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1.

to continue, to go on, to proceed


2. to ask, to inquire, to question, to demand
3. comfortable, convenient, suitable
4. another, other, others, the others (, )
5. to raise(ed), to lift (ed), to pick (ed) ()
6. to allow, to permit, to let ()
7. different, various, diverse (, )
8. awful, terrible, dreadful, horrible ()
9. a piece, a slice, a lump (, )
10. to pull, to drag, to draw (, )
11. beautiful, lovely, handsome, good-looking, pretty
12. empty, vacant, blank ()
13. trade, profession, occupation (, , )
14. stout, fat, fleshy, plump (, )
15. thin, slender, slim, lean, meager (, )
16. way, road, path, route ()
17. to say, to tell, to talk, to speak
18. some, any, no, every
19. to see, to look, to glance, to stare, to peep
20. clever, intelligent, smart (, )
21. weak, feeble, faint, frail (, , )
22. to want, to wish, to desire, to long, to crave (, )

23. to choose, to select, to elect, to pick out ()


24. to answer, to reply, to respond
25. big, large, great ()
26. little, small, tiny ()
27. to shut, to close, to lock ()
28. to get, to gain, to receive, to obtain ()
29. to finish, to end, to complete ()
30. to break, to destroy, to ruin ()
31. happy, lucky, fortunate ()
32. a slip, a mistake, an error ()
33. opportunity, possibility, chance ()
34. cost, price, worth, value (, )
35. to appear, to seem, to turn out, to prove (, )
36. to defend, to protect, to guard (, )
37. to do, to make ()
38. to learn, to study, to teach
39. an owner, a master, a host ()
40. to catch, to snatch, to seize, to grab (, )
41. to abandon, to leave, to give up, to quit, to resign (, )
42. famous, well-known, celebrated, distinguished, eminent (, )
43. effective, efficient, skilled, experienced (, )
44. afraid, frightened, scared, fearful (, )
45. to appreciate, to estimate, to value (, )

46. idea, conception, notion, thought (, , )


47. director, manager, chief, boss, head (, , )
48. huge, vast, enormous, immense (, )
49. busy, engaged, occupied ()
50. quick, fast, rapid, swift (, )
51. to understand, to realize, to grasp ()
52. to shout, to cry, to scream, to shriek ()
53. quiet, calm, still, peaceful (, )
54. to hold, to keep, to retain, to preserve (, )
55. to cry, to weep, to sob (, )
56. strange, queer, odd, quaint (, )
57. note, notice, take notice, pay attention (, )
58. wage, salary, stipend, fee, royalties ( )
59. work, job, position, post ()
60. fairly, rather, quite (, )
61. advantage, benefit, profit, gain (, )
62. to wait, to expect, to anticipate ( , )
63. greedy, mean, stingy (, )
64. to show, to demonstrate, to display,to exhibit, to reveal (, )
65. bill, fare, fee, fine, tip ( -)
66. to change, to alter, to vary, to adjust (, )
67. funny, witty, amusing, merry( , )
68. lonely, alone, single, lonesome, solitary

69. bank, shore, coast, beach, seaside

(to continue, to go on, to proceed)


to continue (ed), to go on (went on, gone on), to proceed (ed) ''.

.
to continue - '' (- - ) :
1) :
To continue a speech -
To continue a conversation -
The story will be continued in our next month's issue.

.
2) , ,
:
To continue working -
To continue to play -
Pat didn't say anything but continued staring at Toby.
, .
She didn't pay any attention to him but continued to read her book.
, .
to go on to continue , .
:
1) , with:
To go on with somebody's work -
To go on with somebody's story -
2) , ( to
go on ):
To go on working -
To go on singing -
to continue to go on, ,
, :
Please, continue your story.
, .
Pray, go on with your next story.
, .
Cora didn't answer but continued staring at the letter.
, .
Nancy went on eating an apple.
.
to proceed ,
.
:
1) , with:
Tell us your name and then proceed with you story.
, , .
2) , :
In this manner he proceeded scarifying the members of his staff.
.
:
1) to go on to proceed ' '.
2) to go on '' :
"What's going on here?"
" ?"
to continue, to go on, to proceed
:

Lexical Test (continue, go on, proceed).

(to ask, to inquire, to question, to demand)


to ask(ed), to inquire(ed), to question(ed), to demand(ed)
', '.
.
to ask - '', ' , -'
.
. :
1) :
To ask the way -
To ask a question -
Before buying anything, you should ask the price.
- , .
2) , after, about:
To ask after a person's health -
To ask about the latest news -
I must ask after my sick friend.
.
Paul asked about the latest news.
.
to ask , :
"Are you hungry?" the first lady asked me.
" ?" - .
He visited us the next day and asked if we had got home safely.
, .
to inquire ,
- -; . :
1) :
The clerk inquired my name.
.
2) , after, for, of, into, about:
a) To inquire after - -
I inquired after the wounded.
.
b) To inquire for somebody - , -
I was to come over and inquire for Master Davy.
(. ) .
c) To inquire of a person - -
"What are they talking about?" inquired the old lady of one of her granddaughters in a very audible voice.
" ?" - .
d) To inquire into a matter -
Tim decided to inquire into the very core of the matter.
.
e) To inquire about something - , -
Something has gone wrong. I will inquire about it.
- . .
to inquire , :
"Are you married?" inquired a dirty-faced man.
" ?"- .

She inquired if Jonathan liked his job.


, .
to question '', ' ' (
, , , ):
They questioned him asking him what had happened to him.
, , .
to demand ' '.
, , :
"Are you sure that it's all?" Martin demanded menacingly.
" , ?" - .
As the vehicle rumbled out of the yard, Shirly, rallying her spirits, demanded what had become of the
wounded.
, , , , .
:
to demand ''.
:
This letter demands an immediate answer.
.
to ask, to inquire, to question, to demand
:

Lexical Test (ask, inquire, question, demand).


(comfortable, convenient, suitable)
comfortable convenient '', suitable
'', ''.
. .
comfortable ('') '',
' ':
A comfortable bed -
Comfortable shoes -
I didn't feel comfortable under his scrutinizing look.
.
convenient ('') '',
'':
Convenient time -
A convenient day -
Which is the most convenient time for you to start work?
, ?
We must arrange a convenient time and place for the meeting.
.
suitable '', '' :
"A watch would be the most suitable present for Father," said Emma.
, .
convenient suitable , convenient
, suitable
:

At forty-five Henry was playful and boastful, a behavior not suitable to his age.
, .
comfortable, convenient, suitable
:

Lexical Test (comfortable, convenient, suitable).


Comfortable convenient
, .
.
comfortable ,
.
: comfortable armchair,
comfortable pair of shoes.
convenient , . : - convenient timetable,
convenient place.
, :
1) This is comfortable chair. Its very soft. I can sit and watch TV.
2) This is convenient chair to sit in to answer the letters.
,
. , ,
. .. ,
, -.
Exercise:
1) These shoes are ________ for a long walk.
2) The flat was rather _______ , but it wasnt ___________ to get to
work.
3) Sunday is the most _________ day for meeting with my friends.
4) I like to sleep in my bed, I find it very __________.
Keys: 1) convenient 2) comfortable, convenient 3) convenient 4) comfortable
(another, other, others, the others)
other - '', ''
,
.
Another (an+other) , .
, :
I don't like this pencil; please give me another one.
. , , .
other ,
, .
other others. other, ,
:
1) the other book = the other
the other books = the others
2) another book = another
3) other books = others

, ,
.
other , ,
, - ,
other :
. :
"Whose books are they?"
" ?"
"One of the books is mine and the other is Ann's."
" , ".
the other .
, ,
another :
. . :
"Don't worry, dear. I'll buy you another one."
" . ."
others the others.
, the others:
. :
"Whose books are these?"
" ?"
"One of them is mine, and the others are my sister's."
" , ."
others , ''
:
, . :
"Some of the books have been taken by the teachers and others by the pupils."
" , ."
another, other, others, the others
:
Lexical Test (another, other, others, the others).

(to raise(ed), to lift (ed), to pick (ed))


to raise(ed), to lift (ed), to pick (ed) up - ''
, .
to raise (ed) , :
To raise one's hand -
To raise one's eyes -
Their eyes met and he raised his hat.
, .
to raise :
To raise one's voice - ()
To raise a question -
To raise one's spirits -
To raise a revolt -
To raise prices -
To raise a cry -
Theodor Dreiser was one of the first to raise his voice against fascism.
, .
:
to raise to rise (rose, risen),
, ,
'' - '':

The moon rose big and full over the water.


.
to lift , to raise. to raise to lift
: ' -', ' -
', ' ':
Gina raised herself upon tiptoe.
.
Emily lifted her glass of champagne to her lips.
.
I raised my right hand, and Mike lifted his left one.
, .
to pick up '', ' -,
', , .
, ,
:
To pick up a handkerchief -
To pick up some litter -
In the garden Martina saw a few fallen apples and picked them up.
.
to raise, to lift, to pick up
:
Lexical Test (raise, lift, pick up).

(to allow, to permit, to let)


to allow, to permit, to let '', ''.
.
to allow ' - - ', ' ,
- '. :
Father never allowed the children to swear.
.
Jack was allowed to come too, and he barked at the porters, and at the station-master, and even at the train
as soon as it appeared.
, , ,
.
to allow :
Pray allow me to detain you for a minute.
, .
Will you allow me to use your pen?
, ?
to permit '', ' - '.
to allow to permit
:

No person but yourself is permitted to lift this stone or enter the cave.
, , .
Because of his weak heart he was not permitted to play football.
- .
to allow to permit
,
:
Smoking is not allowed here.
.
Smoking is not permitted in this restaurant.
.
to let '', '', ' -
-':
He was a most unsociable dog; he didn't let them lay hand on him.
() ; .
This fellow didn't let me pass the footbridge.
.
to let (me, you, him, her,
them, it) , to:
Let me introduce you to the staff.
.
Don't let the children come near the edge of the platform.
.
to drop () to fall ()
to let :
Shall we let the matter drop?
?
She has let her matches fall in the gutter and they are all spoiled.
, .
to let to allow .
to let :
Let me tell you how I first read that story.
, .
Allow me to introduce my fellow-travelers to you.

.
to allow, to permit, to let
:
Lexical Test (allow, permit, let).

(different, various, diverse)


different, various, diverse '', ''.

