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CALORIMETRY AND CHANGE OF STATE

NARAYANA I NSTI TUTE


SP-12 A, Indra Vihar, Talwandi, Kota Ph : 3200120, 3200121
107
CALORIMETRY AND
CHANGE OF STATE
1. INTRODUCTION
(i) Calorie
It is defined as the amount of heat required to raise the temperature of 1 gm water by 1C
(ii) International calorie
International caloire is the amount of heat required to raise the temperature of 1 gm water from
14.5 C to 15.5 C rise of temperature.
(iii) Ki lo Caloi re
Kilo calorie is defined as the amount of heat taken by 1 kg water from 14.5 C to 15.5 C. 1 K. cal =1000 calorie.
(iv) Bri tish thermal unit (B. T. U.)
It is the amount of heat required to raise the temperature of one pound water by 1F.
1 B.T.U. =252 calorie.
(v) Relation between Heat and work
Whenever work is done an equivalent amount of heat is always produced.
i.e. W H or W =J H where J =Mechanical equivalent of heat
1 Calorie =4.18 joule, 1 Kilo caloire =4.18 10
3
J oule if H =1 cal, then W =J
Hence, mechanical equivalent of heat is the work in producing 1 cal of heat
2. HEAT
Experiments show that when a body is heated, then the heat given to a body depends upon the mass of
the body m, specific heat s, and temperature difference At.
3. SPECIFIC HEAT
This is called Heat inertia of a substance.
Definitaion : The amount of heat needed for an unit increase in the temperature of unit mass of a (substance
solid, liquid or gas) is called its specific heat
Unit : kilocalorie/kg-C or calorie/g-C
1 Kcal/kg-C =1 cal/g-C
If mass of the body is m and specific heat is s then amount of heat needed to increase its temperature
by dT is given by Q =msAT
3.1 Specific heat of solid & Li quid (s) : If a solid or a liquid is heated till the change of the state, there is
no change in their volume hence the work done is zero. Hence there is only one specific heat of solids and
liquids which is constant.
Specific heat of water =1kcal/kg-C =1cal/g-C =4.18 10
3
J /kg-C
Kelvin can also be used instead of C is size of both units is same.
3.2 Specifi c heat of gas (c)
(i) There are many processes possible to give heat to a gas. A speicific heat can be associated to each such
process which depends on the nature of process.
(ii) The number of possible specific heats for a gas is infinite and the value of specific heats can very from zero
(0) to infinity ()
CALORIMETRY AND CHANGE OF STATE
NARAYANA I NSTI TUTE
SP-12 A, Indra Vihar, Talwandi, Kota Ph : 3200120, 3200121
108
(iii) Generally two types of specific heat are mentioned for a gas -
(a) specific heat at constant volume (C
v
)
(b) specific heat at constant pressure (c
p
)
(iv) These specific heats can be molor or gram, depending on the amount of gas considered to define it
4. THERMAL CAPACITY OR HEAT CAPACITY
Amount of heat needed to increase the temperature of a substance (any amount) by 1C is called thermal
capacity of that substance.
Thermal capacity =(mass of body) (specific heat) H
c
=ms
Unit =calorie/C or Kcal/C
Example based on thermal capacity
Ex.1 The ratio of radii of two copper spheres is 2 : 1 and they are kept at same temperature. The ratio of their
heat capacities will be -
(1) 2 : 1 (2) 1 : 1 (3) 8 : 1 (4) 4 : 1
Sol.
1
2
dHc
dHc
=
S r
3
4
S r
3
4
3
2
3
1
t
t
1
8
1
2
r
r
3
3
2
1
= |
.
|

\
|
=
|
|
.
|

\
|
=
Hence correct Ans. (3)
Ex.2 Two spheres of radii in the two ratio 2 : 3 have specific heats in the ratio 3 : 2. What is the ratio of their
thermal capacities ?
