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Running head: MAKE A DIFFERENCE INTERGRATED UNIT

Make a Difference: Integrated Unit Lynette Nichols RDG/410 August 29, 2011 Professor Carrie Stroud

Make a Difference: Integrated Unit Make a Difference: Integrated Unit Title: Make a Difference Focus: Community Involvement Length: Two Weeks Goals: 1. Students will discover the privileges and responsibilities of living in a democratic society. 2. Students will discover people in history that made positive contributions to society. 3. Students will discover people and organizations currently working to improve the local, state, national, and global community. 4. Students will discover and apply methods to contribute to society in different capacities. 5. Students will get involved in or create projects in local, state, national, or global efforts to make a difference. 6. Students will create an informational or inspirational piece to encourage community members to get involved.

Make a Difference: Integrated Unit Cross-curricular web


KWL Chart Center Activities Introduce theme Read trade books Identify research questions Word sort types of communities Conclude unit Create a Flyer Research one person who made a difference Time line of one person who made a difference and summary Word Wall EFGHI ABCD Citizen City Compare Democracy Equality Government RS Rights Rural area Photography State Video- create informational commercial Suburban PowerPoint presentation JKLM Law TUV Town Urban NOPQ Population WXYZ Internet/Multi Media News programs: Current Events Review Internet sites

Vocabulary Activities Grammar Practice Word Wall Word Sort

Make a Difference Social Studies Science Community Projects Compare ways people make a difference Multi-genre project- How I Make a Difference and People Who Made a Difference Informational Video to Encourage Community Involvement

Wordbook with pictures Fill in the blank

People Nature Service

Literacy Skills and Strategies Note taking and quick writes Graphic organizers and Charts Learning Logs Mock interview Assessments Discussions Rubrics and Checklists Cloze Tests Vocabulary Games Student Made Quizzes -

Make a Difference: Integrated Unit Annotated Bibliography A&E Television Networks. (2011). Mary McLeod Bethune: History.com articles, video, pictures and facts. Retrieved from http://www.history.com/topics/mary-mcleod-bethune A brief yet detailed online biography about the accomplishments of educator Mary McLeod Bethune from her birth to death. Amolo, S. (2009). Mary McLeod Bethune: Influential Americans. Retrieved from http://influentialamericans.weebly.com/mary-mcleod-bethune.html A brief online article about educator Mary McLeod Bethune compiled by Sharon Amolo a media specialist at Gwin Oaks Elementary in Gwinnett County Georgia. Gwinnett County Public Library. (n.d.) Gwinnett County Public Library. Retrieved from http://www.gwinnettpl.org/ The library provides many resources to the community in print, audio, video, ebooks, and programs. Events are held year round at each branch. The library hosts read-alouds and informational presentations. Some locations offer courses in various arts and domestic skills such as reading, book clubs, writing, cooking, gardening, sewing and more. Kalman, B. (2000). What is a community from a to z. New York, NY: Crabtree Publishing Company. This informative picture book acknowledges components that make up communities. Kalman, B. & Walker, N. (1997). Community helpers from a to z. New York, NY: Crabtree Publishing Company.

Make a Difference: Integrated Unit This informative picture book provides a look at people from different ethnic and cultural backgrounds in careers of public service. McCloud, C. (2006). Have you filled a bucket today: A guide to daily happiness for kids. Northville, MI: Ferne Press. In this picture book like other bucket filling themed books children learn the value of good character. Even young children can find ways to fill a bucket through acts of kindness, respect, and responsibility. Pollak, B. (2004). Our community garden. New York, NY: Aladin. In this picture book Audreys neighbors work together and share in the harvest of their community garden. Scholastic Inc. (2011). Draw parents into the school community with career day celebration. Retrieved from http://www2.scholastic.com/browse/article.jsp?id=7209 Harris provides a strategy to evolve parents in school. She explains ways to encourage and support parents participation in a career day celebration. Harris suggests strategies to make the event enjoyable and beneficial to parents, students, and teachers. Stevenson, J. (1998). Popcorn: Poems. New York, NY: Greenillow Books. Stevenson has a playful sense of humor sending the reader looking for pages that do not exist. He has several free verse poems that resemble haiku style. The book is fun to read not just for the poems and pictures but the way they are presented on the pages. Sweeney, J. (1998). Me on the map. New York, NY: Dragonfly Books.

Make a Difference: Integrated Unit The focal point of the story is on the location of a little girl. The map she draws becomes more abstract as the story reaches its climax. Then the process is reversed and the focus is back on the little girl in her room. Troll, M. (1991). The ball, the book, and the drum. Austin, TX.: Raintree Steck-Vaughn. Warty Morganson is a mean and ugly troll inside and out. He sneaks and takes what he wants from others. He does not use the things he treasures but locks them away. One day while he is out someone breaks into his home and steals all his ill-gotten possessions. He is left feeling sad. He finds his favorite items enjoyed by children.