.
different '', ' (-)', '
-', ''. alike (, ), similar
(, ):
Different tastes -
Different opinions -
We both enjoyed the same things but in different ways.
, -.
They approached the subject from different points of view.
.
various '', '
'; ' ':
Various professions -
Various accounts -
This can be applied to various fields of science.
.
Mr. Crawly is a manager in a big company and he has various duties.
.
diverse - ,
:
Diverse interests -
Diverse methods -
The remedies suggested are very diverse.
.
He kept the conversation flowing easily on diverse topics.
.
different, various, diverse

:
Lexical Test (different, various, diverse).

(awful, terrible, dreadful, horrible)


- awful, terrible, dreadful, horrible '', '',
.
awful , ' , ,
, - - ,
':
An awful storm -
An awful mistake -
She didn't say a word, being overpowered with awful fear.
, .
The orchestra was playing the awful music of "Don Juan" before the statue entered.
" " .
terrible ' ', ' -,
', ' ':
A terrible fear -
A terrible performance -
I have never seen a more terrible exposure of human weakness.
() .
After three weeks of sailing, the weather changed, and there came a terrible storm.
, , .
dreadful ' ':
A dreadful place -
A dreadful disease -
The man brought dreadful news.
.
I felt a dreadful pain, and could not say a word.
.
horrible ' ,
', '', '':
A horrible smell -
A horrible sight -
In the practice of the ancient Greek dramatists, murder on the stage was avoided as horrible.
, ,
.

From the fish-dealers' stalls arises a horrible smell.


.
:
1) , ,
:
An awful (dreadful, terrible) accident has happened.
.
2) '', '',
'', '':
An awful joke -
Terrible heat -
Horrible weather -
A dreadful bore -
"I am a terrible bookworm," said Mr. Hardy; "and my first act when I got here was to examine the library."
, - - , , ,
.
awful, terrible, dreadful,
horrible :
Lexical Test (awful, terrible, dreadful, horrible).

(a piece, a slice, a lump )


a piece, a slice, a lump ', '.
;
.
a piece ', ,
-' :
A piece of bread -
A piece of wood -
A piece of chalk -
To cut to pieces -
While I was washing the dishes, a plate slipped out of my hand and broke to pieces.
, .
A very small piece of paper peeped from a corner of the brief-case.
.
a slice ' ', ' -
':
A slice of bread - ()
A slice of lemon -

Soon after five p.m. we had another meal consisting of a small mug of coffee and half a slice of brown
bread.
- .
His whole face screws up when he sees someone eat a slice of lemon.
, , - .
a lump ' -
', '', '':
A lump of clay -
A lump of sugar -
To break up something into lumps - -
How many lumps of sugar do you usually put in your tea?
?
There was a tin vessel filled with lumps of lead and iron as a weight.
, .
:
a piece ' ', '', '
', .
A piece of china -
A piece of furniture -
A piece of music -
A piece of news -
a piece, a slice, a pump
:
Lexical Test (piece, slice, pump).

(to pull, to drag, to draw)


to pull, to draw, to drag '', ''
. .
to pull ', - ', '
':
To pull a sledge -
To pull somebody's ears - -
To pull one's hair -
The horse was pulling a heavy cart.
.
The drawer must have got stuck; I can't pull it out.

, .
"Don't pull my hair! You are hurting me."
" ; ."
to draw ' ', '', '', '
', '':
A cart draws easily -
To draw a chair to the window -
The wagon seemed to be very light; the mules easily drew it.
; .
The workers were slowly drawing a telephone wire across the yard.
.
The woman came up to the window and drew the curtains.
.
to drag ' - - ', ' ', ' ', ' ( -)':
The time drags slowly -
To drag one's feet - ,
He was so tired he could hardly drag his feet.
, .
A little girl was dragging an old doll behind her.
.
to draw, to drag :
To draw fire - ,
"If you are not careful with what you say in public, you can easily draw fire."
,
() .
To draw interest - ,
The exhibition of modern art drew little interest of the public at large.
.
To draw to a close - ,
The wedding reception was drawing to a close, and the guests were filing out of the restaurant.
, .

To drag one's heels - ,


"I don't think you should be dragging your heels about whether to take part in the conference or not."
, .
To drag in (someone or something) - - , -
Theresa is capable of dragging in her personal problems in every conversation.
.
to pull, to drag, to draw
:
Lexical Test (pull, drag, draw).

(beautiful, lovely, handsome, good-looking, pretty)


beautiful, lovely, handsome, good-looking, pretty
.
beautiful " ".
, , , .. beautiful
', ':
Julia had the most beautiful face he had ever seen.
, - .
William cared for beautiful things.
.
The swallow flew over the city and saw the rich making merry in their beautiful houses.
, .
, beautiful
.
handsome '
, '. handsome
''.
handsome :
Dorian was very young and handsome.
.
, handsome
:
Would you describe Betty as beautiful or handsome?
?

handsome
:
What a handsome old building it is!
!
lovely ,
. lovely '',
'', '' ,
:
The tears were running over her lovely face.
.
What a lovely sight!
!
good-looking , ;
. good-looking
'', ' () ':
Della never told me that her brother was so good-looking.
, .
Felix was very good-looking, tall and broad-shouldered with a fine figure of an athlete.
, , .
pretty ', '.
', '
- - :
A pretty little house stood at the top of the lane with a garden in front of it.
.
Pretty , :
John's son is a pretty little boy of five.
.
beautiful, lovely, handsome, good-looking,
pretty :
Lexical Test (beautiful, lovely, handsome, pretty).

(empty, vacant, blank)


empty, vacant, blank , ,
- .
empty ', ', :

an empty box -
an empty street -
an empty room -
To my great surprise the house was empty.
, .
vacant ' , ':
a vacant seat - ,
a vacant apartment - ,
The owner of the hotel said they didn't have a single vacant room.
, .
empty vacant
:
an empty chair - , ..
a vacant chair - , .. , ,
Is this seat taken? - No, it's vacant.
? - , .
There is an empty chair in the corner.
.
blank ', , ':
a blank page - ,
a blank form - ,
I wonder what he suddenly saw on this blank paper.
, .
empty, vacant, blank
:
Lexical Test (empty, vacant, blank).

(trade, profession, occupation)


trade, profession, occupation - .
'', '', ' '.
occupation . Occupation
:
Lionel is engaged in many tasks and he takes his occupation seriously.
, .
Occupation , -
:

Nobody knew about his real occupation.


.
Right now my occupation is that of a business consultant.
.
Profession
:
Helen's father is a lawyer by profession.
.
Trade - ; :
Alec wants to learn the trade of a turner.
.
When Chekhov was a boy, he was taught the trade of a shoemaker.
.
trade, profession, occupation
:
Lexical Test (trade, profession, occupation).

(stout, fat, fleshy, plump)


stout, fat, fleshy, plump .
,
, .
,
.
stout '',
'', ' ':
Through the open window Marcie saw a stout man coming up to the house, whistling gaily.
, , .
fat ' ',
, :
A fat man -
fat cheeks -
Everything about the man was fat; he had a fat body, fat cheeks and chin, fat hands and fat legs.
; , ,
.
fleshy ,

, ', '.
, :
A fleshy person -
A fleshy nose -
Susan still remembered her old uncle Robert, who was fleshy and sardonic.
, .
Steve had a large fleshy nose with wide nostrils.
.
plump ', , '.
, :
A plump baby -
Plump hands -
At that time Mike was a nice little boy with plump cheeks.
.
Sara used to be very thin, but at the age of forty she became plump. - ,
.
:
- , stout '',
'', '' (a stout rope - ; a stout sole - )
.
- ''
thick (a thick board - , a thick tree - ).
.
stout, fat, fleshy, plump
:
Lexical Test (stout, fat, fleshy, plump).

(thin, slender, slim, lean, meager)


thin, slender, slim, lean, meager - .
,
, . ,
.
thin '', ''
.
, :
A thin woman -

thin fingers -
The head of the family was a tall, thin man whose name was George Garden Woodrow.
, .
thin ,
, :
a thin sheet of paper -
a thin wire -
Through the thin wall of the next room I could hear a child crying.
.
The connection between them was a very thin wire.
.
slender , , ,
:
A slender figure -
Slender fingers -
slender
, ,
: A slender vase -
The slender legs of the table -
William compared Tina to a pale gold flower on a slender stem.
- .
slim , , ,
( ) , , :
A slim girl -
A slim hand -
.
lean '', '':
The fellow was as lean as a rail.
, .
meager , ,
, :
A meager person -
A meager face -

Looking at his meager features, I couldn't help feeling sorry for him.
, .
:
- thin '', '': thin hair - ; thin soup . thin .
- slender, slim, lean, meager , ,
: slender means - , slim resources - , lean years , meager results - .
.
thin, slender, slim, lean, meager
:
Lexical Test (thin, slender, slim, lean, meager).

(way, road, path, route)


way, road, path, route ,
.
Way - , ,
, , ,
, , :
Can you tell me the way to the station, please?
, , ( )?
I think I have lost my way.
, (. )
Road way
- , .. , :
They could not find the road in the thick forest.
.
road ,
-:
The Communist Party congress adopted a new and fully revised program "The Road to Socialism".
, "
".
Path - ' ', '':
At a bend in the road he saw a path leading across a stream.
, .

Route - ,
:
More bus routes have been reopened recently.
.
:
- way ) , : the best way of
doing something - -; ) , : he likes to have his own way -.
way .
- way road .
:
Are you going this way? - ? ( ?)
Are you going this road? - ()?
way, road, path, route
:
Lexical Test (way, road, path, route).

to say, to tell, to talk, to speak


to say () to tell (, ) ;
.
to tell :
I can tell the time.
.
, , ,
"", , "":
I can tell you the time.
, .
to say
() :
He said nothing.
.
He said that he lived in London.
, .