Sol. Thermal capacity =m.s =(4tR
3
/3). sd, where d =density of the body
d s ) 3 / R (4
d s ) 3 / R (4

sphere ond sec of capacity Thermal
sphere first of capacity Thermal
2
3
2
1
3
1
t
t
=
=
|
|
.
|

\
|
|
|
.
|

\
|
2
1
3
2
1
s
s
R
R
9 : 4
2
3
.
3
2
sphere ond sec of capacity Thermal
sphere first of capacity Thermal
3
= |
.
|

\
|
|
.
|

\
|
=
5. WATER EQUIVALENT OF A BODY
If m gram of a substance is given Q amount of heat which rises its temperature by AT. Now if on giving same
amount of heat temperature of w gram of water is also increased by AT then w is called water equivalent of
body of mass m.
The value of water equivalent of a body is same as its heat capacity. The difference in only in units. e.g.
If heat capacity of a body is m caloire/C then its water equivalent will be m gram.
Physical meaning : The same amount of heat gas to be given to a body for increasing its temperature by
dT as needed for quantity of water equal to its water equivalent by same temperature range.
6. LATENT HEAT
Latent heat is defined as the amount of heat absorbed or given out by a body during the change of state
while its temperature remaining constant. Latent heat is of two types :
(i) Latent heat of fusion, and (ii) Latent heat of vaporisation
CALORIMETRY AND CHANGE OF STATE
NARAYANA I NSTI TUTE
SP-12 A, Indra Vihar, Talwandi, Kota Ph : 3200120, 3200121
109
6.1 Latent heat of fusion
The latent heat of fusion of a substance is the quantity of heat required to change unit mass of the solid substance
form solid state to liquid state, while temperature remaining constant.
In case of ice, the latent heat of fusion of ice is 80 cals.
6.2 Latent Heat of Vaporisation
The latent heat of vaporisation of a substance is the quantity of heat required to change unit mass of liquid
substance into vapour state while temperature remaining constant.
In case of water, the latent heat of vaporisation is 540 cals.
The heat absorbed or rejected during change of state is : Q = ML
The heat absorbed by the substance during change of state is used in increasing the distance between the
atoms or molecules. During change of state the kinetic energy of the molecules remain constant but the potential
energy increases.
7. LAW OF MIXTURES
When two materials (solid-solid, liquid-liquid, solid-liquid) at different temperatures are mixed then heat given
by hotter system is equal to the heat taken by colder system.
Heat given = Heat taken
Q
1
=Q
2
m
1
S
1
(u
2
u) = m
s
S
2
(u u
1
)
where m
1
, S
1
and u
1
are the mass, specific heat and temperature of one material and m
2
, S
2
and u
2
are
the mass, specific heat and temperature of second material.
Example based on Law of mixtures
Ex.3 1 g of steam at 100C can melt how much ice at 0C? Latent heat of ice = 80 cal/g and latent heat of
steam = 540 cal/g.
Sol. Heat required by ice for melting of m g of ice =mL =m 80 cal
Heat available with steam for being condensed and then brought to 0C
= 1 540 +100 =640 cal
m 80 =640
or m =
80
640
=8 grams
Ex.4 A tap supplies water is 10C and another tap at 100C. How much hot water must be taken so that we get
20 kg of water at 35C?
Sol. Let mass of hot water =m kg
mass of cold water = (20 m) kg
Heat taken by cold water = (20 m) 1 (35 10)
Heat given by hot water =m 1 (100 35)
Law of mixture gives
Heat given by hot water =Heat taken by cold water
m 1 (100 35) =(20 m) (35 10)
65 m =(20 m) 25
65 m =500 25 m or 90 m =500
m =
90
500
=5.56 kg
CALORIMETRY AND CHANGE OF STATE
NARAYANA I NSTI TUTE
SP-12 A, Indra Vihar, Talwandi, Kota Ph : 3200120, 3200121
110
Ex.5 5 g of ice at 0C is dropped in a beaker containing 20 g of water at 40C. What will be the final temperature?
