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Created by Emily Lavender, 2014

Novel Study
Miss Lavender
3rd grade
Charlottes Web is a heartwarming book on friendship. This story about a little
pig named Wilbur who was born a runt will have readers wanting more. Mr.
Arable wants to kill Wilbur, until his daughter Fern decides she will take care
of Wilbur. Fern spends her free time with Wilbur and loves him very much.
Wilbur meets new barn animals that become some of his friends, including
Charlotte. Charlotte befriends Wilbur and helps him deal with the shocking
news that his life will end. Charlotte goes as far as coming up with an
interesting plan that only this spider could carry out, with the help of
Templeton the rat to help Wilbur escape death.

Created by Emily Lavender, 2014
Charlottes Web
A Summary

Elwyn Brooks White was born on July 11, 1899 in Mount Vernon, New
York. E.B. Whites father was a piano manufacturer. He had two brothers and three
sisters. E.B. White served in the Army during World War I. He attended and
graduated from Cornell University. E.B. White loved to travel. E.B. White worked for
The New Yorker, where he became a writer and editor for several years.
As an adult, E.B. White lived on a farm, where he got most of his ideas for
writing. E.B. White is most known for his childrens novels, Stuart Little (his rst
childrens novel!), Charlottes Web, and The Trumpet Swan.
He received many awards and honors for his work. He received the
Presidential Medal of Freedom, 1971 National Medal for Literature, the Laura
Ingalls Wilder Medal, and a Newbery Honor Award.
E.B. White passed away on October 1, 1985, at the age of 86. E.B. White is
still remembered and celebrated today by his outstanding literary work.
Created by Emily Lavender, 2014
About
the Author
runt- p. 1 a small, weak animal
salutations- p. 35 greetings
gullible- p. 67 easily to fool or trick
unremitting- p. 53 continual, constant, around-the-clock
versatile- p. 116 can easily move from one thing to another; able to do many
different things
loot- p. 123 a collection of valued objects
slogan- p. 87 memorable saying
sedentary- p. 61 not moving, staying in one place
conspiracy- p. 49 a planning and acting together secretly, for an unlawful or
harmful place
updraft-p. 179 an upward current of air
languish- p. 146 to become weak or feeble
Created by Emily Lavender, 2014
KEY VOCABULARY:
Charlottes Web
Name:__________________________ Date: ___________
Charlottes Web Key Vocabulary Review:
Directions: Read the definition. Circle the correct word.
1. A small, weak animal.
a. runt b. languish c. riot d. slogan
2. To become weak or feeble.
a. slogan b. tired c. languish d. loot

3. An upward current of air.
a. loot b. languish c. slogan d. updraft
4. A planning and acting together secretly.
a. runt c. languish d. conspiracy d. cage
5. Not moving, staying in place.
a. loot b. sedentary c. conspiracy d. tired
Directions: Match the definition to the correct
word.
1. _____ Slogan a. collection of valued items
2. _____Loot b. memorable saying
3. _____Salutations c. greetings
Directions: Use the following words in a sentence.
1. Versatile
___________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________
2. Gullible
___________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________
3. Unremitting
___________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________
Created by Emily Lavender, 2014
Poems!
* A list of poems included to discuss throughout the literature study for
Charlottes Web
Created by Emily Lavender, 2014
Pigs
by Charles Guigna
Pigs are playful
Pigs are pink
Pigs are smarter
than you think.
Pigs are slippery
Pigs are stout
Pigs have noses
Called a snout.
Pigs are pudgy
Pigs are plum
Pigs can run
But never jump.
Pigs are loyal
Pigs are true.
Pigs dont care for
Barbecue.
*Discussion:
Give an example of a time where
Wilbur is loyal in the book,
Charlottes Web.
Are there any other examples of
loyalty in this book?
Spiders Webs
Spiders webs are sticky
Spiders weave them tight
Spiders weave that silky string
To make their webs just right!
Pig
Behold the pig!
Its very big!
Its color pink
Is nice, I think!
Its tails a beaut,
So curly cute!
And on the farm,
It oinks with charm!
Directions: Fill in the blanks using the correct words from the word bank.
1. The initial E in E.B. White stands for _______________________.
2. E.B White was born in __________________________________.
3. ______________________ was E.B. Whites first Childrens Novel. It was
written in 1945.
4. E.B. White received several _______________ and honors for his outstanding
literary work.
5. E.B. White passed away at the age of ________________.
Created by Emily Lavender, 2014
About the Author Quiz!
