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Adapted from Mastering AutoCAD Civil 3D 2013

Chapter 11, Advanced Corridors, Intersections and Roundabouts ISBN: 978-1-118-28175-8


Copyright 2012 John Wiley and Sons
Used with permission
Page 1 of 1

Intersection Creation
Download the zip file containing the files needed for the exercise. Extract the files
to a convenient location on your hard drive before you begin. The files associated with
this exercise are compatible with Civil 3D 2013 and higher.
This exercise will take you through building a typical peer-road intersection using
the Create Intersection wizard:
1. Open the Intersection.dwg (Intersection_METRIC.dwg) file.
The drawing contains two centerline alignments (USH 10 and Mill Creek
Drive) that are part of the same corridor.
2. From the Home tab Create Design panel, choose the Intersections Create
Intersection tool.
3. Using the Intersection object snap, choose the intersection of the two existing
alignments.
4. When prompted to select the main road alignment, click the USH 10 alignment
that runs vertically in the project.
The Create Intersection General dialog will appear (Figure 11.30).
Figure 11.30: The Create Intersection General dialog

Adapted from Mastering AutoCAD Civil 3D 2013
Chapter 11, Advanced Corridors, Intersections and Roundabouts ISBN: 978-1-118-28175-8
Copyright 2012 John Wiley and Sons
Used with permission
Page 2 of 2

5. Name the intersection USH 10 and Mill Creek Drive. Set the Intersection
corridor type to Primary Road Crown Maintained, as shown in Figure 11.30,
and click Next.
6. In the Geometry Details page (Figure 11.31), verify that USH 10 is the primary
road by looking at the Priority listing. If USH 10 is not at the top of the list, use
the arrow buttons on the right side to reorder the roads.
Figure 11.31: The Geometry Details page of the Create Intersection wizard


7. Click the Offset Parameters button, and do the following:
a. Set the offset values for both the left and right sides to 24 (8 m) for
USH 10.
b. Set the left and right offset values for Mill Creek Drive to 18 (5 m).
c. Select the check box Create New Offsets From Start To End Of
Centerlines.
At this step, the screen should resemble Figure 11.32.
d. Click OK to close the Intersection Offset Parameters dialog.
Adapted from Mastering AutoCAD Civil 3D 2013
Chapter 11, Advanced Corridors, Intersections and Roundabouts ISBN: 978-1-118-28175-8
Copyright 2012 John Wiley and Sons
Used with permission
Page 3 of 3

Figure 11.32: Intersection Offset Parameters dialog

8. Click the Curb Return Parameters to enter the Curb Return Parameters
dialog.
a. For all four quadrants of the intersection, place a check mark next to
Widen Turn Lane For Incoming Road and Widen Turn Lane For
Outgoing Road.
b. Click the Next button at the top of the dialog to move from quadrant to
quadrant.
Adapted from Mastering AutoCAD Civil 3D 2013
Chapter 11, Advanced Corridors, Intersections and Roundabouts ISBN: 978-1-118-28175-8
Copyright 2012 John Wiley and Sons
Used with permission
Page 4 of 4

As shown in Figure 11.33, a temporary glyph will help you
determine which quadrant you are currently modifying.
Figure 11.33: Adding lane widening to the SW Quadrant of the
intersection

When you reach the last quadrant, you will see that the Next button
is grayed out. This means that you have successfully worked through all
four curb returns.
d. Click OK to return to wizards Geometry Details page.
Adapted from Mastering AutoCAD Civil 3D 2013
Chapter 11, Advanced Corridors, Intersections and Roundabouts ISBN: 978-1-118-28175-8
Copyright 2012 John Wiley and Sons
Used with permission
Page 5 of 5

Some locales require that lane slopes flatten out to a 1% cross-slope in an
intersection. If this is the case for you, you can change the lane slope
parameters in the Intersection Lane Slope Parameters dialog (Figure 11.34). In
this exercise you will leave this as 2%.
Figure 11.34: Lane slope parameters control the cross-slope in the
intersection.

