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SET SAIL ON A LEGEND

Van der Graaf, 2000 / 2014, 49.5m / 162ft, 8 guests, €7m

Eleonora is an exact replica of the enormously famous 1910 Herreshoff gaff rig schooner, Westward. Wide sweeping decks provide

plenty of space for dining and entertaining or simply relaxing under the hugely impressive rig. The full-beam saloon and ensuite cabins

are handsome period pieces with modern electrics and entertainment systems – Eleonora is the perfect combination of 21st century

technology and period style. See her at the Monaco Yacht Show or contact Mike Horsley, + 334 93 34 68 98, mjh@edmiston.com

MONTE CARLO:

+377 93 30 54 44

LONDON:

+44 20 7495 5151

NEW YORK:

+1 212 792 5370

MEXICO CITY:

+52 55 52 80 95 74

www.edmiston.com/classic-yachts

SALE & PURCHASE NEW CONSTRUCTION CHARTER MANAGEMENT CREW

CITY: +52 55 52 80 95 74 www.edmiston.com/classic-yachts SALE & PURCHASE NEW CONSTRUCTION CHARTER MANAGEMENT CREW

COVER IMAGE: NIGEL SHARP RIGHT: MIKKEL THOMMESSEN

NIGEL SHARPDAN

GRAND BANKS

SHOW COVER IMAGE: BEN WOOD

HOUSTON

Mariquita From houseboat to Med marvel Page 30
Mariquita
From houseboat
to Med marvel
Page 30

CRAFTSMANSHIP

Contents

CRAFTSMANSHIP

OCTOBER 2014 Nº316

FEATURES

COVER STORY

8 . EUROPE WEEK 2014 Once-a-century regatta to mark Norway’s independence

8

EUROPE WEEK 2014

A real sizzler; both the hot weather and the racing

COVER STORY

22 . WHITE ROSE

OF MEVAGISSEY What’s the CB Award-winning White Rose like to sail?

17 . LOGBOOK

e Opera House Cup attracts some of the nest US classics

30 . MARIQUITA:

HER HISTORY Ben Wood delves into her past and how she is racing today

22 48
22
48
86
86

42

PHILIP PLISSON

REGULARS

18

. TELL TALES

39

. SALEROOM

40

. OBJECTS OF DESIRE

91

. LOOKING AHEAD

96

. LETTERS

98

. STERNPOST

ONBOARD

63

. NEW CLASSICS

65

. LAZARETTE

67

. BOOKS

67

. SUNDOWNERS

71

. GETTING AFLOAT

CRAFTSMANSHIP

80

. YARD NEWS

82

. BOATBUILDER’S NOTES

90

. ADRIAN MORGAN

COVER STORY

42 . VIVE L’HERMIONE

e replica French frigate is about

to start her sea trials

48 . GRAND BANKS

We look at these trawler yachts

ahead of a new model next year

54 . ARTHUR BEALE

London’s 400-year-old yacht chandler is undergoing a revival

86 . BBA AT LYME REGIS

We visit as students celebrate completing their 9-month course

For more features and all the latest news and opinion, go to classicboat.co.uk

TC 90 Kealoha

To view the range www.hoekdesign.com

TC 5 1

TC 5 6

TC 6 5

TC 8 0

TC 9 0

TC10 0

TC10 8

TC12 7

Truly
Truly

Truly sailing.

Frenzy 35’ Nicolaas WitseN Royal cRuiseR GAzeLL 1935 toRe holm-oscaR schelliN sk40 Loa: 10.62 m

Frenzy

35’ Nicolaas WitseN Royal cRuiseR

Frenzy 35’ Nicolaas WitseN Royal cRuiseR GAzeLL 1935 toRe holm-oscaR schelliN sk40 Loa: 10.62 m |

GAzeLL

1935 toRe holm-oscaR schelliN sk40

Loa: 10.62 m

|Beam: 3.00 m

|Draft: 0.70 m

|price: EUR 105,000

|

|Loa: 15.32 m

|Beam: 2.37 m

|Draft: 1.71 m

|price: EUR 110,000

| Beam: 2.37 m | Draft: 1.71 m | price: EUR 110,000   GAeL SchArhörn  
| Beam: 2.37 m | Draft: 1.71 m | price: EUR 110,000   GAeL SchArhörn  
 

GAeL

SchArhörn

 

76’ PhiliP Rhodes – abekiNg & RasmusseN ketch

 

56ft double eNdeR motoR yacht fRom 1939

Loa: 23.20 m

|Beam: 5.20 m

|Draft: 2.76 m

|price: EUR 1,200,000

|

|Loa: 17.00 m

|Beam: 4.00 m

|Draft: 1.80 m

|price: EUR 495,000

| Beam: 4.00 m | Draft: 1.80 m | price: EUR 495,000 zephyr 1928 beRtil bothéN

zephyr

1928 beRtil bothéN iNteRNatioNal 6mR

Loa: 11.34 m

|Beam: 2.06 m |Draft: 1.60 m |price: EUR 110,000 |

| Beam: 2.06 m | Draft: 1.60 m | price: EUR 110,000 | roArinG WAter moRRis

roArinG WAter

moRRis m36 – modeRN classic

|Loa: 11.00 m

|Beam: 3.10 m

|Draft: 1.69 m

|price: EUR 195,000

+49 (0)461 31 80 30 65

Member of the Robbe & Berking family Y A CHT S · baum+koenig@classic-yachts.de · w
Member of the Robbe & Berking family
Y A CHT S
·
baum+koenig@classic-yachts.de
·
w w w.classic-yachts.de

DAN HOUSTON

DAN HOUSTON classicboat.co.uk Jubilee House, 2 Jubilee Place, London, SW3 3TQ EDITORIAL Editor Dan Houston +44
classicboat.co.uk Jubilee House, 2 Jubilee Place, London, SW3 3TQ EDITORIAL Editor Dan Houston +44 (0)207

classicboat.co.uk Jubilee House, 2 Jubilee Place, London, SW3 3TQ EDITORIAL Editor Dan Houston +44 (0)207 349 3755 cb@classicboat.co.uk Deputy Editor Steffan Meyric Hughes +44 (0)207 349 3758 steffan.meyric-hughes@classicboat.co.uk Senior Art Editor Peter Smith +44 (0)207 349 3756 peter.smith@classicboat.co.uk Senior Sub Editor Dan Tye +44 (0)207 349 3756 dan.tye@classicboat.co.uk Contributing Editor Peter Willis peter.willis@classicboat.co.uk Technical Editor Theo Rye Publishing Consultant Martin Nott Proofing Vanessa Bird

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2013 all rights reserved

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FROM DAN HOUSTON, EDITOR

Getting into the outboard

FROM DAN HOUSTON, EDITOR Getting into the outboard We thought there was water in the outboard.

We thought there was water in the outboard. We had not even used the 3hp Yamaha and after a brief dunk in lake water it was not starting. So it should be a simple thing of getting the fuel out of the carburettor, but on this engine we could not find a bleed pump which might help drain the petrol bowl at the bottom of the carb. We could see some tiny recessed screws that might well be for that job but with only a Leatherman and a spanner that would fit the spark plug we were on limited resources, and we told ourselves: “Good luck with that!” We’d got the spark plug out and could see it was wet when a yacht came circling with skipper Jeff who was admiring “our” boat – a Kitiwake 16, on our mooring. We were exchanging pleasantries – we’d seen him out the day before with his other boat, a Cornish Shrimper sailing downwind under jib alone in a hatful of wind, when he offered some fresh fuel, from his own tank, as a way of ascertaining whether it was the fuel or not. Then he mentioned he had a tool kit we could use. I

was at the point of taking the engine, still playing doggo, over to a marine outfit on the other side of the lake but Jeff said it would be quicker and much cheaper to do it ourselves. And while sometimes, of course, advice like that does not lead to good results, more often than not it does, and it seemed Jeff

“It would be quicker to do it ourselves”

had turned up at just the right time. The first mate decided she’d prefer to get supper going as a more appropriate division of our labour

and so the engine and I were shipped aboard Jeff’s boat and we motored over the lake to get the tools from his Shrimper. On the way Jeff told me he was a regular on the lake spending every other week there

from his home in Leeds. His moorings were in front of one of those desperately

pretty grey stone boathouses of Lakeland; a little piece of heaven. We’d re-crossed

the lake and replaced the fuel and were about to dismantle the arrangement to get

at the carburettor when Jeff remembered we should try the engine at every stage of troubleshooting. Tug! It fired and roared into happy two-stroke life, and it

started first time every day after that.

Of course Jeff wouldn’t take money or much more than our thanks but people

like him restore your faith in the waterborne community

the lines of the pretty Kitiwake which he’d come over to admire in the first place.

Some of it too is down to

Real sizzler atat EuropeEurope WeekWeek
Real sizzler
atat EuropeEurope WeekWeek
Last time, the centenary regatta raced under the looming clouds of World War One. This
Last time, the centenary regatta raced under the
looming clouds of World War One. This year, there was
nothing to stop the once-a-century sailing celebration
of Norway’s independence – and we were there
STORY CLARE MCCOMB PHOTOGRAPHS CLARE MCCOMB AND MIKKEL THOMMESSEN

CLARE MCCOMB

EUROPE WEEK

THOMMESSEN CLARE MCCOMBMIKKEL
THOMMESSEN CLARE MCCOMBMIKKEL

Above, top:

Magda VIII, veteran of the 1914 regatta, sailed just as beautifully in 2014

Above, bottom; Jeløen, one of the smallest entries at 21ft 8in (6.6m), flies the ensign

E urope Week 2014 was a real sizzler, both for the weather and the racing; temperatures touched the 30s at times and many of us were melting on land, although it was mostly glorious out on the water. For a lover of classic boats this was an

amazing spectacle. Around 100 yachts from 10 countries had gathered at the old whaling and shipbuilding town of Sandefjord for a regatta celebrating the establishment of the Norwegian constitution, 200 years before. We were echoing the first centenary regatta held at nearby Horten in 1914, days before the winds of war wreaked their havoc across Europe. Other celebrations were scheduled elsewhere: the Tall Ships were booked to sail into Bergen and on 17 July, a mass flotilla of classic boats from all over Norway gathered in the Oslo fjord, from whence they made their slow passage towards the city. I stole a day from the regatta to sail alongside them in an 1898 Colin Archer yacht, among a small fleet of other Colin Archers. Wherever I looked were every size and shape of classic craft: vintage fishing and pilot boats, a World War One merchant ship, creaking old cruise liners, coastal vessels

merchant ship, creaking old cruise liners, coastal vessels of all sorts, reproduction Viking ships and even

of all sorts, reproduction Viking ships and even a huge whaler with a gangway from the bridge to the bow from whence the captain would fire his deadly harpoon. It was awe-inspiring to be part of this huge heritage fleet moving smoothly toward the capital, sails and funnels as far as the eye could see, forward and back, while a 21st century camera-drone buzzed annoyingly overhead. As we passed the Oscarsborg gun emplacements, where brave Norwegians repelled the first wave of the German invasion in 1940, we were moved to say the least – but conscious too that we were making, as well as marking history that day. Speaking as someone of Norwegian heritage, it is important to remember the length of the coastline compared to the population size and the entire reliance on the sea. Fjordside communities use boats of all sizes to get about, and they were, and are, lifelines keeping those settlements alive. Accounts from before World War One talk of very small boys handling their vessels with effortless skill; it was not a question of just owning boats but of designing and building them. You will find the skills, instincts and folklore of seafarers and shipwrights even when talking to sophisticated city folk in Norway’s

capital. Also there is a fierce fascination with racing boat against boat, from the Olympian

capital. Also there is a fierce fascination with racing boat against boat, from the Olympian King downwards, and I’m told that it is not uncommon for shoreline watchers to actually applaud as a special yacht slips by; making Europe Week 2014 (EW14) a perfect expression of Norway’s love affair with beautiful sailboats. At Sandefjord, out by the moorings, the mighty 12-Ms made a fine showing, sleek and turned out like racehorses for the Grand National. Anker’s 1909 Magda VIII (ex Magnolia) and Fife’s 1911 Erna Signe were present in 1914 and are based at the port. Einar Sissener, their owner, is a great supporter of classic boats with Johan Anker’s 1938 15-M Magda XIII representing the latest addition to his stable of historic racing yachts. The double-ender Raak was another survivor from the Horten regatta and proved a tough competitor in EW14. Meanwhile Pelham Olive had changed class from ‘Racing’ to ‘Cruising Gaff’ to challenge Fife’s 1909 Cintra with his 1903 Mylne cutter Kelpie. The 8-Ms had a fine showing too, perhaps because King Harald’s legendary Sira was an entrant, pitted up against Magne Brekke’s Wanda; among the others I particularly picked out Fram II, a perfect 5.5 shining among the variety of

CLARE MCCOMB
CLARE MCCOMB

MIKKEL THOMMESSEN

Above: The 12-Ms

Magda VIII and Erna Signe, both owned by classic boat devotee Einar Sissener (who also owns 15-M Magda XIII) Left: Suzanne, 9-M beauty in both 1914 and 2014

CLARE MCCOMB Above: The legendary Sira sweeps all before her Left: King Harald V opening
CLARE MCCOMB
CLARE MCCOMB

Above: The legendary Sira sweeps all before her Left: King Harald V opening the regatta

cruisers, spissgatters/double-enders and other less familiar one-offs. Boat after boat might have had top billing at a lesser gathering. The 9-M Johan Anker-designed yacht Pandora, for instance, is, as far as current research can tell, the first boat to be built after the first International Rule was agreed, launched in February 1907. Odd Syse wants to change her for a single-hander now his children are grown up but he knows he must pass her on to the right owner. “I couldn’t sell her to someone who didn’t understand what they were buying, or have the time and resources to take care of her properly,” he says. “I have to be able to sleep at night.” On the first day, from the press boat, we witnessed tragedy – little Mosquito, whose owner had been persuaded by international requests to enter at the last minute, was involved in a collision with the 7-M Star III and three and a half feet (c1m) of her bow was simply pulverised. Both yachts were there in 1914, where Mosquito had actually won the 6-M class, so this was a double tragedy. I took picture after picture as the emergency unfolded – in that unworldly limbo that often follows an accident, decisions seem to take a long time

EUROPE WEEK

CLARE MCCOMB MCCOMB MIKKEL THOMMESSENCLARE CLARE MCCOMB CLARE MCCOMB
CLARE MCCOMB
MCCOMB MIKKEL THOMMESSENCLARE
CLARE MCCOMB
CLARE MCCOMB

and we all feared she could sink. Eventually the crew

jib and the main operational. Downwind there was more

Clockwise from

improvised by wrapping the gaping hole with Mosquito ’s own spinnaker before she was towed, stern first, back to port, passing floating fragments of mahogany on the way. Luckily Star III only had minor damage but everyone on shore later was reeling at the news – saying it’s the risk you have to take racing these centenarians, while shaking their heads in disbelief and a genuine sense of loss, clearly wondering, “there but for the grace of God”. I rang 6-M aficionado Tim Street in England to break the news because Mosquito is such an iconic 6-M. There was more to come. The following day the wind stiffened from 5 to 20 knots and racing was challenging for everyone, even the heavy-weather boats. In the rough water, the elegant 92ft (28m) Eileen IIs mizzen had been shifting where caulking had worked loose – suddenly there were all sorts of problems with the rigging as a fitting broke. One of its holding bolts had already sheered, unbeknown to anyone, and the second one just gave, so lightning action was needed to re-fix the backstay. Then, while trying to reduce canvas, a halyard came apart and one foresail crashed to the deck but still Eileen II was racing along toward the last mark, with only her

drama: a shackle gave with an almighty BANG and suddenly the gaff was hanging at a ghastly angle. After a hasty emergency meeting in the teeth of the wind, with everything upside down, a brave decision was made to keep sailing, and amazingly the crew’s grit gained a just reward when they won the race, despite everything. There was much chatter about it in Sandefjord that evening. The situation will not recur – invisible rust is a constant nightmare for classic boats but Eileen II’s owner, Erling Storm, told me he would now replace the fixtures with bronze, keeping everything as authentic as possible, rather than risk such a series of shocks again. After two days of steely competition, the entrants raced in company onward to the sunbathed marina at Son with its pretty wooden houses, home of the famous boat designer Jac M Iversen until the mid 1920s and other Norwegian shipwrights. I watched the yachts sweep into view with their ballooning spinnakers, wave after wave in the silvery light, like Viking ships returning from sea. Local historian Anstein Spone came second in his class in Annemor, his gaff-rigged pilot vessel, a faithful 1986 copy of a 1910 Colin Archer double-ender; he was

top left: 12-M Vema III’s crew cooling off; disaster as 101-year-old 6-M Mosquito lost 3ft 6in (c1m) of her bows; organiser Peter Ennals getting some sailing time at last; German- owned 12-M Anitra leads waves of yachts victoriously into Son