:
He said nothing to me.
.
To say ( , , -) -
, :
The teacher said, "Do this exercise!"
: " ."
Tell ( -, -)
:
Tell me your name, please.
, .
to tell :
The teacher told the class to do the exercise.
. ( , .)
to say to tell , , :
to say nothing -
to say a word/ a few words - \
to say little/ much - \
to say no/ yes - \
to say good-bye/ hello - \
to say smth. important - -
I say, : - , :
Sorry to say : - :
to tell the time -
to tell the news -
to tell a joke -
to tell the truth -
to tell a lie - ,
to tell a story -
to say, to tell
:
to speak to talk : ", ,
". . to speak
, :
to speak at the meeting.
to talk :
Let's talk about it later. O.K?

to speak :
to speak to smb.
to speak with smb.
to speak about smb (smth.)
Let's speak with you about our holidays. I spoke to him about our holidays.
to talk :
to talk to smb.
to talk with smb.
to talk about smb. (smth.)
What are you talking about? Who did you talk to?
to speak to talk , , :
to speak up - ,
so to speak -
to speak at the meeting -
to speak over the phone -
to speak a foreign language -
to speak fast (slowly, well, badly) - (, , )
to talk shop -
to talk sports -
to talk books -
to talk nineteen to the dozen -
to speak, to talk
:
Lexical Test (say, tell, talk, speak).

some, any, no, every


Some, any, no, every body, one, thing.
something (-) somebody/someone (-)
:
There is something on the floor.
- .
There is somebody/someone at the door.
- .
anything (-) anybody/anyone (-)
:

Is there anything on the floor?


- ?
Is there anybody at the door?
- ?
nothing () nobody/no one
():
There is nothing on the shelf.
.
There is nobody/no one in the kitchen.
.
every thing, body, one - everything (),
everybody/everyone ():
Jack knows everything about everybody/everyone.
.
some, any, no, every
:
Nobody is absent today. ()
.
There is nothing on the table. ()
.
Everybody likes tea. ()
.
Tell me everything about it. ()
.
, - :
Nobody knows anything about it.
.
,
, . -
not, to be (am not, is not, are not), (do not)
(cannot). : nothing, nobody, no one .
, nothing, nobody, no one
anything, anybody, any one:
There isn't anybody in the room.

.
There isn't anything on the shelf.
.

.
:
.
- : Nobody ever tells me anything.
:
Something, somebody, someone ( anything, anybody, anyone) ,
- :
Will somebody help me?
- ?
Will you have something to eat?
- ?
anything, anybody, anyone ", ,
":
This job is simple; anyone can do it.
; .
some, any, no, every
:
Lexical Test (something, everything, nothing, nobody)..

to see, to look, to glance, to stare, to peep


to see , .. :
Four eyes see more than two.
to look, to stare, to glance, to peep
.
to look - , , ,
. at:
Look at the picture, please.
, .
Fanny murmured something not looking at me.
- , .

look
here! (!):
Look here Susan, I want you to clear the mess in your room.
, , .
to stare , ..
, :
George stared through his monocle into an empty coffee cup.
.
to stare at:
The ticket-collector stared at him a cold hostile stare.
? .
with:
For a while she stared with astonishment at what used to be her favorite purse.
, - ? .
to glance " ", " ".
at:
Stella glanced shyly at the young man out of the corners of her eyes.
, .
to peep "", "", "
" into (), through ():
Once or twice Mary peeped into the book her brother was reading.
, ? .
I saw a man peeping through a hole in the fence.
- .
to see, to look, to glance, to stare, to peep
:
Lexical Test (see, look, glance)..

to learn, to find out, to discover


to learn (learnt, learnt) ", ":
David learnt about the arrival of the delegation from his boss.
.
to find out (found out, found out) "":

I'd like to find out who was using my computer during my absence.
, ? .
to discover ", " ,
, , - :
They suddenly discovered that it was too late to do it.
, .
to learn, to find out, to discover
:
Lexical Test (learn, find out, discover)..

travel, journey, voyage, trip, tour


travel, journey, voyage, trip, tour ,
.
Travel ,
?
:
Travel was long and dangerous in old days.
.
Journey - , ?
:
The journey to Spain will not take more than three weeks.
? ? .
Voyage - , , ? -
- :
Henry announced that he was going to sea for another voyage as soon as he was well rested.
, ? , ?.
Trip - , ,
:
A trip to the country will take no more that an hour and a half.
? .
Tour - , , , ? ,
:
We made a tour of Italy last summer. We visited a number of wonderful towns and then returned to Rome.
. ,
.
travel, journey, voyage, trip, tour
:
Lexical Test (travel, journey, voyage).

(clever, intelligent, smart)


clever, intelligent, smart ', '.
. .
,
.
clever -
:
A clever student -

A clever answer -
Cathy was clever, much cleverer than he.
, .
That was a clever move; we couldn't help appreciating it.
; .
intelligent ' ',
'':
An intelligent child -
An intelligent question -
People are much more intelligent than animals.
.
I was surprised at his intelligent remark.
.
smart '', '',
''. '':
A smart reply -
A smart boy -
Bessie Lee was a girl of good natural capacity, for she was smart in all she did.
.
I must admit it was a smart plan.
, .
:
intelligent, '',
. ''
cultured, well-educated, intellectual:
John Brown was an intelligent and cultured man.
.
clever, intelligent, smart
:
Lexical Test (clever, intelligent, smart).

(weak, feeble, faint, frail)


weak, feeble, faint, frail
', , '.
.
Weak :
1) ' ':
A weak woman -
Too weak to walk - ,
After her long illness Felicity was still very weak.
.
It is weak and silly of you to say you can't bear what you must bear.
, ,
.
2) ' ,
':
a weak voice -
a weak mind -
to be weak in Grammar -
Jeffrey was weak in Sciences and good at languages.
, .

3) ' ':
A weak character -
Weak defense -
He could never resist any temptation; he had a very weak character.
; .
4) ', ':
weak health -
a weak heart -
Jenny's mother had a weak heart.
.
5) ' -':
weak tea -
weak coffee -
6) ' , , ':
Industry was weak and equipment of the railways was equally weak.
.
Feeble ' ' ' :
a feeble old man - ,
feeble hands -
Little by little Tin Ackerson grew old and feeble.
.
feeble ,
:
a feeble light -
a feeble sound -
The door opened, letting in a feeble lantern gleam.
, .
Faint ,
( ):
Joe was faint with hunger and cold.
.
faint '',
'', '':
a faint voice -
faint hope -
"No one knows I am here," she said in a faint voice and with an appealing smile.
, , - .
Frail '',
'', '':
a frail man - ,
a frail child -
The associate editor was a frail little man whose hand seemed strangely cold.
, .
frail
'', '', ', ':
a frail constitution -
a frail support -
We could hear a little clear frail sound which was repeated again and again.
, , .
She was still too weak and frail to be out of bed.

, .
weak, feeble, faint, frail
:
Lexical Test (weak, feeble, faint, frail).

(to want, to wish, to desire, to long, to crave)


to want, to wish, to desire, to long, to crave , .
.
To want
:
I wanted so much to come and see you.
.
to want ' -':
I don't want any coffee, thank you.
, .
to wish :
1) ' , -':
I wish to thank him for his help.
.
2) ' - -':
I wish you luck.
.
to desire ,
, :
She desires to make your acquaintance.
.
to desire ;
to want to wish - :
He was met by a maid who informed him that her mistress desired to speak with him.
, , .
to long , , -
( , ). :
They were longing for the change.
.

Oliver longed to see his own name in the list of the prize winners.
.
to crave ,
-:
Sam craved for a good home and satisfying family life.
.
:
- to want, to wish . ( '
' 61.)
, '':
I want you to help me.
, .
I wished he were more than a friend.
, .
-
to wish :
I wish it would stop raining, and the sun would be shining again.
, , .
I wish you had given him my telephone number.
, .
wish ' '
' '. ( ' ' 66.)
to want, to wish, to desire, to long, to
crave :
Lexical Test (want, wish, desire, long, crave).

(to choose, to select, to elect, to pick out)


to choose, to select, to elect, to pick out ''.

.
to choose
. To choose , ,
, :
to chose a book -
to chose a friend -

Choose an author as you choose a friend. (Proverb.)


, . (.)
to select ,
.
Mary took the child into the closet and selected a choice apple and gave it to him.
, .
To select :
Any knight might select any antagonist for combat by touching his shield.
, () .
to elect , :
to elect Chairman - ()
to elect President -
He rapidly became famous and was elected a member of the Academy of Letters.
.
to pick out , - (), , . to pick out
to select, ,
:
It is strange that you should have been able to pick out the correct answer.
, .
to choose, to select, to elect, to pick
out :
Lexical Test (choose, select, elect, pick out).

(to answer, to reply, to respond)


to answer, to reply, to respond
.
to answer ( - -)
. :
To answer a question -
To answer a letter -
To answer the telephone call -
Shall I answer this question? I don't like it.
? .
to reply ' - -', to
answer : to reply - . ,
, to:
To reply to a question -
To reply to a letter -
To reply to the enemy's fire -

There was something in it that Mary did not know how to reply to.
- , , .
to respond ' - - , '
, to:
To respond to an action -
To respond to an insult -
To respond to a demand -
Jack responded to the insult with a blow.
.
to answer, to reply, to respond
:

Lexical Test (answer, reply, respond).


(big, large, great)
big, large, great ''
. .
big , , , ,
:
A big house -
A big bookcase -
A big plate of meat -
In front of a big bookcase in a big chair, behind a big volume sat Mr. Emerson, looking a full size larger
than any of them, big as they were.
,
, .
big :
A big man - , .. ,
Big things -
Big business - ( )
Leonard really had a big business; he made diamonds.
; .
large , , ,
-:
A large house - ()
A large bookcase - ()
A large basket of flowers -
There was a large lovely lawn with soft green grass in front of the house.
.
large :

large ,
-, :
A large family -
A large number of people -
A large crowd of spectators -
A large crowd gathered to gaze at the unusual show.
, .
great ,
, , -:
Great love -
Great patience -
Great haste -
Anna felt very cold and strange, with great pain in her head.
, , .
great ,
, '', '', '':
A great scientist -
The Great Patriotic War -
Great events -
The Great Patriotic War lasted almost four years.
.
great
, .
great .
', ':
George had been patching up a great pair of water-boots.
.
:
big ', '
:
You have a big heart and strong will.
.
big, large, great
:
Lexical Test (big, large, great).