Make a Difference: Integrated Unit KWL Chart: Making a Difference in Our Community

Community

Make a Difference: Integrated Unit Unit Introduction Introduce the unit to students with the KWL chart. Ask the students to share what they know about communities in general, the state, city, and neighborhoods. Ask students to think about some of the informational picture books about community recently read in class. Provide students with a fact-finding sheet to take home. Tell them to write as many facts as they can about communities. Tell students to ask parents and others about what they do in the community such as types of work, play, and volunteering. Tell students to bring in pictures, drawings, and artifacts. Students may complete individual posters about careers. Use the artifacts and surveys to update the KWL chart over the unit. Allow students to add to the chart over the next two weeks. As a class, make a collage with the pictures, writings, and artifacts. Tell students they will work in groups to make a video at the end of the unit. The video will be shown during a parent night/community outreach event. At the event, tell parents know children have studied about careers and you plan to have a career day celebration. Find ways to promote parental involvement as such. Tell parents to make sure students share at least one thing about their parents and family. This opening exercise will allow you to get to know students and their families. Ask parents if they would like to volunteer to speak to the class, write a letter, or provide other type of media relevant to their career. This strategy will allow busy parents unable to attend functions to participate. Harris suggests offering a formal invitation to parents on the school letterhead for parents to show their employer (Scholastic, 2011, para. 3).

Make a Difference: Integrated Unit Fact Finding Survey Sheet People Careers Entertainment Volunteering Things I like. Things I do not like. How I help. Artifacts

Vocabulary Lesson Plan Topic: Introduce Social Studies Content-Area Vocabulary Words Time: Three 30-minute sessions Introduce eight key vocabulary words associated with the social studies unit on community. Allow students to review the KWL chart on community from a previous lesson. Make sure the collage on community, created by students, is display where all students may view it. Previewing vocabulary extensively supports ELLs and other students struggling with vocabulary and comprehension. Standards GA- Georgia Performance Standards Subject: English/Language Arts Grade/Course: Grade 3 Skill Area: Reading Strand: VOCABULARY Standard: ELA3R2 The student acquires and uses grade-level words to communicate effectively. The student

Make a Difference: Integrated Unit Performance Indicator: a. Reads literary and informational texts and incorporates new words into oral and written language. Performance Indicator: f. Determines the meaning of unknown words on the basis of context. Subject : Social Studies Grade/Course : Grade Three Skill Area : Geographic Understandings Standard : SS3G1 The student will locate major topographical features. Performance Indicator : d. Locate Greece on a world map. Standard: SS3G2 The student will describe the cultural and geographic systems associated with the historical figures in SS3H2a. Performance Indicator: a. Identify on a political map specific locations significant to the life and times of these historical figures. Skill Area: Listening/Speaking/Viewing Standard: ELA3LSV1 The student uses oral and visual strategies to communicate. The student Performance Indicator: b. Recalls, interprets, and summarizes information presented orally. Objectives When provided with a demonstration, the student will verbally explain the meaning of eight vocabulary words in his or her own words independently with 80% accuracy. When provided with a map and map key, the student will use cardinal and intermediate directions to indicate five locations on the map independently with 90% accuracy. When provided with the

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Make a Difference: Integrated Unit Gist Procedure, the student will orally summarize five main points from the text independently with 80% accuracy. Materials Anticipation guide for each student Artifacts from students Cloze activity worksheet Collage on community Highlighter for each student KWL chart on community Paper for each student Vocabulary words: Community Citizen City Farm Town Urban Suburban Rural area Word Wall Large Map

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Pencil for each student Vocabulary cards for each group

Procedures 1. Tell students they will read the textbook chapter on community. Remind students of the activities focused on community such as the KWL chart and collage on community. Show students the artifacts and pictures collected. These activities activate prior knowledge and encourage motivation. Read the eight vocabulary words from 3x5 cards aloud to the class. Attach the cards to the word wall for students to view during the discussions and activities. 2. Pass out the anticipation guide. The anticipation guide will have three columns; the eight vocabulary words listed in the middle column with room for students to write more words they come across in the reading. The first column is headed Before Reading and the last column is headed After Reading both split into three columns as follows: I know the word well, I have heard this word, I do not know this word. The students will put a check mark in the column that coordinates with their evaluation. After reading the chapter, students will reevaluate their word knowledge of the eight vocabulary words. The students add other words of interest for further study and discussion. Follow up with a brief Gist Procedure, students will have a copy in their

Make a Difference: Integrated Unit journals. Allow students to take turns finding locations mentioned on the map. You will explore the topics in-depth in the next lesson Comprehension. 3. Divide the students into pairs, or groups of four. Provide each pair or group with a set of 16 flashcards. Eight cards have the vocabulary words and eight have the definitions. For students needing visual aids provide vocabulary words with the picture on one side and the word or definition on the other side. Students match the vocabulary word to the definition. Review each vocabulary word and definition with each group and as a class to clarify any discrepancies. *Allow students needing more time to take the flashcards home. Tell them to find pictures, artifacts, books, or TV shows that remind them of the words. Tell the students to record their discoveries in a journal. *In a later lesson on people in the community, add flash cards to introduce occupations within a community and other key vocabulary from the unit. To maximize comprehension and retention for all students, do not introduce more than eight new vocabulary words at one time. 4. The next day, divide students into different groups to repeat the word sort. Review the meaning of each word as a class to clarify any misunderstandings. Divide students into groups of three to four students. Provide the closed activity worksheet. Students complete sentences taken from the chapter with the correct vocabulary word. Students consult with peers to review their answers. Review the sentences with the class on the whiteboard to clarify any discrepancies. 5. On the third day, add the eight new words to the alphabetized word wall. Model a quickwrite on the whiteboard using the eight new vocabulary words and other words from the word wall. Students complete quickwrites with at least four of the new words and two other words from the word wall. The student quickwrites resemble the teachers model. The students highlight the