Sol. Let final temperature be =u
Heat taken by ice = m
1
L + m
1
c
1
Au
1
=5 80 +5 1 (u 0)
=400 +5 u
Heat given be water at 40C
=m
2
c
2
Au
2
=20 1 (40 u)
=800 20u
As heat given =Heat taken
20 u =400
u =
25
400
=16C
Ex.6 5 g ice of 0C is mixed with 5 g of steam at 100C. What is the final temperature ?
Sol. Heat required by ice to raise its temperature to 100C,
Q
1
=m
1
L
1
+m
1
c
1
Au
1
=5 80 + 5 1 100
=400 + 500 = 900 cal
Heat given by steam when condensed,
Q
2
=m
2
L
2
=5 536 =2580 cal.
As Q
2
>Q
1
. This means that whole steam is not even condensed.
Hence temperature of mixture will remain at 100C.
Ex.7 Determine the resulting temperature when 1 kg of ice at 0C is mixed with 9 kg of water at 50C.
Sol. Heat given by water to coll upto 0C is equal to = 9000 1 (50 0) =450000 cal. =450 kcal
heat taken by ice to melt =1000 80 =80000 cal. = 80 kcal
Since the hot water can give heat, therefore the temperature of mixture
cannot be zero degree. Therefore, if the temperature of mixture is u, then
9000 1 [50 u] = 1000 80 +1000 1 (u 0)
450000 80000 =10000 u or u =37C
Ex.8 How many grams of a liquid of specific heat 0.2 and at a temperature 40C must be mixed with 100 gm of
a liquid of sp. heat 0.5 and at 20C, so that the final temperature of the mixture becomes 32C?
Sol. The liquid at temperature 40C will give heat to the other liquid at temperature 20C. The temperature of the
mixture becomes 32C. Now
heat taken = 100 0.5 (32 20) = 600 cal
heat given = m 0.2 (40 32) =1.6 m cal
Now, heat taken =heat given
600 cal =1.6 m or m =
6 . 1
600
=375 gm.
Alternative method
Q =ms T
=20 1 40 =800 cal
A
Q =mL =400 cal
t
0C
40C
T
(a) Heat required to convert
Ice in water =400 cal
(b) Water reject maximum amount of heat =800 cal
T
min
=
Q remain 400
Total mass 25
=
=16C
Alternative method
Q =mL
3
Q =ms
2
AT
water steam
water Ice 0C
100C
T
t
Q =mL
1
Q
1
=mL =5 80 =400 cal
Q
2
=msAT =5 1 100 =500 cal
Q
3
=mL =5 540 =2700 cal
Ice want 900 cal heat to convert in 100C
water so mixture contair water and steam
mixture and mixture temp. is 100C.
Alternative method
T
min
=
mass Total
remain heat
=37C
CALORIMETRY AND CHANGE OF STATE
NARAYANA I NSTI TUTE
SP-12 A, Indra Vihar, Talwandi, Kota Ph : 3200120, 3200121
111
Ex.9 A lump of 0.10 kg of ice at 10C is put in 0.15 kg of water at 20C. How much water and ice will be found
in mixture when it has reached the thermal equilibrium ? Specific heat of ice =0.50 k cal/kg and its latent
heat of melting = 80 k cal/kg.
Sol. Heat taken by 0.10 kg of ice in coming from 10C to 0C
=100 0.5 10 =500 cal.
If m gm of ice melts, then heat taken in melting = m 80 cal.
Heat given by water = 150 20 = 300 cal.
500 +m 80 =3000 or m =(2500/80) =31.25 gm
Ice present at thermal equilibrium =100 31.25 =67.75 gm.
Water present at thermal equilibrium =150 +31.25 =181.25 gm.
8. CHANGE OF STATE
(i) Melting
Conversion of solid into liquid state at constant temperature is known as melting.
(ii) Boiling
Evaporation within the whole mass of the liquid is called boiling. Boiling takes place at a constant temperature
known as boiling point. A liquid boils when the saturated vapour pressure on its surface is equal to atmospheric
pressure. Boiling point reduces on decreasing pressure.
