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Argument Writing Final Assessment Assignment


Megan Saputo TE 408: Bell Spring 2014

Table of Contents: Assignment Sheet- for student....2 Rubric- for student.......................3 Peer Evaluation Form- for student..5 Scope and Sequence- for teacher6 o o o o Essential Questions Student Outcomes/ Unit Goals Common Core Standards Content Focus

Calendar- for student & teacher..7 Rationale- for teacher.10 List of Texts- for students; List of Resources- for teacher12

Assignment Sheet
English 9 Name: ____________ Due Date: _________ Extended Definition Essay-English 9 Final Project Throughout the unit we have considered both the causes of and the effects of social justice. We have looked at social justice in literature, throughout history, and across cultures. We have read novels, poems, and speeches, as well as looked at examples from your personal lives. In this past unit, we have also learned about argument writing, focusing on making claims, counterclaims, warrants, and using evidence as support. For your final project, your task is to write an essay in which you provide an extended definition of social justice.

Closely analyze the concept social justice, and write an essay which aims to give a definition to this concept as you have come to understand it, drawing on class discussions, your personal opinions, and integrated examples from class texts.

Your essay should include: a general introduction in which you provide your extended definition. a set of at least 4 criteria or rules that state clearly what social justice is and is not for each criterion, an example or non-example from literature, class discussions, or your personal experiences that illustrates the rule at work; at least half of your examples must come from the literature studied in class. a counterexample from literature, class discussions, or your personal experiences that appears to meet the conditions of the rule yet that lacks some essential ingredient; at least half of your examples must come from the literature studied in class for each example and counterexample, a warrant that clearly explains why the rule is or is not being met a conclusion which wraps up your argument and evidence conventional grammar, spelling, punctuation, and usage throughout your essay a rough draft with at least one peer evaluation

Your essay should be 1000-1200 words, typed in 12 point font, double spaced, and follow MLA formatting.
Assignment adapted from Smagorinsky, Peter. "Goals for Conventional Writing Assignments." Teaching English by Design: How to Create and Carry out Instructional Units. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann, 2008. 77-78. Print.

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Rubric
CATEGORY Definition 3 - Above Standards The introduction provides a clear, strong statement of the author's definition of social justice. All of the criteria or rules are specific, relevant and explanations are given that show how each piece of evidence supports the author's definition. Essay includes BOTH a counterargument that clearly shows the opposite side, AND a rebuttal that clearly defends the author's definition. All examples used for quotes, statistics and facts are credible and cited correctly. At least half of the examples are from the literature studied in class. 2 - Meets Standards 1 - Approaching Standards 0 - Below Standards There is no definition. Score

The introduction provides a clear An introduction is present, but statement of the author's does not make the author's definition of social justice. definition of social justice clear. Most of the criteria or rules are specific, relevant and explanations are given that show how each piece of evidence supports the author's definition. Essay includes BOTH a counterargument AND a rebuttal, but they do not clearly defend the author's definition. At least one of the criteria or rules is relevant and has an explanation that shows how that piece of evidence supports the author's definition.

Criteria & Rules

Criteria or rules are NOT relevant AND/OR are not explained.

Counterargument & Rebuttal

Essay ONLY includes a Essay does not include a counterargument OR a counterargument or a rebuttal, but they do not clearly rebuttal. defend the author's definition. Most examples used for quotes, statistics and facts are credible and cited correctly. Less than half of the examples used are from the literature studied in class. Author makes many errors in grammar or mechanics that distract the reader from the content. Many examples are not credible AND/OR are not cited correctly. There are NO examples from the literature studied in class. Author makes more than 4 errors in grammar or mechanics that distract the reader from the content.

Sources

Grammar & Mechanics

All examples used for quotes, statistics and facts are credible and most are cited correctly. At least half of the examples are from the literature studied in class. Author makes no errors in grammar Author makes a few errors in or mechanics that distract the reader grammar or mechanics that from the content. distract the reader from the content.

Rough Draft

Student turned in a rough draft Student did not turn in a that is different from their final rough draft, or student draft. turned in a rough draft that is not different from final draft.

Peer Evaluation

Student turned in a peer evaluation of rough draft.

Student did not turn in a peer evaluation of a rough draft.

Grade Breakdown: Total points possible= 35 Definition: __x3= ___ Criteria & Rules: __x2= ___ Counterargument & Rebuttal: __x2= ___ Sources: __x2=___ Grammar & Mechanics: __x2= ___ Rough Draft: __x1= ___1 Peer Evaluation: __x1= ___1

Total points earned= ___/35

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Authors name: _______________ Peer Review

Editors name: _________________

Read your peers essay and answer the following questions. Remember to be respectful and constructive. You will be required to turn in this review, along with your rough draft, with your final essay. Feel free to write on the back of this sheet, or on a separate piece of paper if needed.

