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Table of Contents

STANDARD 5:
Assess student learning
5.1 Assess student learning
5.2 Provide feedback to students on their learning.
5.3 Make consistent and comparable judgements
5.4 Interpret student data.
5.5 Report on student achievement.

Standard 5
Assess student learning
5.1 Demonstrate understanding of assessment strategies, including
informal and formal, diagnostic, formative and summative
approaches to assess student learning.

5.2 Demonstrate an understanding of the purpose of providing timely
and appropriate feedback to students about their learning.

5.3 Demonstrate understanding of assessment moderation and its
application to support consistent and comparable judgements of
students learning.

5.4 Demonstrate the capacity to interpret student assessment data to
evaluate student learning and modify teaching practice.

5.5 Demonstrate understanding of a range of strategies for reporting to
students and parents/carers and the purpose of keeping accurate
and reliable records of student achievement.
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5.1 Demonstrate understanding of assessment strategies, including
informal and formal, diagnostic, formative and summative approaches to
assess student learning.
Reflective Journal Entry:
(Assessment) 4
th
August 2014
After two lessons it was time to
conduct a formal formative
assessment of the Possums
language with checkout 14
containing a series of questions
testing their vocabulary, sentence
recall and comprehension of
opposites, similarities,
absurdities. Once I had all the
results mentor and I entered the
data into data sheets which are to
be handed in at 4pm the end of
the week. The results of the
assessment showed that the
Possums learning was adequate
to progress onto the next lesson
topic.
Assessing students in a
culturally diverse class is
to provide multiple ways
of formative and
summative assessment
that allow students to
demonstrate their various
potentialities and
competencies in diverse
ways (Dempsey & Arthur-
Kelly 2007).
Reference:
Dempsey, I., & Arthur-Kelly, M. (2007). Maximising learning outcomes in
diverse classrooms. South Melbourne, VIC: Thomson
Formal formative
assessment contd:
Assessment 14
Formal formative assessment:
Assessment14
Example: Section of lesson for
Assessment 14
Informal summative assessment is
ongoing during class time and is a
good opportunity to help student
gauge where they are at and what the
end goal is so they remain engaged
in lessons and achieve curriculum
outcomes.
5.2 Demonstrate an understanding of the purpose of providing timely and
appropriate feedback to students about their learning.

Reflective Journal Entry: (Feedback) 13
th
August
2014
Today I tested two children with Math Mastery 8
as one was absent for the past week and
missed the class test and the other failed the
class test. Both children obtained a 100% pass.
One of the two students who tend to struggle
with math concepts but today passed the tested
I had a brief conversation with. I raised with her,
her great ability to do well if she remained
focused in class and to make good choices. I
went over the data verbally with her and we both
agreed that she had improved in her
independent counting ability. Mentor and I are
able to interpret the assessment data from the
checkout and mastery tests that occur after a
set of lessons. I can see the common errors
and modify the teaching where required. For
example counting backwards for example 46 -36
proved to be difficult for most students. The
modification process included counting and a
class from 0 to100 and then 100 to 0 while
maintaining a rhythm. This process helps
consolidate learning for that particular
reoccurring error.
Assessing students in a culturally diverse class is
to provide multiple ways of formative and
summative assessment that allow students to
demonstrate their various potentialities and
competencies in diverse ways (Dempsey &
Arthur-Kelly 2007)
Reference:
Dempsey, I., & Arthur-Kelly, M. (2007). Maximising learning outcomes in diverse classrooms. South Melbourne,
VIC: Thomson
Image sourced 25/08/14:
http://escmarzano.wikispaces.co
m/7.+Setting+Objectives+and+Pr
oviding+Feedback
5.3 Demonstrate understanding of assessment moderation and its
application to support consistent and comparable judgements of students
learning.