(little, small, tiny)


little, small, tiny ''
.
little, ,
, -
:
A little house - ()
A little room - ()
A little rose - ()
Paul sitting on his little chair looked and talked like a little old man.
, .
little , :
) , -:
little work -
little food -
little money -
Johnny had no work and little money.
.
) -:
little hope -
of little interest -
little efforts -
Martin's first novel attracted little attention.
.
) -:
a little talk -
a little walk -
a little interview -
Charles is not in; he has gone for a little walk in the garden.
; .
) , -:
a little matter -
little things - ,
little efforts -
I don't want you to worry about little things.
, - .
) -:

a little boy -
a little girl -
little Sarah -
All of a sudden little Sarah started to cry.
.
small , :
) :
a small house -
a small room -
a small window -
Steve took a small bag out of his pocket.
.
) , -:
a small income -
a small company -
a small audience -
By that time quite a small crowd had gathered and everybody wanted to know what the matter was.
, , .
) - :
small talk -
a small farmer -
a small event -
After her husband left the room Miriam tried to make small talk.
, .
) :
a small boy -
a small dog -
Though Ronald was sixteen he was too small for his age.
, .
, little small .
,
' ':
They sat down opposite each other at one of the two small tables in the little room.
.
tiny , , ; :

A tiny cottage -
Tiny paws -
The elves lived in a tiny cottage all by themselves and every day they worked in their tiny garden.
, .
little, small, tiny
:
Lexical Test (little, small, tiny).

(to shut, to close, to lock)


to shut, to close, to lock ''.
, .
to shut :
1) -, -:
To shut a door -
To shut a box -
To shut a drawer -
Tim came up to the window and shut it to keep out the cold.
, .
2) -, , :
To shut a book -
To shut an umbrella -
To shut one's eyes - ()
Children! Will you please shut your exercise books and look at me?
! , , .
3) -, :
They have shut up the art gallery and the museum.
.
to close to shut . to close
, to shut, ,
- . to close to shut :
She closed her face with her hands.
.

- . to close
, to shut - :
I wanted to shut the window, so I asked my fellow passenger if he would mind its being closed.
, , ,

.
to lock ' ', '':
To lock a door -
To lock a gate -
To lock a trunk -
Locking the door on the outside, David turned to a flight of wooden steps.
, .
to shut, to close, to lock
:
Lexical Test (shut, close, lock).

(to get, to gain, to receive, to obtain)


to get, to receive, to obtain, to gain ''
.
to get
. .
We got some money for our work and we got some money for Spot.
,
().
to receive , ,
. to get to receive
:
To receive a letter -
To receive a telegram -
To receive news -
On the third day Tim wrote to Edna, but didn't receive an answer.
, .
to obtain , , -
:
To obtain a prize -
To obtain a position -
To obtain experience -
His knowledge of French had been obtained long ago in one of the private schools.
- .
to gain , ' -':

To gain a reputation -
To gain advantage over smb. - -
To gain one's confidence - -
She decided to be agreeable to her benefactors and to gain their confidence.
.
to get, to gain, to receive, to obtain
:
Lexical Test (get, gain, receive, obtain).

(to finish, to end, to complete)


to finish, to end, to complete '', ''
.
to finish ' -', ' -
'. :
1) :
To finish one's work -
To finish a book -
To finish a letter -
I have finished all the letters except one.
, .
2) :
To finish speaking -
To finish reading -
As soon as he finished reading, he put the book aside and rose from the chair.
, .
to end ' -, ,
':
To end a speech -
To end a conversation -
to end :
1) , with:
They ended the evening with "Auld Lang Syne".
.
2) , by, ,
:

Joss ended by agreeing as might be expected of him.


, , .
to complete ' -
':
To complete one's work -
To complete one's task -
The shell of the house of Robin Hill was thus completed by the end of April.
- , , .
to finish, to end, to complete
:
Lexical Test (finish, end, complete).

(to break, to destroy, to ruin)


to break, to destroy, to ruin '', '', ''
. .
to break ', -
':
To break a window -
To break a wall -
To break a cup -
Two wine glasses stood on the table, but the third one lay broken on the carpet.
, .
While playing football in the yard the boys broke a window.
.
, , .
:
To break the silence -
To break somebody's heart - -
To break the peace -
"I must get rid of it," said the man in the corner of the carriage abruptly breaking the silence.
" ", , , .
Promises are given to be broken. (proverb)
, . (.)
to destroy ', ' '', '
':
To destroy a town -
To destroy a bird's nest -

A lot of houses were destroyed by the hurricane.


.
Be careful with the toy ship; don't destroy it.
, .
to ruin '', '', '':
The mud in the street will ruin your shoes.
.
Three years with little rain ruined the farmer.
.
The senator was ruined by the scandal.
.
to break, to destroy, to ruin
:
Lexical Test (break, destroy, ruin).

(happy, lucky, fortunate)


happy, lucky, fortunate ''.

. ,
.
happy, ,
:
Jack was extremely happy.
.
He used to say that a woman must be happy in her own family circle.
, .
happy, ,
'', '', '':
A happy idea -
A happy outcome -
Happy laughter -
I could hear happy voices of the children, who were playing in the garden.
, .
She was recovering slowly; her illness had a happy outcome.
, .
Your idea is a happy one; I think I can accept it.

; , .
lucky '',
'':
A lucky fellow -
A lucky player -
Some people seem to be always lucky.
, .
You have been lucky in choosing your time.
.
lucky , ,
:
A lucky chance -
A lucky guess -
He made his fortune by lucky investments.
, .
This final shot was not lucky, and his arrow flew by the thin white stick.
, .
fortunate
', ':
Sally was fortunate enough to have inherited a small teashop.
.
fortunate ,
,
:
As my last voyage was not fortunate, I grew weary of the sea and intended to stay at home with my family.
,
.
happy, lucky, fortunate
:
Lexical Test (happy, lucky, fortunate).

(a slip, a mistake, an error)


a slip, a mistake, an error ''.

.
an error, , '',
'', '- - ':

An error of judgment -
A spelling error - ()
This is an error that can be soon corrected.
, .
Your solution of the problem is not free from error.
.
a mistake '' ',
':
A mistake in calculation -
A mistake in the dictation -
To speak to a person in the street, thinking he was somebody else, would be a mistake.
, - , .
It was a mistake to argue with him.
.
a slip ' ', '', '', '
':
A slip of the tongue -
A slip of the pen -
A slip may happen in writing or speech.
.
It was not a gross mistake, just a slip of the tongue.
, .
a slip, a mistake, an error
:
Lexical Test (slip, mistake, error).

(opportunity, possibility, chance)


possibility, opportunity, chance ""
, .
possibility .
'' ' ',
. ,
of, :
There is a possibility of rain, so take your umbrella.
, .
Is there any possibility of getting airline tickets for tomorrow?
?
opportunity

, :
My friend has the opportunity of going to England for two weeks.
.
The professor gave the students an opportunity to ask questions.
.
opportunity :
To have, to find, to get, to give, to take, to seize ( ), to grasp (), to miss
(), to waste ( ), to provide (), to offer ():
Why have you missed the opportunity of going overseas as a volunteer?
?
He seized at the opportunity to express his point of view.
.
, opportunity :
good, excellent (), wonderful (), golden, rare (), welcome
(), unique ():
David had a rare opportunity of visiting a few African countries.
.
Anna was given an excellent opportunity of studying at Harvard.
.
chance opportunity . chance
:
If I had an opportunity / chance of going to Spain for my holiday, I would certainly take it.
, .
, .
opportunity. chance
, :
Susan always jumps at the chance of showing off.
.
Peter had a chance to work as an interpreter at an international conference in summer, which was very good
practice for him.
,
.
:
possibility to have (have the
possibility).
possibility, opportunity, chance
:

Lexical Test (possibility, opportunity, chance).


(cost, price, worth, value)
cost, price, worth, value '', ''.
. .
price ', - ':
They didn't buy the house because the price was too high.
, .
The price of petrol has gone up considerably.
.
cost price:

The cost (price) of the picture was $100.


.
, cost ' ,
-'; cost price.
:
Higher production costs usually lead to higher prices.
.
Cost :
The man saved the child's life at the cost of his own.
.
The cost of human suffering during the Second World War was enormous.
.
value ', -',
' -':
The value of pictures by the Impressionists increased after the First World War.
.
value ,
:
We all know the value of regular exercise.
.
We never know the value of water till the well is dry.
, , . ()
worth to be (to
be worth) ' ':
They paid $15000 for their house in 1970, but now it's worth at least $20000. 15000
1970, , , 25000.
The book is not worth much.
.
cost, price, worth, value
:

Lexical Test (cost, price, worth, value).


(to appear, to seem, to turn out, to prove)
to appear, to seem
'', ''. ''
to turn out, to prove.
:
They seemed to be discussing something important.
, - .
David looks sad. He appears to have heard some bad news.
. , .
The instrument didn't turn out to be any good.
.
Steve proved to be a careless driver.
.
to seem , , to appear
. :

Cora seems / appears to be happy.


, , .
Lionel seemed / appeared surprised by the news.
, , .
, : , , .
, , , to appear, to seem.
I think / I believe:
I think / believe she was born in Moscow.
I think / believe he has written a new book.
to turn out, to prove - '' - ; to prove
, to turn out:
She turned out / proved to be right.
.
The man turned out / proved to be a famous artist.
, .
:
to appear '', .
: to come in, to arrive, to enter:
Soon a small dot appeared in the sky above their heads; it was their long-awaited plane.
; .
to prove ' , ..'
. : to demonstrate, to establish:
The exception proves the rule.
.
The man was delighted to prove his skill.
.
to appear, to seem, to turn out, to prove
:

Lexical Test (appear, seem, turn out, prove).