1. Highlight your peers extended definition. 2. Underline your peers criteria. 3. Did their criteria provide back-up for their definition? Why or why not?

4. Name three things you really liked about your peers essay.

5. Name three things you would like your peer to work on. These can include: fixing grammar, adding detail, providing further explanation, etc.

Scope and Sequence


Essential Questions: What does argument look like in our lives? What makes a good argument? How does evidence influence a good argument? What components are necessary to make an argument valid? What is an extended definition? How does an extended definition become an argument? How is social justice defined?

Student Outcomes/Unit Goals: SWBAT create an extended definition in the form of an argument to support claims using valid reasoning and textual evidence. SWBAT define social justice based on course texts, class discussions, and personal experiences. SWBAT incorporate criteria, counterexamples, warrants, and counterarguments into an essay that supports an argument. SWBAT critique and evaluate peer essays in order to provide constructive feedback.

Common Core Standards: CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.1a Introduce precise claim(s), distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and create an organization that establishes clear relationships among claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.1b Develop claim(s) and counterclaims fairly, supplying evidence for each while pointing out the strengths and limitations of both in a manner that anticipates the audiences knowledge level and concerns. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.4 Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 13 above.) CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.9 Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.5 Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience. (Editing for conventions should demonstrate command of Language standards 13 up to and including grades 910 here.)

Content Focus: Throughout this unit, students will be focusing on argumentative writing in order to create an extended definition. Students will define social justice based off of prior knowledge gained from a prior unit focused on social justice.

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Unit Calendar

Monday Objective: SWBAT identify arguments in their lives as well as analyze components of the arguments. Standard:
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.1a

Tuesday Objective: SWBAT define claims, judgments, criteria, warrants, counterargument, and rebuttal. Standard:
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.1a

Wednesday Objective: SWBAT develop claims and counterclaims from analyzing evidence.

Thursday Objective: SWBAT develop claims and counterclaims from analyzing evidence.

Friday Objective: SWBAT set up an overview of their argument, assembling and collecting ideas to prepare their essay.

Week 1 What makes a good argument? What components are necessary to validate an argument?

Standard:
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.1a

Standard:
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.1a

Standard:
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.4

Activity: PowerPoint-Introducing argument

Activity: Activity: PowerPointWhodunit? Definitions: claim, judgment, criteria, warrants, counterargument, rebuttal Assessment: Students will provide an exit ticket with examples of the definitions learned today. Objective: SWBAT define and create extended definitions. SWBAT compare extended definitions to dictionary definitions. Standard:
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.1a .

Activity: Whodunit?

Activity: Writers WorkshopStudents will have time in class to work on essay. Class will be held in the media center. Assessment: Students will turn in the beginning outlines of their argument. This will count as class participation. Objective: SWBAT develop their extended definition. SWBAT continue working on their essay.

Week 2 What is an extended definition? How does an extended definition become an

Assessment: Students will turn in an exit ticket providing examples of argument from their daily lives. Objective: SWBAT define and create criteria.

Assessment: Students will work through Whodunit? crime puzzles with teacher, as a class. Objective: SWBAT define and create extended definitions. SWBAT compare extended definitions to dictionary definitions.

Assessment: Students will work in groups to solve Whodunit? crime puzzles . Objective: SWBAT define and create extended definitions. SWBAT compare extended definitions to dictionary definitions. Standard:

Standard:
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.1a .

Standard:
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.1a .

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.1a .

Activity:

Standard:
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.4

argument?

Activity: What is Courage?Introducing students to writing criteria.

Activity: What is Courage?Introducing students to extended definitions, creating a definition for courage as a class.

Activity: What is Courage?Students will work in groups to create definitions for terms provided by the teacher, and then compare their definitions to the dictionary. This will be a continuation of the previous days lesson. Assessment: Students will work in groups to create definitions on chosen words, working similar to the courage definition the class creates. Objective: SWBAT argue, in writing, for or against a particular policy.

What is Courage?Students will present their group findings from the previous day. The remainder of the class will listen, take notes, and comment or rebuttal after each groups presentation. Assessment: Students will turn in their final extended definition with their group.

Activity: Writers WorkshopStudents will have time in class to work on essay. Class will be held in the media center.

Assessment: Assessment: Students will turn in an Students will turn in their exit ticket defining criteria definition of courage. and provide examples.

Assessment: Students will have produced their extended definition. This will count as class participation. Objective: SWBAT provide evidence to back up their chosen argument. Standard:

Week 3 How does evidence influence an argument?