EUROPE WEEK

EUROPE WEEK MIKKEL THOMMESSEN CLARE MCCOMB CLARE MCCOMB Above, left to right: even more delighted the

MIKKEL THOMMESSEN

CLARE MCCOMB

EUROPE WEEK MIKKEL THOMMESSEN CLARE MCCOMB CLARE MCCOMB Above, left to right: even more delighted the
EUROPE WEEK MIKKEL THOMMESSEN CLARE MCCOMB CLARE MCCOMB Above, left to right: even more delighted the

CLARE MCCOMB

Above, left to right:

even more delighted the following day when the 30SqM

Eileen II won her race despite rigging problems; Kjell Arne Myrann, the King’s sailing master; Penguin Café, Eileen II and Kelpie readying for a race

Sally III won her race, for he had been one of the driving forces in bringing her home to Son from Sweden in the 1990s and restoring her over 2,000 hours through a shivering winter, with a small group of enthusiasts and funding from a local family of retired shipowners. Sally is important because she was Jac Iversen’s own yacht, built in his Son yard in 1920 and he had his greatest regatta successes in her – local sailors had brought her out of storage and into racing trim for Europe Week and she did them proud. Son is one of those places where it would be hard to live and not interact with the water, swim and fish and sail. I know this because my grandparents fell in love there in 1910 doing just these things and boat designing/building roots go deep into the place. The hospitality was fantastic with a shrimp and salad supper for all, town bands and street theatre and local folk music and dance. We were sad to leave. On our way from Son to Oslo, vintage ships and steamers from the Heritage Festival passed by in the opposite direction as we raced up the fjord, to great delight. I was on Eileen II with Peder Lunde Jr, Norway’s most famous yachtsman at the helm and although the rigging was spot-on this time it took all his years of Olympic and Whitbread round-the-world experience to coax four knots out of her; lighter boats skimmed ahead as we waited for a breath of breeze that only arrived after the finish. Still, you could feel how powerfully she would handle, had the wind given her half a chance. The third and final mooring was in the shadow of Kongelig Norsk Seilforening (KNS), Oslo’s Royal Yacht Club, where competition was dulled by lack of wind over the last couple of days, causing race cancellations in

CLARE MCCOMB
CLARE MCCOMB

Left: 10-M yacht Tarpon II, veteran of 1914, restored just in time for 2014

the intermittent mirror calm. Apparently it had been hot and becalmed in 1914 too. People made the most of it, swimming and dressing up in Edwardian costume for the Oslo welcome party, admiring KNS boats including a

fine row of Knarrer and cementing friendships yachtside.

I was hijacked by a determined owner and his partner,

who invited me on board their 1946 40SqM Kristofersen spissgatter for the experience and some iced water. Designed only to cruise, she was a little dreamboat, perfect in every visible detail with only a few modern exchanges such as engine for icebox and a tiny fridge behind a wooden door. Even in the searing heat we were blissfully cool under the awning. I’d like to register my thanks that everyone courteously spoke English although

I was the only native speaker there. A champagne reception at the city hall the second night was followed on the last evening by a visit to the famous National Maritime Museum, of world heritage quality. We were allowed to wander and I was stunned to discover Johan Anker’s exquisite original drawings for King Harald’s Sira laid out on a wide table. Next to me a yacht owner was smiling to himself, having found some early pictures of his own boat in a dusty old book. Abel’s pre-World War One photographs of yachts are a national treasure and many images would hold Beken to ransom:

if you are ever in Oslo, make sure you visit. Afterwards King Harald oversaw the prizegiving to resounding cheers. The German visitors were very successful, champions in the 12s with Anitra as well as two of the five cruising categories, and popular winners. The yachts I had picked out in Sandefjord had done very well: Pelham Olive’s Kelpie had won her battle with Raak and Cintra, and Sira had beaten Wanda; even 5.5 Fram II gained a good second place in her class. With a statesmanlike decision, the King awarded his personal prize to the Russian yacht Variag for coming all the way from St Petersburg and Peter Ennals, event organiser for KTK, gave an insightful speech about the need for international regattas to help maintain the classic boat enthusiasm of the world, while voicing his pleasure at how many families with small children had attended, because “they are the future”. We were all conscious that in that future, tireless volunteers will surely dedicate months of their lives to bring about a tri-centenary regatta just as Peter, Henrich Nissen-Lie (KNS) and their teams have for our historic event. There will be new humans celebrating in 2114 but it’s very likely many of these magnificent boats will still be racing.

in 2114 but it’s very likely many of these magnificent boats will still be racing. 14
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Logbook

Out and about

L o g b o o k Out and about Above, left to right: Two 12-Ms
L o g b o o k Out and about Above, left to right: Two 12-Ms

Above, left to right: Two 12-Ms in perfect conditions; crowds throng the shoreline; Erbil Arkin, owner of Tempus Fugit celebrates with Andy Green, British America’s Cup tactician

Opera House Cup
Opera House Cup

American classics

PHOTOGRAPHY INGRID ABERY

A cherished tradition, the Panerai Opera House Cup Regatta, is held on the third Sunday of every August on Nantucket and is the grand finale of Nantucket Race Week. The regatta was the first all-wooden, single-hulled classic boat regatta on the East Coast, and attracts some of the finest sailboats in the country. Past participants include former

America’s Cup winners (Intrepid, Weatherly, Columbia),

well-known competitors (Shamrock, Endeavor) and such other notable yachts as the Mystic Seaport schooner Brilliant and General Patton’s When and If. On the smaller side, prestigious boats in the Dragon class and the classic Herreshoff-designed and Nantucket-built Alerions challenged the big boys.

and Nantucket-built Alerions challenged the big boys. Main image: Crew and skipper of Tempus Fugit celebrating

Main image: Crew and skipper of Tempus Fugit celebrating Above: The rainbow fleet of the all-American Beetle Cats

JAMES HAMILTON

Tell Tales

STAR CLASS

See more news on our website:

www.classicboat.co.uk CB address and tel; please see page 7

‘Star’ lot – JFK’s boat for sale

Flash II, the Star Class keelboat owned by John F Kennedy, has just had a
Flash II, the Star Class
keelboat owned by John
F Kennedy, has just had
a cosmetic re-fit at BM
Boatworks in Seabrook,
Texas, in readiness for
auction. Boatbuilder
Ben Miller, who used to
race in the Star Class,
took her for a
celebratory sail that
could be, if a museum
buys the boat, her last
ever. John F Kennedy was a keen
yachtsmen who owned the S&S yacht
Manitou (CB294) and the Wianno
Senior Victura (his favourite, according
to his biographers), as well as Flash II,
which he raced with some success as a
teenager. In addition to this, he had use
of the presidential yacht of the time,
Honey Fitz. The date of the auction, by
Heritage Auctions in New York, is 8
November, with internet bidding
starting a month before. The estimate
is
US$100,000.
TOM TAMBORELLO, LACY PHOTOS
ROBERT KNUDSEN, WHITE HOUSE/JOHN FITZGERALD KENNEDY LIBRARY, BOSTON
KNUDSEN, WHITE HOUSE/JOHN FITZGERALD KENNEDY LIBRARY, BOSTON THAMES SAILING BARGES 51st Southend Match Eleven Thames

THAMES SAILING BARGES

51st Southend Match

Eleven Thames Sailing Barges in three classes raced on 24 August o Southend, Essex. Winners were Adieu (bowsprit class), Edith May (staysail class) and Lady of the Sea (coasting class). This photo, with Reminder in the foreground, shows the fleet at dusk after the day’s racing.

Dolly 1914 C/O THE OWNER
Dolly
1914
C/O THE OWNER

A century of sail dredging

The Falmouth Working Boat Dolly, built of Scandinavian and pitch pine on oak by Peter Ferris of Looe in 1914, has dredged for oysters under sail for all but 15 years of her life, writes Nigel Sharp. Her first owner, Thomas Ferris, named her Five Sisters but she soon acquired the nickname Dolly. The Ferrises kept her until 1940. After the war, John Cock owned her. During his time, she broke her mooring and went aground one Christmas Eve in Restronguet Creek. In 1972, current owner Barry Prynn of Mylor bought her and started racing. In 1983 the oyster fishery was closed due to disease and Dolly was laid up for 15 years. Barry stopped racing her in 2010, but still owns her and dredges in her today.

CORRECTION The correct number for Summerwine Boats, who built the Buzzards Bay 15 (last month’s CB), is +44 (0)7711 117668. Also, VAT is not applicable, so the price of a boat is £70,000.

FALMOUTH-IsLe OF wIgHT-greenwIcH Tall Ships A fleet of 44 Tall Ships left Falmouth, Cornwall on

FALMOUTH-IsLe OF wIgHT-greenwIcH

Tall Ships

A fleet of 44 Tall Ships left Falmouth, Cornwall on 31 August (above), racing to a line south of St Catherine’s Point on the Isle of Wight. An estimated crowd of 100,000 watched from vantage points on land, while up to 1,000 spectator craft took to the water. The largest ship due to take part – the 376ft (115m) steel, Russian four-masted barque Kreuzenshtern – had to cancel after a disaster in

CHRISTIAN TOPF

Esbjerg, Denmark on 4 August, in which she towed the tug Diver Master to her sinking when a hawser failed to release. All three tug crew escaped to safety. The Tall Ship fleet is due to be in London from 5-9 September for a parade of sail. As we went to press, around half the fleet had crossed the finish line; our reporter on Lady of Avenel was still south of Portland. See more in future issues.

MERVYN MAGGS

MERVYN MAGGS scOTLAnD More protected waters The Scottish Government recently announced 30 new Marine Protected Areas,

scOTLAnD

More protected waters

The Scottish Government recently announced 30 new Marine Protected Areas, doubling Scotland’s protected sea area to 24 per cent. The designation came into force on 7 August, two weeks after the announcement. Marine wildlife pressure groups have unanimously endorsed the move, but some insiders say that the “protection” (from future “licenced activities”) is presently unambitious and ambiguous. RYA Scotland sees no impediment to the free passage of leisure craft.

eAsT sUsseX cOAsT

World’s biggest offshore wind farm planned

Amid the endless speculation about the future of our energy supply, it seems an answer is already coming to fruition but with little comment in the press. The recent announcement of the world’s biggest offshore wind farm for the East Sussex Coast is in just one episode of the success story of offshore wind power, in which Britain leads the world. The East Sussex farm, from German firm E.On, which received planning permission this July, makes impressive reading. If built, its 175 turbines, up to 200m (650ft) tall, would produce up to 700mW, enough to power 450,000 homes. There are about 25 million homes in Britain, so the farm – if and when completed by 2018/19 – would provide nearly two per cent of Britain’s entire domestic electricity supply. The potential for offshore wind farms to power every home in Britain is becoming clear. In December 2013, wind power provided more than a quarter of the domestic supply. More offshore farms either in build or at planning stage will increase current capacity five-fold over the next decade.

More offshore farms either in build or at planning stage will increase current capacity five-fold over

dragan miletic

TELL TALES

bALEAric iSLAndS

Around Mallorca in a fishing llaut

The latest adventure from Giacomo de Stefano, our 2013 Man of the Year, was coming to an end as we went to press. His round-Mallorca voyage was a short hop compared to his first big trip from London to Istanbul in a dinghy; but no day sail either. One of Giacomo’s maxims is to travel slowly, and this voyage, conducted in an 18ft (5.5m) lateen-rigged fishing llaut with friend David Ramon Oliver, is 300nM long. Giacomo is an extraordinary character. Since dropping out of conventional life to raise environmental awareness, he has survived largely on barter and donation. His is an enemy of speed, the throw-away culture and environmental brutality. He has had considerable success in his endeavours in the past and the Volta Mallorca project, as it was called, was conducted to raise awareness of Mallorca’s ecological problems, one of the biggest being an overwhelming tourist influx that consumes 400 million bottles of water every

summer. These end up either incinerated or littering the island’s beautiful bays. This did not stop him enjoying the trip, particularly the unspoilt northern coast, and the boat itself, which belongs to David. She’s a 1940-built traditional llaut, the local version of the sort of stout double- ended fishing craft that is found on the shores of every nation in the Mediterranean. “It’s really easy to drop the sail in a squall,” reports Giacomo. “Our highest winds were 20-22 knots – perhaps a little more in the squalls – but the low centre of effort meant we never even had to think about reefing.” Never one to mince his words, he reports that the main problem came from exuberant powerboat users creating wash – “the usual Mediterranean attitude, individualistic, egotistic and selfish.” His next project will be a grander version of his London-Istanbul voyage, a 27,000-mile odyssey conducted in up to five boats and lasting five years.

conducted in up to five boats and lasting five years. Top to bottom: Giacomo at the

Top to bottom:

Giacomo at the oars; Giacomo and david; at sea

In the meanwhile, he will be busy with another restoration project as he travels to Faversham, Kent in autumn to begin work on the 24ft 8in (7.5m)

gaff cutter Jennie of Paglesham, built

in 1947 on the bones of a yacht dating back to 1885. Apparently quite a bit of the 1885 material is extant and Giacomo hopes to save this. We look forward to catching up with him this autumn and learning more about the next big project.

nICO MARTInEz

TELL TALES

nICO MARTInEz TELL TALES 30Th AnnuAL ConDE DE BArCELonA Sailing fun but shoreside sterile – calls

30Th AnnuAL ConDE DE BArCELonA

Sailing fun but shoreside sterile – calls made for a return to Palma

Reports from the 30th annual Conde de Barcelona, held in the modern port of Alcudia on the Balearic island of Mallorca this 20-24 August have been rather negative. Our correspondent Annie Smith writes: “I have always been a fan of this regatta and was heavily involved with one of the yachts that raced in it for many years. Last year I mentioned in CB that although the racing was great, there were few boats and a shake up of the organising committee was needed. It never happened. Racing on

the water was fun but between races it could be “rather quiet” to put it mildly. Many people are trying to keep the regatta alive including Jonathan Syrett who has put much effort into it over the years. Perhaps we might see it back in Palma in 2015 and encourage more boat owners to compete in what was the most prestigious meeting.” Giacomo (facing page) was there too and confirmed the need to return to Palma. Winner in the classic class was Emeraude, followed by Carillon of Wight and Jolly Roger.

Carillion of Wight chasing hallowe’en

GARY BLAkE

GARY BLAkE CoWES, ioW Victory Class celebrates 80 years After racing at Cowes Week had ended

CoWES, ioW

Victory Class celebrates 80 years

After racing at Cowes Week had ended on 6 August, a special ‘One Hour Victory’ race off the Royal Yacht Squadron was held to commemorate the 80th anniversary year for the class. The race, in which each boat was crewed by a Cowes Week sponsor, was won by Chatham Marine, ahead of Volvo and Solent Events. The 20ft 9in (6.4m) Victory keelboat is now made in glassfibre and is popular locally.

Gary Blake

 

SAinT-TropEz

WorD of

Centenarians to race again

ThE monTh

Retreenailed

Spoken of a ship when she has had thorough repair and new treenails put into her.

Some 14 yachts, eight new to the event, will race in the fourth annual Gstaad Yacht Club’s Centenary Trophy at Les Voiles de Saint-Tropez on 2 October. The new entries are a diverse bunch, ranging from the Linton Hope schooner Morwenna, to racing designs including the Fife III Cork Harbour One Design Jap and survivors from the 7-M and 8-M classes. This is Marigold, right.