Stuart Little editor
Elwyn 86
Mount Vernon, New York awards
Charlottes Web: FUNSIE!
Craft/Activity: Paper Plate Pigs and Paper Plate Spiders!
Materials Needed:
black paper plates
light pink paper plates
permanent black markers
googly eyes (large)
dark pink paper
red pipe cleaners
black pipe cleaners
glue
Created by Emily Lavender, 2014
Summarizing: Five Finger Retells...
Directions: With your pair and share
partner, use the ver nger retells
strategies to summarize
Charlottes Web.
Directions: Use these questions below to
summarize Charlottes Web.
Do this with your pair and share partner
Questions What you will say...
WHO is the story about? The story is about _____.
WHAT is the problem? The problem was that ___.
WHEN does it take place? It was in the _______.
WHERE does it take
place?
It happens on a _______.
HOW is the problem
resolved?
The problem was solved
when ________.
Created by Emily Lavender, 2014
With your pair and share
partner, discuss the following and
write about it in your writing
journal.
Name: ________________
Author Report
E.B. White
3 Interesting Facts about the authors life:
____________________________________________________
____________________________________________________
____________________________________________________
____________________________________________________
____________________________________________________
2 books written by the author:
____________________________________________________
____________________________________________________
____________________________________________________
____________________________________________________
____________________________________________________
1 question you would ask the author if you interviewed him:
____________________________________________________
____________________________________________________
____________________________________________________
____________________________________________________
____________________________________________________
Created by Emily Lavender, 2014
Before Reading Charlottes Web: Activity
Before reading Charlottes Web, discuss the similarities and differences
about farms and cities. Have a Venn Diagram available on chart paper,
the SmartBoard, etc. Have students brainstorm what they know about
farms and cities. Then proceed to introduce the book, Charlottes Web.
Discuss how this book takes place on a farm. Encourage students to keep
a list of new things they learn about farms while reading Charlottes
Web.
Created by Emily Lavender, 2014
Created by Emily Lavender, 2014
Visualization: Students create an image or picture in their minds while
listening to a story that has strong visual images.
Visualization
Activity #1
The teacher will read a passage from Charlottes Web. The teacher
will ask the students to close their eyes and visualize an image/picture
from what they hear. When the teacher is nished reading, he/she will
ask the students to open their eyes and draw what they saw on a
worksheet provided. The teacher will encourage students to use colors,
words, phrases, and pictures. The students will then share their work.
Visualization Activity #2
The teacher will read a passage from Charlottes Web. The teacher
will have a worksheet provided with an outline of a character from the
book on it. The teacher will ask students to listen closely as he/she
reads from the book. When the teacher is nished reading, he/she will
ask the students to use the character and the space around to portray
the character based on the passage they just heard. The teacher will
encourage students to use symbols, words, phrases, color, pictures, and
shapes to complete this. The students will then share their work. (This
activity is similar to a sketch-to-stretch activity.)
Created by Emily Lavender, 2014
Making Connections: Students
make text- to-self, text-
to-text, and text-to-
world
connections.
Making Connections Activity #1
The teacher will have a Text-to-Text, Text-to-Self, and Text-to-
World chart on the SmartBoard (or on chart paper, white board, etc).
The teacher will use this chart throughout the book. The students will
have their own chart to keep throughout the novel study. Each week,
the teacher will use this chart to help students make connections. This
will be a whole-group activity. The students will keep a personal list, and
the class will use the SmartBoard as their class making connections
chart.
Created by Emily Lavender, 2014
Visualization
Summarizing: Students being able to identify
main ideas.
Summarizing Activity #1
Students will be given a summarizing graphic organizer. Students
will work on their own to complete this graphic organizer. This activity is
to be completed once the novel has been read. Students will determine
the main ideas from the book, Charlottes Web. They will write the main
ideas from the beginning, the middle, and the end of the book on their
graphic organizer. Once students have completed the graphic organizer,
the teacher will put the students into groups. In their groups they will
compare each others graphic organizers to see who has the same main
ideas. The groups will be asked to make a list of the main ideas they
have in common. Then as a whole-group discussion, the class will decide
which main ideas and key events were most important in the story.
Created by Emily Lavender, 2014
Making Connections
Predicting: As students listen, they are predicting what will happen next.
Predicting Activity #1
Students will be given a graphic organizer. Students will be asked
to ll in what they predict will happen next. Then they will be asked to
give reasons why they think this will happen based on what they have
read so far. They will complete the graphic organizer and then discuss
their predictions with their pair and share partner.
