Вы находитесь на странице: 1из 2

R English 4 Invisible Man Paul Laurence Dunbar Rachel Lenkei

Feb 4, 2014

Enduring Understandings:
An individuals identity is shaped by how they think about themselves, how others see them, and how society influences these perspectives.

Essential Questions:
How do societal norms and values influence the formation of a persons identity? How does an individual come to feel/is made to feel invisible? Why are certain historical or societal events incorporated into fictional literature?

Objectives:
Students will be able to: Analyze the meanings of themes, symbols, and figurative language in a text Connect central themes and ideas across multiple texts Identify societal and historical influences in fictional texts

Materials: Copies of We Wear the Mask and When Malindy Sings Procedures: Warm Up: Pass back midterms Review midterms exams Using specific examples to support claims Identify thesis and connect paragraphs back to thesis Guided Reading and Discussion: Pass out copies of We Wear the Mask and When Malindy Speaks Give background on Dunbar, poetry, and historical context Play recording of When Malindy Speaks as students read silently With a partner, students will paraphrase each stanza Go through speaker, subject, tone of poem What aspects of African American culture are being described? Why were the dialect poems popular? Ask for student to read The Mask out loud once, then students will read poem again silently Students will annotate poem noting first impressions, points of confusion After reading, students will write answers in notebooks: Who could the we in the poem be? How does this person or group of people feel? Ask students to share answers to questions, thoughts about the poem (if necessary, prompt students to point out there are many people who could be wearing the mask invisibility isnt just race-based) Homework: Read The Doll and answer reading questions Assessment: Note-taking while reading, participation in discussion Standards:
CC.1.3.11-12.A: Determine and analyze the relationship between two or more themes or central ideas of a text, including the development and interaction of the themes; provide an objective summary of the text. CC.1.3.11-12.B: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences and conclusions based on and related to an authors implicit and explicit assumptions and beliefs. CC.1.3.11-12.E: Evaluate the structure of texts including how specific sentences, paragraphs and larger portions of the texts relate to each other and the whole. CC.1.5.11-12.A: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions on grades level topics, texts,

R English 4 Invisible Man Paul Laurence Dunbar Rachel Lenkei

Feb 4, 2014

and issues, building on others ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.