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Make a Difference: Integrated Unit vocabulary words used. Evaluate the quick writes to assess students work knowledge. Use the cloze activity worksheet and the quickwrites as assessments. *Extension- tells students to share their discoveries about community with parents and the class. Tell students to continue recording facts and collecting artifacts to make brochures at the end of the unit. Anticipation Guide Before Reading
I know the word well I have heard this word I do not know this word Citizen City Community Farm Rural area Suburb Town Urban area

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Vocabulary Word

After Reading
I know this word I have heard this word I do not know this word

Cloze Activity Worksheet 1. A para. 2). 2. A 8, para. 3). 3. An 4. A 5. A is another word for city land and spaces (Houghton Mifflin, 2006, p. 15, para. 1). is a community next to or close to a city (Houghton Mifflin, 2006, p. 16, para. 1). is far from the city (Houghton, Mifflin, 2006, p. 17, para. 1). is an official member of a community, state, or country (Houghton Mifflin, 2006, p. is a place where people live, work and play together (Houghton Mifflin, 2006, p. 6,

Make a Difference: Integrated Unit 7. You might find 8. A in a rural area where homes and businesses are far from the city.

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is an urban area with lots of people and businesses close together. Cloze Activity Worksheet Answer Key

1. A community is a place where people live, work and play together (Houghton Mifflin, 2006, p. 6, para. 2). 2. A citizen is an official member of a community, state, or country (Houghton Mifflin, 2006, p. 8, para. 3). 3. An urban area is another word for city land and spaces (Houghton Mifflin, 2006, p. 15, para. 1). 4. A suburb is a community next to or close to a city (Houghton Mifflin, 2006, p. 16, para. 1). 5. A rural area is far from the city (Houghton, Mifflin, 2006, p. 17, para. 1). 7. You might find farm in a rural area where homes and businesses are far from the city. 8. A city is an urban area with lots of people and businesses close together. Teacher Sample Quickwrite I am a citizen of the small city of Snellville, Georgia. Snellville is a great place to live because it has many features of different kinds of community. Snellville is a suburb of the greater Atlanta area. You will find farms in less urban areas of Snellville. The community is too populated and urban to be a rural area. Compared to Atlanta, Snellville is more of a suburban town than a city.

Make a Difference: Integrated Unit Comprehension Lesson Plan Topic: History/Reading for Research/Big Ideas Time: Two 30-45 minute session Standards GA- Georgia Performance Standards Subject : English/Language Arts Grade/Course : Grade 3 GA- Georgia Performance Standards Subject : English/Language Arts Grade/Course : Grade 3 Strand: COMPREHENSION Performance Indicator: c. Generates questions before, during, and after reading. Performance Indicator: g. Summarizes text content. Performance Indicator: k. Self-monitors comprehension to clarify meaning. Subject: Social Studies Grade/Course : Grade Three Skill Area : Government/Civic Understandings Standard: SS3CG2 The student will discuss the character of different historical figures in SS3H2a. Performance Indicator: b. Explain how the historical figures in SS3H2a used positive character traits to support their beliefs in liberty, justice, tolerance, and freedom of conscience and expression. Skill Area: Listening/Speaking/Viewing

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Make a Difference: Integrated Unit Standard: ELA3LSV1 The student uses oral and visual strategies to communicate. The student Performance Indicator: a. Adapts oral language to fit the situation by following the rules of conversation with peers and adults. Performance Indicator: b. Recalls, interprets, and summarizes information presented orally. Objectives When provided with a graphic organizer, the student will record five key events and facts, which occur in sequential order in the reading with 90% accuracy. When provided with a reading log and demonstration, student will develop five questions for self-monitoring before, during, and after reading. When provided with a map and map key, the student will use cardinal and intermediate directions to indicate five locations on the map independently with 90% accuracy. When provided with a graphic organizer and reading log, students will indicate three accomplishments of the historical figure with 90% accuracy. Materials Articles provided online: A&E Television Networks. (2011). Mary McLeod Bethune: History.com articles, video, pictures and facts. Retrieved from http://www.history.com/topics/mary-mcleod-bethune A brief yet detailed online biography about the accomplishments of educator Mary McLeod Bethune from her birth to death. Amolo, S. (2009). Mary McLeod Bethune: Influential Americans. Retrieved from http://influentialamericans.weebly.com/mary-mcleod-bethune.html