(to defend, to protect, to guard)
to defend (ed), to protect (ed), to guard (ed) '',
''. .
.
to defend ' ', '':
To defend one's country -
To defend a person -
To defend oneself -
Defend me from my friends I can defend myself from my enemies.
, .
to protect '', ' ',
' - , , ':
To protect one's children -
To protect one's interests -
To protect somebody's reputation - -
to defend to protect :
The trade union official promised to defend / protect the workers' interests.
.

to defend to protect . to defend


, ,
to protect , -
:
The duty of a soldier is to defend his country, but the duty of the government is to protect its people.
, .
to protect :
) :
Electric wires are protected by a rubber covering.
.
) , , :
This insurance company protects your property against loss or damage.
.
to defend to protect to guard '
', ' ', ' ':
Jennet, poor soul, passionately guarded her only love and treasure.
, , , .
It gave him pleasure to watch all her movements and guard her every step.
.
to defend, to protect, to guard
:

Lexical Test (defend, protect, guard).


to do, to make
to do - ""
:
I do a lot of work about the house.
He did nothing to help me.
Do you do morning exercises?
To make - "" - :
I made this box myself.
Will you, please, make some coffee?
to do to make
- .
Do (did, done):
to do homework -
When do you usually do your homework?
to do work about the house -
There is always a lot of work to do about the house.
to do one's bed -

Why don't you ever do your bed?


to do an exercise -
Which exercise did you do yesterday?
to do morning exercises -
Have you done morning exercises yet?
to do translation -
I can't do this translation; the text is too difficult.
to do somebody a favour
Could you do me a favour and meet my sister at the station?
to do one's best -
I'll do my best to help you, I promise.
to do harm - ,
This medicine won't do you any harm, I am sure.
Make (made, made):
to make a mistake -
The students often make mistakes in dictations.
to make a present -
I'd like to make my mother a present.
to make a speech -
He made a good speech at the meeting.
to make coffee -
Shall I make some coffee for you?
to make a noise -
Don't make much noise; the child is sleeping.
to make tea -
My Granny made tea and we sat down to table.
to make oneself at home -
Come in and make yourself at home.
to make a fuss - /
Don't make a fuss about it!
to make a mess -
He always makes such a mess in his room.
to do, to make

:
Lexical Test (do, make).

to learn, to study, to teach


to learn :
1) - :
My son learns English at school.
2) - :
Hillary has never learnt to skate to this day.
:
: " ; " -
:
He goes to school. (He is a schoolboy.) He is a student of the University.
to study :
1) - , ; -
:
Sam wants to study medicine.
2) - :
I knew a young fellow who studied to play the flute.
:
: " ; " -
:
He is doing well at school (at the university). (He is a good pupil (student).)
to teach - -, ; :
My cousin Lidia teaches History at school.
, to learn, to study, to teach.
- Your son is a college student, isn't he?
- That's right. He studies computers. He is going to be a computer programmer.
- What does your daughter do for a living?
- She teaches French at the University. And in her spare time she learns to play the piano.
- Oh, I see.
to learn, to study, to teach
:
Lexical Test (learn, study, teach).

(an owner, a master, a host)


"" .

An owner - , -. : () , , ..
Who is the owner of the bicycle? May I borrow it for a while?
A master (mistress):
1. () :
Every dog loves its master.
2. , :
To be one's own master - .
To be the master of one's own destiny - .
To be the master of the situation - .
A host (hostess) - () , .
The host asked us if we would like to have tea in the garden.
The mother told the children to thank the hostess.

(to catch, to snatch, to seize, to grab)

to catch (caught, caught), to snatch (ed), to seize (ed), to grab (ed)


", ".
.
.
to catch - ", "
", ":
To catch a ball -
To catch fish -
The child caught his mother by the edge of her skirt and didn't let it go.
.
A drowning man catches at a straw.
.
Tim threw the ball to Alice and she caught it.
, .
To catch " , ":
To catch an idea -
To catch the drift of an argument -

I am sorry I didn't quite catch what you said.


, , .
Sam is so voluble that it's difficult to catch the meaning of his speech.
, .
To catch :
To catch a glimpse -
To catch an opportunity -
To catch sight of - ,
To catch cold -
To catch a train -
Margaret caught sight of a tiny kitten sitting under the table.
, .
You won't catch your train unless you hurry.
( ) , .
It's a good thing you've come just now; in ten minutes you wouldn't have caught me.
, , .
to snatch - "", ""
; :
To snatch a coin -
To snatch a worm from the hook -
To snatch from the jaws of death -
The thief snatched the purse and ran.
.
"Don't snatch your food, eat slowly," said the mother.
" , ", .
I was able to snatch a few hours of sleep.
.
to seize - ", "
; :
To seize smb. by the arm - -
To seize a criminal -

To seize the reins of power -


The drowning man seized the edge of the boat and held on to it until help arrived.
.
Terror seized the people when they saw a child on the edge of a deep pool.
, .
to grab " - \ - , ":
I grabbed the intruder by the collar.
.
He grabbed me by the arm and twisted it.
.
to catch, to snatch,
to seize, to grab :
Lexical Test (catch, snatch, seize, grab).
(to abandon, to leave, to give up, to quit, to
resign)

to abandon (ed), to leave (left, left), to give up (gave up, given up), to
quit (quit, quit), to resign (ed) ", ".
to quit ,
ed ,
ed. ,

.
to abandon - ", "
" -, -".
, -.
,
.
:
To abandon a career -
To abandon one's house -
To abandon one's wife and children -

The crew abandoned the sinking ship.


.
After all she couldn't abandon her husband to aid her friend.
, , .
to leave - ", "
. to
leave ", ".
, for:
To leave one's job for another -
To leave a political party -
To leave for London -
Robert decided to leave his job at a grocery store.
.
It is worthwhile to leave home for a year, just to enjoy being independent for some
time.
,
- .
to give up to quit, , - ",
", "", " - \ -".
:
To give up / to quit one's job -
To give up / to quit smoking -
My father had been smoking for twenty years and at last he gave it up. (He quit
smoking.)
20 , , .
He tried to swim across the English Channel but gave up \ quit half way.
-, .
to resign - ", "
" ", "", " ".
:
to resign a property -
to resign a claim -
to resign membership -

to resign from Parliament -


Jones Clark resigned as principal of the school last year.
.
Jeffrey Archer resigned from Parliament because he had debts as a result of the
collapse of a Canadian company in which he had invested.
,
- , .
to abandon, to
leave, to give up, to quit, to resign :
Lexical Test (abandon, leave, give up, quit, resign).
(famous, well-known, celebrated,
distinguished, eminent)

famous, well-known, celebrated, distinguished, eminent


"", "".

.
famous - "", ""
" ", " ".
,
. Famous for,
, , :
A famous inventor -
The place famous for its beauty -
It is the most famous pearl in the world.
.
well-known " ", "
" famous ,
:
A well-known composer -
A well-known book -
Agatha Christie is a well-known detective story writer.
.

Ted Norton was well-known for his notorious senseless statements.


,
.
celebrated - ""
""
:
A celebrated writer -
A celebrated musician -
The most celebrated musicians charmed his guests with wonders of their art.

.
distinguished - ""
, ,
:
Among the guests there were some distinguished persons.
.
When Old Osborn first heard how distinguished an officer Major Dobbin was, he exhibited a great deal of scornful incredulity.
,
, .
eminent - "", "", ""
,
:
An eminent statesman -
An eminent physician -
They were expecting the arrival of an eminent scientist.
.
Mother Theresa was an eminent woman, distinguished for her virtues.
, .
famous, wellknown, celebrated, distinguished, eminent

:
Lexical Test (famous, well-known, celebrated, distinguished, eminent).

(effective, efficient, skilled,


experienced)
effective, efficient, skilled, experienced
"", "".
.
.
effective "", "";
" ", "":
Aspirin is an effective remedy for a cold.
.
Special lightening was very effective.
.
:
affective, " ",
"":
Mary pretended that his words were not affective, but deep in her heart she was hurt.
efficient - "" ,
.
", ",
", ",
:
Paul is an efficient computer programmer.
- .
The assembly line is an efficient way of producing cars.
- .
skilled ",
" " ".
.
skillful skilled,

"":
They needed a skilled electrician to do the job.
.
The painting was intricate, the job of a skilled hand.
, .
He is not very skillful with his chopsticks.
.
experienced " ",
:
They found him out immediately; he was not very experienced in telling lies.
; .
I must admit I am not very experienced in that kind of work.
, .
effective, efficient,
skilled, experienced :
Lexical Test (effective, efficient, skilled, experienced).

(afraid, frightened, scared, fearful)


afraid, frightened, scared, fearful
", ".
.
afraid - ""
. afraid of
that
.
:
It would be unworthy of a military man to say that he was afraid of defeat.
, .
The buses are often overcrowded, and I am always afraid of treading on somebody's
toes.

, - .
That day she was afraid to be left alone.
.
I am afraid ,
- :
I am afraid the result is not what you expected.
, , .
frightened - ", "
afraid
:
If Nora was frightened when she arrived, she was now in a panic of fear.
, , .
He that has nothing is frightened at nothing. (a proverb)
, , .
scared " ", " ,
":
The little boy was scared of dogs.
.
I am scared to fly in a plane.
.
fearful "
", "":
Little Philip had broken his mother's favorite vase and was fearful of her anger.
.
I have always been fearful of the dark.
.
afraid, frightened,

scared, fearful :
Lexical Test (afraid, frightened, scared, fearful).

(to appreciate, to estimate, to value)

to appreciate (ed), to estimate (ed), to value (ed)


", ".
.
.
to appreciate " -\-",
" ":
I greatly appreciate your kindness.
.
I appreciate my friends very much.
.
to estimate " - ,
, ", " -":
To estimate the size of the room -
To estimate the weight of a stone -
To estimate smb.'s intellect - -
It is difficult to estimate what will be gained by this experiment.
(), .
I asked the building firm to estimate the repairs to the roof.
.
to value " ",
", -":
The house was valued at $100 000.
.
He values honor above riches.
.

to appreciate, to
estimate, to value :
Lexical Test (appreciate, estimate, value).

(idea, conception, notion, thought)


idea, conception, notion, thought
", , ".
.
.
idea :
1) ,
2) , :
I haven't the slightest idea what you mean.
, .
Her book gives a good idea of life in the American Colonies.
.
conception - ", , "
, ,
- :
A baby has little conception of time.
.
Compare Byron's conception of literature and poetry with the conception of O.Wild.
.
notion , ,
. Notion
, , :
A time came when she knew him better, and changed her notions regarding him.
,
.
He has no more notion of navigation than an African of snow.

, .
thought , , ,
. idea
thought , ,
:
He discovered one morning that an idea had come to him for making a series of watercolor drawings of London.
,
.
Good thoughts, even if they are forgotten, do not perish.
, , .
idea,
conception, notion, thought :
Lexical Test (idea, conception, notion, thought).

(director, manager, chief, boss,


head)
director, manager, chief, boss, head
", , ".

.
director : ,
, .
,
:
Mr. Potboiler is company director.
.
Norman Brown is the managing director of a large company.
.
director "", " ":
In the theatre director is a person who stages a play, deciding how to interpret the

text, instructing the actors, and so on.


- , , ,
, ..
The director of the church choir is called a chanter.
.
manager "" ,
, ,
, , :
, ..:
Haig has been hotel manager for many years.
.
John works for a big construction firm; he is production manager.
; .
chief - ", , "
, :
Chief accountant -
Chief constable - ()
Chief engineer -
If you want to take this magazine home, you must get the permission from the chief
librarian.
,
.
chief
.
:
HUNGARIAN AIRLINE CHIEF SACKED

boss - ""
, ,
:

My boss said I could leave early today.