(iii) Evaporation
Conversion of liquid into vapours at all temperatures is called evaporation. It is a surface phenomenon. Greater
the temperature, faster is the evaporation. Smaller the boiling point of liquid, more rapid is the evaporation.
Smaller the humidity, more is the evaporation. Evaporation increases on decreasing pressure that is why evaporation
is faster in vacuum.
(iv) Sublimation
Direction conversion of solid in to vapourstate is called sublimation.
(v) Condensation
The process of conversion from gaseous or vapour state to liquid state is known as condensation .
These materials again get converted to vapour or gaseous state on heating.
(vi) Hoar frost
Direct conversion of vapour into solid state is called hoar frost.
(vii) Regelati on
When weights are suspended from a ice block with the help of a wire, then the wire
cuts the ice block and moves down, but the block again gets intact above the wire.
This process is known as regelation.
In this process due to increase in pressure the melting point of ice decreases and ice
melts and the wire penetrates into the block. After removal of pressure the melting point
again increases so that the melted ice again gets frozen and becomes intact.
9. HEATING CURVE
If to a given mass (m) of a solid, heat is supplied at constant rate and a graph is plotted between temperature
and time, the graph is as shown in fig. and is called heating curve. From this curve it is clear that
W
1
W
2
Ice slab
Alternative method
Ice Ice water water
10C C 0C 20C
Q
1
=msAT =10 0.5 10=500cal
Q
2
=mL
Q
2
=100 80 =8000
(a) heat required to convert Ice in water
Q =500 +8000 =8500 cal
(b) Maximum heat rejected by the
water =150 1 20 =3000 cal
which is less then required heat so
whole ice is not converted into water so
mixture contain ice and water and
mixture temp. is 0C
CALORIMETRY AND CHANGE OF STATE
NARAYANA I NSTI TUTE
SP-12 A, Indra Vihar, Talwandi, Kota Ph : 3200120, 3200121
112
a = solid
b = super heated solid
c = liquid
d = superheated liquid
e = vapour
o =slope of solid heating curve
| =slope of liquid heating curve
=slope of vapour heating curve
Q
c
Q
b
=Letent heat of fusion
Q
e
Q
d
=Latent heat of vaporisation
(a) In the region ab temperature of solid is changing with time so,
AQ =mSAT
slope of ab region =
mS
1
T mS
T
Q
T
=
A
A
=
A
A
(specific heat)
s

slope
1
i.e., specific heat (or thermal capacity) is inversely proportional to the slope of temp/heat curve.
(b) In the region bc temperature is constant, so it represents change of state, i.e., melting of solid at melting
point T
1
. At b melting starts and at c all solid is converted into liquid. So between b and c substance is partly
solid and partly liquid. If L
F
is the latent heat of fusion Q =mL
F
[In this region speicifc heat (1/tan u) = ]
(c) In the region cd temperature of liquid increases so speicific heat (or thermal capacity) of liquid will be inversely
proportional to the slope of line cd, i.e.,
S
L
(1/slope of line cd)
(d) In the region de temperature is constant, so it represents change of state, i.e., boiling with boiling point T
2
. At d
all substance is in liquid state while at e in vapour state and between d and e partly liquid and partly gas.
[In this region speicifc heat (1/tan 0) = ]
(e) The line ef represents gaseous state of substance with its temperature increasing linearly with time. The reciprocal
of slope of line will be proportional to specific heat or thermal capacity of substance in vapour state.
10. EQUILIBRIUM STATE AND PHASE CHANGE
There are three states of matter solid, liquid and gas.
(a) By changing the temperature and pressure on the substance their states (solid, liquid and gas) can be changed.
In order to change the state heat is either supplied to the system or taken from the system.
(b) The graph drawn in between the pressure and temperature of the substance is called change of phase indicator
diagram or (P T) state indicator diagram. With the help of this diagram phase changes of the substance
can be studied.