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Make a Difference: Integrated Unit A brief online article about educator Mary McLeod Bethune compiled by Sharon Amolo a media specialist at Gwin Oaks Elementary in Gwinnett County Georgia. Highlighters for each group Projector Procedures 1. Tell students they will read about an important person from history that made a positive contribution to make a difference in her community. She not only improved her community but also made a difference for citizens across the United States. The person is Mary McLeod Bethune. Students may recall reading about Bethune in the textbook. Pass out copies of the articles and reading logs with graphic organizers to students. Tell the students to record their thoughts in the reading log on the opposite page of the graphic organizer. Recording and reflecting are important for monitoring the thinking process and comprehension. Read the articles aloud to the class. Show the locations mentioned in the article on the large wall map. Allow students to write their thoughts and questions in the blank pages of the logs during the read-aloud. Model the think-aloud strategy to illustrate self-monitoring and self-questioning. 2. After reading, review the main ideas and facts in the article. Project the graphic organizer on the board. Ask students to state the main ideas first. Highlight the beginning, middle, and end each in a different color. Organize the main ideas on the graphic organizer. Ask the students to name two facts per group. Record the facts in chronological order on the graphic organizer. Walk around the room to check for discrepancies. 3. Conduct an instructional conversation. Ask key questions to generate brainstorming. Why did Bethune start a school? How did building a school make a difference? What would life be Internet access Reading logs with graphic organizers Computer Wall map Pencils

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Make a Difference: Integrated Unit like if we did not have a school in our community? Look at the pictures of Bethunes school. How is it like our school? What is different? Allow students to discuss these questions and generate their own in their group and then as a whole class. Remind students to take notes on the sheet next to the graphic organizer in the reading log. If students struggle with these questions, provide more questions and comments as such: Why did Bethune travel so far to go to school? Why is important to go to school? I learn things at school that I would not know if I stayed at home. Why do you think that is? Ask and answer questions to clarify ideas. Conclude the conversation summarize the main points on the board below or beside the graphic organizer. Provide students with another article about an individual of his or her choice. Tell students to review the article. Allow the students to complete research at home. Meet with lower level readers and writers to provide pre-teaching support. Read the article with each group with the appropriate style of choral reading. Once students have at least one sentence for the beginning, middle and end, review the article once more to clarify any misunderstandings. If needed retype the article to match his or her reading level. 5. On the second day, review how to make entries in the reading log. Allow students to time to revise their logs or ask questions. As an assessment, tell students to complete a new graphic organizer independently for the second article. For students needing additional instruction review the reading. Allow students to regroup to evaluate their responses. Meet with each group to clarify any discrepancies. Students will need this information to complete the mock interview activity.

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Make a Difference: Integrated Unit Main Idea/Time Line Graphic Organizer Section of Article Beginning Middle End Time Line Main Idea or Event Importance

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Structural Analysis Lesson Plan Topic: Syllabication Rules/Haiku/Community Helpers Time: Three 45-minute sessions Standards GA- Georgia Performance Standards Subject: English/Language Arts Grade/Course : Grade 3 Skill Area: Writing Standard: ELA3W1 The student demonstrates competency in the writing process. The student Performance Indicator: f. Begins to use specific sensory details (e.g., strong verbs, adjectives) to enhance descriptive effect. Performance Indicator: n. Publishes by presenting an edited piece of writing to others. Standard: ELA3W2 The student writes in a variety of genres, including narrative, informational, persuasive, and response to literature. Performance Indicator: The student produces a narrative that: Detail: h. May include pre-writing.

Make a Difference: Integrated Unit Detail: i. May include a revised and edited draft. Detail: j. May be published. Subject: Science Grade/Course : Grade 3 Skill Area : Content Strand : Life Science Standard: S3L2. Students will recognize the effects of pollution and humans on the environment. Performance Indicator: b. Identify ways to protect the environment. Conservation of resources Recycling of materials Objectives When provided with a demonstration, the student will identify and use the fivesyllabication rules to decode multisyllabic words independently with 80% accuracy. When provided with samples and a demonstration, the student will write a haiku following the fiveseven-five syllable format independently with 90% accuracy. During a class discussion, the student will explain three values nature holds in the community. During a class discussion, the student will identify and explain three ways community members protect the environment with 90% accuracy. Materials Haiku graphic organizer Vocabulary words Printed Poems: Computer Projector Printer Syllabication rules graphic Printing paper Whiteboard

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Make a Difference: Integrated Unit DLTKs Sites (2011). Kid zone poetry: Haiku. Retrieved from http://www.kidzone.ws/poetry/haiku.htm Learning A-Z.com (2011). Haiku lesson plans. Retrieved from http://www.readingaz.com/poetry/lesson_plans/haiku/haiku Procedures 1. Tell students to take out their graphic organizers for the syllabication rules. Tell the students you will review the five-syllabication rules. Use key vocabulary words, words from books on the unit topic, and others suggested by students. Project the rules on the board from the computer PowerPoint or Word document. 2. Demonstrate how to break apart and sound out one or two words for each rule. Solicit suggestions from the students for the next sample word. 3. Divide students into groups of three. Pass out a blank syllabication graphic. Tell students to pick 10 words from the word walls and readings. Students may pick any words not listed on their first syllabication graphic. Allow students to work in groups to complete the assignment. Float around the room to assess the students progress and provide feedback. 4. Review the sheet together as a class. Explain the answer for each word. 5. Read two or more haiku poems from the website. Demonstrate how to count the syllables using the syllabication rules. Print a copy of the poems for students to review. Explain that haiku poems are often written about nature. Ask the students, Why is nature important to the community? What can we do in our community to protect nature? Use the metaphor bucket

