snapshot: in the backyard watching bats dive-bomb a glow-in-thedarkFrisbee we are throwing while waiting for the occasional owl to swoop down
the hemlocks next to the telephone poles, plump and juicy, like a man's head with
wings [Coupland, D. Life after God. 1994, p. 234].
(
us, we),
:

{are sitting; are

throwing),

{Laurie vanished from our family's life five years ago. She was my
older sister and for at least a few of the years before she vanished she was closer
to me than anybody else, back when we were young [Coupland, D. C. Life after
God. 1994, p. 231]). ,
,
,
. snapshot,

-,
,
.

'*',

,
'
. , ,
[, 1989].

142


.
, , (.
5 . 5.13, 5.14). ,

, ,

, ,
.

, .
, .

,
-,

.

"Alice's Adventures in Wonderland" (. 5 . 5.15, 5.16).

,
,

- -

.
^Repeat, "You are old Father William,"' said the Caterpillar.
Alice folded her hands, and began:

'You are old, Father William,' the young man said,


'And your hair has become very white;
And yet you incessantly stand on tour headDoyou think, at your age, it is right?'...

'That is not said right,' said the Caterpillar.


'Not quite right, I'm afraid,' said Alice, timidly; 'some of the words have got

143

altered: [Carroll, L. Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, 1994, pp. 55-58].


,
, ,
( , ),
{said the Caterpillar).
,
(
), .
,
.
,
, ; , ,
.

, : ,
,
.
, ,
.
,

.
, ,


. ,
, .

144

"Hocus Pocus" . ,
,
, , ,
. What coincidence! When I started out with my list of
lovers, I thought that however many of them there were might serve as my epitaph,
a number and nothing more. But by golly if that same number couldn't stand for
the people I've killed [Vonnegut, K. Hocus Pocus. 1991, p. 206].

lovers

killed.
, .

: many, number, list.


,

.

,
.
.
,

,
, ,
.

, .

(. 5 . 5.17, 5.18): -

145

, -

.
. - .
, :
{If I
were fighter plane instead of a human being, there would be little pictures of
people painted all over me [Vonnegut, K. Hocus Pocus. 1991, p. 125]).
- , -

(,
, ,
- the list of men, women, and
children I've killed [Vonnegut, K. Hocus Pocus. 1991, p. 206])

.

3. 3. 3.

,
.


.
,
.

146

, .
, ,
, :
Just after you saw the eagle you asked me, seemingly out of the blue,
"Where do people come from? " I wasn 't sure if you meant the birds and bees or if
you meant the ark or what have you. Either direction was a tad too much for me
handle just then, but you did get me to thinking. I mean, five thousand years ago
people emerge out of nowhere - sproing! - with brains and everything and begin
wrecking the planet. You 'd think we 'd give the issue more thought than we do
[Coupland, D. C. Life after God. 1994, p. 5].
"Where do people come from?"
. ,
{the birds and bees).
(
ark
).

{or

what

have you).

or
. (. 5 . 5.19),
,
, .

.
"The Great Profundo" .
:
.
Artists came to draw me... Well, one artist but he came time and time
again. I didn 't know who he was at that time - a small man with a white beard
and glasses. He didn't talk much -just drew all the time.
At this point the subject sprang from his seat and rummaged beneath his bed

147

and produced a dog-eared folder from a suitcase. It contained newspaper


clippings and photographs of himself and in a cellophane envelope a signed
drawing by Matisse. (See illustration.) [Mac Leverty, B. The Great Profundo,
1994, p. 125].

.
-


. , ,

(artists - one artist - small man with a white beard and glasses... Matisse).

.

{See illustration). (. 5 . 5.20)

'L'avaleur

des

sables'

().

{ signed drawing by Ma tisse),


( ), .

, ,

, .
.

. ,
, .
, ,
,
.

148

. .

. .

,
.

, .
As soon as she had made out the proper way of nursing it, (which was to
twist it up into a sort of knot, and then to keep tight hold of its right ear and left
foot, so as to prevent its undoing itself) she carried it out into the open air. "If I
don't take this child away with me," though Alice, "they're sure to kill it in a day
or two: wouldn't it be a murder to leave it behind?" [Carroll, L. Alice's
Adventures in Wonderland. 1994, p. 73]
.
.
,
,
, murder
kill. to nurse, ,

{twist it up into a sort of knot; keep tight hold of its right ear).
(. 5 . 5.21)
(. 5 . 5.22).
: ;
, ; ,

149

.
,
"Please would you tell me," said Alice, a little timidly, for she was not quite
sure whether it was good manners for her to speak first, "why your cat grins like
that?"
"It's a Cheshire cat," said the Duchess, "and that's why. Pig!"
She said the last word with such sudden violence that Alice quite jumped;
but she saw in another moment that it was addressed to the baby, and not to her,
so she took courage, and went on again: "I didn 't know that Cheshire cats always grinned; in fact, I didn 't know that
cats could grin."
"They all can," said the Duchess; "and most of em do." [Carroll, L. Alice's
Adventures in Wonderland. 1994, pp. 69-70]

(please; would you tell


me),

(would),

{timidly).
: , ,
(it's; that's),
, {of'em).
violence
, ,

sudden

such,

: , .
(. 5 . 5.23)

(. 5 . 5.24).