In the following figure, pressure temperature curve of a substance is shown.
Following characteristics are found in this indicator diagram :
(c) There is a range of each state and two regions are separated by a boundary curve.
(d) The equilibrium curves of all the three states of matter meet at a point. This point
e
B.P
M.P
a
Q
b
Q
c
Q
d
Q
e
Q
e
Q
d
Q
c
Q
b

|
o
c
d
b
T
Q
f
CALORIMETRY AND CHANGE OF STATE
NARAYANA I NSTI TUTE
SP-12 A, Indra Vihar, Talwandi, Kota Ph : 3200120, 3200121
113
is called triple point. At this point all the three states of matter are in equilibrium. This point is unique, i.e.
remains constant in all conditions. The triple point of water is 0.0098C at a pressure of 4.58 mm of mercury.
(e) Only two states of matter are found in equilibrium at any point (except triple point) situated on the boundary
curves.
(f) The curve made from common points of liquid and vapour states is called vaporisation curve, curve made
from common points of solid and liquid states is called mel ting curve then the curve made from the common
points of solid and vapour is called sublimation curve.
(g) If slight change occurs in the temperature or pressure, one out of the three states would disapear.
Melting point of ice decreases with the increase of pressure.
Boiling point of water increases with the increase of pressure.
Effect of pressure on melting poi nt of a solid
The variation of melting point with pressure is given by the formula
dT
dP
=
) V V ( T
J L
1 2

where, L is the latent heat of fusion of the substance, T is melting point of the substance, V
2
is the volume
of solid state and V
1
is the volume of liquid state. Now there are two cases :
(i) Those substance for which the volume of solid state is less than the volume of liquid state i.e. V
2
>V
1
,
dT
dP
is positive and the melting point increases with increase in pressure.
(ii) Those substance for which the volume of solid state is more than the volume of liquid state i.e. V
2
<V
1
,
dT
dP
is negative and the melting point decreases with increase in pressure e.g. ice.
CALORIMETRY AND CHANGE OF STATE
NARAYANA I NSTI TUTE
SP-12 A, Indra Vihar, Talwandi, Kota Ph : 3200120, 3200121
114
Q.1 One kg of ice at 0C is mixed with 1kg of water at 80C. The resulting temperature will be -
[1] between 0C and 80C [2] 0C
[3] less than 0C [4] greater than 0C
Q.2 If 10 gm of ice at 0C is mixed with 10 gm of water at 10C, the final temperature t is -
[1] given by 10 70 +10 (t 0) =10 (10 t) [2] given by 10 80 =10 (10 t) +10 (t 0)
[3] 0C [4] 5C
Q.3 Boiling water is changing into steam. Under this condition, the specific heat of water is -
[1] one [2] zero [3] [4] <1
Q.4 Latent heat of steam =536 calories per gm. Latent heat of ice =80 cal/gm. Specific heat of ice =0.5 cal/
gm degree C. The heat required to convert 10 gm of ice at 20C into steam at 100C is -
[1] 100 calories [2] 900 calories [3] 9900 calories [4] 7260 calories
Q.5 Heat required to convert 1 gm of ice at 0C into steam at 100C is -
[1] 100 cal [2] 0.01 kilo calorie [3] 716 cal [4] 1 kilo-calorie
Q.6 If the pressure of the surrounding is increased, then the latent heat of steam -
[1] remains unchanged [2] increases [3] decreases [4] changes erratically
Q.7 The temperature of ice is 10C [specific heat =0.5 kcal/ (kg C)] and that of water 60C. They are mixed