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Make a Difference: Integrated Unit filling in reference to recently read stories. Ask students, How can we fill our buckets for nature? Tell the students they will learn more about haiku poems in the next session. 6. In the next session, tell the students they will learn how to write a haiku poem. Tell students the haiku is a popular style of poem from Japan. Read the Who am I? haiku poems to the students. Talk about the structure of a haiku poem. Indicate the first line is five syllables, the second line is seven syllables, and the third line is five syllables for 17 syllables. Draw a graphic organizer on the board to illustrate the three sections. Write the number of syllables to the left. 7. Ask the students to choose a topic related to the unit about community. Remind students that haikus are often written about nature. Remind students of the discussion on filling buckets for nature. Once the class has agreed on one topic, write it above the graphic. Tell students to take out their journals and begin quickwrites for the topic. Write your own quickwrites in a journal. 8. After two to five minutes, ask the class to share the words and phrases from the quickwrites. List the words to the right of the graphic. Ask students to count the syllables for each word to determine which words to choose and where to put them. Read the poem aloud to the class. 9. Pass out a haiku graphic organizer. Tell each student to write a new haiku on the same topic. They may use the same words and arranged them differently or use new words. Float around the room to provide support. 10. After 10 minutes ask students to trade poems with a partner for proof reading. Tell them to fill out the checklist below the graphic. Tell students to return the papers for revisions. Students need to revise any mismatch in the syllable count and misspellings. Float around the room and provide feedback.

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Make a Difference: Integrated Unit 11. In the third session, ask students to pick their own topic related to the unit on community. Provide some suggestions on the board as such: community leaders, community helpers, community needs, local attractions, or community history. Allow students to use the checklist for assessment. Open a Word document and allow students to type their revised poems one at a time. 12. As an assessment, proofread the document once all of the poems are typed. Print the document. Print a copy of the collage designed by students at the beginning of the unit for the cover. If time permits demonstrate how to bind. A parent volunteer could conduct the demonstration. Syllabication Rules Graphic Organizer Rule Word 1. When two consonants sit between two vowels in a word, divide syllables between the consonants (Tompkins, 2006, p. 167). 2. When there are more than two consonants side by side in a word, divide syllables keeping the blends together (Tompkins, 2006, p. 167). 3. When one consonant sits between two vowels in a word, divide syllables after the first vowel (Tompkins, 2006, p. 167). 4. If the word does not make sense after following the third rule, divide the syllables after the consonant that comes between the vowels (Tompkins, 2006, p. 167). 5. When two vowels sit side by side that do not make a Syllables

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Make a Difference: Integrated Unit vowel team, divide the syllables between the vowels (Tompkins, 2006, p. 167)..

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Haiku Graphic Organizer First Line Five Syllables Second Line Seven Syllables Third Line Five Syllables Did the first line have five syllables? __yes__no Did the second line have seven syllables? __yes__no Did the third line have five syllables? __yes __no

Circle any misspelled words. Did the words match the topic? __yes __no Explain.

What did you like most about this poem? Explain.

Fluency Lesson Plan Topic: Good Citizenship/Reading and Writing Fluency Creative Writing Time: Five 30-45-minute sessions Standards GA- Georgia Performance Standards Subject: English/Language Arts Grade/Course : Grade 3 Strand: FLUENCY Standard: ELA3R1 The student demonstrates the ability to read orally with speed, accuracy, and expression. The student Performance Indicator: a. Applies letter-sound knowledge to decode quickly and accurately. Performance Indicator: b. Reads familiar text with expression.

Make a Difference: Integrated Unit Performance Indicator: d. Uses self-correction when subsequent reading indicates an earlier misreading within grade-level text. Skill Area: Writing Standard: ELA3W1 The student demonstrates competency in the writing process. The student Performance Indicator: a. Captures a readers interest by setting a purpose and developing a point of view. Performance Indicator: d. Uses organizational patterns for conveying information (e.g., chronological order, cause and effect, similarity and difference, questions and answers). Performance Indicator: m. Pre-writes to generate ideas, develops a rough draft, rereads to revise, and edits to correct. Performance Indicator: n. Publishes by presenting an edited piece of writing to others. Standard: ELA3W2 The student writes in a variety of genres, including narrative, informational, persuasive, and response to literature. Performance Indicator: The student produces a narrative that: Detail: a. Captures a readers interest by writing both personal and fantasy/imaginary stories, setting a purpose, and developing a point of view. Detail: b. Sustains a focus. Detail: c. Includes the appropriate purpose, expectations, and length for the audience and genre.