, .
. principal headmaster, - director of
education:
In American schools students might be asked to go to the principal's office if they
misbehave.
,
.
The head of some local educational authorities is called director of education.
.
head - " ,
headmaster headmistress :
I've got to go and see the head now.
.

, of:
Head waiter -
Head porter -
Head of the English Department - ()
I'd like to talk to the head waiter.
.
Lorain Marshal was appointed head of the English Chair.
. .
:
head "",
.
director,
manager, chief, boss, head :
Lexical Test (director, manager, chief, boss, head).

(huge, vast, enormous, immense)


huge, vast, enormous, immense
", ".
.
.
huge - ", "
, , , :
A huge mountain -
A huge wave -
A huge box -
The redwood tree has a huge trunk.
.
She got a huge bouquet of flowers along with other presents.
.
huge :
Huge influence -
Huge satisfaction -
Albert was sure that huge success awaits his son.
, .
vast - "" "",
"" "":
Vast plains -
A vast continent -
There is a big bridge across the river and vast fields on the other bank.
,
:
vast knowledge -
vast surprise -
To the vast surprise of the boys they were allowed to stay up till midnight.
.

enormous - "" ,
, , , .
:
An enormous building -
An enormous sum of money -
Enormous difference -
Enormous loss -
The cost of the villa was enormous.
.
The town has undergone enormous changes.
.
The man had an enormous appetite.
.
immense - ""
"", "":
An immense palace -
An immense desert -
There are immense deserts in Africa.
.
His immense adoration knew no bounds and it sometimes looked like a farce.
, .
huge, vast,
enormous, immense :
Lexical Test (huge, vast, enormous, immense).

(busy, engaged, occupied)


busy, engaged, occupied
"".
. .
busy - "" :
1) , 2) :

A busy day -
A busy line -
A busy part of the town -
Some people are too busy and never do anything.
, .
In the days that followed she was busy arranging a party.
.
I called again, but the line was still busy.
, .
engaged - ""
" -":
He was engaged at that time upon his first work of fiction.
.
Amlia was engaged in a lively conversation with a tall gentleman.
.
occupied -"" , ,
:
Pauline was occupied in knitting a long green scarf.
.
I am sorry, but this seat is occupied.
, .
:
- engaged " "
.
- busy, engaged, occupied
:
9 6 .
I am usually busy from 9 a.m. till 6 p.m.
I am usually engaged from 9a.m. till 6 p.m.
I am usually occupied from 9a.m. till 6 p.m.

busy,
engaged, occupied :
Lexical Test (busy, engaged, occupied).

(quick, fast, rapid, swift)


quick, fast, rapid, swift ",
"
. .
quick -,
, :
A quick answer - ,
A quick mind - ,
Quick come, quick go.
, .
Jim had a quick brain and good education.
, .
fast - ,
:
A fast train -
A fast yacht -
Wanda is a fast reader.
.
The fast train was exchanged for a local one.
.
rapid, , ,
:
A rapid stream -
Rapid events -

With rapid step he went beneath the shade of trees.


.
I heard my name mentioned among those rapid words.
, .
swift ,
:
A swift arrow - ,
A swift glance -
A short time later, as the swift twilight began to sink into the tropical night, I saw
Smith sitting on the sandy beach.
,
, , .
His swift progress was a source of surprise and interest.
.
quick, fast,
rapid, swift :
Lexical Test (quick, fast, rapid, swift).

(to understand, to realize, to grasp)


to understand (understood, understood), to realize (ed), to grasp (ed)
""
.
.
to understand '',
' -':
To understand a question -
To understand a signal -
It is better to understand little than to misunderstand a lot.
, .
He suddenly understood that she had hated him for years.

, .
' ', ' '.
:
'I hear' - , 'I've been told' - :
I've been told that the job has been given to someone else.
, - .
I hear that you are leaving our department.
, .
to realize -,
- .
: 'He realized his mistake' ,
, , .
: 'He didn't understand his mistake' , '
, , '.
I soon realized that I was wasting my time.
, .
Suddenly he realized that he was alone in the building.
, .
to understand to realize
:
I realize (understand) how you feel.
, .
They don't seem to understand (realize) the importance of hard work.
, , .
to grasp ", ".
to understand to grasp "
":
To grasp a subject - -
To grasp an idea -

I can't quite grasp your meaning, I am sorry.


, , .
to understand, to
realize, to grasp :
Lexical Test (understand, realize, grasp).

(to shout, to cry, to scream, to


shriek)

to shout (ed), to cry (ed), to scream (ed) , to shriek (ed)


""
. .
to shout :
1) ' , ':
William shouted as loud as he could.
.
2) ' - '. to shout
, to:
The mother shouted to the boy to come home immediately.
, .
3) , . to shout
, at:
If the children made a great noise, she shouted at them.
, .
to cry ' , ,
, , , ', .. , - :
"Send a lady's maid to me," Mrs. Crawley cried in great anger.
, - .
to cry ,
:
The sea-birds usually cry louder than usual when a storm is brewing.
.
to scream ' ', ' ,
, '. to cry ,
:

Jenny ran to the door, shook the lock and screamed.


, .
This parrot screams but does not talk.
, .
to shriek , ,
, , :
Seeing a dead body, she shrieked, turned, and ran out of the room.
, .
:
to cry '' :
The child started to cry for his mother.
.
to shout, to cry, to scream, to
shriek :
Lexical Test (shout, cry, scream, shriek).
(quiet, calm, still, peaceful)

quiet, calm, still, peaceful ",


".
. .
quiet , :
1) - , , :
A quiet man -
A quiet disposition -
He was a quiet boy and had no adventurous, troublesome ways.

.
2) - :
A quiet evening -
A quiet sea -
We lit our pipes and sat, looking out on the quiet night, and talked.
, .
3) - :
A quiet day -
A quiet life -
I have always lived a quiet life.
.

calm ,
, , :
A calm answer -
Calm weather - ,
The sea was fairly calm and I could see all about me.
, .
still ,
:
A still pool - ,
As still as the grave -
The air was still, as if a whirlwind had just passed.
, .
still
: to sit, to stand, to lie:
Stand still while I take your photograph.
, .
still .
peaceful , :
A peaceful temper -
A peaceful life -
His face looked as peaceful as if it were sainted.
.
quiet, calm, still,
peaceful :
Lexical Test (quiet, calm, still, peaceful).
(to hold, to keep, to retain, to
preserve)

to hold (held, held), to keep (kept, kept), to retain (ed), to preserve (ed)
", ". ,
, , ..
. :
- to keep a secret
- to preserve vegetables
- to retain patience
to hold to keep ,
2 .
1.
) To hold - - :

Please hold yourself still for a few minutes while I make a sketch of you.
, ( ) ,
.
Nora always held her head erect.
.
) To keep - - :
If your hands are cold, keep them in your pockets.
, .
She likes to keep all things in their proper order.
.
2.
) To hold - - (, , ..):
That part of Poland which was held by the Russian Empire up to 1915, was completely occupied
by the Germans during the first world war.
, 1915 ,
.
) To keep - -:
Mr. Boland keeps a lot of animals on his farm.
.
to hold to keep .
to preserve ", ":
The seas preserve a considerable portion of the heat they receive in summer.
, .
The gentleman was tall, well preserved and of upright carriage.
, .
to retain ", ":
This oven retains heat well.
.
Julia retained the traces of her aristocratic origin.
.
to hold, to keep, to retain, to
preserve :
Lexical Test (hold, keep, retain, preserve).

(to cry, to weep, to sob)

to cry (cried), to weep (wept, wept), to sob (sobbed)


", ".
.
to cry
; to cry ,
, to weep. to cry
, for with:
To cry for someone - -
To cry with pain -
The girl was crying because she had lost her money.
, .
The boy was crying with hunger.
.
The little child was crying for his mother.
.
to weep , , :
She bowed her head and wept long and bitterly.
.
to weep ,
for with:
To weep with rage -
To weep for joy -
He felt awful, but was ashamed to weep with pain like a small boy.
, , .
When she got the news of his safe return, she wept for joy.
, .
to sob "", " ":
She was not able to say anything, she only sobbed convulsively, hiding her face in both hands.
- ; , .
to cry, to weep, to sob
:
Lexical Test (cry, weep, sob).
(strange, queer, odd, quaint)
strange, queer, odd, quaint
", "

. .
strange : "
, ", ", ":
A strange idea -
A strange feeling -
Steve was a strange, shy man, whom I could never understand.
, .
Her voice sounded hoarse and strange.
.
queer , ,
,
- "", "":
A queer thing -
A queer character - ,
There are a great many queer things to be seen in the great world.
.
Adam had a queer way of talking.
.
odd ,
; "":
Sandy was still haunted by the odd feeling of remorse and shame.
.
Her eyes were large, odd and attractive.
, .
quaint ", ,
":
A quaint old village - ,
A quaint costume -
John's ideas were quaint and fantastic.
.

The quaint back streets of Kingston looked quite picturesque.


.
:
strange "", "".
:
Everything seems strange in a strange country.
.
strange,
queer, odd, quaint :
Lexical Test (strange, queer, odd, quaint).

(note, notice, take notice, pay


attention)
to note (ed), to notice (ed), to take (took, taken) notice, to pay (paid,
paid) attention ", ".

.
to notice ", ":
Sue was wearing a new hat, but Tim didn't even notice.
, .
Gina noticed that Mark left the party early.
, .
to take notice - ,
, :
The woman could see that the boy wanted to speak to her, but she took no notice of
him.
, ,
.
Don't take any notice of Maggie's sarcastic remarks about your work.
.

to pay attention " ",


"":
I wish you'd pay more attention to your work.
, .
Mike can't remember the rule because he wasn't paying attention when it was being
explained.
, , .
to pay attention .
,
:
The author pays great attention to historical detail.
.
to note to notice
" - ":
Note the use of the definite article in this sentence.
.
Please note that this bill must be paid within ten days.
, , 10
.
to note to notice.
to note, to notice, to
take notice, to pay attention :
Lexical Test (note, notice, take notice, pay attention).

(wage, salary, stipend, fee,


royalties)
wage, salary, stipend, fee, royalty
, - .
.
.