Objective: SWBAT recognize and create successful examples of evidence. Standard:


CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.9

Objective: SWBAT recognize and create successful examples of evidence. Standard:


CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.9

Objective: SWBAT argue, in writing, for or against a particular policy.

Standard:
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.1b

Standard:
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.1b

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.4

Activity: What makes a good mascot or a good leader? Class will work together to analyze good mascots/leaders, creating sufficient evidence as to why.

Activity: What makes a good mascot or a good leader? Students will work in groups to analyze good mascots/leaders, provided by exit tickets from the previous day, creating sufficient

Activity: Writing arguments of policy. Class will look at school rules and policies, formulating an argument including claims, counterclaims, and warrants.

Activity: Writing arguments of policy. Students will work in groups to research a school rule or policy which they will develop an argument for.

Activity: Writers WorkshopStudents will have time in class to work on essay. Class will be held in the media center.

evidence for their claims. Assessment: Students will turn in an exit ticket with a good mascot or a good leader they want to evaluate and why. Assessment: Students will share reports on why their groups mascot/leader was good, including sufficient evidence. Assessment: Students will have produced evidence to back up their extended definition. This will count as class participation.

Week 4 Writing Workshop: Reviewing format, peer editing.

Objective: SWBAT understand and incorporate MLA standards into their writing. Standard:
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.5

Objective: SWBAT write an extended definition essay.

Assessment: Students will turn in an exit ticket outlining this lesson. Students will show their understanding of the vocabulary and todays activity. Objective: SWBAT edit and evaluate peer rough drafts in order to improve overall writing assignment. Standard:
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.5

Assessment: Students will turn in their group report on their argument of policy.

Objective: SWBAT modify any changes in their essay.

Objective: SWBAT modify any changes in their essay.

Standard:
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.910.5

Standard:
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.5

Standard:
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.4

Activity: Lecture- Teacher will explain MLA formatting via PowerPoint presentation.

Activity: Writers WorkshopStudents will have time in class to work on essay. Class will (hopefully) be held in the media center.

Activity: Writers Workshop- Students will be put in groups of 2-3 where they will trade and edit papers. Students will fill out a peer evaluation form based on the paper they read, giving constructive feedback. Assessment: Students will turn in peer evaluation form, which will count as points toward their overall assessment grade.

Activity: Writers WorkshopStudents will have time in class to work on essay. Class will (hopefully) be held in the media center.

Activity: Writers WorkshopStudents will have time in class to work on essay. Class will (hopefully) be held in the media center.

Assessment: Students will turn in correct examples of MLA formatting.

Assessment: Students will need to have evidence of work completed.

Assessment: Students will need to have evidence of work completed.

Assessment: Students will need to have evidence of work completed. Final paper is due on Monday.

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Rationale For the context of this assignment, I would be teaching a 9th grade English course. Looking at the year as a whole, this argumentative writing unit would directly follow a unit on social justice, putting the writing unit near the end of the semester. This would allow the essay to serve as a final assignment. In order to complete this writing assignment, students will use prior knowledge gained through our social justice unit, executed directly before this one begins. The social justice unit is one I created for my Course Goals Assignment in TE 407, where students were exposed to social issues across a multitude of perspectives, enabling them to become better citizens by learning how to effectively handle the injustices they may be faced with in their lives now or may be faced with in the future. While this particular school has a majority of white students, I believe it is key to allow all students to find a book, character, and/or story they can not only connect with, but find growth in. I chose several of the texts from the Common Core website, along with adding selected novels from a Literature for Young Adults course I took, in an attempt to meet the standards with canonical literature while simultaneously incorporating text that students are reading on their own. Here, I would assign novels, speeches, and poems as well as asking students to provide personal stories, song lyrics, and poetry they can link to social justice. After completing this unit, gaining knowledge on social justice in the world around them, students will embark on a four week unit exploring argumentative writing. The overarching goal for this unit is for students to be able to define social justice based on course texts, class discussions, and personal experiences while incorporating criteria, counterexamples, warrants, and counterarguments. Students will be able to do so by creating an extended definition in the form of an argument essay, supporting claims by using valid reasoning and textual evidence. Finally, students will be able to critique and evaluate essays written by their peers, in order to provide and receive constructive feedback. Essential questions this unit will lead students to learn what argument looks like in their lives, so that students will be able to make a case in support of a claim in every day affairs (Hillocks, xv). Students will learn what makes a good argument, how evidence influences a good argument, and what components validate an argument. Before creating their extended definition, they will learn what an extended definition is, how it is used, and how it can be turned into an argument. Finally, these questions will lead students to be able to define social justice according to the knowledge they have learned throughout the two previously described units. The extended definition essay asks students to consider both the causes of and effects of social justice throughout literature, history, and cultures. Students will analyze the concept of social justice and write an essay which aims to give a definition to this concept as they have come to understand it. This essay asks students to include a general introduction stating their definition, a set of criteria or rules clearly stating what social justice is and is not, examples, counterexamples, warrants, a counterargument and a rebuttal. Students will be graded heavily on their definition, graded equally on their criteria, counterargument and rebuttal, sources, and grammar mechanics. Finally, students will be graded on the inclusion of a rough draft and a peer evaluation, worth one point each. This unit will expand four weeks. Many of the activities I included were taken directly from Hillocks Teaching Argument Writing Grades 6-12 resource book. In the first week, the class will be introduced to argument writing, including terminology such as claims, judgment and warrant, through a PowerPoint lecture, which they will respond to with examples of argument from their own lives. The rest of the week will be focused on Hillocks Whodunit activity, where students will use what they have about arguments to work through and solve crime puzzles. We will first work through one as a class, and then students will work through them in groups.