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Make a Difference: Integrated Unit Detail: d. Uses sensory details and other literary language to communicate setting, characters, and plot. Detail: e. Uses appropriate organizational structures to ensure coherence (well developed beginning, middle, and end, and sequence of events) and strategies (transition words/phrases, time cue words, and sequence of events). Detail: f. Develops characters through action and dialogue. Detail: g. Provides a sense of closure. Detail: h. May include pre-writing. Detail: i. May include a revised and edited draft. Detail: j. May be published. Objectives When provided with a demonstration, the student will practice strategies to monitor fluency and comprehension. When provided with a reading log the student will record five details from the story in chronological order independently with 90% accuracy. When provided with a demonstration, the student will self-correct reading and writing with 90% accuracy. When provided with a demonstration, the student will indicate revisions for writing on the checklist with 90% accuracy. Materials Trait Checklist Whiteboard The book: Chart paper Red and green ink pens

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Make a Difference: Integrated Unit Troll, M. (1991). The ball, the book, and the drum. Austin, TX.: Raintree Steck-Vaughn. Warty Morganson is a mean and ugly troll inside and out. He sneaks and takes what he wants from others. He does not use the things he treasures but locks them away. One day while he is out someone breaks into his home and steals all his ill-gotten possessions. He is left feeling sad. He finds his favorite items enjoyed by children. Procedures 1. Tell the class they will practice fluency for the next several days. Introduce the book. The picture book, The Ball, the Book, and the Drum by Morgan Troll fits the theme of this Social Studies unit because the storys theme relates to being a good neighbor and citizen. In addition, the author, Morgan Troll wrote the story in fourth grade and won a contest to have his book published. His story may inspire other children to become fluent readers and writers. Because Trolls book is not a repetitive text even advanced fluent readers will find the story challenging and engaging to read. 2. Divide students into groups of three. Distribute a copy of the book to each group. If there are not enough copies available, read in small groups. If whole class instruction is preferable type the story in a Word document and project it on the whiteboard. 3. Activate students prior knowledge with a discussion about good citizenship. Ask the students, What do good citizens do? How do you behave like a good citizen? What do you see on the cover of this book? Look through the pictures of the book. What do you think this book is about? Do you see words you know? Do you see word you dont know? On the whiteboard or large chart paper, make two columns: Words We Know and Words We Dont Know.

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Make a Difference: Integrated Unit 4. Begin shared reading. Read the book aloud to the class. Point at each word sliding you finger or a pointer across the page from left to right. 5. Have a grand conversation about the story. Talk about the authors purpose for writing, punctuation, word usage, and big ideas. Review the chart of known and unknown words with students. 6. In the second session, reread the story chunking the text for students to choral read. Read two to three sentences at a time, pause for students to choral read the same section. Allow fluent readers to take turns leading the choral reading. Indicate grammar usage and graphophonic cues such as syllabication. 7. In the third session, repeat the process. Allow students lead more of the choral reading. When students become familiar with the text allow them to read in pairs or independently. Tell students to complete quickwrites for the story as they read. For students needing more support provide one-on-on or small group instruction to re-teach fluent reading strategies. 8. In the fourth session, tell students they will write a literature response to the story. Tell the students to take out their writing guide. The writing guide has the stages of the writing process and traits listed. Students will use the guide to help them develop their responses. 9. In the fifth session, provide students with a checklist to match the traits guide. Divide the students into pairs to evaluate the responses. After each students paper is evaluated, the will revise. A second evaluation by a different peer follows the revision. Peers will only mark papers for grammar, spelling, and other writing mechanics. All other trait critiques will be written on the checklist. The student revises the paper and submits the paper and checklist to the teacher for a final assessment before publishing.

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Make a Difference: Integrated Unit 10. Students complete publishing by typing, printing, and creating a cover with pictures for each response. Traits Checklist Trait Peer Evaluater1 Name Use green ink pen Ideas are clear. The writing is organized with a beginning, middle, and end. Voice. The writing is interesting to read matches the ideas. Word choice. The word choice __yes__no Explain is entertaining. Not a lot of repeating words and phrases. Sentence fluency. The sentences are easy to read. Mechanics. The writing has proper spelling, capitalization, punctuation, and grammar. __yes__no Explain __yes__no Explain __yes__no Explain __yes__no Explain __yes__no Explain __yes__no Explain __yes__no Explain __yes__no Explain __yes __no Explain Peer Evaluator 2 Name Use red ink pen __yes__no Explain __yes__no Explain

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Make a Difference: Integrated Unit Writing Lesson Plan Topic: Community Involvement/Writing Process/Purpose for Writing Time: five 1-hour sessions Standards GA- Georgia Performance Standards Subject : English/Language Arts Grade/Course : Grade 3 Skill Area: Writing Standard: ELA3W1 The student demonstrates competency in the writing process. The student Performance Indicator: a. Captures a readers interest by setting a purpose and developing a point of view. Performance Indicator: b. Begins to select a focus and an organizational pattern based on purpose, genre, expectations, audience, and length. Performance Indicator: c. Writes text of a length appropriate to address the topic or tell the story. Performance Indicator: d. Uses organizational patterns for conveying information (e.g., chronological order, cause and effect, similarity and difference, questions and answers). Performance Indicator: e. Begins to use appropriate structures to ensure coherence (e.g., transition words and phrases, bullets, subheadings, numbering). Performance Indicator: f. Begins to use specific sensory details (e.g., strong verbs, adjectives) to enhance descriptive effect. Performance Indicator: g. Begins to develop characters through action and dialogue.