A Dictionary of Sea Terms, A Ansted

C/O THE ORGAnISERS
C/O THE ORGAnISERS

Cornwall’s

rose

After years of building commercial fishing boats by eye and fitting out superyachts, Cornish boatbuilder Peter Moor decided to build his first sailing yacht. She won her category at our 2014 awards and she’s a real “piece of furniture”

story and PHotoGraPHs NIGEL SHARP

WHITE ROSE OF MEVAGISSEY

WHITE ROSE OF MEVAGISSEY Clockwise from top left: bowsprit traveller and bronze furler; mainsheet block with
WHITE ROSE OF MEVAGISSEY Clockwise from top left: bowsprit traveller and bronze furler; mainsheet block with

Clockwise from

top left: bowsprit traveller and bronze furler; mainsheet block with its own cleat; gooseneck pin rails made by Peter; tiller aperture in the transom bulwark

T he winner of Classic Boat’s 2014 Traditional New Build award was Peter Moor’s White Rose of Mevagissey, a boat which was almost twenty years in the making. Peter began his boatbuilding apprenticeship with his father John in

1978, which led to a partnership building and repairing commercial fishing boats at their Mevagissey yard. From time to time when orders have been thin on the ground, Peter has also worked at Falmouth’s Pendennis Shipyard. In the mid-1990s, having never built a boat for himself or a sailing boat for anyone, Peter found that he had “an itch to scratch”. He was particularly drawn to a picture he had seen of Wanderer II, the gaff cutter designed by Jack Laurent Giles for Eric and Susan Hiscock in 1935. “That was where we got our inspiration,” he told me. “The rig and everything on that boat appealed to me.” So he decided to design and build a new boat. His starting point was to make a 1:16-scale half model and take its lines, a technique he and John had used for many years for fishing boats. “The great thing about making a model,” said Peter, “is that you can hold it up and see what you’ve got. You can even touch it and feel any imperfections in the shape.”

Peter has never seen a lines plan of Wanderer II so it is only possible to compare the dimensions of the two designs: Peter’s is 6in (15cm) longer (on deck and on the waterline), 7in (17.5cm) wider and 1in (2.5cm) deeper but she displaces a tonne more and has a substantially greater sail area. Whereas Wanderer II had a pole mast and a loose-luffed topsail, Peter’s mast is shorter and his topsail has a luff pole: “for less windage, Cornish style”. This leads us to a neat designer and geographical connection. In 1936 Jack Laurent Giles’s staff included a draughtsman called John Tew (who, it is thought, may have produced the lines for the Vertue on Giles’s behalf) and who designed a gaff cutter, slightly larger than Wanderer II, for himself and his fiancée Helen. The boat was built by Percy Mitchell in Port Mellon less than a mile from Peter’s yard and christened Mary Helen, and over sixty years later Helen Tew famously sailed her across the Atlantic with her son. It wasn’t until 2000 that Peter found the time, the money and the space in his shed to start assembling his new boat’s centreline structure: the wood keel, sternpost and deadwood in English oak, bolted together with bronze bolts; and the stem and its apron in laminated iroko, glued together with epoxy and bolted to the keel

as one unit. The choice of material here came from reservations that Peter has, in

as one unit. The choice of material here came from reservations that Peter has, in common with many other boatbuilders, about gluing oak. “It can be very good but sometimes it will spring apart even with these so-called wonder epoxies,” he said. Fore-and aft ribbands were laid over athwartships moulds, 7/8 x 1¼in (22x32mm) English oak frames were steamed inside them, and then 7/8in (22mm)-thick Scottish larch planks were fitted, copper clenched to the frames and with their ends fastened into the stem and sternpost with bronze screws. The stringers, beamshelf and most of the deck structure are larch but the deck beams for the coachroof are grown oak. “I got hold of a lovely board perfectly shaped for the camber,” said Peter, “and you can’t get any better than that.” There is a ½in (12mm) Anchor plywood sub-deck – Lloyds approved with a 20-year guarantee – and on top of that a ½in-thick Burmese teak laid deck. Peter decided that this would not be fully swept, partly because of the difficulty of bending parallel planks on such a short boat, particularly the inboard ones forward, “and because it would make the boat look too short”. So the deck is semi-swept, with the side deck planks running parallel to the coamings and joggled into both the covering boards and king plank.

and joggled into both the covering boards and king plank. Above: Nav area, engine box, companionway

Above: Nav area, engine box, companionway step and galley area. Left:

Reaching along the Cornish coast

Top: Peter takes the helm. He says he got her up to 8 knots with
Top: Peter takes the helm. He says he got her up to 8 knots with

Top: Peter takes the helm. He says he got her up to 8 knots with full main and both headsails in a Force 3 last summer Above: Sea trials

For more photographs of White Rose visit – www.classicboat.co.uk

Peter made the pattern for the 2-tonne iron ballast keel and sent it to Irons Brothers for casting, but not until the boat was about two thirds complete. “I preferred to keep the money in my pocket as long as I could,” he said. When Peter started building the boat, his plan was to cruise her with wife Maryse – whose father was a Breton fisherman – and their daughters, Dominique and Tamsin, then 13 and 10. However, the boat took much longer to build than he ever imagined and she wasn’t launched until May 2013, by which time his children had grown up and left home. “This was because I had to do it all in between building other boats or working at Pendennis, and as the budget would allow,” he told me. “When I started, all I could afford to buy was a pile of wood.” Peter’s new boat was named White Rose of Mevagissey for several reasons: ‘White Rose’ is a traditional Cornish folk song he used to sing when he was gig rowing, Rose is his mother’s name and Tamsin’s middle name, and he has punts called Rosen (Cornish for Rose) and June Rose. I met Peter and White Rose in Mevagissey on a sunny blustery day in July. He had only just got her ready for the new season – once again he had been prioritising his paying work – and had not yet moved her to her summer mooring in the Fowey River. When we got on board he

WHITE ROSE OF MEVAGISSEY

WHITE ROSE OF MEVAGISSEY introduced me to his French friend Alain who would be sailing with
WHITE ROSE OF MEVAGISSEY introduced me to his French friend Alain who would be sailing with

introduced me to his French friend Alain who would be sailing with us and who very quickly referred to Peter as

on board

inside faces sit tight to the mast, and their bevelled edges but up against their neighbours. “Mast wedges are funny

Above, clockwise from top left:

“a perfectionist”. But I was already able to see that for myself: the standard of finish throughout the boat, both in terms of the quality of construction and the surface coatings, is outstanding.

things. They are either falling out or they are too tight and damaging everything around them,” said Peter. “Hopefully we have got those about right,” he added with typical modesty. The interior layout is simple but practical: the forepeak has a vee-berth with an infill, below which is a

Traditional skylight and grown oak deck beams over the saloon; teak, teak and more teak

The most striking feature about White Rose, inside and out, is the amount of varnished teak: below decks the joinery is mostly constructed from 3/8in (9mm) plywood with ¼in (6mm) teak on top of it – tongue and groove on the main cabin bulkhead and furniture fronts – with solid teak locker doors; while on deck the bulwarks and capping, coamings, forehatch, companionway hatch, traditional skylight and the handrails are all solid teak. “I like teak,” said Peter, with considerable understatement. “In fact there are only five types of wood in life: larch, oak, teak, iroko and firewood!” Perhaps the single thing which best illustrates Peter’s “perfectionist” tag are the varnished oak mast wedges, about 3in (75mm) of which are visible beneath the deckhead. They are notoriously difficult to fit: their outside shape meets an octagonal hole, their concave

Blakes Lavac heads; in the saloon there are two settee berths with a folding leaf table between them and shelves with 4½in (114mm)-deep fiddles outboard; aft of that there is a galley to port with a sink and two-burner Origo meths cooker; and to starboard there is a nav area that includes instruments and a switch panel mounted in opening doors which allow easy access to the wiring. The engine box over the Beta 20hp diesel provides a useful seat for the galley or for the navigation area. Some white-painted areas provide a welcome contrast to the dark teak, as does the lighter coloured cabin sole which is Alaskan yellow cedar, a timber that Peter particularly likes, despite not making his “five types of wood” list. Many of the deck fittings are bronze including the sheet tracks, fairleads and portholes from Davey and Co, and four self-tailing winches from LVJ in Holland. The

– the port side of the saloon; locker door showing vent hole detail; forward cabin showing heads below the infill

WHITE ROSE OF MEVAGISSEY

JACK WOOD FRANK NOON, Cb ARChives
JACK WOOD
FRANK NOON, Cb ARChives

Above left: Painting

stainless steel mainsheet horse was made from a piece of

depicts Wanderer II under the solo command of Eric Hiscock in 1937 Above right: Mark Horton of BBC’s ‘Coast’ series presenting Peter with CB’s ‘Best trad new build

rod rigging rescued from a boat being refitted with carbon fibre rigging at Pendennis. That and the other stainless steel deck and spar fittings were mostly fabricated by Peter himself: he cut out the parts and tack-welded them together and, after a sub-contractor had fully welded them, he polished them, a partial throwback to the days when pretty much everything that went into a new boat would be produced by its builders. Peter also made the spars, all in Douglas fir and glued with West epoxy. The bowsprit is solid and has some downward pre-bend in it

under 40ft’ award

“I’ve seen the Falmouth Working Boats do that so it

in March in London

must be right” – and the boom was made in two halves, hollowed out traditionally. But having made them, Peter thought he would try a more modern technique for the

mast and gaff, which were made up from eight staves in

a

bird’s mouth construction and vacuum bagged. The

sails were made by SKB Sails in Falmouth using Richard

Hayward’s Sunwing Classic cream cloth.

Sailing

Below: The half-model that

There was a blustery offshore Force 5 blowing when White Rose left Mevagissey. Peter initially chose to sail with just a double-reefed mainsail and staysail with the

was scaled up to

jib left furled, an entirely sensible decision that gave us

build White Rose

a

nicely balanced sail plan. White Rose has a lively turn

WHITE ROSE OF MEVAGISSEY LOA DRAught 24ft 6in (7.5m) 5ft (1.5m) LWL sAiL AReA 21ft
WHITE ROSE OF MEVAGISSEY
LOA
DRAught
24ft 6in (7.5m)
5ft (1.5m)
LWL
sAiL AReA
21ft (6.4m)
600sqft (56m 2 )
beAm
DisPLACemeNt
7ft 8in (2.3m)
5 tonnes

of speed and on a close reach we managed a constant 6.5 knots and a burst of 7.2, and Peter told me that he got her up to 8 knots with full main and both headsails in a Force 3 last summer. She is relatively unhindered by the drag of her stern gear as she has a self-feathering Max-Prop. Peter told me that this was “probably three or four times the price of a fixed-blade prop” but that it was “money well spent”, and he is also very pleased with the way she handles under power. Later in our sail Peter unfurled the jib for a short time when broad reaching. Peter didn’t get to use White Rose much in her first season, although one memorable voyage was cruising in company with the Falmouth Working Boats on their annual passage race to Fowey, at the end of which he was pleased that he was still quite close behind them. At some point he and Maryse hope to sail to south Brittany where they have a house. “The dream has always been to moor White Rose in front of the house,” said Peter. However, although he has every confidence in the boat, he sensibly recognises that Maryse is not an experienced sailor and that there is “no point in getting her on board and scaring her half to death”. For now, he is as aware as anyone of the delightful harbours along the Devon and Cornwall coasts each side of Fowey. In the meantime White Rose needs a bit more work including some trimming ballast up forward. His initial thought that she might need as much as 250kg (550lb) has been allayed somewhat by the 200ft (61m) of anchor chain right forward. He still needs to get a topsail made and also plans to fit a manual windlass. When I asked Peter how many hours he took to build White Rose he was only able to say “a lot”. Although he built her very much for himself she is, perhaps as much as many boats are, for sale. “If someone were to come along with a nice cheque I think they could have her and I’d build another,” he told me. “But this time I’d have the money to do it full-time and much quicker.” Peter attended the CB awards ceremony with his daughter Dominique. While he is clearly more at home in a Cornish boatyard than in a Mayfair watch showroom, he greatly enjoyed the experience and is clearly thrilled with the award. “It’s great that people took the trouble to vote,” he told me, “and it’s nice to be recognised for something that took so long. We never see anyone on the quay when we are working through the winter and it’s good to feel appreciated.”

petermoorboatbuilder@hotmail.com

the winter and it’s good to feel appreciated.” petermoorboatbuilder@hotmail.com 28 CLASSIC BOAT OCTOBER 2014
SPERRY TOP-SIDER NAME AND SYMBOL ARE REGISTERED TRADEMARKS OF SR HOLDINGS LLC available at sperrytopsider.co.uk
SPERRY TOP-SIDER NAME AND SYMBOL ARE REGISTERED TRADEMARKS OF SR HOLDINGS LLC
SPERRY TOP-SIDER NAME AND SYMBOL ARE REGISTERED TRADEMARKS OF SR HOLDINGS LLC
SPERRY TOP-SIDER NAME AND SYMBOL ARE REGISTERED TRADEMARKS OF SR HOLDINGS LLC available at sperrytopsider.co.uk
SPERRY TOP-SIDER NAME AND SYMBOL ARE REGISTERED TRADEMARKS OF SR HOLDINGS LLC available at sperrytopsider.co.uk

available at sperrytopsider.co.uk

Mariquita

TheTh historyhi t off a legend
TheTh
historyhi t
off a legend

She might look majestic now, but Mariquita spent years languishing in the mud at Pin Mill in Suffolk as a house boat. Here’s the story of her landmark restoration and how her 2014 owners and crew are respecting her heritage by continuing to race her hard and fast

STORY AND PHOTOGRAPHS BEN WOOD

Above: Mariquita (in the foreground) racing Corona , 1912 Right: John Caulcutt helming in Cannes

Above: Mariquita

(in the foreground) racing Corona, 1912 Right: John Caulcutt helming in Cannes – summer 2013

BEN WOOD
BEN WOOD

A s the only remaining 19-M in commission, Mariquita is widely regarded as one of the rarest and most beautiful classic yachts sailing today. Designed and built for industrialist Arthur Stothert by William Fife III, she

was launched in 1911 at Fairlie on the Clyde in Scotland. As a gaff-rigged cutter Mariquita is a direct link to the historic Big Class and a precursor to the J-Class that would follow in the 1930s. Mariquita is one of the most iconic yachts in the history of the sport and her career spanning over a century is one of the great maritime stories. In May 1911, Mariquita joined three other 19-Ms, Octavia, Norada and Corona, in a new class that caught the imagination of the sailing public in the years leading

to World War One. The new 19-M class fulfilled the aspiration to have a matched class of big cutters. The three great British designers of the day were represented with Charles E Nicholson and Alfred Mylne contributing a design each and the leading designer of the day William Fife III contributing two. Mariquita combined Fife’s design with the high build quality of his celebrated yard.

MERSEA MARITIME MUSEUM

MERSEA MARITIME MUSEUM

MARIQUITA

E A M A R I T I M E M U S E U M
E A M A R I T I M E M U S E U M
G.L. WATSON
G.L. WATSON

BEKEN OF COWES

The ‘Great 19s’ travelled far and wide: The Clyde,

Rowhedge, Wyvenhoe and Brightlingsea. Captains such

Above from top:

Cork, Harwich, Cowes, Dartmouth and abroad to Kiel and Le Havre. Mariquita performed admirably in the three seasons from 1911-1913, especially in light winds. Not only was the arrival of the 19-M class unexpected, but the quality of racing was astonishing: after five hours, the yachts often finished within seconds of each other. The threat of war in 1913 stopped competitive sailing in its tracks. William Burton, the owner of Octavia, put her up for sale, marking the end of the 19-M class. Mariquita was sold in 1915, ending up in neutral Norway where she spent the war years. Mariquita returned to Great Britain after the war, but her time as a top-flight racing yacht was over. George V, The Sailor King, brought back the iconic yacht Britannia – and a new Big Class eclipsed the 19-Ms. Although Mariquita raced against her old rivals Octavia and Norada, under reduced rigs, it was in the handicap classes. It was the beginning of the end. It’s said that a crew is a ship’s lifeblood. Over the years, Mariquita’s captains and crew were drawn from the creeks of Essex and Suffolk, from villages like

as Edward Sycamore and Robert Wringe were local men who had learnt their craft on the fishing boats of the East Coast before graduating to yacht-racing. It was perhaps a sad irony that, in 1938, Mariquita returned to this area to end her sailing days. She was brought to West Mersea by Arthur Hempstead, whose firm undertook the decommissioning. Her fine mast was chopped away above the deck, her keel bolts let go and 40 tonnes of lead cut into scrap on the Mersea Hard. After a spell in Tollesbury, in Essex, the hulk of the once-beautiful yacht was towed to Woodbridge on the River Deben, where she served for a decade as a houseboat. Mariquita was then moved to Pin Mill, on the River Orwell, in 1958. This was expected to be her final resting place. One by one all the 19s had turned their bows inland to expire in the mud – to decay and vanish. After 30 years as a houseboat in Suffolk, Mariquita appeared doomed. However, the timely intervention of William Collier and Albert Obrist in 1991 led to her landmark restoration at Fairlie Restorations. Although Mariquita’s original structure had stayed intact, a

Launching from the beach at Fairlie; Edward Sycamore (inset) and at the helm; languishing in the mud at Pin Mill waiting for better times

MARIQUITA

DAN HOUSTON BEN WOOD BEN WOOD BEN WOOD
DAN HOUSTON
BEN WOOD
BEN WOOD
BEN WOOD

complete rebuild was necessary before she could carry a 38-tonne keel and more than 1,000sqft (93m 2 ) of sail. After three painstaking years Mariquita finally appeared

Over a long career John has sailed a vast number of boats including Solings, Stars, Admiral’s Cup Boats, Maxis and then High Voltage the America’s Cup

John Caulcutt, Stephen Hemsley, Nick Edmiston and

Top: racing at Naples in 2013 Above from left:

in 2004 and was recommissioned under the captaincy of Jim Thom. With Mariquita’s restoration, her owners sought not only to to save a unique yacht, but also the quality ethos to which she was built and raced back in 1911. “The Mariquita Project” was one of the most professional and well-resourced classic yacht programmes ever undertaken. This was classic sailing pushed to a never-before-seen level. So started a highly successful nine-year campaign that saw Mariquita star at regattas throughout Europe from The Fife Regatta in Scotland, The Westward Cup in Cowes and countless regattas in the Mediterranean. However in 2012, Mariquita was unexpectedly offered for sale – and a new era for this remarkable yacht began. Her new co-owner John Caulcutt takes up the story: “I received this call from William Collier: the opportunity to own Mariquita. Gosh, that’s not the sort of call you get every day. What an opportunity – the chance of a lifetime to own this thoroughbred of classic racing yachts; one of the most beautiful boats ever built and certainly one of the most beautiful still around today. To be given that opportunity by William was something that I wholly welcomed at the time and have absolutely no regrets at the end of our first season of having made that decision to put a syndicate together.”