Predicting Activity #2
The teacher will have a Predicting Poster hung in the classroom.
During independent/silent reading time, the teacher will ask students to
make a prediction of what they think will happen next based on their
reading. Students will write their predictions on a post-it note and place
it on the Predicting Poster. As a whole group, the class will discuss the
predictions made.
Predicting Activity #3
The teacher will put students in groups and ask them to create a
1-2 minute video recording their predictions of what they think will
Created by Emily Lavender, 2014
Summarizing
happen next. The teacher will encourage creativity (ex: a newscaster).
The teacher will play the videos for the class, this will begin the class
discussion on predicting.
Questioning: Students ask questions before, during, and after they read.
Questioning Activity #1
The students will be given a graphic organizer. Student will
complete this on their own as they are reading. This graphic organizer
will be given each week so student can record their questions. Students
will ll in questions they have before, during, and after their reading. If
their questions are answered, they will ll in the answers on the
graphic organizer.
Questioning Activity #2
Students will be given the worksheet, Wonderful Wonderings.
Students will ll in the thought bubbles with wonderings they may
have after their reading.
Created by Emily Lavender, 2014
Predicting
Inferencing: Students use clues in the text and their own background
knowledge to deepen understanding about oral, written, and visual texts.
Inferencing Activity #1
Students will be given a graphic
organizer. Student will ll in the chart with
what they already know and new
information they have learned from the
text to draw inferences. This activity will be
Created by Emily Lavender, 2014
Questioning
done in groups. The groups will be asked to discuss and draw inferences
and then present to the class.
Comprehension
Strategies
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Making
Inferences
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About the
Author
Created by Emily Lavender, 2014
CLosing Activity
To conclude the novel study on Charlottes Web, a class
trip to Stone Hollow Farmstead will take place. This eld
trip will include touring the Grade A Dairy and
Creamery, the vegetable gardens, the herb gardens, the
chicken house, the honey bee hives and more. We will
depart at 9:00am and return to the school by 2:00.
Lunch will be provided by the school. The cost of this
trip will be $10.00 per student.
Students will complete the Field Trip Reection after
returning from the eld trip. The students will be asked
to make connections from the book, Charlottes Web.
Created by Emily Lavender, 2014
Name: ______________________ Date: __________
Field Trip Reection
1. Did you enjoy this eld trip? What was your favorite
part?
2. What new things did you learn?
3. Did you see or hear anything that we discussed in the
book Charlottes Web? Practice making connections
here.
Created by Emily Lavender, 2014
Additional
Resources
Created by Emily Lavender, 2014
Opening/Closing
Activity
Charlottes Web
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Reading Schedule
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Weekly Schedules
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Poem Activity:
Directions: Write an acrostic poem about Wilbur. Begin each line with a
word that starts with the letter on that line. Use words that describe
Wilbur.
W ______________________________
I ______________________________
L ______________________________
B ______________________________
U ______________________________
R ______________________________
Created by Emily Lavender, 2014
Charlottes Web: Extension Project
1. Make a soundtrack to Charlottes Web.
2. Create a diorama of the farm in the book, Charlottes Web.
3. Make a video of your favorite scene in the video.
4. Create a storyboard of Charlottes Web on a poster.
**Choose one of the above to do your extension project. Be creative!
Created by Emily Lavender, 2014
Charlottes Web
Project Ideas
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Miss Lavenders
Class List
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Poem Activity
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Genre Web
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Charlottes Web Class
Summary Project
This project is designed to incorporate the comprehension strategy,
summarizing. Each student will be assigned a chapter from the book,
Charlottes Web. Each student will receive a graphic organizer and will
be asked to take notes/ll out their graphic organizer for their assigned
chapter. The students will take their notes and create a summary of
their chapter. Their summary should be a few sentences. This will be the
rst draft.
To help students understand what the assignment entitles, the teacher
will complete the rst four chapters (in class), the class will do four, and
then from then on out, individual students will do their assigned chapter.
At the end of the novel, the students will be asked to make a nal draft
of their summary. The students will include a picture.
The teacher will have the summaries bound together in order to keep in
the classroom library.