Reflective Journal Entry:
(Moderation) 25
th
August 2014
Today mentor and I discussed
assessment moderation within a
Direct Instruction context. All our
data is recorded and handed each
week to our Coach Kiri who
extracts the data and feeds it to
NIFDI (National Institute for Direct
Instruction). This is Direction
Instruction data interpreting
organisation. Kiri and members of
NIFDI discuss the data and NIDI
direct Kiri on what moderation is
required for each group or
individual of students. Every
Wednesday morning Kiri and the
Principal advise the teachers
collectively what moderation is
required for their respective class
and students. The result could be
to continue the lessons as currently
planned, go back 5 or so lessons
until firm or advance to the next
level of lessons.
Reflective Journal Entry: (Feedback) 13
th
August
2014
Today I tested two children with Math Mastery 8
as one was absent for the past week and missed
the class test and the other failed the class test.
Both children obtained a 100% pass. One of the
two students who tend to struggle with math
concepts but today passed the tested I had a brief
conversation with. I raised with her, her great
ability to do well if she remained focused in class
and to make good choices. I went over the data
verbally with her and we both agreed that she had
improved in her independent counting ability.
Mentor and I are able to interpret the assessment
data from the checkout and mastery tests that
occur after a set of lessons. I can see the
common errors and modify the teaching where
required. For example counting backwards for
example 46 -36 proved to be difficult for most
students. The modification process included
counting and a class from 0 to100 and then 100 to
0 while maintaining a rhythm. This process helps
consolidate learning for that particular reoccurring
error.
5.4 Demonstrate the capacity to interpret student assessment data to
evaluate student learning and modify teaching practice.

Reflective Journal Entry:
(outing Visit) Date
When we review and evaluate
assessment data after every
test we know immediately
whether the group needs to
go back over the lessons to
make them firm or remedy
and retest or move forward.
The Lesson Progress Chart
(LPC) demonstrates the
Emus and Possums
progress. The data shows
that all students achieved a
90% or higher for Language
Assessment 14 therefore may
progress to the next 10
lessons and assessment 15
in due course.
Assessment diagnose
whether or not learning has
successfully occurred.
Assessment is a tool to
increase student motivation,
provide vital diagnostic
information for the teacher. It
can also guide teachers
instructional practices and
lesson planning (Marsh,
2008).
Reference: Marsh, C. (2008). Becoming a teacher knowledge,
skills and issues (4th ed.) Frenchs Forest, NSW: Pearson
Australia.
Photo: Language Lessons Progress Chart for two groups: Emus and Possums
5.5 Demonstrate understanding of a range of strategies for reporting to
students and parents/carers and the purpose of keeping accurate and reliable
records of student achievement.
Reflective Journal Entry:
(outing Visit) 20
th
August 2014
This standard relates to an
understanding of strategies for
assessment, feedback,
assessment moderation and
reporting. Strategies used are
to include informal, formal,
diagnostic, formative and
summative types of
assessment. It also relates to
teachers having the ability to
interpret data generated from
students' assessment and to
evaluate and modify teaching
practices appropriately.
Reflective Journal Entry: (outing Visit) 20
th
August 2014
From time to time parents may receive some negative feedback about
their child for example the child not focuses on lessons, or falling asleep
during lessons or even disruptive. How this negative feedback is given
to the parent from their teacher should be mediated and tender to ensure
it is not a focus of discuss, rather a factor with numerous solutions to
consider. There are some parents I have spoken to where
communicating some negative feedback was required to raise
awareness of an issue, but with immediate solutions to resolve the
issue(s). I shall be preparing a positive card for these parents as well as
other parents as a strategy for reporting to the parent some student
achievement (additional to formal report cards and parent interviews)
Feedback about assessment is important for students, parents, schools
and teachers. Positive feedback which highlights accomplishment helps
to increase parents and students' self-confidence as it focuses on what
they have achieved rather than where they have fallen short (Woolfolk &
Margetts, 2010).
Image of Parent Positive
Card example Image of Positive Behaviour Awards
Twice a year
reports cards are
produced by
teachers, approved
by the principal and
given to parents
demonstrating
students
achievements