in equal amounts. What part of the ice will be melted -
[1] (5/6) th [2] (11/16) th
[3] whole of it will be melted [4] (5/11) th
Q.8 100 g of steam initially at 100C is passed at 20C. Assuming no heat losses and negligible heat
capacity of the calorimeter, the final temperature of calorimeter and contents is (Latent heat of evaporation
of water = 540 kcal/kg) -
[1] 58.2C [2] 76.3C [3] 100C [4] 60C
Q.9 The ratio of the densities of the bodies is 3 : 4 and specific heat in the ratio 4 : 3. The ratio of their thermal
capacitates for unit volume is -
[1] 9 : 16 [2] 2 : 1 [3] 16 : 9 [4] 1 : 1
Q.10 A copper block of mass 50 g is heated to 100C and placed on a block of ice at 0C. The specific heat of
copper is 0.1 cal/gm C and latent heat of ice is 80 cal/gm. The amount of ice melted is -
[1] 6.15 gm [2] 6.2 gm [3] 6.25 gm [4] 6.3 gm
Q.11 One gram of ice at 0C is added to 5 grams of water at 10C. If the latent heat of ice be 80 cal/gm, then
the final temperature of the mixture is -
[1] 5C [2] 0C [3] 5C [4] none of the above
Q.12 A glowing horse shoe of mass 2 kg at a temperature of 1200C is dropped in to 1 kg of water at 40C. The
mass of steam produced is (specific heat of horse shoe =0.1 kcal/kg. K) -
[1] 0.3 kg [2] 0.4 kg [3] 0.5 kg [4] 1 kg
EXERCI SE # 1
CALORIMETRY AND CHANGE OF STATE
NARAYANA I NSTI TUTE
SP-12 A, Indra Vihar, Talwandi, Kota Ph : 3200120, 3200121
115
Q.13 Melting point of ice -
[1] increases with increasing pressure [2] decreases with increasing pressure
[3] in independent of pressure [4] is proportional to pressure
Q.14 One gm of ice at 0C is added to 5 gm of water at 10C. If the latent heat of ice be 80 cal/gm, then the final
temperature of the mixture is -
[1] 5C [2] 0C [3] +5C [4] none
Q.15 5 g of steam at 100C is passed into 6 gm of ice at 0C. If the latent heats of steam and ice are 540
cal/gm and 80 cal/gm, then the final temperature is -
[1] 0C [2] 50C [3] 30C [4] 100C
Q.16 In above question the mixture contains -
[1] 11 gm of water [2] 8 gm of water [3] 6 gm of water [4] 5 gm of water
Q.17 1 gram steam at 100C can melt how much ice at 0C -
[1] 80/540 gm [2] 540/80 gm [3] 8 gm [4] 8 kg
Q.18 The value of specific heat depends on -
[1] The nature of the material
[2] amount of work done externally due to expansion of the substance caused by raising temperature
[3] Both
[4] None of the above
Q.19 One gram of ice is mixed with one gram of steam. After thermal equilibrium, the temperature of the
mixture is -
[1] 0C [2] 100C [3] 55C [4] 80C
Q.20 50 g of water at 10C is added to 250 g of water at 50C. The final temperature of water is -
[1] 41.7C [2] 43.3C [3] 65C [4] 45C
Q.21 0.5 kg of ice initially at 5C is to be converted completely into water at 0C. The heat required is -(spe-
cific heat of ice =0.5 kcal/kgC, latent heat of fusion of ice =80 cal/kg)
[1] 1.25 kcal [2] 40kcal [3] 38.75kcal [4] 41.25kcal
ANSWER KEY EXERCISE # 1
Qus. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15
Ans. 2 3 3 4 3 3 2 2 4 3 2 1 2 2 4
Qus. 16 17 18 19 20 21
Ans. 2 3 1 2 2 4
CALORIMETRY AND CHANGE OF STATE
NARAYANA I NSTI TUTE
SP-12 A, Indra Vihar, Talwandi, Kota Ph : 3200120, 3200121
116
Q.1 2kg of ice at 20C is mixed with 5 kg of water at 20C in insulating vessel having a negligible heat capacity.