- wages salaries. Wage


salary , .
, wage , , ..
. wage
, , :
Alec's wages are $200 a week.
200 .
Matilda is a shop assistant; she earns good wages.
- , .
Salary () ,
.
.
, . , ,
(salary) ,
, (wages)
:
Mrs. Marshall is a teacher; her salary is not very high.
- , .
stipend, '',
. stipend ,
, ..
, ,
:
George is a magistrate and he gets his stipend for the work.
- , .
Fee - (, , ) .
Fee ,
:
Jane couldn't afford to pay the solicitor's fee.
.
In England public school fees are now so high that only a small minority of parents can

afford to send their children there.


,
.
Royalty (royalties)
'',
.
. Royalty '
' :
The publisher offered him a royalty of 10% of the price of the book on all copies sold.
10% .
Martin received $2500 in royalties for his invention.
2500 .
wage,
salary, stipend, fee, royalties :
Lexical Test (wage, salary, stipend, fee, royalties).

(work, job, position, post)


work, job, post, position ''
.
.
work ,
:
Interesting work -
Difficult work -
I find my work rather boring.
.
The principle of equal pay for equal work has now been accepted.
.
work ,
.
paper:

I met Linda on my way to work.


.
Pat's work has considerably improved this term.
.
Has the teacher marked the exam papers yet?
?
work
, .
- ,
:
A work of art -
A work of genius - ( )
Some people say that this picture is a work of genius.
, .
This is one of his latest works.
.
job , ,
:
She's got a lot of jobs to do in the house.
.
I'd like you to do a little job for me.
, .
job work . ,
, job:
Celesta is looking for a job of a medical nurse.
.
Martha is constantly changing jobs.
.
job ,

:
Marion applied for a teaching job.
.
The government promised to create more jobs.
.
post
, - ,
: , , ..:
Recently the post of chief engineer has become vacant.
.
I knew that my chances of getting an academic post were nil.
,
.
position post ,
:
Paul applied for a position of hotel manager.
.
I have been offered a position with a shipping company.
.
work, job,
position, post :
Lexical Test (work, job, position, post).

(fairly, rather, quite)

fairly, rather, quite '', ' '.


,
.
fairly
- , rather

, , . , fairly
, rather .
'', . : ' ' ' '.
This room is fairly big. I think it'll do.
. .
This room is rather big. Is there a smaller one free?
. ?
fairly rather
, , , ..
. ,
, ,
:
The water is fairly hot, so you can have a bath.
. .
The water is rather hot. Wait a minute or you'll scald yourself.
. , .
, rather - ,
. interesting (), pleasant
(), pretty () .. rather '', ' -
' '':
Daniela had a rather pleasant voice.
.
I thought the girl was rather pretty.
, .
fairly ,
:
Fairly interesting -
Fairly well -

I've got a fairly good memory for faces, but I am rather poor at names.
, .
rather , :
) :
It's rather a pity Steve couldn't come to the party.
, .
) :
I rather enjoyed the concert.
, -, .
) :
Noel seemed rather surprised when I mentioned it.
, , .
quite '', ' ',
'', '', ''.
, : right (), lonely (), empty
(), exhausted (), hopeless (), impossible (),
mad (), ridiculous (), true (), sure (), etc.:
You are quite right.
.
Sam was quite exhausted after the work in the garden.
.
quite , : to
forget, to recover, to finish, etc.:
I've quite forgotten to call my friend.
.
She hasn't quite finished reading the book.
.

The wounded have quite recovered.


.
fairly, rather, quite
:
Lexical Test (fairly, rather, quite).

(advantage, benefit,
profit, gain)
advantage, benefit, profit, gain
"", "", ""
.
advantage ""
"", " ":
This painting is seen to better advantage from a distance.
( ) .
He had the advantage over the other boys of being born into a rich family.
,
.
benefit - "", "" -
(-):
A vacation will be a benefit for the whole family.
.
Lisa had the benefit of a good education.
.
profit - "", ""
"", .. -
:
There is no profit arguing about this.

() .
I am sure you'll gain a lot of profit from your studies.
, .
gain ", ",
:
No pains, no gains. (a proverb)
. (.)
Big money didn't make him happy; it was ill-gotten gain.
; ,
.
advantage, benefit,
profit, gain :
Lexical Test (advantage, benefit, profit, gain).

(to wait, to expect, to


anticipate)
to wait (ed), to expect (ed), to anticipate (ed)
"", ""
. .
to wait " -
". for,
:
We waited to see what would happen.
, , .
We are going to have dinner soon. Everybody is waiting for you.
. .
to expect "", ",
- ". to expect
:

Heavy showers with thunder storms are expected later in the afternoon.
.
Hillary was not yet home; she had been expected on Wednesday, but wired that it
would be Friday.
, , ,
.
:
We expect the taxi in five minutes, let's go out and wait for it outside.
5 , .
to anticipate - ""
"":
We anticipated cold winter that's why we had bought an extra supply of coal.
, .
I didn't anticipate that she would be so hostile.
, .
to wait, to expect, to
anticipate :
Lexical Test (wait, expect, anticipate).

(greedy, mean, stingy)


greedy, mean, stingy ",
".
. .
greedy "",
"", "", :
Don't be greedy, Helen! Leave some sweets for the others.
, ! .
Ben is greedy. When he goes somewhere with other people, he always tries to avoid
paying.
- . - ,
, .

Greedy ,
, :
Gregory is greedy for power and money.
.
Melanie was frivolous, greedy for any kind of entertainment.
, .
mean - "", "" ,
, - :
I can't stomach Lewis; he is mean. He never contributes anything when we have a
party.
; . ,
.
stingy - "", "", -
- :
Don't be stingy, Mike! Give me some more discs; you have plenty of them.
, ! ; .
:
mean, "", "",
:
It is mean of you to have let me down.
.
greedy, mean, stingy
:
Lexical Test (greedy, mean, stingy).

(show, demonstrate,
display, exhibit, reveal)
to show (showed, shown), to demonstrate (ed), to display (ed), to
exhibit (ed), to reveal (ed)

", ".
. .
to show - "" -
.
:
To show a new camera -
To show one's love -
Will you show me the shortest way to the station, please?
, , .
Paul never shows what he thinks.
, .
to demonstrate - "", "" -
:
)
:
The boy demonstrated his love for the puppy by taking good care of it.
\ ,
.
) - :
The salesperson demonstrated to me how to use the video camera.
,
) :
The workers marched through the streets with flags and posters demonstrating their
solidarity.
,
.
At the meeting the people demonstrated their approval by loud cries.
.
to display - "" - "

", "p ":


To display one's intelligence - \
To display one's generosity - \
Ben displayed his stamp collection to the whole class to see.
.
The soldiers displayed no fear under the enemy's fire.
.
to exhibit - ", , "
" ":
George wondered why I didn't want to exhibit my paintings.
, .
The aim of an art gallery is to exhibit its paintings for the people at large.
.
to reveal - "", " ,
":
Robert took off his shirt and revealed awful scars on his back and shoulders.
.
The girl made me swear never to reveal their hiding place.
, .
to show, to demonstrate, to
display, to exhibit, to reveal :
Lexical Test (show, demonstrate, display, exhibit, reveal).

(bill, fare, fee, fine, tip)


bill, fare, fee, fine, tip "
-",
. ,
.
Bill "", "", "",
"":

an electricity / gas / phone bill


/ /
She spends all her time chatting with friends and I must pay her telephone bills.
, ,
.
Fare - , , :
In some cities taxi fare to the airport can cost more than the actual flight to a foreign
land.
,
.
Fee - "", "", "", - :
This lawyer charges insane fees but he is worth it.
, .
Fine - "", , -
:
Better don't leave your car on sidewalk, fines for illegal parking are really heavy here.
,
.
Tip - "", ,
:
This bill includes 10% tip to the waiter.
10- .

"", , tip
"", "":
tip of the iceberg, 10 tips for losing weight
, 10

:
Bill, fare, fee, fine, tip.

(to change, to alter, to


vary, to adjust)
to change, to alter, to vary, to adjust
", ". ,
.
Change - "" "":
Did you change your hairdo?
?
, Change :
- "":
If you want me to paint the room, I'll have to change into my working clothes.
, ,
.
- " ()", " ":
Can you change a $5 note?
?
I must change the car tyres.
.
- " ":
You will have to change the bus at the City Park.
.
Alter " - ", ,
, . .:
Those threats really scared me: I took a new name, moved to another city, even
altered handwriting.

: ,
.
Alter "":
I like this dress but it's too long, could you alter it?
, , ?
"Alter a firm" " ":
Our company was altered in an attempt to avoid bankruptcy.
, .
Alter Change , Alter, ,
, , :
I think you need to alter the background on your painting, perhaps to make it lighter.
, , , .
I think you need to change the background on your painting, what about an old
castle?
, , ?
Vary "",
, "", "":
The orchestra varied last night's program with a new selection.

.
Life expectancy varies a lot in different countries.
.
Adjust " - ,
", "()":
I lost my job last month so I had to adjust my expenses.
.
I need to adjust my piano before the performance.
.

to change, to alter, to vary, to


adjust :
Lexical Test (change, alter, vary, adjust).

: funny, witty,
amusing, merry
, .
funny "", "". ,
, funny, :
Just listen what a funny thing happened to me today.
, .
"",
"":
There is something funny going on in this warehouse.
- .
When I see spiders I feel a bit funny.
, - .
Amusing - funny,
, " ":
Engine power of 20 hp today seems amusing, but in 1908 it was an impressive figure.
20 .. , 1908
.
amusing "", "".
Witty - "", "".
.
Bernard Shaw left behind many witty quotes like "I'm an atheist and I thank God for
it."

, , "
, !"
witty reply, witty remark
,
Merry "", "", "".
- -,
:
Suddenly I heard someone whistling a merry tune.
, - .
to make merry over / with / about somebody / something
-. / -.
funny,
witty, amusing, merry :
Funny, witty, amusing, merry.

: lonely, alone,
single, lonesome, solitary
, : lonely, alone,
single, lonesome, solitary. , ,
.
To be alone - " ", , :
I'm 26 and I still live with parents, of course I would prefer to live alone.
26 , , ,
.
alone , "":
We have sold 100,000 CDs in Great Britain alone.
100 000 .

Lonely lonesome, ,
"":
Old people are afraid of a lonely life.
.
lonesome
, ,
.
Solitary "", , ,
.
As a rule, tigers are solitary animals.
, - .
"", "":
a solitary passer-by, a solitary building, solitary confinement
, ,
Single "" "", .
. - "".
We cannot fire her, she is a single mother.
, - -.
, "", "",
" ":
I did not see a single tree in this city.
.
single policy, every single dollar, not a single word
, ,

:
Lonely, alone, single, lonesome, solitary.