Challenge boat. He had always admired the big classics and when the opportunity came along in 2012 it seemed the right time. “Taking on the challenge of ownership of Mariquita was an easy decision for me to make,” he says. “It completed the spectrum of the wide variety of boats that I had owned and helmed over the years. It also completed the circle, as my first offshore boat Mayfly, a Mersea Bay oyster-catcher, was gaff -rigged. Going back to a classic gaff-rigged boat once again seemed like a natural way forward for me.” After a brief meeting at the Royal Thames Yacht Club, John quickly put a syndicate of four like-minded yachtsmen together. Mariquita had four new owners:

Jamie Matheson. To prepare for the transition, the new syndicate was invited to take part on Mariquita during her 2012 season which included the Pendennis Cup in Falmouth, the Régates Royales de Cannes and Les Voiles de Saint-Tropez. “We had a lovely summer sailing season in 2012 on Mariquita, a bonus year if you like, getting to know the boat, getting to know some of the people, getting to understand better the type of deal that we would need to put together with the previous ownership into a format that we felt would preserve that spirit of tradition that was very important to the previous owners

photo taken to mark Mariquita’s Centenary in 2011 with Jim Thom as captain; racing in 2010 during the Westward Cup off the Isle of Wight; three of the new owners, John Caulcutt, Stephen Hemsley, Jamie Matheson and skipper George Newman (2nd from left)

STOCKBRIDGE

YACHT

BROKERS

STOCKBRIDGE YACHT BROKERS Winner in Spirit of Tradition division and Panerai Grand Prix division at 2014
STOCKBRIDGE YACHT BROKERS Winner in Spirit of Tradition division and Panerai Grand Prix division at 2014
STOCKBRIDGE YACHT BROKERS Winner in Spirit of Tradition division and Panerai Grand Prix division at 2014

Winner in Spirit of Tradition division and Panerai Grand Prix division at 2014 Nantucket Opera House Cup

Grand Prix division at 2014 Nantucket Opera House Cup GOSHAWK Builder: 23m / 76’ Brooklin Boat

GOSHAWK

Builder:

23m / 76’

Brooklin Boat Yard Year: 2005 Price: $ 1.895M

Length:

www.stockbridgeyachts.com

info@stockbridgeyachts.com

O: +44 1725 510738 M: +44 7788 925337

BOATYARD OF THE YEAR Discover more at www.tnielsen.co.uk +44 (0)1452 301117 Bristol Channel Pilot Cutters
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OF THE YEAR
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+44 (0)1452 301117 Bristol Channel Pilot Cutters Mascotte and Olga racing 36 CLASSIC BOAT OCTOBER 2014

For more photographs of Mariquita visit www.classicboat.co.uk

MARIQUITA

and very important to us. I don’t think you can take on a boat like Mariquita unless you are prepared to embrace that spirit of tradition, that legacy and heritage and pedigree – everything that William Fife epitomised. He designed her and she was built as a race boat. We took her on as a race boat. That has been our focus this year

– to take Mariquita on as a race boat – to compete on the classic circuit.” The new syndicate embarked on an ambitious season in the Med including five of the Panerai events plus the Puig Vela Classica in Barcelona, Monaco Classic Week and Les Voiles de Saint-Tropez. It was a steep learning curve as John Caulcutt explains: “Helming Mariquita is unique. To race this gaff cutter as she was intended to be sailed, without winches or any other power, is a defining experience. It’s a huge responsibility, with a crew of 23 and no guard rails. Like any boat, she has a sweet spot. For Mariquita, it’s in 10-12 knots

of breeze going to windward – and the boat has a groove and it feels absolutely fantastic when you’re there. Get her in 25 knots of breeze, let alone any more, and the whole thing becomes a very different experience. When the boat becomes

paramount. It took time for the new crew to bed in but by the fourth regatta in Barcelona the skipper George Newman was seeing signs of real improvement: “The teamwork is really beginning to come together. When we started the season in Antibes it was a shock to us how much we had to learn. All the crew now know their systems and it’s starting to click.” Despite some dramatic conditions in both Mahon and Cannes and some very close racing with her great rivals Moonbeam IV and Cambria, Mariquita arrived in Saint-Tropez for the final regatta of the season in good shape with six podium finishes under her belt. The Voiles de Saint-Tropez is always a fitting finish to the season and the 2013 event did not disappoint, as the final race on the Saturday unfolded. Crew member Matty Oates

recalls “On the last approach to Saint-Tropez, there is a small dog-leg which the boats have to take, with a gate at the end. Sailing through the

fleet (spectator boats everywhere), we’re coming in on Moonbeam IV from weather; we’re calling for water because we’re about to hit the buoy. Moonbeam IV is calling for water because she is

“Big jackyard topsail up, totally overpowered, lee rail under, crew up to ”

their waists in water

 

loaded up, it’s a handful – I mean a real handful! You have 25ft (7.6m) of boom overhanging the transom. If you come to the weather mark and you want to bear away, unless that mainsheet is dumped, you

about to hit Seche rock. To have these two near identical boats gliding through this tiny gate at such incredible speeds on the final day of the season, with so much drama going around us, was

through this tiny gate at such incredible speeds on the final day of the season, with

don’t have a hope. You cannot physically move the wheel.

incredible.” It was certainly a great way to round off a

It’s not a question of strength

it’s a question of dynamics.”

memorable first season for the syndicate. As John

Below from left:

The syndicate was helped by inheriting some of the existing Mariquita crew, who had earned their stripes under the previous skipper Jim Thom. As John Caulcutt explains: “Inheriting such a fantastic crew with George Newman stepping up to the mark as skipper – being able to preserve that continuity that would have taken years, like it took Jim Thom years to create, we were able to pick up the baton and keep running. George, Matty Oates, Billy Butler, Tubby Brook – they were all there for

Caulcutt adds: “To be in Saint-Tropez with Mariquita with a forecast of 10-12 knots of breeze and suddenly finding ourselves in 25-30 knots, with the big jackyard topsail up, totally overpowered, lee rail under, crew up to their waists in water, was memorable stuff for everyone on the water. What an unforgettable day’s racing to end the season.” Mariquita’s 2014 season is going well. Having won the Big Boat class at Argentario Sailing Week, she’s well placed in the Panerai standings.

her lifering; racing off St Tropez

us, fulfilling those key functions on the boat.” With a yacht as complex as Mariquita where everything is done by hand, working as a team is

With Vele D’Epoca di Imperia and Régates Royales Cannes left to go, this could be her year to win the coveted Panerai trophy.

BeN WOOD BeN WOOD
BeN WOOD
BeN WOOD

Latifa

Latifa William Fife III 70 ft Yawl 1936 € 2.5M Lying Italy Designed by William Fife
Latifa William Fife III 70 ft Yawl 1936 € 2.5M Lying Italy Designed by William Fife

William Fife III 70 ft Yawl 1936

2.5M Lying Italy

Designed by William Fife III at the peak of his powers in 1936 - not only has LATIFA been widely regarded by yachting luminaries to the present day as the best of all his designs – but the great man himself considered her to be his finest.

Mere mention of her name imparts a legendary tone to any yachting conversation and as one of Fife’s last designs kept one foot in the past while putting the other firmly in the future. Second in the 1937 and ’39 Fastnet Races, she also had a class win in the first post war race in 1947.

Thoroughly, sensitively and immaculately restored, LATIFA is strong with up to date systems and equipment and sensible accommodation for long distant cruises in great comfort. In her current ownership LATIFA’s special capabilities are marked by achieving 12 single handed transatlantic crossings and a circumnavigation with her owner’s family as crew. It is a very special 70 ft yacht from any era that can be sailed by one man alone!

33 High Street, Poole BH15 1AB, England. Tel: + 44 (0)1202 330077

email: info@sandemanyachtcompany.co.uk

www.sandemanyachtcompany.co.uk

C/O CHArLeS MILLer LTd

Saleroom

C/O CHArLeS MILLer LTd Saleroom C/O rM AuCTIOnS RM AUCTIONS C ar auctioneer finds boat market
C/O CHArLeS MILLer LTd Saleroom C/O rM AuCTIOnS RM AUCTIONS C ar auctioneer finds boat market
C/O rM AuCTIOnS
C/O rM AuCTIOnS

RM AUCTIONS

Car auctioneer finds boat market buoyant

BY DAVE SELBY

RM Auctions, which bills itself as the world’s leading international auction house for investment-grade automobiles, is also making waves in the classic boat scene. The Canadian company’s July classic car auction in Michigan, USA, featured a 1930 Gar Wood triple cockpit 28ft runabout, which made $275,000 (£165,000). One of only 52 model 28-40 runabouts built in 1930, the 200bhp six-cylinder Scripps powered vessel has been restored to the highest standards. Next up at RM’s Hershey, Pennsylvannia classic car auction on 9-10 October are a pair of collectible Chris-Crafts. Muse, a 26ft 1930

Model 111 built for the president of Colgate Palmolive, was discovered in a Minessota boat yard and has been restored to show winning standard, taking Best of Show at the Keels and Wheels concours in Texas. Although her original 250hp 824 cubic-inch (13.5 litres) Chris-Craft A-120 824 has been lost to history she has been fitted with a correct-type 1930 A-120 replacement. She’s expected to fetch $250,000-300,000 (£150,000-

180,000).

Runaway Jane is one of just three

Top to bottom:

27ft runabouts built in 1941. In place of her original engine is a 300bhp 8.2-litre Mercruiser, upgrading performance over the original A-120 engine. Her estimate is $225,000- 275,000 (£135,000-165,000).

Gar Wood runabout; Muse was built for the president of Colgate; beautiful dials in Muse

CHARLES MILLER LTD

Lively bidding

When rarity, quality and historical interest combine, the pre-sale auction estimates can go out the window, as was the case when this circa 1800 Admiralty Board frame model came under the hammer at Charles Miller Ltd’s last London maritime auction. The exquisitely crafted 1:48 scale 45-inch long model constructed in steamed box wood with pinned stringing is thought to be of the 38-gun HMS Lively. Launched in 1804, she soon saw action off Cadiz, but came to an ignominious end in 1810 when she ran aground and was wrecked off Malta, due to the incompetence of her master who was court martialled and “dismissed the ship and ordered to serve before the mast.” On auction day the model quickly breezed past its £8,000-12,000 estimate to sell for £37,200. Charles Miller Limited’s next London maritime auction is on 29 October.

Limited’s next London maritime auction is on 29 October. BONHAMS Watercolour from a floating studio Bending

BONHAMS

Watercolour from a floating studio

Bending on the Grapple is a fine example of the watercolour technique of renowned marine artist Henry Scott Tuke (1858-1929) who converted a French brigantine, Julie, into a floating studio. Indeed, the distinctive green bulwarks suggest this 1893 painting may even have been set on board Julie. Henry sold this painting for £12 12 shillings back then but at a Bonhams 19th century art auction this characteristically romantic painting made £9,375.

C/O BOnHAMS
C/O BOnHAMS

Objects of desire

Objects of desire John Groves historic paintings A corvette, nearly all plain sail set, beats out

John Groves historic paintings

A corvette, nearly all plain sail set, beats out of the Solent against a background of a passing squall over Portsmouth, during the wars with France. She is a flush decked vessel

of war with one tier of guns, small and fast, and

designated as a naval escort. As you can see, John Groves not only accurately captures the historic drama and action of life on the sea, he also manages to emulate the style

and palette of the bygone marine artists (Original Pastel 20in x 30in). Similar pictures sell for around £2,500.

www.johngroves.org

Similar pictures sell for around £2,500. www.johngroves.org Mount Gay 1703 rum Mount Gay rum has always
Similar pictures sell for around £2,500. www.johngroves.org Mount Gay 1703 rum Mount Gay rum has always

Mount Gay 1703 rum

Mount Gay rum has always been an old friend of the sailor. If you are inspired to spend over £100 on a bottle then you may want to turn your nose towards the Mount Gay 1703 – marking the year the distillery opened. Master blender Allen Smith has created it from reserves aged between 10 to 30 years. The taste is described as ‘oak-smokey honeyed nectar’ and it is already scoring high in international competitions.

www.mountgayrum.com

Bill Bishop brushwork

Pictured here is Bill’s latest commissioned oil on canvas (£22,000) – and it’s a beauty. It shows Sincerity, Sumurun and Mariella racing away from the start of the Antigua Classic Regatta. Bill tells us he has worked to capture the movement of the yachts in the swell and the bright Caribbean colouring of sea and sky. Bill spent much of his childhood cruising under sail, then later racing and maintaining his own dinghies and wooden keel-boats, competing in a number of Cowes Weeks and National Championships. Since deciding to paint full-time in 1981 he has attended a number of classic regattas and has been invited to race aboard several classic yachts, experiences he says that have inspired him to record on canvas.

www.bishopmarineart.com

Fish prints

Here’s a chance to have some of Jonathan Couch’s beautiful fish artwork on your wall. Scanned from his 1865 book, ‘Fishes of the British Isles’, a choice of four (herring, pilchard, mackerel and sprat/whitebait) are available in 40cm x 30cm frames. They are Giclée printed on 225gsm Somerset Velvet Enhanced paper, using pigmented inks which give a guaranteed light fastness of 200 years. The scan is at 300dpi and the print at 1400 dpi. The glass is clear and the frame moulding is 21mm wide, coloured green with gold and blue bands. Other fish from the book (nearly 300) can be requested. Each £75 plus p&p.

fishoutofwatergallery@gmail.com

Each £75 plus p&p. fishoutofwatergallery@gmail.com For more Objects of Desire, go to classicboat.co.uk/objects

The Norfolk Gypsy

Manor Farm, Glandford, Holt, Norfolk NR25 7JP • +44 (0) 1263 741172 info@neilthompsonboats.co.uk www.neilthompsonboats.co.uk

info @ neilthompsonboats.co.uk www.neilthompsonboats.co.uk Norfolk Urchin Norfolk Oyster Norfolk Gypsy Neil

Norfolk Urchin

www.neilthompsonboats.co.uk Norfolk Urchin Norfolk Oyster Norfolk Gypsy Neil Thompson Boats

Norfolk Oyster

www.neilthompsonboats.co.uk Norfolk Urchin Norfolk Oyster Norfolk Gypsy Neil Thompson Boats Dimensions Length Beam

Norfolk Gypsy

Norfolk Urchin Norfolk Oyster Norfolk Gypsy Neil Thompson Boats Dimensions Length Beam Draft Total