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Make a Difference: Integrated Unit Performance Indicator: h. Begins to use descriptive adjectives and verbs to communicate setting, character, and plot. Performance Indicator: i. Begins to include relevant examples, facts, anecdotes, and details appropriate to the audience. Performance Indicator: j. Uses a variety of resources to research and share information on a topic. Performance Indicator: m. Pre-writes to generate ideas, develops a rough draft, rereads to revise, and edits to correct. Performance Indicator: n. Publishes by presenting an edited piece of writing to others. Subject: Science Grade/Course: Grade 3 Skill Area : Content Strand : Life Science Standard: S3L2. Students will recognize the effects of pollution and humans on the environment. Performance Indicator: a. Explain the effects of pollution (such as littering) to the habitats of plants and animals. Performance Indicator: b. Identify ways to protect the environment. Conservation of resources Recycling of materials Subject: Social Studies Grade/Course: Grade Three Skill Area: Historical Understandings Standard: SS3H2 The student will discuss the lives of Americans who expanded peoples rights and freedoms in a democracy.

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Make a Difference: Integrated Unit Performance Indicator: a. Paul Revere (independence), Frederick Douglass (civil rights), Susan B. Anthony (womens rights), Mary McLeod Bethune (education), Franklin D. Roosevelt (New Deal and World War II), Eleanor Roosevelt (United Nations and human rights), Thurgood Marshall (civil rights), Lyndon B. Johnson (Great Society and voting rights), and Csar Chvez (workers rights). Objectives When provided with a rubric, the group will complete a piece with a central theme, which flows throughout the beginning, middle, and end with 90% accuracy. When provided with a rubric, the group will use relevant research material to develop dialog with 90% accuracy. When provided with peer responses on traits, the group will develop a piece with proper oral and written grammar with 90% accuracy. When provided with the Authors Purpose Worksheet, the group will develop a piece with a clear voice and purpose for writing. The group will print or type the dialog will legible font. The group will provide copies of all resourced materials. Materials Project Planner for each group Authors Worksheet Trait Worksheet Performance Rubric Samples from class research and previous writing assignments

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Procedures Students will choose their own purpose for writing in this multi-genre class collaboration. The class will review the different purpose of writing: to inform, persuade, and entertain. Students will compile the multi-genre pieces created throughout the unit in class collaboration.

Make a Difference: Integrated Unit 1. Provide examples of each purpose of writing: to inform, to persuade, and to entertain. Use the articles, books from classroom library, and other media collected in the beginning of the unit. Indicate projects students have completed by genre and purpose. Have a discussion with the class to classify their previous projects. Pass out the Authors Purpose classification worksheet. Guide students through one example of each. Have the students complete the sheet in groups of four. 2. Divide students into heterogeneous groups of six. Remind the students each group will work together to compile a video. Tell the students they will evaluate each other and themselves on the project. The groups will draw straws to see who gets to choose a project from the bowl first. There must be at least three groups. Write the name of each project on a different slip of paper and fold it into small squares. Some possible assignments: Mock Interview- the group will review research and previous work of classmates to write and perform dialog for an interview of a significant person who made a difference in the community. News Report- the group will review research and previous work of classmates to write and perform dialog for a news report about current events related community service. Commercial- the group will review research and pervious work of classmates to write and perform dialog for a commercial advertising the benefits of community service. Poetry Reading- the group will review poetry written that follows the unit theme. Students may choose to write an original piece. 3. Students plan and divide the work. Provide a graphic organizer for each group to plan their project. Students must choose a purpose for writing: to persuade, entertain, or inform. Students

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Make a Difference: Integrated Unit must choose the role they will play, task to perform, and a time line for their project. Once this is complete, the students will share their previous research and projects from the unit. Provide support with feedback and guidance. Remind students that each project can be developed to suit any of the three purposes for writing. For example, sometimes interviews are funny, sometimes commercials are entertaining and informative, and sometimes poetry is persuasive. Provide each student with a copy of the performance rubric to guide the development of the project. 4. During session two student complete research and gather artifacts for the project. 5. During session, three students complete the first draft. 6. During session, four students complete the final draft. 7. During session, five students practice their performance and record the video. Project Planner Group Member Role and Tasks Researcher Editor Writer Organizer Big Ideas Art Authors Purpose Worksheet Write the genre for each of the five writings you read. Tell the purpose for each. Explain your answer. 1. 2. Due date Monday

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Make a Difference: Integrated Unit 3. 4. 5. Performance Assessment Rubric

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Organization

Focus/ Content

Standard-based Objectives The students will compose a performance piece with smooth transitions in the following order beginning, middle, and end. The student will apply and arrange relative facts and details from resources (research, logic, or examples) relevant to the intended audience without unnecessary information.

Excellent The response contains a beginning, middle, and end in chronological order. The essay contains smooth transitions between ideas.

Good The response contains a beginning, middle, and end in chronological order with awkward transitions between ideas.

Fair The response contains a beginning, middle, and end in chronological order no obvious transitions between ideas. The beginning recognizes an audience and names the subject, and provides insufficient or irrelevant background information. The middle contains one or more paragraphs that support the writers purpose and includes a significant amount of unnecessary information. The end n summarizes the writers purpose and does not provide a solution or forward looking thought. Most adjectives and adverbs used appropriately. The first word of each sentence is capitalized and most proper nouns.