Created by Emily Lavender, 2014
Charlottes Web Chapter _______ Summary
Name: ____________________________________
___________________________________________________
____________________________________________________
____________________________________________________
____________________________________________________
____________________________________________________
____________________________________________________
____________________________________________________
____________________________________________________
Created by Emily Lavender, 2014
Summary Project Chapter Assignments:
Chapter 1- Miss Lavender
Chapter 2-Miss Lavender
Chapter 3-Miss Lavender
Chapter 4-Miss Lavender
Chapter 5-Class
Chapter 6-Class
Chapter 7-Class
Chapter 8-Class
Chapter 9-Joey
Chapter 10-Ross
Chapter 11-Rachel
Chapter 12-Pheobe
Chapter 13-Monica
Chapter 14-Chandler
Chapter 15-Derek
Chapter 16- J.J.
Chapter 17-David
Chapter 18-Aaron
Chapter 19-Penelope
Chapter 20-Reid
Chapter 21-Emily
Chapter 22-Alex
Created by Emily Lavender, 2014
Cross Curricular: Math
Standard: 20.) Recognize area as an attribute of plane gures, and
understand concepts of area measurement. [3-MD5]
Objective: When given an exit slip, students will be able to calculate the
area of a rectangle or square with 100% accuracy.
Activity: This activity is designed for a Geometry lesson. The teacher will
review area. This particular activity is focusing on area of a rectangle
and square. The teacher will discuss how animals on a farm sometimes
stay in an animal pen. The teacher will discuss different shapes of animal
pens, ask students if they have ever seen one, etc. Then using a
SmartBoard, Elmo, or the white board, the teacher will review how to
nd the area of a rectangle and square. Prior to this lesson, the teacher
will have set up animal pens around the classroom. The teacher will
have measurements at each animal pen station. The students will work
with a partner to nd all of the animal pen areas. When the students
have nished, they will discuss their answers. The teacher will provide
and exit slip to see if the students have mastered this concept.
Created by Emily Lavender, 2014
Name: ______________________ Date: __________
Area Exit Slip!
Directions: Find the area of the animal pens below.
1. Find the area of Wilburs animal pen.

2. Find
the
area of Templetons animal pen.
Created by Emily Lavender, 2014
3
9
Answer:
________________________
4
4
Answer:
____________________
Cross Curricular: Science
Standard: 8.) Identify how organisms are classied in the Animalia and
Plantae kingdoms.
Objective: When given a chart, students will be able to correctly
classify a specic animal.
Activity: The teacher will review content on Classifying Animals (content
attatched). The teacher will have students choose an animal from the
book Charlottes Web to begin and then add different animals. The
students will plug in the information on http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/
site/index.html and then classify their animal using a chart given.
Created by Emily Lavender, 2014
Writing Connection:
It is not often that someone comes along who is a true friend and a
good writer. Charlotte was both. -Charlottes Web
Think about your friends. What do you like to do together? How would you describe
your friends? What characteristics make a good friend? What makes a true friend?
Brainstorm Here:
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Cross Curricular: Social Studies/Geography
Standard: 1.) Locate the prime meridian, equator, Tropic of Capricorn,
Tropic of Cancer, International Date Line, and lines of latitude and
longitude on maps and globes.
Interpreting information on thematic maps
(examples: population, vegetation, climate, irrigation)
Objective:
Activity
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Cross Curriculum:
Charlottes Web
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SCIENCE LESSON
www.mensaforkids.org
Lesson 2. Organizing the Animals: How It Happened
Back in the 18th century, a Swedish man named Carolus Linnaeus thought it was
important to organize living things, and he developed a system to do just that. He
started out interested in plants, but he ended up ordering all life as he knew it. We still
use the essence of his system today. Scientists are constantly refining the system
based on new knowledge. Who knows? Maybe you will make a change in how animals
are organized!
Putting animals in order like this is called taxonomy. The taxonomists people who
name animals use a book called the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature,
or ICZN, to tell them the rules for classifying animals.
Linnaeuss system has seven levels:
1. Kingdom
2. Phylum
3. Class
4. Order
5. Family
6. Genus
7. Species
Every animal on the planet, down to the most microscopic creature you can imagine,
can be classified according to this system.
You can remember the order the system comes in with one of the following phrases.
The first letter of each word is the first letter of the level of classification. Pick the one
you like the best and practice saying it five times.
King Phillip, come out, for goodness! sake! King penguins congregate on frozen ground
sometimes. Keep ponds clean or frogs get sick.
Lets look at each level, and an example using one common animal.
These levels start out broadly that means the top levels have the most animals, and
they get narrower and narrower as you go down. So, by the time you get to the species,
there is only one animal in the group. You can imagine these levels as an upside-down
triangle.