Neil Thompson Boats

Dimensions

Length Beam Draft Total sail area Weight

23’ 8” (7.28m) 7’ 6” (2.31 m) 1’8” (0.51m) 212 sq ft

1300kg

sail area Weight 23’ 8” (7.28m) 7’ 6” (2.31 m) 1’8” (0.51m) 212 sq ft 1300kg

Norfolk Smuggler

sail area Weight 23’ 8” (7.28m) 7’ 6” (2.31 m) 1’8” (0.51m) 212 sq ft 1300kg

Norfolk Trader

NIGEL PErt

Vive l’

HermIOne

She hit a sandbar off the Brittany coast 221 years ago and was only re-discovered in 1992. While her remains are on the sea bed, a replica Hermione has been built in France, to the tune of €25m. Now, the replica is about to take to the sea, and if she’s worthy, she will cross the Atlantic next year

story kevin desmond PHotoGrAPHs PhiliP Plisson and nigel Pert

T his September, a full-scale replica of the 18th-century frigate Hermione begins her sailing trials. While the original was built by several thousand workers in just 11 months, the replica Hermione has taken a resolute band of modern-day craftsmen

some 17 years to complete. The original Hermione has major historical significance as she was sailed by the Marquis de Lafayette from Rochefort to Boston in 1780, on a secret mission to help America gain independence. The original Hermione was a 12-pounder Concorde- class frigate. She was light, fast and manoeuvrable yet armed with twenty-six 12-pounder long guns on her main deck and lighter pieces of artillery on the forecastle and poop deck, and manned by a crew of 255. Designed by Henri Chevillard, the original Hermione was built at the Rochefort Arsenal in 1779. Following successful sea trials in the Bay of Biscay, Hermione carried out a brilliant campaign off the French coast, audaciously capturing several English corsairs and many merchant ships. A year later, the Marquis de Lafayette (Marie Joseph Paul Yves Roch Gilbert du Motier) was asked to take word to America, as swiftly as possible, that King Louis XVI would be sending half a dozen ships and 5,000 French infantry to help the American revolutionaries fight against the British. The young La Fayette had already been fighting for the cause of American liberty alongside Freemason, General George Washington and on 21 March, 1780, La Fayette set sail

on Hermione, arriving in Boston just 38 days later. The promised French regiments landed less than four months later and helped turn the tide of the revolution. With the mission to deliver the message accomplished, the frigate then joined the war, suffering serious damage in a fierce but indecisive action against the 320-gun British frigate Iris . Under the command of Louis-René Levassor de Latouche Tréville, Hermione was

engaged in several decisive naval actions, in particular at the battle of Louisbourg on 21 July, 1781. With the American Revolutionary War over, Hermione then became part of a squadron sent to India to help Pierre André de Suffren against the British for the control of the Gulf of Bengal. Peace declared, she returned to Rochefort. Eight years later, in 1793, while again in service against the British, she crashed on a sandbar. Wrecked by heavy seas off Le Croisic on the Brittany coast, she went to the bottom. It was the discovery of her remains, almost two hundred years later, that sparked an idea to build a replica. In 1993, a handful of local figures and sailing enthusiasts were trying to put life back into the depressed river port of Rochefort. The port already had the Corderie Royale (Royal Ropery), but since the closure of the navy arsenal in the 1920s, Rochefort had been searching for other ways to encourage tourism. The idea of building a full-scale replica originated from Benedict Donnelly, an American PR executive and Erik Orsenna, a French politician and novelist. Together they created the Association Hermione-La Fayette, with Benedict appointed as president. Later, in 2007, a Friends of Hermione-Lafayette in America was created because of the strong American heritage associated with Hermione. The idea was for reconstruction to take place in a dry dock deliberately located at the end of the Royal Ropery, so the public could pay a few Euros to see the progress of the build first-hand. The plan has worked; more than 3.5 million visitors have since been to see Hermione over the past seventeen years, contributing to the cost to build her and boosting tourism to the region. There have been major challenges along the way. The first was that there were no detailed plans for Hermione apart from models and her logbook. A French marine historian, Jean Boudriot, managed to track down some British-drawn plans of one of Hermiones sister frigates

down some British-drawn plans of one of H e r m i o n e ’
Above: held at the National Maritime Museum in London. lovingly, if slowly, seek to recreate

Above:

held at the National Maritime Museum in London.

lovingly, if slowly, seek to recreate the Hermione, piece

Gun deck – on board Hermione, showing some of her 26 replica cannon

These plans had been drawn up after the British captured the frigate Concorde in a battle in 1783. The association has used these along with additional information about the original Hermione brought up by divers. The project really started to gain momentum when the tender for the construction of hull and topsides was won by the Asselin Shipyard of Thouars (after fierce European competition). The next major challenge was to locate mature, but supple, oak trees having just the right natural bends in their trunks. These were needed to form the wishbone-shaped ribs, curved beams and planking on the replica. For authenticity, Asselin decided to use only oak from France, no less than 1,200 tonnes of it, requiring 2,000 trees selected from the forests of western France, including the royal domains of Versailles and Fontainebleau. On 4 July 1997, fittingly American Independence Day, the keel was laid. Watched from caged walkways by a steady flow of paying visitors, the hull frame began to rise up like the ribbing of a giant whale. The important stern and inner sternposts followed, to which a 4.3-tonne ‘carcasse’ of curved pieces of timber was attached. Then, in traditional style, the first of the 62 frames was assembled working from the cant frames at the stern towards the bows until, on 17 February 1999, the main (widest) frame was erected. Over the next 15 years historians, architects, carpenters, blacksmiths, sculptors and sailmakers would

by piece. It’s been a puzzle of more than 400,000 pieces of wood and metal, 1,000 pulleys and a tonne of oakum for caulking. While meticulous effort has gone into keeping everything true to the original, there have been some modern tweaks for the sake of robustness and security. In particular, the planks are bolted instead of pegged down and the masts are glued (instead of being assembled by metal rings) to prevent water infiltration. While there are 26 cannon (with 12-pound balls) on the battery deck and eight cannon (with 6-pounder balls) on the forecastle deck, the originals were cast-iron but the replicas are lightweight and non-functional. At least the running rigging remains as hemp. There are two other major additions that certainly weren’t on the original; two electric 360° POD motors, especially developed by Masson Marine. These are required for safely manoeuvring the replica in harbour. Both engines are installed at the stern of the replica and each weighs 2.5 tonnes and have 300kW of power. Modern tools and machinery have also been used in the build, yet many of the carpenters have been taught 200-year-old methods of boatbuilding, like using iron chisels and hammers to wedge long strands of hemp as filler between the wooden planks. As a result, watching the craftsmen at work has been a wonderful spectacle for visitors. For a few Euros they have watched workers coat the oak planks with oils and fill crevices with oakum. At nearby sites, the carpenters have also run ‘show and tells’

HERMIONE Above: For the long and intricate construction, 1,200 tonnes of oak came from the

HERMIONE

Above: For the long and intricate construction, 1,200 tonnes of oak came from the forests
Above: For the
long and intricate
construction,
1,200 tonnes of
oak came from the
forests of France
Right: Hermione is
officially launched
(July 2012)
PHILIP PLISSON
PHILIP PLISSONPHILIP
PLISSON

where they explain how they have made accessories such as chicken coops and rowing boats for the replica or how they have carved large blocks out of Elm. Local blacksmiths have also hand-forged bolts, hooks and pins. Visitors have also learnt how the crew took turns to sleep in narrow hammocks, how fresh meat was reserved for officers and ill crew members, and how the gunpowder, water and wine were stored. All of this means the Hermione replica project has created a very successful tourist industry for Rochefort as well as helping to fund 40 per cent of the total €25m build cost (with the other 60 per cent coming from the city of Rochefort, Charente-Maritime and the Poitou- Charentes region). If the upcoming sea trials are successful then the plan is for a Franco-American crew to sail Hermione across the Atlantic. The journey is being called ‘Voyage 2015’ and will start from the mouth of the River Charente, in Port des Barques, where La Fayette boarded on 10 March, 1780. The voyage will be a three-month, 3,819 mile transatlantic crossing using 18th century technology and is expected to take 27 days in total, before landfall at Yorktown, Virginia and definitely a visit to Boston. The challenge continues. And while the rebuild process celebrates great craftsmanship, it also renewing the La Fayette family motto of “why not?” and showing that, given determination, anything is achievable.

www.hermione2015.com

Project Hermione – a timeline

July 1997 The long keel is laid down. The stern and inner stern posts follow. A ‘carcasse’ of curved timber is fixed on the inner stern post. February 1999 The main frame (the widest frame) is erected. Framing continues. The hull is strengthened. The deck-beam timbers are added. November 2001 Slatted planking begins. Leaving out every second oak plank allows the wood to settle in. This first phase was completed in 2003. November 2004 Work begins on Hermione’s vaigrage (the internal skeleton between the gun deck and the quarterdeck) costing €2.2 million. May 2005 The lower stern hold is completed. June 2005 Hermione’s dinghy is launched. The two millionth visitor to the shipyard buys her entry ticket.

January 2006 The coaming is fixed on to the mainmast. April 2006 The duckboards of the forecastle are built August 2006 Building of the big dinghy April 2007 Arrival of the first masts September 2007 Building the ship’s longboat June 2008 Although Hermione’s three support boats have been launched, the frigate is far from ready. The official launch won’t happen for another three years. September 2008 The big capstan and the entire top deck are completed January 2009 All tools and accessories for the guns are completed, rigging begins in May. June 2009 Craftsmen begin to caulk the oak planking, starting with the topsides.

Hermione

PhILIP PLISSON NIgeL Pert
PhILIP PLISSON
NIgeL Pert
Hermione PhILIP PLISSON NIgeL Pert NIgeL Pert Above left to November 2009 rochelle, the Voilerie burgaud

NIgeL Pert

Hermione PhILIP PLISSON NIgeL Pert NIgeL Pert Above left to November 2009 rochelle, the Voilerie burgaud

Above left to

November 2009

rochelle, the Voilerie burgaud in

right: marye Vital general delegate of Hermione; the figurehead carved by english sculptor Andy Peters; Hermione’s commander, Yann Cariou; Anne renault, master sailmaker

Chantier Nautique du Vieux Port from La rochelle begins the paintwork. Over 2,000 kg (4,500 lbs) of anti-fouling primer is applied before the royal blue and yellow paint. It takes 800 man hours to complete. March 2010 the deck starts to take shape. July 2010 Sailmaking begins, all 19 of them, measuring between 50 and 280m², in synthetic linen equating to 7km of fabric and an overall area of 2,131m². the work is entrusted to three sailmakers: Incidences Voiles in La

Noirmoutier and the Atelier Voilerie Anne renault in Fouras. the first two carry out the cutting and assembly, while Anne renault finishes them. the public can pay 10€ to have their name printed on the sail. October 2010 the final oak plank is put in and caulked, making the hull completely enclosed. November 2011 Official unveiling of the lion figurehead to mark the end of the works on the frigate’s hull; this was carved over six months by english sculptor, Andy

HERMIONE by numbers Far Left: Hermione in combat at Louisbourg from a painting by Auguste

HERMIONE by numbers

Far Left:

Hermione in combat at Louisbourg from a painting by Auguste Louis de rossel de Crey Left: The marquis de Lafayette

LOA

guNS

145ft (44.2m)

26 gundeck

beAm

6 upperdeck

36ft 11in (11.2m)

COmPLemeNt

DrAught

242

16ft 4in (5m)

WeIght LADeN

heIght

1,260 tonnes

177ft (54m)

PuLLeYS

SAIL AreA

1,000 (40 types)

330sqft (1,000m 2 )

SAIL CLOth

1,200m 2 (20 sails)

mAterIALS

Oak 40,965ft 3 (1,160m 3 ) Conifer 7,240ft 3 (205m 3 ) Iron 77,426 lb (35,120kg) Lead 7,743lb (3,512kg) Tar 2,218lb (1,006kg) Oakum 6,651lb (3,017kg) Hemp 33,279lb (15,059kg) Rope 15miles (25km)

Peters at his ‘maritima’ workshop in Waterstock, Oxfordshire. Andy was chosen out of 32 sculptors. December 2011

Ninety per cent of the standing rigging

is completed, some 8km of rope.

the officers’ quarters take 3,000 hours to fit out. the electric POD motors are installed. July 2012

hermione’s launch takes place with a 21-gun official salute and an armada of 50 classic rigs, boats and traditional canoes. It includes the three-master belem and the Naval cutter mutin. October 2012 raising of the lower part of the 23.5m mizzen mast with its rigging and foretop, then the 14m bowsprit. November 2012 hermione’s Commander is announced as Yann Cariou, an experienced commander of the etoile, the belle Poule and the belem. recruitment of a

a professional crew for shakedown

trials begins. January 2013 the number of maintenance volunteers increases to keep hermione clean and well polished. April 2013 the Oregon pine top-masts, each weighing two tonnes and the topgallant are raised. May 2013 raising of the topgallant masts (3rd stage of the masting) and of the lower yards. the masting was officially completed on 15 June. September 2014 We should see the first trial of the POD motors and some sails along the local Charente river. this will be followed by exhaustive sea trials under sail and, where required, electric power. If all is OK, she will sail on Voyage 2015 and when this is over, hermione will

resume her well-deserved place as a tourist attraction in rochefort.

m i o n e will resume her well-deserved place as a tourist attraction in rochefort.
Panerai British Classic Week Cowes, 18th - 25th July 2015 ENTRIES OPEN APRIL 2015 Super
Panerai British Classic Week Cowes, 18th - 25th July 2015 ENTRIES OPEN APRIL 2015 Super
Panerai British Classic Week Cowes, 18th - 25th July 2015 ENTRIES OPEN APRIL 2015 Super
Panerai British Classic Week Cowes, 18th - 25th July 2015 ENTRIES OPEN APRIL 2015 Super
Panerai British Classic Week Cowes, 18th - 25th July 2015 ENTRIES OPEN APRIL 2015 Super
Panerai British Classic Week Cowes, 18th - 25th July 2015 ENTRIES OPEN APRIL 2015 Super
Panerai British Classic Week Cowes, 18th - 25th July 2015 ENTRIES OPEN APRIL 2015 Super
Panerai British Classic Week Cowes, 18th - 25th July 2015 ENTRIES OPEN APRIL 2015 Super

Panerai British Classic Week

Cowes, 18th - 25th July 2015

ENTRIES OPEN APRIL 2015

Super Zero Class 75ft and over | IRC Classic yachts 25ft and over | Modern Classic Division Full Social Programme | Solent racing and long inshore race | EFG Around the Island Race Racing Sunday 19th July to Friday 24th July | Parade of Classics Saturday 25th July

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Further information and entries, please contact, Mary Scott-Jackson, info@msjevents.co.uk, Tel:+44 (0)1983 245100 www.britishclassicyachtclub.org/regatta

Grand

enTrAnce

With Grand Banks set to launch a new entry-level model next year, we take a look at this most venerable of burly, blue-water trawler yachts

story Jonathon savill PHotoGrAPHs grand banks

GRAND BANKS T here comes a time in a sailor’s life when, in pitch black

GRAND BANKS

T here comes a time in a sailor’s life when, in pitch black and freezing rain, heeling at 45 degrees, he wonders if there is another way to reach France. In the meantime a Grand Banks owner sits in his warm cabin, sipping thoughtfully

from a cut-glass tumbler, making 12 knots in a straight line. When he gets there, he wanders below to the king-size bed in his ensuite cabin.

A Grand Banks has a substantial quality. Its teak

interior radiates relaxed luxury and the boat feels solid and expensive. One imagines its bow cutting a swathe through the fogs off the New England coast, trawling for lobsters or fish.