calculate the final mass of water remaining in the container. It is given that the specific heats of water & ice are
1 kcal/kg/C & 0.5 kcal/kg/C while the letent heat of fusion of ice is 80 kcal/kg - [IIT Screening-2003]
[1] 7 kg [2] 6 kg [3] 4 kg [4] 2 kg
Q.2 Amount of heat required to raise the temperature of a body through 1 K is called its - [MH CET(MED.)-2001]
[1] Water equivalent [2] Thermal capacity [3] Entropy [4] Specific heat
Q.3 50 g of copper is heated to increase its temperature by 10C. If the same quantity of heat is given to 10g
water, the rise in its temperature is (specific heat of copper =420 joule-kg
1
C
1
. Specific heat of water =4200
joule-kg
1
C
1
- [EAMCET(MED)-2000]
[1] 5C [2] 6C [3] 7C [4] 8C
Q.4 At 100C, the substance that causes the causes the most severe burn, is -
[Karnataka CET (Engg. /Med.) 1993; UPSEAT-1999]
[1] Oil [2] Steam [3] Water [4] Hot air
Q.5 The specific heat of gas in an isothermal process is - [AFMC)-1998]
[1] infinite [2] zero [3] negative [4] remains constant
Q.6 The SI unit of mechanical equivalent of heat is - [MP PMT/PET-1998]
[1] joule calorie [2] joule/calorie [3] calorieerg [4] erg/calorie
Q.7 70 calories of heat are required to raise the temperature of 2 moles of an ideal gas at constant pressure from
30C to 35C. The amount of heat required to raise the temperature of same gas through the same range
(30C to 35C) at constant volume (R =2cal/mol/K) - [IIT 1985; MP PMT 1997; MP PET 1999,2001]
[1] 30 cal [2] 50 cal [3] 70 cal [4] 90 cal
Q.8 Work done in converting one gram of ice at 10C into steam at 100C is -
[PM PET/PMT 1998 EAMCET (MED.) 1995; MP PMT-2002]
[1] 3045 J [2] 6056 J [3] 721 J [4] 616 J
Q.9 An amount of water of mass 20 gms at 0C is mixed with 40 gms of water at 10C. Final temperature of
mixture is - [EAMCET(ENGG.)-1996]
[1] 20C [2] 6.66C [3] 5C [4] 0C
Q.10 30 gms of water at 30C is in a beaker. Which of the following, when added to water, will have greatest cooling
effect (specific heat of copper =0.1 cal/gm/C) - [EAMCET-1997]
[1] 100 gms of water at 10C [2] 15 gms of water at 0C
[3] 3 gms of ice at 0C [4] 18 gms of copper at 0C
Q.11 The material that has largest specific heat is - [EAMCET(MED)-1998]
[1] mercury [2] water [3] iron [4] diamond
Q.12 A liquid of mass M and specific heat S is at a temperature 2t. It another liquid of thermal capacity 1.5 times,
at a temperature of t/3 is added to it, the resultant temperature will be - [EAMCET(ENGG)-1999]
[1]
3
4
t [2] t [3]
2
t
[4]
3
2
t
EXERCI SE # 2
CALORIMETRY AND CHANGE OF STATE
NARAYANA I NSTI TUTE
SP-12 A, Indra Vihar, Talwandi, Kota Ph : 3200120, 3200121
117
Q.13 Two liquids at temperatures 60C and 20C respectively have masses in the ratio 3 : 4 and their specific heats
in the ratio 4 : 5. If the two liquids are mixed, the resultant temperature is - [EAMCET(ENGG)-2000]
[1] 70C [2] 50C [3] 40C [4] 35C
Q.14 Boiling water at 100C and cold water at tC are mixed in the ratio 1 : 3 and the resultant maximum temperature
was 37C. Assuming no heat losses, the value of t is - [EAMCET(MED)-1999]
[1] 4C [2] 9C [3] 12C [4] 16C
Q.15 20 gm of ice and 20 gm of hot water are mixed. When the ice is melted the temperature of the mixture was