: bank, shore,
coast, beach, seaside

, : bank, shore, coast, beach, seaside.
, , ,
.
Bank - , , ..
.
It's not a perfect place for a camp, we will have to climb up and down the bank to get
some water.
,
, .
Coast , ,
.
The Black Sea Coast has a developed tourism industry.
.
Shore, coast, -
.
There is a colony of penguins on the shore not far from here.
.
Beach - , ,
, . ,
beach "".
I know a small quiet beach just 5 minutes of walk from here.
.
Seaside coast,
, ,
, .
Our city can offer all traditional seaside entertainments for all the family, including boat

rides, surfing and beach volleyball.



, , .
, , - strand.
,
.

:
Bank, shore, coast, beach, seaside.

http://www.native-english.ru

: hide / conceal / screen / secrete


/ cache / bury
3
, - , ,
,
, .
, .

: hide / conceal / screen / secrete / cache / bury


, ,
, ,
. hide.
.
Clouds hid the sun. .
I hid the money in a vase. .
She ran off and hid behind the tree. .
He hid the gift under the table. .
, hide
:
Why are you hiding? ?
conceal hide
, :

The listening device was concealed in a pen.


.
She concealed a document in the bureau. .
We concealed ourselves behind the gate wishing to avoid meeting her.
, .
screen :
, ,
.
She screened herself behind his back so that her mother should not see her.
, .
She raised her hand to screen her eyes from the bright light. ,
.
secrete ,
. , -
- , ; -
.
She secreted her ring. .
They secreted drugs in their clothing. .
, cache,
. secrete,
- ,
. , cache ,
- .
, , .
She decided to elope with her beloved man so she cached enough money in her hiding-place.
,
.
bury , -
, -.
Two climbers were buried in the snow. .
The thieves buried the jewels in the garden. .
,
, , (in / behind / under),
, . , (hide, conceal, screen)
(from), ,
- : to hide a book from smb, to conceal a document from
smbs view.

: hide / conceal / screen


- ,
, ,
, - , ,
-. , , , ,
.

, hide. ,
, -,
; , ,
, -
.
I have nothing to hide. .
There was a hidden meaning in his speech. .
He always hid his feeling as he thought nobody would understand him.
, , .
conceal ,
, - -,
, :
He concealed his origin. .
She could barely conceal her irritation. .
She decided to conceal the unhappy truth as long as it possible.
.
screen :
, - ,
- : to screen smbs faults ( - ), to screen a guilty
person ( ).

: remember / recollect / recall


3 2
- , .
,
. -?
? ? ,

, remember, recollect recall,


.

: remember / recollect / recall


, ,
, -
, .
: -
; ,
, -.

, .
remember. -
( -) - (
-).
I cant remember his name. .
I dont remember signing this document. , .
I remember her as a girl. .
Just as the door closed he remembered that his keys were inside the room.
, , .
, ,
. ,
- ( ) .
, , ,
, . remember
.
recollect ,
-. , ,
, .
: , .
I had to make a decision and tried to recollect his exact words.
, .
Each of us sometimes recollects the days of his childhood.
.
I know that this woman is familiar to me. Im trying to recollect when and where we met.
, . , .

recall, recollect ,
, .
- , ,
recollect. Recollect ,
, recall ,
.
I dont recall arranging time to meet. , .
This recalls my childhood to me. .
Can you recall where you lost your bag? , ?

: pain / ache / pang / throe /


twinge / stitch
3
,
. , , . ,
, , ,
. ,
.
: ; (, , ,
..); , ;
( ).

: pain / ache / pang / throe / twinge / stitch



pain. ,
, ,
, - ( ) .
He had severe stomach pains. .
I felt a sharp pain in my foot. ().
She was given some medicine to ease the pain. , .
ache ,
( ),
. headache ( ), toothache
( ) :
There is a dull ache in my shoulder. .
Toothache is the most annoying thing in life.
.

Ive had a headache all morning. .


pang , , .
I feel a sharp pang if I touch my cut. , .
: throe (. ) ,
; twinge , ; stitch (
). , ,
, , .
. -
, . throes pang ,
: throes of childbirth, birth pangs.

twinge ,
, : a twinge of gout . stitch
, , , , ,
: a stitch in the side .
, ,
in smth, : a pain in the
back , an ache in ones limbs ; pangs / throes in the
belly , a twinge / a stitch in ones side . twinge
throe of smth, : the
throes of seasickness . pain
with / in: He cried out in / with pain. .

: pain / ache / pang / throe / twinge

,
. ( stitch),
. , pain
. , ,
. pain
, , :
I cant describe the pain I suffered when she died. ,
, .
I am sorry my news caused you such pain. ,
.
ache ,
- : the ache of loneliness
.
The ache returned to his heart. .

(), pang:
pangs of envy , pangs of conscience , pangs of
remorse .
Jack felt a sharp pang of jealousy. .
pang throe,
. ,
: throes of yearning .
twing, ,
, pang, : twinges of conscience
, a twinge of sorrow .
, -, .
I admit I felt a twinge of guilt as we left. , ,
.
, pain, ache, pang, with: with a
dull pain of despair in his heart (), with an
ache in ones heart , with a pang of disappointment
.

: live / reside / dwell / inhabit


3 2
, ,
: , , , , . , ,
, ,
. ,
, ?
.

: live / reside / dwell / inhabit


, ,
, ,
. : lodge, sojourn, put up,
stay, stop. - ,
. ,
, -,
.

live, ,
.

I still remember the house she lived in. , .


They live in Moscow. .
We have been living in New York since childhood. -.
She dreams of living in Sevastopol at the seaside. .
reside -
. , ,
, .
The Queen of Great Britain resides in Buckingham Palace.
.
reside live, ,
.
This family resides on an estate. .
My sister currently resides in Born. .
dwell , reside.
, ,
.
Decades ago a lot of people used to dwell in the country.
.
What do you think about dwelling abroad?
?
, , inhabit , - -,
- , .
These remote islands are inhabited only by birds.
.
The Earth is the only planet inhabited by people. ,
.
, , .
, ,
.

: honest / upright /
conscientious / scrupulous / honourable
3

.
, , .
-, .
, . ,
. ,
?

: honest / upright / conscientious / scrupulous /


honourable , ,

, .
. .
honest.
, , , , ,

. - ,
.
To be honest, I didnt really enjoy the party. ,
.
She was honest with her husband. .
She is too honest to take your things without permission. ,
.
honest ,
. ,
honest woman, ;
honest worker,
.

, honest ,
. upright
, ,
. , upright ,
, ,
. : ,
, , .
She was an upright woman thats why she couldnt flatter anyone.
.
He behaved as any upright citizen would have under the circumstances. ,
.

conscientious / scrupulous / honourable


, .
,
.
,
, ,
conscientious: a conscientious worker ,
.
He was too kind and conscientious to leave me alone. ,
.
, ,
,
scrupulous, ,
, .
Hes very scrupulous about making sure that all the facts are checked.
, , .
He was scrupulous in the fulfillment of the task.
.
, ,
, honourable.
He tried to be honourable and to do what the honour of his profession dictated.
.
about smth. (smb.), about doing
smth., in (doing) smth., as to smth. honest with smb. :
he was honest with the doctor, he was honourable about her friend.

: honest / upright / conscientious / scrupulous /


honourable
, .
,
. , ,
, , , ,
.
, :
an honest attempt ( ), honourable intentions ( ),
upright conduct ( , ), honest thinking
(, ), upright protest (, ), a conscientious
piece of work ( ), conscientious approach to the work (
), a scrupulous decision ( ), scrupulous
translation ( ), honourable service ( , , ).

: want / wish / desire / crave /


covet
3 4
, . :
, .
. ,
-, -.
, , , . ,
. .
.

: want / wish / desire / crave / covet


, , ,

, :

;
;
() .


want.
, ,
, . complex
object (to want smb. to do smth.) want .
, .
He wants a new car. .
You cant always do what you want. , .
I dont want to talk about it. .
We can go later if you want. , .
I want him to explain why he behaved this way. , ,
.
want , ,
-:
I just wanted to board the train when it started. ,
.
wish want.
: , ,

- , , ,
, .
I wish to speak to the manager. .
She wished to be alone. .
I wished for tomorrow impatiently. .
wish
. .
, .
I wish the day were over. .
wish - :
I wish him luck for his test. .
, want desire.
, -. ,
, .
You can have whatever you desire. , .
Its quite natural that you should desire amusement at your age. ,
.
,
. crave , desire.
, -.
.
He craved for something to drink. .
She craves higher education. .
A child craves for affection. .
, , covet.
- -, () .
, .
She coveted fame. .
All covet, all lose. , .
He coveted wealth. .
,
, : to want / to wish / to desire / to crave / to covet something.
, :

to want / to wish / to desire / to crave to have something. wish crave


: to wish / to crave for something.

: wish / desire ,
-
. ,
.
: desire , want:
I do want her and I want a son! , ,
!
He desired her passionately. .

: leave / abandon / desert /


forsake
3
leave .
, , ; , , ; -; ..
, .
.

: leave / abandon / desert / forsake


-
leave -.
, ,
:
Ill never leave you. .
She left him for a younger man. .
He left his wife with three children. .
abandon . ,
, ,
. , - - ,
( , , ).
He was abandoned by his mother as a baby. , .
He abandoned me! !

. desert
( ) ,
, .
, .
,
.
He deserted his wife and children. .
She had to desert her friend. ( ).
,
.
(,
), - ,
, , -
.
.
He felt he couldnt forsake her when she was so ill. ,
.
He forsook his old friends. .

: leave / abandon / desert / forsake


, ,
,
, - - , .
, , leave. , ,
; ..
Im leaving work early today. .
They left for Paris last night. .
She left school at 16. 16 .
abandon leave?
-.
They were forced to abandon the car. .
The captain is the last to abandon the sinking ship.
.
desert , , -
, . ,
: 1. , ; 2. .

Young people are deserting the countryside to work in towns.


() .
The streets were deserted. .
-
, .
He has forsaken his farm and moved to the city. .
, desert,
. desert .

: leave / abandon / desert / forsake


, ,
, , . ,
- - -; -
(, , , ..).
leave. ,
, (, ,
), .
His fear left him. .
His restraint abandoned him. .
Energy seems to desert me. , .
His gaiety forsook him. .

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