Poor The response possesses little or no obvious organization or transitions.

The beginning recognizes the audience provides sufficient background information related to the subject, and names the subject without unnecessary information. The middle contains one or more paragraphs that clearly introduces and supports the writers purpose without unnecessary information. The end proposes a solution or forward looking thought without unnecessary information.

The beginning recognizes an audience and names the subject but provides an insufficient amount of background information. The middle contains one or more paragraphs that support the writers purpose and contains some unnecessary information. The end summarizes purpose but does not provide a solution or forward looking thought.

The piece does not recognize an audience, contain background information, an obvious purpose, and the ending incomplete or missing.

Grammar

The students will match verb tenses to intended meanings. The student will use the appropriate forms of subject, verbs, and adjectives. The student will use capitalization appropriately.

The verb tenses in the response match the intended meanings. The response contains adjectives and adverbs used appropriately. The response contains capitalization of proper nouns and the first word in each sentence.

Most verb tenses match the intended meanings. Most adjectives and adverbs used appropriately. The first word of each sentence is capitalized and most proper nouns.

Punctuation

The students will use appropriate punctuation, including semicolons, apostrophes, and quotation marks. The student will use commas appropriately to punctuate compound,

The response contains appropriate applications of semicolons, apostrophes, and quotation marks. Commas applied appropriately in compound, complex, and compound-complex sentences.

The response contains some inconsistent errors in punctuation that do not hinder comprehension.

The response contains consistent errors in punctuation that do not hinder comprehension.

The sentence structures lack complete thoughts or mismatches subject and predicate. The verb tenses do not match the intended meanings. The adjectives and adverbs do not complement each other. Capitalization is inconsistent or inappropriate. The response contains numerous errors in punctuation.

Make a Difference: Integrated Unit


complex and compound-complex sentences. The students will use legible handwriting and appropriate spacing.

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Handwriting

The response contains appropriate spacing and legible handwriting.

The response contains legible handwriting with minor inconsistencies in spacing.

The response contains handwriting infrequently illegible and inconsistencies in spacing that distract the reader. The response contains frequent misspellings. The misspellings do not affect the overall comprehension.

Spelling

The students will use appropriate spelling of high frequency words present in the response.

All high frequency words spelled correctly. The response contains no misspellings or few misspellings of words above grade level. The misspellings do not affect comprehension.

The response contains some misspelled high frequency words. The response contains some misspelled words above grade level. The misspellings do not affect comprehension.

The handwriting is consistently illegible. The essay contains too much or too little space between words, sentences, and paragraphs. The response contains several words constantly misspelled. The response contains misspelled grade level words.

Make a Difference: Integrated Unit References A&E Television Networks. (2011). Mary McLeod Bethune: History.com articles, video, pictures and facts. Retrieved from http://www.history.com/topics/mary-mcleod-bethune Amolo, S. (2009). Mary McLeod Bethune: Influential Americans. Retrieved from http://influentialamericans.weebly.com/mary-mcleod-bethune.html DLTKs Sites (2011). Kid zone poetry: Haiku. Retrieved from http://www.kidzone.ws/poetry/haiku.htm Learning A-Z.com (2011). Haiku lesson plans. Retrieved from http://www.readingaz.com/poetry/lesson_plans/haiku/haiku Kalman, B. (2000). What is a community from a to z. New York, NY: Crabtree Publishing Company. Kalman, B. & Walker, N. (1997). Community helpers from a to z. New York, NY: Crabtree Publishing Company. McCloud, C. (2006). Have you filled a bucket today: A guide to daily happiness for kids. Northville, MI: Ferne Press. Pollak, B. (2004). Our community garden. New York, NY: Aladin. Scholastic Inc. (2011). Draw parents into the school community with career day celebration. Retrieved fromhttp://www2.scholastic.com/browse/article.jsp?id=7209 Stevenson, J. (1998). Popcorn: Poems. New York, NY: Greenillow Books.

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Make a Difference: Integrated Unit Sweeney, J. (1998). Me on the map. New York, NY: Dragonfly Books. Task Stream Inc. (2011). Georgia performance standards English Language Arts: Grade 3. Retrieved from http://www.taskstream.com/Main/main_frame.asp Task Stream Inc. (2011). Georgia performance standards Social Studies: Grade 3. Retrieved from http://www.taskstream.com/Main/main_frame.asp Tompkins, G. E. (2006). Literacy for the 21st century: A balanced approach. Retrieved from The University of Phoenix eBook Collection database. Troll, M. (1991). The ball, the book, and the drum. Austin, TX.: Raintree Steck-Vaughn. University of Phoenix. (2010). ABCD objective writing method: EDU/310 version 4. Retrieved September 7, 2010, from University of Phoenix, EDU310- Models & Theories of Instruction website. University of Phoenix. (2010). Bloom's taxonomy matrix: EDU/310 version 4. Retrieved September 7, 2010, from University of Phoenix, EDU310- Models & Theories of Instruction website. Viola, H. J., Bednarz, S. W., Cortes, C. E., Jennings, C., Schug, M. C., & White, C. S. (2006). Houghton Mifflin Social Studies Georgia: Our Democracy. Boston Mass.: Houghton Mifflin Company

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