In fact not much could be further from the truth. A

company originally called American Marine has always built Grand Banks boats in Hong Kong, Singapore and Malaysia. It changed its name to Grand Banks Yachts (PTE) Ltd after joining the Singapore stock market in 1993. The current yard in Malaysia covers 11 acres (44,515m 2 ) and employs around 350 people. The quality of the range is undoubted. All original Heritage models 42ft (12.8m) and above attain ‘Ocean A’ RCD category, while smaller boats attain ‘Ocean B’. Around £80,000 will get you a 36ft (11m) Mark 2 from 1980, or an older pristine wooden version. And if you’re worried that you won’t have enough left over for diesel, they burn around eight gallons or £40 an hour cruising at 10 knots, with a capacity of 500 gallons (2,273L). Filling up from empty will cost you £2,470 in the UK or £1,255 in the USA. This will take you from the south coast of the UK to Gibraltar without refuelling. In fact several GBs have crossed the Atlantic using deck tanks. An old adage was that a single engine 36 would go for a season on a tank of gas. An original 32 woody will typically set you back about £40,000. Grand Banks has changed since the 60s. Back then, teams of skilled boatbuilders made complete boats but the advent of CNC cutting machines and CAD have meant more reliance on technology. The company evolved to make its hulls lighter and faster, because they were originally massively overengineered. Newer materials such as foam coring and laminates, not to mention GRP, have changed the landscape of their business. Less hardwood and teak is used and honeycomb materials are more common; but build quality is still paramount. If you ground your GB the propellers are protected, and 4in (100mm) of resin on the keel means you can knock rocks and not suffer serious damage.

GRAND BANKS

“I’ve been selling boats for 35 years now and I have never seen anything like the post 2008 market”

Below: Colin

Watts, godfather

of Grand Banks in

The newer 43 and 47 Heritage models are now able to reach 25 knots, giving both a performance and fuel consumption the older models could only dream of. Earlier generation 42s had large engines that chased the performance market. They were affectionately known as white rhinos because they just stood up in the water and charged forward. But their fuel burn was outrageous. Colin Watts of the Boat Showroom is the UK godfather of Grand Banks, having sold every new GB delivered here in the last 25 years. At the moment he has 27 used boats for sale, including three 36s, ranging from £130,000. He also has six 42s from £120,000. Not all sales have gone smoothly. On 31st October 1987 a storm rocked Europe (the one that reduced Sevenoaks in Kent to one oak). GBs would come in to Rotterdam by container ship and Colin found a brand new Grand Banks 42, on its side smashed to bits with a broken Fokker jet crushed through it. The factory built the owner a replacement in three months. His second brand new 42ft (12.8m) boat was moved to Croatia. There the Serbians used her for target practice and she was blown to pieces and written off. It’s not known whether he took up a new hobby at that point In 2000, at their dealer conference, Grand Banks suddenly announced they would not build the 36 any more. The company was making 120 boats a year and Colin was selling around 12 of them. Was it wrong to discontinue the 36 in 2001? Colin answers: “Well, actually Grand Banks is considering building a

when the engines are installed. The remainder is paid two weeks before delivery. That is done by letter of credit or bank guarantee.” You will then get the boat roughly six months after placing the order. How does Colin find the market? “Quality is hard to sell,” he says. “People sometimes compare Grand Banks to lesser boats. But you get what you pay for. I’ve been selling boats for 35 years now and I have never seen anything like the post-2008 market. It’s getting better but in recent years the brokerage market was decimated. In the old days it was easy. People offered 10 percent less than the asking price and everything worked. But during the worst of the market, I had offers of 50 per cent and there are always owners that will sell at any price. Thank goodness we are returning to some form of normality.” Boat sales rely on the triumvirate of survey, sea trial and finance. A major change in the market means lenders no longer put a lien on the boat but on other equity so the boat you’re buying is no longer an asset in itself. Colin explains why – and it’s a chilling story: “During the crisis, banks were repossessing many boats. But they had to continue to pay for their upkeep, and their value was plummeting. In the end there was a pool of 5-6,000 boats without owners. They were funnelled through a group of selected brokers who were told to sell them for the best price possible,” he pauses. “None of those was a Grand Banks though.” So would Colin rather sell new boats or secondhand? “Used boats are less complicated. New boats are great

replacement entry-level vessel of 36ft. It may debut next

but tie you much more in both details and legalities. The

the UK; a Grand Banks 47 at anchor Preceding spread:

year.” So why did they stop and why are they starting again? Colin says it’s because it was very difficult to make smaller boats for profit, adding: “They now have a streamlined manufacturing process and the need to address a hole in the market.”

other factor is we get two or three used boats sales a month. We sell maybe two or three new boats a year.” Average powerboat usage is dropping dramatically. It used to be 100 hours a year but is now around 65. Colin believes cost is a reason and people are now more aware

A Grand Banks 47

I ask what happens if you want to buy a new Grand

of fuel burn. Grand Banks normally register above

Banks. “It starts with a ten percent deposit when you

motor yacht

version

average use because they are blue-water cruisers.

sign the contract,” Colin says. “You pay thirty percent

Paul Matkin is a happy Grand Banks owner and Mr

C/o Colin watts

Paul Matkin is a happy Grand Banks owner and M r C/o Colin watts C/o grand

C/o grand banks

GRAND BANKS GRAND BANKS 47 LOA 46ft 9in(14.3m) beAm 15ft 8in (4.8m) DrAught 3ft 10in
GRAND BANKS
GRAND BANKS 47
LOA
46ft 9in(14.3m)
beAm
15ft 8in (4.8m)
DrAught
3ft 10in (1.2m)
heIght
21ft 1in (6.4m)
DISPLACemeNt
23.7 tonnes
GRAND BANKS 36
LOA
36ft 10in(11.2m)
beAm
12ft 8in (3.9m)
DrAught
4ft (1.2m)
heIght
22ft 4in (6.8m)
DISPLACemeNt
10.9 tonnes
GRAND BANKS 32
LOA
31ft 11in(9.7m)
beAm

11ft 6in (3.5m)

DrAught

3ft 9in (1.1m)

heIght

19ft 4in (5.8m)

DISPLACemeNt

7.7 tonnes

www.chantierduguip.com Guip Shipyard – Brest – Ile aux Moines Quai du Commandant Malbert 29200 Brest,

www.chantierduguip.com

Guip Shipyard – Brest – Ile aux Moines Quai du Commandant Malbert 29200 Brest, France Tel: +33 (0)2 98 43 27 07 Fax: +33 (0)2 98 44 81 29 E-mail: guip29@chantierduguip.com

WINNER Boatyard SPONSORED BY Since 1790 © Philip Plisson
WINNER
Boatyard
SPONSORED BY
Since 1790
© Philip Plisson

Vanity V – 12-metre class - Designed and built by William Fife III in 1936 Complete rebuild by Guip Shipyard (Brest), launched in 2000

Complete rebuild by Guip Shipyard (Brest), launched in 2000 Workshop (1,250 m²) on the quay. Overhead

Workshop (1,250 m²) on the quay. Overhead travelling crane. Accommodates vessels up to 100 tons

Trades: Shipwrights, joiners, electrical engineers, project managers. Skills: Building, restoring, repairing and maintaining wooden historic vessels, classic yachts and workboats. Traditional shipwrighting and modern wooden boat-building techniques. Deck and interior joinery. Wooden mast and spar making. Passionate about the sea, maritime heritage and wood!

Passionate about the sea, maritime heritage and wood! www.ibtcheritage.co.uk International Boatbuilding
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www.ibtcheritage.co.uk
International Boatbuilding Training College Richard Johnstone-Bryden
International Boatbuilding
Training College
Richard Johnstone-Bryden

Est. Lowestoft 1975, our Portsmouth branch opens April 2015 in Boathouse 4 of the Historic Dockyard with satellite classes at the Shipwright School, Buckler’s Hard. Visitors welcome at either site or see us on stand B037 Southampton Boat Show 12-21 Sept.

Enrol now for Spring 2015 in Portsmouth or start your training straight away in Suffolk.

Portsmouth or start your training straight away in Suffolk. www.ibtc.co.uk 01502 569663 www.ibtcportsmouth.co.uk 02392

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www.ibtcportsmouth.co.uk 02392 893323

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GRAND BANKS

ABovE phoToS: JonAThon SAvIll

GRAND BANKS ABovE phoToS: JonAThon SAvIll Above: a GB offers luxury of steering in the dry
GRAND BANKS ABovE phoToS: JonAThon SAvIll Above: a GB offers luxury of steering in the dry
GRAND BANKS ABovE phoToS: JonAThon SAvIll Above: a GB offers luxury of steering in the dry

Above: a GB offers luxury of steering in the dry Above right: the builder’s plate; and the saloon civilised boating

Toad, his 10-year-old 42ft motor yacht version has a full-beam cabin. The boat exudes quality. She was originally owned by a Pete Townshend, the Who rock guitarist in Eel Pie Island. After two years she changed ownership and ended up in

the Med where Paul bought her in a fairly tatty condition. The boat was brought back to England via the Bay of Biscay, being too tall for the French canals. Once home she went into a yard for a couple of months and was returned in as-new condition. “That’s the great thing about these boats,” says Paul, “You can always bring them back to new.” There are some cool toys on Paul’s boat. The throttle system has

“It has a solid image: a consistent, conservative, instantly-recognisable sheer; the profile and clear lines”

two sets of levers. Essentially, you run the boat on idle in harbour and manouevre using the forward and backward gears. You can also set one throttle to control both engines and a switch cuts the idle speed of both engines back to ensure compliance with the harbour

speed limits. Paul has bow thrusters forward and aft. I have always laughed at these but having seen them in action I am totally sold. He could safely berth on his own. He even has a remote control for the bow thrusters although he doesn’t use it: “I would never leave the boat unmanned,” he adds. In many ways Paul is a traditional GB owner. He is a Yachtmaster and has cruised extensively in the Med and crossed the Bay of Biscay several times. He is totally in control of his boat and has the relaxed calm of an expert. He explains his love of Grand Banks: “It’s a brand people aspire to. Most owners are leaving sailing and the Grand Banks looks like a good boat to move into. It’s a quality build and sailors like that reassurance. Grand Banks boats don’t depreciate in the same way as boats that rely on fashion. They haven’t really greatly changed shape in 40 years.”

So what is the magic of the brand? Bob Livingston, past President of American Marine, had a precise answer:

“It has a solid image: a consistent, conservative, instantly-recognizable sheer; the profile and clear lines; the almost plumb bow; that certain angle of windshield; the joint between deckhouse and flybridge – these are instantly-recognisable from 500 yards away. A Grand

Banks looks like a Grand Banks

Three classics – 32, 36 and 42

The ‘classic’ Grand Banks came in three lengths, 32ft, 36ft and 42ft. In Mark 1 form they were timber, built from 1965 to 1973, the Mark 2 was glassfibre between 1973 and 1990, and the Mark 3 was between 1990 and 2001 (the 32 ended production in 1995). The three models are very similar looking but are differentiated by small details and an increase in internal volume. There were four versions of the Mark 3. These were the Classic, the Sedan (no aft cabin), the Europa (no cabin and a flying bridge overhang) and a motor yacht version. This was essentially a Europa front end and a rear end similar to the Classic but with a full width aft-cabin. In 2000 a brand new Grand Banks 36 cost around £290,000 and a 42 £365,000. Grand Banks Yachts has built 1,135 of the 36 GBs. In 1972 they made the switch from wood to glassfibre without telling their dealers or the public. It came as a big surprise to a boating world still suspicious of the new material.

Always has.”

world still suspicious of the new material. Always has.” Thanks to Colin Watts, boatshowrooms.com CLASSIC BOAT

Thanks to Colin Watts, boatshowrooms.com

ThE

SHOw

muST gO On

Situated right in the heart of London’s theatre district, the 400-year-old Arthur Beale yacht chandler is currently undergoing a revival. Join us for a tour…

story and photographs PETER WILLIS

R unning a shop without credit card or mail-order system, let alone managing without a website, seems perverse and self-defeating these days – especially if you happen to be a yacht chandler based in the

heart of London’s West End. That, though, was how it was with Arthur Beale – a name well known to generations of yachtsmen, with a 400-year heritage and a small, though tardis-like shop on Shaftesbury Avenue. It had supplied at least one of Shackleton’s Antarctic expeditions and its ropes had helped conquer Everest. But its recent history was one of stately decline and the end loomed a few months ago in a morass of unpaid suppliers and the threat of liquidation. It was at this point that Alasdair Flint received a telephone call from a sculptor friend, who told him:

“You’ve got to rescue Beale’s!” Alasdair, it turned out, was uniquely qualified, in various ways, for this role. For a start, he is possibly the only retailer who has been awarded the Royal Cruising Club’s Tilman Medal for high-latitude exploration. He already runs an online marine chandler’s, an offshoot of his main business, Flints Theatrical Chandlers, a trade description he dreamed up to cover the supply of all the rope, paints and hardware requirements of theatrical productions and the like. Beale’s too has always acted as an emergency supplier to nearby theatres for just that sort of thing. “We found that Beale’s had been losing money for four or five years,” Alasdair recounts. “We stepped in, paid off the bills and now we’re trying to turn it round.” His status at Beale’s is a bit vague, like much else about the firm. He clearly now runs it, but as to ownership… “There are two existing members of the Beale family, who own the freehold – one of them is a nun, who gave her share to the Catholic Church. They’ve given us a favourable lease,” says Alasdair. Then there is the somewhat curmudgeonly old chap in an office on the second floor. He is referred to as Mr Coleman, the former manager, who has been with the shop for 55 years and latterly put his own money in to keeping it going. As for the 400-year origins, the business began as Buckingham Ropes, on the banks of the River Fleet, possibly even longer ago in 1500. Ships could come up at high water to lay over and get re-rigged. The firm moved

into its present premises around 1890, trading as Beale & Cloves before becoming simply Arthur Beale in 1901. Alasdair’s aim is to smarten up the business – he’s already increased the opening hours, set up a rudimentary website and begun to develop the range of stock, as well as beginning a programme of Thursday evening talks and classes. The shop is actually a five- storey building. A massive amount of clearing out has already been done, with a fair bit still to go. Cupboards reveal boxes of arcane, unidentifiable bits of equipment, and numerous books of Arthur Beale gift vouchers, value 10 shillings and sixpence. Alasdair hauls down a package that contains a Walker’s Excelsior Log. “I’ve no idea how much this would sell for?” he wonders. “A thousand pounds?” He’s been making up blue display boards to help customers identify their needs among the vast array of shackles, carbine hooks and all the small hardware, cross-referenced to the bank of drawers behind the counter. “If we haven’t got it, then no-one has,” he likes to boast. He’s planning to move the shop into electronics, starting with handheld VHFs and has already added to the range of useful tools. “And if we’re asked for something we haven’t got, we write it down and look at stocking it”. The next stage is to open up the first floor and start stocking nautical books and a larger range of clothing, including Guy Cotten protective wear and Norwegian thermals. In fact, Alasdair has ambitions for Beale’s to become a one-stop shop for kitting-out expeditions. Which brings us back to the Tilman medal. He won it, together with Tim Loftus, for a 2011 voyage to, and ascent of, Jan Mayen Island in the Arctic Circle (the crew also included Charlotte Watters, who illustrates Adrian Morgan’s columns in this magazine). One of the boats was Tim’s self-built 34ft (10.4m) Ed Burnett-designed cutter Thembi (CB233), the other Alasdair’s own 25ft (7.6m) Vertue, Sumara of Weymouth. It will be the subject of one of the October talks. Alasdair, who’s now planning a trip to Russia, believes such exploits complement his approach to Beale’s. “We want to be a bit different – more than just a shop!”

want to be a bit different – more than just a shop!” arthur Beale, 194 shaftesbury

arthur Beale, 194 shaftesbury avenue, London WC2h 8Jp tel: +44 (0)207 836 9034, arthurbeale.co.uk

Clockwise from

top: There are some quirky shops in London’s West End, none more so than Beale’s

chandler’s; Sumara

of Weymouth

anchored off Jan Mayen Island Left: Alasdair Flint planning full ahead for Arthur Beale

Left: Alasdair Flint planning full ahead for Arthur Beale “We stepped in, paid off the bills

“We stepped in, paid off the bills and now we’re trying to turn it round.”

Onboard

Onboard

CORFU TO SPETSES

CRUISING . SEAMANSHIP . EQUIPMENT

Corfu to Spetses

The first Corfu Regatta this year was followed by a magical cruise to the next
The first Corfu Regatta this year was
followed by a magical cruise to the next
regatta, the now-established Spetses.
Our cartoonist packed his cigars and
shipped aboard for the ride
STORY AND PHOTOGRAPHS GUY VENABLES

NIKOS KARANIKOLAS

NIKOS KARANIKOLAS ILLUSTRATION BY GUY VENABLES C orfu Sailing Club is situated on the north side
ILLUSTRATION BY GUY VENABLES
ILLUSTRATION BY GUY VENABLES

C orfu Sailing Club is situated on the north side of a high peninsula under the old fort of Corfu town in the sparkling Ionian sea. Once it was a British protectorate garrison and now it is home to the Ionian University School of Music.