150

,
.

,

.
... thought Francine was hinting that he should buy her a Colonel
Sanders Kentucky Fried Chicken franchise, which was a scheme for selling fried
chicken.
A chicken was a flightless bird which looked like this:
[ (. 5 . 5.25)]
The idea was to kill it and pull out all its feathers, and cut off its head and
feet and scoop its internal organs - and chop it into pieces and fry the pieces, and
put the pieces in a waxed paper bucket, so it looked like this:
[ (. 5 . 5.26)]
Kentucky Fried Chicken,
,
.
,
: 1) , 2) .
{ chicken was flightless bird which looked like this{)
.

- .
, ,
. (.
5 . 5.25)

- ,
. , ,

151
, ,

, , .

.
,
(kill, pull out, cut off, scoop, chop, put).
,

, .
head, feet, internal organs
,
, .
(. 5 . 5.26)
, so (so
it

looked

like

this).

.
( ) .

.

:
.

,
.
hamburger was made out of an animal which looked like this
[ (. 5 . 5.27)]
The animal was killed and ground up into pieces, then shaped into patties
and fried, and put between two pieces of bread. The finished product looked like

152
this

[ (. 5 , 5.28)]
[Vonnegut, . Breakfast of Champions. 2000, pp. 124-125].
,
.
,
.
, ,
. ,
.
, ,
, . ,

, beef, pork.

.

(the

animal)

,
, .
to kill,
, ,

(ground up, shape, fry), (


),

.

.
(
). -
: .
:

153

,
.
( - , , - , )
,
.
( - , - , ), ,

; -.


.



.

.

154

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95143 95153 95177 95189 95191 95203 95213 95219 95231 95233 95239
95257 9526195267 95273 95279 95287 95311 95317 95327 95339 95369
95363 95393 95401 95413 95419 95429 9544195443 95461 95467 95471
95479 95483 95507 95527 9553195539 95549 9556195569 95581 95597
95603 95617 95621 95629 95633 9565195701 95707 95713 95717 95723
95731 95737 95747 95773 95783 95789 95791 9580195803 95813 95819
95857 95869 95873 956819589195911 95917 95923 95929 95947 95957
95959 95971 95987 95989 9600196013 96017 96043 96053 96059 96079
96097961379614996157961679617996181 96199 96211 96221 96223
96233 96259 96263 96269 9628196289 96293 96323 96329 96331 96337
9635396377 96401 9641996431 9644396451 9645796461 9646996479
96487 96493 96497 96517 96527 96553 96557 96581 96587 96589 96601
96643 96661 96667 9667196697 96703 96731 96737 96739 96749 96757

. 3.4.

178

. 3.5.

. 3.6.

. 3.7.

179

. 3.9.

. 3.11.

. 3.10.

. 3.12.

. 3.14.

. 3.13.

180

. 3.15.

. 3.16.

. 3.17.

. 3.18.

181

. 3.19.

. 3.20.

. 3.22.

. 3.23.

. 3.21.

182

. 3.25.

. 3.26.

183

. 4.1.

. 4.2.

. 4.3.

BEHAVIIVIG

INJECTS
. 4.5.

. 4.6.

184

. 4.7.

HARROW & WEALDSTONE 2

utn

7 MIN

3 QUEEN'S PARK

. 4.8.

1 HARROW

&

WIAIDSTONE

2 WiLLESDEN J U N C T I O N

MIN

4 MIN

. 4.9.

1 HARROW

&

WEALOSTONE

STAND BACK TRAIN APPROACHING


. 4.10.

185

4.11.

4.12.

rs
.

4.13.

HEY.DAO.-yOUCAN
EITHER HAVE HOUSE
OR LIFE... I'M
HAVING A LIFE

4.14.

4.15.

186

. 4.16.

. 4.17.

. 4.18.

187

this sign:
. 5.2

. 5.1.

. 5.3.

. 5.5.

. 5.4.

188

. 5.6.

. 5.7.

. 5.8.

. 5.9.

189

^) ]

..

if

<
. 5.10.

. 5.11.

. 5.12.

. 5.13.

. 5.14.

. 5.15.

. 5.16.

190

. 5.17.

. 5.18.

\ '

. 5.19.

. 5.20.

. 5.21.

. 5.22.

. 5.23.

. 5.24.

192

. 5.25.

. 5.26.

. 5.27.

. 5.28.