found to be 0C, the temperature of hot taken should be (L
ice
=80 cal/gm)- [EAMCET(MED)-2000]
[1] 40C [2] 72C [3] 80C [4] 96C
Q.16 In 1 g of steam is mixed with 1 g of ice, the resultant temperature of the mixture is- [CPMT-2000]
[1] 270C [2] 230C [3] 100 C [4] 50C
Q.17 When a solid is convrted into a gas, directly by heating then process is known as - [AIIMS-1999]
[1] boiling [2] sublimation [3] vaporization [4] condensation
Q.18 70 calories of heat are required to raise the temperature of 2 moles of an ideal gas at constant pressure from
30C to 35C. The amount of heat required in calories to raise the temperature of the same gas through the
same range (30 35C) at constant volume is - [J & K CET -2000]
[1] 30 cal [2] 50 cal [3] 370 cal [4] 90 cal
Q.19 If certain amount of water at 100C is mixed with double amount of water at 70C, then resultant temperature
will be - [BHU MED.-2000]
[1] 100C [2] 80C [3] 70C [4] 90C
Q.20 A vessel contains 100 gm of water. The heat capacity of the vessel is equal to that of 10 gm. of water. The
initial temperature of water in vessel is 10C. If 220 gm.of hot water at 70C is poured in, the final temperature,
neglecting radiation loss, will be - [UPSEAT-2000]
[1] 40C [2] 50C [3] 60C [4] 70C
Q.21 The ratio of specific heat capacity to molar heat capacity of a body - [UPSEAT-2000]
[1] is a universal constant [2] depends on the mass of the body
[3] depends on the molecular weight of the body [4] in dimensionless
Q.22 The amount of heat required to convert gram of ice at 0C into steam at 100C will be - [RPMT-1999]
[1] 716 cal [2] 500 cal [3] 180 cal [4] 100 cal
Q.23 10 grams of ice at 0C is mixed with 10 grams of water at 20C. The final temperature of mixture will be-
[1] 50C [2] 10C [3] 0C [4] 15C [RPMT-1999]
Q.24 The latent heat of 1 gm of water is 536 cal/gm. Its value is J oule/kg will be - [RPMT-1999]
[1] 2.25 10
6
[2] 2.25 10
3
[3] 2, 25 [4] none of these
Q.25 Temperature of 50 gm of ice in an insolated vessel is 0C, 50 gm water of temperature 100C is mixed in
it. Determine final temperature of mixture (Neglecting heat loss) - [RPMT-2001]
[1] 0C [2] C <Tm <20C [3] 20C [4] above 20C
CALORIMETRY AND CHANGE OF STATE
NARAYANA I NSTI TUTE
SP-12 A, Indra Vihar, Talwandi, Kota Ph : 3200120, 3200121
118
Q.26 The dimensions of latent heat are - [RPET-2002]
[1] M
0
L
2
T
2
[2] M
0
L
1
T
2
[3] M
2
L
0
T
2
[4] M
0
L
2
T
2
Q.27 50 g of ice (latent heat =80 cal/g) at 0C is dropped in 50 g of water at a temperature 20C, contained in
a copper calorimeter. The final temperature of the system, ignoring heat losses and the water equivalent of
calorimeter, will be - [SCRA-1996]
[1] 20C [2] between 0C and 10C
[3] between 0C and 20C [4] 0C
Q.28 540 gms of ice at 0C is mixed with 540 gms of water at 80C. The final temperature of the mixture in C
will be - [PONDY-1997]
[1] 0 [2] 40 [3] 80 [4] 79.9
Q.29 50 ml of water at 100C is mixed with 100 ml of water at 40C and stirred constantly while mixing. The final
temperature of water will be - [SCRA-1996]
[1] 80C [2] 70C [3] 60C [4] 50C
ANSWER KEY EXERCISE # 2
Qus. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15
Ans. 2 2 1 2 1 2 2 1 2 1 2 2 4 4 3
Qus. 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29
Ans. 3 1 2 2 2 3 1 3 1 2 1 4 1 3