In an impossible mixture of pragmatism and romance, when the wind is from the south, anything from opera to jazz can drift down to the sailing club bar just below. I was drinking ouzo whilst listening to a cello under a canopy of scented scarlet bougainvilleas thinking back to Sotiris’s mischievously astute question: “So how much do you pay Classic Boat to be one of their reporters?” We were to sail south from Corfu, through the inland sea and Corinth Canal to the Agean and the island of Spetses where the next regatta would take place. Yianniss, the owner and captain, Sotiris the first mate, Michalis the cook, and Nicos and Vaggelis and me as the crew were strangers for now, soon to become close friends. The boat, Alexandra 1, a pristine 1965 55ft (16.8m) S&S yawl, was rescued by Yanni from a crumbling death in Corfu marina and repaired and refitted to a high standard. Our destination for that evening was Levkas, an island linked to the mainland by a floating swing bridge. We raised the sails and soon the channel between Corfu and the mainland widened and the sea turned a deep cobalt blue. The beaches of Parga on our port and Paxos appeared on our starboard then Anti Paxos, famed for its snorkelling. The heat, humidity and our lack of sleep was gently prised away by the autopilot, the constant gentle breeze and our rotated snoozing patterns. The constancy and reliability of this summer wind that blows from June to September, the Meltemi, has been noted since ancient times and in these waters you are never out of sight of land, the surrounding hills ensure that the swell very rarely rears up and there is so little tide that its direction could be changed by the movement of fish. This was the life. You set a course and just GO there. The only instrument to which I paid anything more than

NIKOS KARANIKOLAS

ONBOARD CORFU TO SPETSES

Above: Transiting through the Corinth Canal in the hours of darkness

a passing concern was the hygrometer on the front of Yiannis’s humidor. This humidity plays hell with cigars. After Michalis had served us spaghetti with octopus and poured us retsina from his own vineyard we were visited by dolphins under a pinkening sky. The land along this part of the coast is mostly uninhabited and unchanged. As it is the same mythical place that Homer wrote about, one has an unerring feeling of being among schoolbook history. The floating lifting bridge into the Gulf of Levkas opens on the hour every hour so the timing of arrival was paramount. As we rounded the point we realised that Infanta, a 1947 45ft (13.7m) yawl that had been our main rival in Corfu Classic race, had been waiting for the bridge to open and although we weren’t actually in a race, we were, of course, racing them. We moored up alongside each other and headed to a restaurant run by friends of Yianniss. Levkas town has a charming port front and just down a side alley we were steered to the restaurant Thymari. Here we ate the chef’s speciality; seafood Trachana, a meal so good I had to prise the recipe from them, knowing that I’d never be able to recreate it at home, as the main ingredient was handmade by an old lady who dries it in the sun. We drank Gerovassiliou, a refined blend of the indigenous grape varieties Assyrtiko and Malagousia, and smoked cigars

grape varieties Assyrtiko and Malagousia, and smoked cigars with glasses of oak-aged Tsipouro. We laughed as

with glasses of oak-aged Tsipouro. We laughed as Michalis, the chef, was advised on what to eat by a drunk and amorous old lady from Birmingham. It was a rare and excellent evening in a truly excellent restaurant. By 10am the next morning it was already very hot and we went for coffee along the parched waterfront beside the saltwater lagoon with its tidal fish traps. We left by eleven and set off down the channel that separates the Levkas canal from the saltwater lagoons. This all used to be swampland. A dredger was dredging next to some weary lime trees and the sea had turned from deep blue to muddy green. The hills rose around us again, covered

ONBOARD CORFU TO SPETSES

in olive groves spiked with pines. This was the Inland Sea.

A Mediterranean within a Mediterranean. Lygia, a fishing

port notoriously well populated with seafood restaurants, came into view and we passed Scorpio Island, formerly owned by the Onassis family and recently bought by a Russian. Some sort of vast, white motor cruiser favoured by the Russian elite was anchored next to it looking like someone had taken an axe to an enormous fridge. Snobbery aside, however, this area is what Sotiris explained as the sweet spot. To the west there is

Apherinos and Meganisi Island, on the Eastern shore Episcopi harbour on Kalamos Island and Ithaca and Castos to the South. From where we were, covering all

points of the compass there were 15 top Mediterranean

small ports of the type you see

in the brochures, the type

where you can step off your stern and walk straight into a taverna and at least twenty

crystal clear anchorages. This

is all within a radius of just ten miles, all of it scattered

with archaeological and historic sites and world-class snorkelling and fishing, all in line-of-sight navigation, where headlands curl around to make lake-like conditions. Tantalisingly, we carried on past them as we were rushing through to get to Spetses on time and Sotiris, my personal tour guide and the chairman of Corfu Yacht club, and I discussed the idea of extending this trip as a very real possibility. If time enough were given, even just a week between the Corfu race and the Spetses regatta, this transit, done in a flotilla led by the Greek boats, would be the feeder of a lifetime and a diary entry that should become a central annual event. It was becoming clear to me that Greece just isn’t like anywhere else.

Once we’d passed Ithaca we turned almost due west and were in the gulf of Patras, our next stop being the city of Patras, the regional capital of western Greece built at the foothills of Mount Panachaikon. The wind followed our turn along the high cliffs and continued to blow steadily if gently, breathing life into the spinnaker. Night fell as we slipped in by the huge ferries and went to the nearest bar. The vast expanse of the Rio-Antirio Bridge filled our skyline the next morning as we passed under it. It was designed by a friend of Nicos and is a huge construction that marks the beginning of the Gulf of Corinth and links the Peloponese Peninsula to central Greece. Vaggelis, a sailor in the lighthouse division of the Greek navy

enthusiastically pointed out ancient lighthouses he’d visited. We sailed past Lepanto, who’s name is shared with the largest naval battle in history fought nearby. Then past

“The only instrument I paid any attention to was the

hygrometer on the front of Yiannis’s humidor.”

Delphi to the north, the renowned archealogical site and modern city. I went below to grab a camera and found Michalis in the bilges. They were full of cans of beer. That solved the puzzle of the self-filling fridge. After I’d served

up kedgeree we approached the Corinth Canal. Vaggelis sidled up to me and told me the ancient story behind it. Before the canal was cut it was still well known as the shortest distance across the landmass and with boats just light enough to pull over ground, it was still worth the effort rather than the long trip round. At both ports on either side there were brothels and the captain would promise to pay for a visit for each of the crew to encourage them to pull the boats over the hill. “A poosy can pool a boat,” he wisely remarked. Once we could see the deep vee of the canal we joked that they must have

Clockwise from left: Corfu Sailing Club with the School of Music and Old Fort behind;
Clockwise from
left: Corfu Sailing
Club with the
School of Music
and Old Fort
behind; Vaggelis
and Yiannis
tweaking the
spinnaker; the
Rio-Antirio Bridge
with the author in
the way; picking
sea urchins for
lunch; ace chef
Michalis in down
time, with CB natch

ONBOARD CORFU TO SPETSES

ONBOARD CORFU TO SPETSES CB ARCHIVES Above, left to right: Very pistol on Alexandra ; the
ONBOARD CORFU TO SPETSES CB ARCHIVES Above, left to right: Very pistol on Alexandra ; the

CB ARCHIVES

Above, left to

right: Very pistol on Alexandra; the restored Rhodes sloop Tincano that belongs to the owner of the Grand Poseidonion Hotel behind; En route on

Alexandra

been exceptional prostitutes as it was clearly the hulls of the boats made by over eager sailors that had worn such a sheer groove into the sandstone. The canal itself, especially at night, is amazing. Firstly the low-lying road bridge sank into the water on giant hydraulic ramps and we motored over it. As the strata of sandstone slowly rose up around us we became quiet with awe. The sides, towering to 650ft (200m), are lit with low orange lights that cast huge repeating shadows of us and the boat onto the sheer walls. Gulls circled in and out of the darkness in silent agreement, landing on protuberances to watch us pass. Then the walls lowered and we were through. We moored on the western bank and had kebabs in a local restaurant while a smattering of locals and a cat watched the World Cup on a huge TV. We decided to make straight for Spetses after this, so night watches were drawn up. The Greeks were extremely polite and all spoke good English together when I was present, on one occasion changing to English mid-sentence when I arrived. For the sake of a good joke or technical issues, they turned to Greek and I was very happy to sit back and smoke a cigar. If there was raucous laughter one of them would lean over, explain it to me, then wait for my response and we would all laugh all over again. If deck orders are shouted in a foreign tongue however, as I learned in Russia, never assume what they mean and stay out of the way until asked or you learn what the order means. Sotiris and I were on first watch at midnight so we set off through the widening gap into the warm night air of the Saronic Gulf lit by the Isthmia oil refinery. Onwards,

the Saronic Gulf lit by the Isthmia oil refinery. Onwards, NAVIGATION NOTES For navigation we had

NAVIGATION NOTES

For navigation we had on board a Garmin GPS 158i which, as far as I know, wasn’t used. The local Greeks either knew where we were going or glanced at their smart phones but they let me look at the relevant Imray Tetra charts that we had on board which had a warning printed on them anyway, advising us to take them with a pinch of salt as many of them were

drawn up in the 1800s. I would, however, check our course on the lovely Kelvin-White compass at the wheel but we were never out of sight of land. I was reading from pages of Greek Water Pilot by Rod Heikell 2007 and our weather check was mostly

done by simply looking around us. The wind was incredibly predictable and I

saw one cloud

once.

ever southeast. The wind had died as it does at night, so we motored with a little help from the main. We smoked

our pipes, watched for lights and talked of Greek things. Sotiris pointed out landmarks as small islands appeared and disappeared in the darkness. By four we’d turned through the channel between the headland and Hydra and, now heading southwest, were on our last tack to Spetses. Spetses is a special place. An island with no cars that has always been home to tobacco and shipping magnates. As we headed in that morning, the sounder read 20m (65ft) and we could see our turquoise shadow scud along the bottom of the gin-clear water. As soon as we were moored next to a convenient taverna we went down the road to the nearest beach. Armed with my Boye knife and

a pair of goggles each, Sotiris and I began prising sea

urchins off the rocks in order to clean them and eat them for lunch. An old lady told us that we were doing the island a service as nobody ate them there any more and the urchins had badly encroached onto the kids’ swimming platform. We ate them with bread and cold Tsipouro. Then we had octopus and Tsipouro then a tomato salad

with Tsipouro. Then Michalis and I got onto a moped and

drove to the top of a dusty mountain track to pick throubi,

a rare, wild cooking herb. Michalis, like many Greeks, is

an emotional man and had a worrying habit of slapping his chest and waving his arms, leaving no hands to steer

as we careered down the mountain, me on the back with

a shirt stuffed full of herbs and him, waving and shouting

about a recipe or an old moped or love or something. That evening I stayed at the Poseidonion Grand Hotel,

a beautiful building and the island’s best hotel. It was with

pangs of regret and disloyalty that I left Alexandra. I knew

that next time I’d see her and the crew I’d be clean-shaven in an ironed shirt wearing a press badge and being steered around meeting race organisers and dignitaries. I’d be “at work”. At least they were now spared my snoring. After returning I talked to the organisers, who have agreed to stretch the time between the two regattas to around 10 days. This makes it three events: two great regattas and a dream-like transit in some of the best harbours and most magical day-sailing in the entire world in a flotilla of classic boats led by locals. In a country by which I am and you will be, utterly smitten.

In a country by which I am and you will be, utterly smitten. For more photographs

For more photographs from Greece visit – www.classicboat.co.uk

Est.1954–Celebratingour60thAnniversary
Est.1954–Celebratingour60thAnniversary
AP 19’ CARACAL
AP 19’ CARACAL

L.O.A. 19’, L.W.L. 18’11”, Displacement 2400lb, Beam 8’7”

First overall of 102 entries in the 22nd Annual Arey’s Pond Cat Gathering

Proud Builders of Arey’s Pond Custom Boats, 12’-39’ P.O. Box 222 • 45 Arey’s Lane • SO. Orleans, MA 02662 info@areyspondboatyard.com • areyspondboatyard.com

508-255-0994

Established 400 years When did you last visit Arthur Beale’s? London’s Yacht Chandler sales@arthurbeale.co.uk
Established 400 years
When did you last
visit Arthur Beale’s?
London’s Yacht
Chandler
sales@arthurbeale.co.uk
www.arthurbeale.co.uk
194 Shaftesbury Avenue London WC2H 8JP
020 7836 9034
Made with pride Britain in Great JAMES LAWRENCE SAILMAKERS LTD BESPOKE SAILMAKERS “Kelpie of Falmouth”
Made
with
pride
Britain
in Great
JAMES LAWRENCE
SAILMAKERS LTD
BESPOKE SAILMAKERS
“Kelpie of Falmouth”
Photo by Anna Boulton, Marine Artist
22-28 Tower Street, Brightlingsea, Essex CO7 0AL
Tel: 01206 302863 • Fax: 01206 305858 • Email: mark@gaffguru.com or lawrencesails@btconnect.com
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UNDERFALL BOAT YARD UNDER FALL B OAT YA R D BRISTOL BRIS TO L The
UNDERFALL BOAT YARD
UNDER FALL B OAT YA R D
BRISTOL
BRIS TO L
The Underfall Yard, situated at the western end of the
New builds and repairs in
wood, steel and advanced
floating harbour in Bristol, offers the following services:
composites by Classic Boat
New builds and
award winner Star Yachts,
repairs in wood,
RB Boatbuilding,Tim Loftus
steel and advanced
and Independent Composites
• composites.
Rigging services by Denis
Rigging services of
Platten of Traditional Rigging
• any size.
Slipway up to 140 Tonnes,
Slipway up to 140
including multi-hulls
• Tonnes.
Moorings and hard standing
• Moorings and
Marine engineering and
hard standing.
electrical services by
Visit
Marine
Motion Marine
our
web
of site our
The
workshops
of the
for
details
• engineering and
On-site forge and blacksmith
Underfall
house
exciting
Heritage
• electrical services.
experienced
fibre Yard shipwrights, composite and
RYA advanced level training
courses by Blue Print Sailing.
riggers,
Lottery
blacksmith
Funded
and
welders,
expansion
specialists
plans
phone: 07967 386 004 or
Tel: 07967-386004 07866 705 181
carpenters.
email:
info@underfallboatyard.co.uk
Email: info@underfallboatyard.co.uk
web:
www.underfallboatyard.co.uk
Web: www.underfallboardyard.co.uk
Underfall Boatyard, Cumberland Road, Bristol BS1 6XG
Underfall Boat Yard, Cumberland Road, Bristol BS1 6XG
Cumberland Road, Bristol BS1 6XG Underfall Boat Yard, Cumberland Road, Bristol BS1 6XG 62 CLASSIC BOAT
Cumberland Road, Bristol BS1 6XG Underfall Boat Yard, Cumberland Road, Bristol BS1 6XG 62 CLASSIC BOAT

ONBOARD

New Classics

ONBOARD New C lassics SPIRIT 74 Sleek SoT from Spirit The latest Spirit yacht from the

SPIRIT 74

Sleek SoT from Spirit

The latest Spirit yacht from the eponymous yard in Suffolk is a departure from the usual Spirit look, with its modern and innovative ‘fan’ light set into the top of the coachroof and the modern portholes let into the cabin trunk. It’s brave but won’t

suit everyone – design departures like this are, after all, highly subjective. The rest of the yacht is a corker in anyone’s book, particularly the huge, oval, American- style cockpit and luxurious solid-wood interior. Being a Spirit, she ought to be fast

too

exceed 20 knots in the right conditions.

these boats have modern underbodies and her builder reckons the 74 can

Tel: +44 (0)1473 214715, spirityachts.com

C/O SPIRIT YACHTS
C/O SPIRIT YACHTS
C/O AREY’S POnd
C/O AREY’S POnd

CARACAL

Enough to make you beam

We’ve always had a fondness for catboats and wondered at how handy they’d be on the East Coast of England as well as the USA. Think of it – unbeatable cockpit accommodation, shoal draught, massive form stability, brilliant light-airs sailing and that look. There is a trade off, as with all boats – catboats are unsuitable for bluewater work and can carry bad weather helm. And you would fear a gybe with that huge sail! Some though, are well sorted – Theo Rye, our technical editor is a fan of the genre and has sailed some well-behaved, neutral-helmed boats. Sadly,

Caracal is a bit far away for us to test, but judging from the photos, Arey’s Pond Boat Yard have come up with a beauty. She’s a solid 2,400lb (1,090kg), and 19ft (5.8m) long with a beam of 8ft 6in (2.6m). According to her builder, Arey’s Pond, she’s a good singlehander with room for up to eight in the 70sqft (6.5m 2 ) cockpit. There are two berths and opening portholes below. Other refinements include an inboard electric motor and folding prop. According to Arey’s Pond “crew and guests do not even need to move to windward when tacking on 12 knots of wind.” That must feel

weird

“good weird”, as they say.