Civil 3D is performing the task of generating the curb return profile. The
Adapted from Mastering AutoCAD Civil 3D 2013
Chapter 11, Advanced Corridors, Intersections and Roundabouts ISBN: 978-1-118-28175-8
Copyright 2012 John Wiley and Sons
Used with permission
Page 6 of 6

profile will be at least as long as the rounded curb plus the turn lanes that are
added in this exercise. If you wish to have Civil 3D generate even more than
the length needed, you can specify that in the Intersection Curb Return Profile
Parameters area (Figure 11.35).
Figure 11.35: Intersection Curb Return Profile Parameters options extend
the Civil 3D-generated profile beyond the curb returns by the value
specified.

You will be keeping all default settings in both the Lane Slope Parameters
area (Figure 11.34) and the Curb Return Parameters area (Figure 11.35).
Adapted from Mastering AutoCAD Civil 3D 2013
Chapter 11, Advanced Corridors, Intersections and Roundabouts ISBN: 978-1-118-28175-8
Copyright 2012 John Wiley and Sons
Used with permission
Page 7 of 7

9. Click Next to continue to the Corridor Regions page (Figure 11.36).
Figure 11.36: The Corridor Regions page drives the assemblies used in the
intersection.

The Corridor Regions page is where you control which assemblies are used
for the different design locations around the intersection. Clicking each entry in
the Corridor Region Section Type list will give you a clear picture of which
assemblies you should use and where (as shown at the bottom of Figure 11.36).
If your assemblies have the same names as the default assemblies, as is the
case in this example, they will be pulled from the current drawing. Alternately,
you can click the ellipsis to select any assembly from the drawing.
If you dont have all the necessary assemblies at this point, you can still
create your intersection. Civil 3D will pull in the default set of assemblies. You
can always modify these assemblies after they are brought in.
10. Click through the Corridor Region Section Type list to view the schematic
preview for each.
Do not make any changes to the assembly listing.
11. Click Create Intersection.
Adapted from Mastering AutoCAD Civil 3D 2013
Chapter 11, Advanced Corridors, Intersections and Roundabouts ISBN: 978-1-118-28175-8
Copyright 2012 John Wiley and Sons
Used with permission
Page 8 of 8

After a few moments of processing, you will see a corridor appear at the
intersection of the roads. Use the REGEN command if you do not see the
frequency lines. Your corridor should now resemble Figure 11.37.
Figure 11.37: The nearly completed intersection

12. Select the corridor and from the Corridor contextual tab Modify Corridor
panel, select Corridor Properties.
13. Switch to the Parameters tab of the Corridor Properties dialog and highlight
one of the regions in the listing, as shown in Figure 11.38.
Figure 11.38: The best way to modify regions is using the corridor
properties. The selected region will highlight graphically.
Adapted from Mastering AutoCAD Civil 3D 2013
Chapter 11, Advanced Corridors, Intersections and Roundabouts ISBN: 978-1-118-28175-8
Copyright 2012 John Wiley and Sons
Used with permission
Page 9 of 9


Notice how the region highlighted in the Parameters tab is outlined in the
graphic. This will help you determine which region to edit, even in the largest
of corridors.
To move from region to region without searching through the somewhat
daunting list, use the Select Region From Drawing button.

In the next steps you will leverage the work Civil 3D has done for you and
Adapted from Mastering AutoCAD Civil 3D 2013
Chapter 11, Advanced Corridors, Intersections and Roundabouts ISBN: 978-1-118-28175-8
Copyright 2012 John Wiley and Sons
Used with permission
Page 10 of 10

extend the intersection in all four directions.
14. Change the region start station on the west side of Mill Creek Road to 101+00
(3+200 for metric users).
15. Change the east side end station to 121+00 (3+700 for metric users).
16. Change the start station of the south end of USH 10 to 10+00 (0+300 for
metric users).
17. Change the north side end station to 16+50 (0+500 for metric users).
18. Click OK and rebuild the corridor.
When the corridor is complete, it will look like Figure 11.39.
Figure 11.39: The completed intersection