Every Friday of this unit will be home to a Writers Workshop, where students will be given the opportunity to incorporate the knowledge gained from the week to work on their essays. Giving weekly writing time will allow students to build on concepts they learn week by week, following Burkes writing process illustrated through the following steps: gather and generate ideas, design and draft the text, review and revise the text, proofread and publish the text, and lastly, reflect and remember (Burke, 77-78). Each of these steps is met during the Friday workshops, for example, after this first week, they will be expected to begin setting up their argument or in Burkes terms, gather and generate ideas. The second week will encapsulate what an extended definition is and how it can become an argument. The goal for this week is for the students to be able to write out their social justice definition during Fridays workshop. To get them there, we will spend the week working through Hillocks activity titled, What is Courage? where students will be introduced to writing criteria. We will go through what an extended definition is and how to formulate criteria. As a class, we will come up with a collective definition for courage, basing our findings off of evidence and criteria. Students will then be assigned to groups, each group given a term, in which they will spend a class period working out extended definitions for. During the next week, students will learn how evidence influences an argument, leading them to be able to incorporate necessary evidence to support their extended definitions during the workshop time. The first two days of the week will be spent discussing what makes a good school mascot, or a good leader, and why. Extended definitions serve as the basis for laws and governing rules (Smagorinsky, 16), so students will then look at school policies, finding evidence for what makes a policy good or bad. Students will have to provide evidence for both of these activities, teaching them what good evidence looks like and why it is important to include in their essays. Students will be asked to find evidence in course text from the social justice unit because the thinking strategies involved in developing argument are very much the same as those in drawing and defending inferences about literature (Hillocks, 149). The final week of this unit will be spent working on the final assignment. Students will learn about MLA formatting and citations. Students will be required to turn in a rough draft by this Wednesday. If students are to flourish as writers, they must feel safe enough toshare it with others, not just the teacher (Dornen et. al, 17), which is why I plan to include a day of peer editing, providing my students with a comfortable opportunity to share their writing, giving and receiving constructive feedback to and from their peers. With this workshop, students will work in groups, read each others essays, and fill out the provided evaluation sheet with feedback. Thursday students will be able to edit their papers, as the rubric specifies that their final draft must differ from their rough draft showing proof that editing and improvement has been done. When the final writing assignment is due, students will be required to turn in their rough draft, peer evaluation sheet, and final draft. The final version of the essay will be due on Friday of the fourth week. After completing these four weeks of argumentative writing instruction, students will be able to successfully formulate an extended definition essay, creating a definition for what social justice is to them.

List of Possible Texts: Novels: o Monster by Walter Dean Myers o The Book Thief by Markus Zusak o The House on Mango Street by Sandra Cisneros o To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee Speeches: o Gettysburg Address by Abraham Lincoln o Letter from Birmingham Jail by Martin Luther King Jr. o Hope, Despair and Memory by Elie Wiesel Poetry: o I, Too, Sing America by Langston Hughes o Student produced poetry and song lyrics o Poetry and song lyrics brought in by students

Resources: Burke, Jim. The English Teacher's Companion: A Completely New Guide to Classroom, Curriculum, and the Profession. 4th ed. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann, 2013. Print. Dornan, Reade W., Lois Matz. Rosen, and Marilyn J. Wilson. "3 Teaching Writing as a Process." Within and beyond the Writing Process in the Secondary English Classroom. Boston: Allyn and Bacon, 2003. 31-77. Print. Hillocks, George. Teaching Argument Writing, Grades 6-12: Supporting Claims with Relevant Evidence and Clear Reasoning. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann, 2011. Print. Smagorinsky, Peter. Teaching English by Design: How to Create and Carry out Instructional Units. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann, 2008. Print.