Kingdom: Generally, scientists agree there are six kingdoms. The animal kingdom
(called Kingdom Animalia) is just one of those. In case youre interested, the others are
Achaebacteria, Eubacteria, Protists, Fungi and Plants. Originally, Linnaeus only
identified two kingdoms: plant and animal. Some scientists think that viruses should
have their own kingdom, but currently they are not included under this system.
Created by Emily Lavender, 2014
Phylum: Within the animal kingdom, the animals are divided into more than 30 phyla
(which is the plural of phylum). You might be interested in Phylum Chordata its the
one humans and all animals with backbones are in (do you see how chordata looks
like the word cord like spinal cord?). Phylum Arthropoda contains insects, spiders
and other animals with segmented bodies, like shrimp. Arthropods have their skeletons
on the outside of their bodies (think of the hard shell of a lobster) and other
characteristics in common.
Class: The third level of classification is class. For example, Phylum Chordata has
classes in it like birds, mammals (Mammalia) and reptiles.
Order: The next level, or rank, is order. Orders are smaller groups within the different
classes. Lepidoptera is the order of moths and butterflies. Carnivora is the order within
Mammalia that has the most diversity in animal size.
Family: The fifth rank of classification is family. (When you get to this rank, people
sometimes disagree about which family an animal belongs to, so you may find that
different sources tell you different things. This can even happen with orders.) The family
for dogs is Canidae.
Genus: This rank looks like genius, doesnt it? Its the second-to-last rank, and a
genus may have only one or two animals in it. If animals are in the same genus, they
are really closely related. In fact, you may not be able to tell them apart just by looking
at them! When we write the name of the genus, we capitalize it and italicize it. For
example, the genus of dogs (and wolves, too!) is Canis.
Species: If animals can breed together successfully, they are a species. When an
animal is called by its scientific name, then that means it is being identified by its genus
and species. We use a lowercase letter and italics for the species. The scientific name
of dogs is Canis familiaris; however, the scientific name of wolves is Canis lupus.
Created by Emily Lavender, 2014
Cross Curricular: Art
Standard: Utilize a variety of processes and media in the production of
artwork.
Examples: producing a drawing using markers, crayons, creating a paining
using watercolors and pastels on watercolor paper
Objective: When given a piece of paper, students will be able to
correctly use a Elmers glue and water color to create a spider web
artwork.
Activity: Students will be given a sheet of white paper. They will use
Elmers glue to create their own spider web. The following day, students
will use water color to create a background for their web. Students will
be encouraged to think about the setting and theme of Charlottes Web
when painting their background.
Created by Emily Lavender, 2014
Resources
(Bibliography)
www.the3amteacher.blogspot.com
www.wisagclassroom.org/teachers/docs/faces/Pork%20Plans.pdf
http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/index.html
Clip Art: Purchased from Apples n Acorns Clip Art
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Cross Curricular: Social Studies
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Cross Curricular: Technology
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Cross Curricular: Music
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Opening Activity
To begin the novel study on Charlottes Web, the students will learn all
about E.B. White and his purpose for writing this novel. To begin, the
teacher will ask students to brainstorm some ideas of why they think
E.B. White wrote Charlottes Web. The teacher will record these. The
teacher will review Authors Purpose and the PIE (persuade, inform,
entertain) poster. The class will research and decide what the authors
purpose of this book is. The teacher will use the Authors Purpose Poster
to help students remember and understand.
Once the class has decided the authors purpose, they will begin
researching about E.B. White. They will read a short About the Author
page and write notes, using the Authors report activity sheet. The
teacher will use a Voki to inform students of some random and fun facts
about E.B. White.
The teacher will make this exciting and engaging as this is the opening
activity, setting up the novel study on Charlottes Web.
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Dear Parents,
We are beginning a novel study on Charlottes Web by E.B. White.
Charlottes Web is a wonderful, heartwarming story of a friendship
between a little girl, and a group of barnyard animals.
Your child will be reading the majority of this novel in class, but will
have some homework to do. Your child will be using the schools copy of
this book, so I ask that you make sure the book is returned daily from
home and kept in good condition.
For this novel study, we will be doing a lot of fun, interactive, and
engaging activities! There will be one project that will need to be
completed at home. Your child will be able to choose which project they
want to complete (Project directions attached). When we nish our study,
the students will present their projects to the class. We will have a
great time listening and looking at all of the projects.
I am looking forward to reading this novel with your children! I know
they will love it!
If you have any questions, please feel free to contact me.
,
Miss. Lavender
Created by Emily Lavender, 2014