Tel: +1 508 255 0994, areyspondboatyard.com

A&R Way Boatbuilding Buiders and restorers of the finest quality wooden boats. Come and see
A&R Way Boatbuilding Buiders and restorers of the finest quality wooden boats. Come and see
A&R Way Boatbuilding Buiders and restorers of the finest quality wooden boats. Come and see
A&R Way Boatbuilding Buiders and restorers of the finest quality wooden boats. Come and see

A&R Way Boatbuilding

Buiders and restorers of the finest quality wooden boats.

Come and see Misty at Southampton boat show where she is making a guest appearance in the marina. We have recently completed a full restoration of this special David Cheverton designed yacht. Come and talk to us about your project or new boat, we are always open and interested in new ideas. Choose from our small boat designs, commission a bespoke boat or yacht or come to us for our classic boat restoration expertise. We build replicas, work with contemporary designers or produce our own designs for you.

www.boatbuildersscotland.co.uk arway@btinternet.com Call Adam 01546606326

produce our own designs for you. www.boatbuildersscotland.co.uk • arway@btinternet.com • Call Adam 01546606326
produce our own designs for you. www.boatbuildersscotland.co.uk • arway@btinternet.com • Call Adam 01546606326
produce our own designs for you. www.boatbuildersscotland.co.uk • arway@btinternet.com • Call Adam 01546606326
produce our own designs for you. www.boatbuildersscotland.co.uk • arway@btinternet.com • Call Adam 01546606326
produce our own designs for you. www.boatbuildersscotland.co.uk • arway@btinternet.com • Call Adam 01546606326
produce our own designs for you. www.boatbuildersscotland.co.uk • arway@btinternet.com • Call Adam 01546606326

Njord

Johan Anker 8 metre for sale

S/Y - “Njord” was built 1918 at Anker & Jensen boatyard in Norway. After several years of total restoration at a boatyard, the yacht was relaunched in 2009 and is now ready for an other 100 years of sailing! She has a IEMA serti cate and can race in the 8 metre eet, or just use her for classic sailing Lying in Oslo

Price 220.000, Euro

for classic sailing Lying in Oslo Price € 220.000, Euro For more information visit www.goclassic.no or

For more information visit www.goclassic.no or email Peter Ennals at peter@goclassic.no Peter Ennals Tel: 0047 93 200 547

more information visit www.goclassic.no or email Peter Ennals at peter@goclassic.no Peter Ennals Tel: 0047 93 200
more information visit www.goclassic.no or email Peter Ennals at peter@goclassic.no Peter Ennals Tel: 0047 93 200
more information visit www.goclassic.no or email Peter Ennals at peter@goclassic.no Peter Ennals Tel: 0047 93 200
more information visit www.goclassic.no or email Peter Ennals at peter@goclassic.no Peter Ennals Tel: 0047 93 200

ONBOARD

Bronze rigging thimbles To progress you sometimes need to take a step backwards, so back
Bronze rigging thimbles
To progress you sometimes need to take a step backwards, so back to the 1958
specification for the shape of thimbles for wire rope – BS464.
This design creates a better shape for hand splicing than the
more modern DIN standard thimbles, and to meet increased
demand, Classic Marine has now made them
in bronze for wire sizes from 5mm to
14 mm. The dimension refers to
the actual size of the score, so
if the wire is served, you
would need to take
account of that when
selecting the size
required.
Prices from £12.68 to
£40.99 including VAT.
www.classicmarine.co.uk
Flare pan

In the galley, due to all the bashing about, we usually use the rejects from the kitchen. This however, if treated right, (it is non stick) could save a lot of gas. We found that the Flare Pan, designed by a jet engine thermodynamic engineer, heated water to boiling 35-40 per cent quicker than all our normal pans, the fins catching the escaping side flames and adding side heat. Take that across the Atlantic, for instance, and it could be the difference between running out of gas or not. Expensive, yes but there’s a long term saving on the gas too. £64.99

Lazarette

Blunt-end safety rescue lock knife

Whether it’s because you’re bouncing around the foredeck in a lively sea or sitting in a RIB or a liferaft, a blunt-end safety knife is an essential bit of survival kit. Here’s one with a keen stainless steel, serrated blade, one-hand opening, built-in shackle key and bright red thermoplastic handle. Only £11.95 so it won’t matter if it falls overboard, not that it will, because it has a lanyard hole.

www.whitbyandco.co.uk

will, because it has a lanyard hole. www.whitbyandco.co.uk Boatwarden security app To put your mind totally

Boatwarden security app

To put your mind totally at rest the Boatwarden app is a cunning invention designed to be used in conjunction with the hardware and boat-monitoring security system and allows you to remotely check the position of your boat, set the bilge pump going, set the alarm, check the battery status, set distance-fenced movement alarms or customise your remote orders to what you want including cctv operation. It uses very little power and some insurance companies are offering reductions if it’s fitted. Free to download to the iPhone or Android phones

Sail spongebag
Sail
spongebag

A spongebag made from old sails. It looks good, it feels good, and it’s big enough to take a tube of deodorant (often the bête noire of lesser sponge bags). It feels sturdy enough, with its metal zip, to last forever. More pleasing than you might imagine. £35

www.lakeland.co.uk

Yacht

Cloth

This big, soft 500gsm high-tech diamond-weave towel holds over 1L of water. It’s designed to dry without smearing but in the way that everything on boats gets demoted, it ends up dealing with oil spills, the bilges, and even dog drying. £12

www.swipewipes.co.uk

www.quba.com

www.boatwarden.com

CK318 ALBERTA £140,000 call: 01206 304690 email: robin@strong-point.co.uk
CK318 ALBERTA
£140,000
call: 01206 304690 email: robin@strong-point.co.uk
FOR SALE 70 ft SAILING YACHT ABEKING & RASMUSSEN See our website for more details
FOR SALE
70 ft SAILING YACHT
ABEKING &
RASMUSSEN
See our website for more details
WWW.YACHT-BAVARIA.COM
YACHT ABEKING & RASMUSSEN See our website for more details WWW.YACHT-BAVARIA.COM 66 CLASSIC BOAT OCTOBER 2014

ONBOARD ONBOARD

Books

ONBOARD ONBOARD Books The Sea Wolf by Stan Grayson We received four re-released books from publisher

The Sea Wolf

by Stan Grayson

We received four re-released books from publisher Adlard Coles in the o ce recently:

20,000 Leagues Under the Sea (Jules Verne),

South (Sir Ernest Shackleton), Mutiny on the HMS Bounty (William Bligh) and this, the most literary and conceptual of the bunch, Sea Wolf by Jack London. It is a dark, frightening story of bookish urbanite Humphrey Van Weyden whose ferry, on a routine crossing from San Francisco to Sausalito, is struck in fog and sinks. He is saved by Captain Wolf Larsen of the sealer Ghost, headed for Japan, and here his nightmare begins. Enslaved on the ship, it transpires that Larsen’s interest is not in delivering Van Weyden to safety, but in enslaving, humiliating and torturing him, forcing him into violent confrontation with fellow crewmen and robbing him of his status as civilised man. This is a classic tale of good against evil, civilisation versus savagery. Captain Larsen ranks among the most horrifying characters in all fiction, a hangover from the 19th-century novels that depicted men so brutal they were in danger of assuming cartoonish auras. What makes this so dark and unsettling is that Larsen is almost believable. First published in 1904, this edition includes an insightful introduction from Bear Grylls. It’s a useful primer to the story, which is somehow a page-turner and challenging at the same time. My only criticism is that the price seems quite high for a paperback re-release of a book no longer in copyright. SHMH Pub Adlard Coles Nautical, bloomsbury.com, paperback, 352pp, £8.99

CLASSIC BOOKSHELF Peter Pye Omnibus s by Peter Pye In 1931 Peter and Anne Pye
CLASSIC BOOKSHELF
Peter Pye Omnibus s
by Peter Pye
In 1931 Peter and Anne Pye bought a 29ft t
west-country fishing boat for £25. She
was put into the hands of a local
boat-builder, converted to a yacht,
rigged as a ga cutter, and, as a final
touch re-named Moonraker after the
pirate ship sailed by Mary Lovell.
For the next 18 years Anne and Peter
spent holidays aboard, until in 1949, they y decided decided
to give up their jobs, cut their ties with the land and embark on what was
to be the first of a series of ocean voyages. This omnibus contains the four
books that were written about these expeditions. Red Mains’l covers the
first trip, an Atlantic circuit to the Caribbean and Bermuda, returning via
the Azores, where a visiting yacht was such a sensation that the day was
declared a public holiday. The Sea is for Sailing is about a second voyage,
through the Panama Canal and into the Pacific, while A Sail in a Forest
sees them setting o for Finland. The final book Back Door to Brazil covers
a fourth cruise, this time in the South Atlantic. Aside from the descriptions
of the sailing, the places they visit and the people they meet, what makes
these books so appealing are the Pyes themselves. They are a true team,
who are happy together, love their boat and thoroughly enjoy the life they
have chosen, making their readers feel like casting o the mooring lines to
depart on adventures of their own. Richard Toyne
SUNDOWNERS WITH GUY VENABLES Morgan’s Origins When my uncle Hugh Venables was entering Jamaica, the
SUNDOWNERS
WITH GUY VENABLES
Morgan’s
Origins
When my uncle Hugh Venables was entering Jamaica, the big
customs lady looking at his passport announced, “You gotta lot of
nerve turning up in a place like this with a name like that.” To
properly understand why, we find ourselves back in 1654.
Cromwell told my great great etc (you fill in the rest) grandfather
General Robert Venables and Admiral William Penn to put
together a fleet of 42 ships and take Hispaniola from the Spanish.
Penn was in charge of the ships and Venables the troops and as
we all know, you gotta only have one skipper. Consequently they
buggered it up, (Venables valiantly blaming the cowardice of his
own troops) so they
took Jamaica instead,
which was hardly
defended and had nicer
beaches. Two events
followed that changed the
history of rum forever (is
history ever changed
temporarily?) Firstly,
Venables rewarded the
sailors and soldiers with
a daily ration of the rum
from what had been left
behind by the fleeing
Spanish force, starting a
tradition that became the
daily tot of rum and
one that continued
until 1970. (Prior to this
British sailors would
have had to rely on beer
or water for refreshment
on board, both of which
spoiled fairly quickly, unlike rum.)
It is also notable that the army did not carry on the tradition and
instead opted for compo rations (water sometimes sweetened
with colouring, biscuits you could tile your bathroom with and
pink meat in a can infused with chemicals that render it inedible).
Secondly, once Venables and Penn had left, after enslaving
much of the local indigenous population, getting very ill and
generally behaving rather badly (apparently Venables has a
statuette in Jamaica which is spat on regularly by the locals), a
welsh privateer Henry Morgan stayed behind to carry on mucking
about in the Caribbean. He was made Captain, and, to mark the
success of his exploits, partly due to his recruiting 500 of the
meanest pirates and dressing himself in red silk, was knighted in
1680. He became governor of Jamaica and retired to become a
sugar cane plantation owner and spend his time “perfecting his
own rum,” – what we now know as Captain Morgan.
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Classnotes

Belfast Lough One-Design

BY VANESSA BIRD

I f you ask several classic boat

Lough One-Design, don’t be

enthusiasts to describe a Belfast

surprised if you get more than one definition. There are in fact five different classes of boat that answer to that name, and which all sailed at around the same time. All were conceived prior to 1901, at a time when Belfast Lough in Northern Ireland was proving a vital source of new one-designs. Although three of the Belfast Lough One-Designs share similar profiles, they were all very different designs, and ranged from 14ft to 37ft (4.3m-11.3m) length overall. Now, only individual boats

exist, with fleets long since dispersed, but at the time these classes were significant designs. They were only ever built in small numbers, but proved very popular with Irish yachtsmen at the six yacht clubs on Belfast Lough. Even today, they command high prices second-hand. The first class of Belfast Lough One-Designs – Class I – was designed by Wm Fife III in 1897. Known as the ‘Seabird’ class, it

followed the Cork Harbour One- Design, which Fife drew in 1895 for members of the

Royal Munster Yacht Club. They were 37ft (11.3m)

LOA and designed as comfortable cruising boats. Built by John Hilditch at Carrickfergus, nine of the cutters were launched into Belfast Lough, and most were named after seabirds. Today, the whereabouts of just three

is known, but two of these have

recently seen extensive restoration.

The second class – Class II – was also designed by Fife, in the same

year as the Seabirds. With a length overall of 24ft (7.3m), nine of these sloop-rigged daysailers were built, five by A Hutchinson & Co, two by

P McKeown and two by John

Hilditch. With its long overhang and

elegant bow, it’s an attractive design now reborn as the Artisan 15, a spirit-of-tradition version built by Artisan Boatworks in Maine. The Jewel class was the third design, this time from Linton Hope. Ten were built by William Roberts in Chester, at 24ft (7.3m) LOA. These were centreboarders named after jewels and relatively little is known about them now. In 1899 the existing three classes were joined by a fourth, designed by Alfred Mylne – the Ulster Star of 30ft (9.1m) LOA. Soon after, a fifth class was introduced, the smallest on the lough at just 14ft (4.3m) LOA. The Insect Class open

centreboarder was designed by WM Inglis for the Ulster Sailing Club. Twelve were built.

“Even today, they command high prices”

Despite their popularity in the last years of the 18th century, by 1902 a new one- design – the Linton Hope-designed Fairy One-Design – had superseded all the classes on Belfast Lough as the tradition of employing paid hands waned. Today, it is the lough’s main

class and a flourishing fleet remains.

Vanessa’s book,

Classic Classes,

is a must-buy.

Please bear in mind that this

book provides only

a snapshot of the

myriad classes in existence.

provides only a snapshot of the myriad classes in existence. ONBOARD SECTION HEAD SUB SECTION The

ONBOARD

SECTION HEAD

SUB SECTION

The Class I Belfast Lough One-Design Whimbrel was designed by William Fife III in 1897. She is one of only three still in existence

IAN ROYSTON

BELFAST LOUGH ONE-DESIGN FIVE CLASSES

Class I – Seabird LOA 37ft 3in (11.4m) LWL 25ft (7.6m) BEAM 8ft 8in (2.7m) DRAUGHT 6ft 3in (1.9m) SAIL AREA 848sqft (78.8m 2 ) DESIGNER William Fife III

Class II LOA 24ft (7.3m) LWL 15ft (4.6m) BEAM 6ft 2in (1.9m) DRAUGHT 3ft 6in (1.1m) SAIL AREA 355sqft (33m 2 ) DESIGNER William Fife III

Class III – Jewel LOA 24ft (7.3m) LWL 17ft (5.2m) BEAM 6ft 6in (2m) DRAUGHT 18in/5ft 6in

(46cm/1.7m)

SAIL AREA 276sqft (25.6m 2 ) DESIGNER Linton Hope

Class IV – Ulster Star LOA 30ft (9.1m) LWL 20ft (6.1m) BEAM 7ft 6in (2.3m) DRAUGHT 5ft (1.5m) SAIL AREA 550sqft (51m 2 )

DESIGNER Alfred Mylne

SAIL AREA 550sqft (51m 2 ) DESIGNER Alfred Mylne Class V – Insect LOA 14ft (4.3m)
SAIL AREA 550sqft (51m 2 ) DESIGNER Alfred Mylne Class V – Insect LOA 14ft (4.3m)
SAIL AREA 550sqft (51m 2 ) DESIGNER Alfred Mylne Class V – Insect LOA 14ft (4.3m)
SAIL AREA 550sqft (51m 2 ) DESIGNER Alfred Mylne Class V – Insect LOA 14ft (4.3m)

Class V – Insect

LOA 14ft (4.3m) BEAM 5ft (1.5m) SAIL AREA 117sqft (10.9m 2 ) DESIGNER WM Inglis

Berenike - a hybrid saloon launch with full facilities on a 26ft GRP hull, sliding