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Pre-Reading Strategies APA Citation:

David, M. (n.d.). Cluster Word

Web. .

Retrieved July 30, 2014 , from

http://eduplace.com/graphicorganizer/pdf/cluster.pdf Name: Cluster Word Web

Steps:

  • 1. The teacher will draw a diagram of the ‘Cluster Word Web’ on the board, or he/she may print off a copy for each student to have.

  • 2. The students will then copy down the chart on a piece of paper (unless given a copy).

  • 3. After each student is done, they will be given the writing prompt.

  • 4. Once the writing prompt has been appointed, the students will then fill the bubbles with ideas for their paper.

  • 5. After they have filled out their bubbles, they will then put it all together to help them arrange their paper promptly.

Strengths and Weaknesses:

This strategy is great for helping students organize their thoughts for writing a paper. The prompt being in the middle of the web will help them branch off into other thoughts that they can use for their paragraphs. The good thing about this strategy is that they will keep using it throughout their schooling and even in college.

Example:

Pre-Reading Strategies APA Citation: David, M. (n.d.). Cluster Word Web. . Retrieved July 30, 2014 ,

Pre-Reading Strategies

APA Citation:

David, M. (n.d.). Give One Get

One. .

Retrieved August 1, 2014 , from

http://www.smoran.ednet.ns.ca/Reader'sworkshop/give_one_get_one.htm

Name: Get One, Give One

Steps:

  • 1. The teacher will draw a T-chart on the board and label one side ‘Give One’ and the other ‘Get One’.

  • 2. The students will then fill out as many facts as they know about the given subject on the ‘Give One’ side.

  • 3. After everyone is done, they will go around their table (or be put into partners) and say what they have for their ‘Give One’ and as they keep going around, the other students will write down the things the other students have in their ‘Get One’, if they don’t already have it.

Strengths and Weaknesses:

This strategy is a great way to find out what the students already know when starting a new chapter. I think it is especially helpful with ELL students. It gives them a chance to say what they know, while learning from their peers.

Example:

Pre-Reading Strategies APA Citation: David, M. (n.d.). Give One Get One. . Retrieved August 1, 2014
Pre-Reading Strategies APA Citation: David, M. (n.d.). Give One Get One. . Retrieved August 1, 2014
Pre-Reading Strategies APA Citation: David, M. (n.d.). Give One Get One. . Retrieved August 1, 2014

Pre-Reading Strategies

APA Citation:

Pre-Reading Strategies: KWL.

(n.d.). .

Retrieved July 31, 2014, from

Name: KWL

Steps:

  • 1. The teacher will hand out the KWL worksheet to each student.

  • 2. The teacher will then demonstrate how to properly use the chart.

  • 3. Then the topic will be written on the board.

  • 4. Then the children will fill out the chart according to their prior knowledge and such.

  • 5. Once each student is done, the teacher start a class discussion over the topic.

Strengths and Weaknesses:

This strategy is great for engaging students in a new topic. The use their prior knowledge to help them start with the topic and then will later reflect on what they learned. It’s a great way to start a new chapter and to get the students thinking about the topic thoroughly.

Example:

Pre-Reading Strategies APA Citation: Pre-Reading Strategies: KWL. (n.d.). . Retrieved July 31, 2014, from <a href=http://www.studygs.net/preread.htm Name: KWL Steps: 1. The teacher will hand out the KWL worksheet to each student. 2. The teacher will then demonstrate how to properly use the chart. 3. Then the topic will be written on the board. 4. Then the children will fill out the chart according to their prior knowledge and such. 5. Once each student is done, the teacher start a class discussion over the topic. Strengths and Weaknesses: This strategy is great for engaging students in a new topic. The use their prior knowledge to help them start with the topic and then will later reflect on what they learned. It’s a great way to start a new chapter and to get the students thinking about the topic thoroughly. Example: " id="pdf-obj-2-37" src="pdf-obj-2-37.jpg">

Pre-Reading Strategies

APA Citation:

Pictures.

Retrieved July 30, 2014, from

___

Name: Pictures

Steps:

  • 1. The teacher will hand out pictures/textboxes about the upcoming chapter/story/lesson.

  • 2. The teacher will then ask the students to take out a piece of paper.

  • 3. Once each student has studied the pictures/textboxes, they will then predict what they think the chapter/story/lesson is about.

  • 4. After each student is done, the teacher will discuss everyone’s predictions.

  • 5. Then the teacher will start the lesson and afterwards will refer back to the students’ predictions and see how they compare.

Strengths and Weaknesses:

This strategy is a great way to start off a lesson or a book. You get the students to start using their imagination and predicting what may happen just by showing them a textbox or picture from the selected material.

Example:

Pre-Reading Strategies APA Citation: Pictures. Retrieved July 30, 2014, from <a href=http://www.education.state.pa.us/portal/server.pt/community/before-during- after_reading_strategies/7540/d_-_during_%28reading rereading%29/508381 ___ Name: Pictures Steps: 1. The teacher will hand out pictures/textboxes about the upcoming chapter/story/lesson. 2. The teacher will then ask the students to take out a piece of paper. 3. Once each student has studied the pictures/textboxes, they will then predict what they think the chapter/story/lesson is about. 4. After each student is done, the teacher will discuss everyone’s predictions. 5. Then the teacher will start the lesson a nd afterwards will refer back to the students’ predictions and see how they compare. Strengths and Weaknesses: This strategy is a great way to start off a lesson or a book. You get the students to start using their imagination and predicting what may happen just by showing them a textbox or picture from the selected material. Example: " id="pdf-obj-3-46" src="pdf-obj-3-46.jpg">

During-Reading Strategies

APA Citation:

Character Sketch.

(n.d.). .

Retrieved August 2, 2014, from

http://www.scps.k12.fl.us/curriculum/AcademicCore/LanguageArtsandReading/SecondaryReadi

ng/DuringReading.aspx

Name: Character Sketch

Steps:

  • 1. The teacher will give each student a Character Sketch worksheet and demonstrate how to

properly fill it out.

  • 2. Once the children have started in their activity, they will be able to fill out this worksheet

during said activity.

  • 3. At the end of class, the students will turn in their worksheet.

Strengths and Weaknesses:

It’s a great strategy that helps students think more about the characters. It would be helpful for students when writing; they’ll be able to put all the characteristics and personality traits for one particular character. This will be beneficial for developing the characters throughout their paper.

Example:

During-Reading Strategies APA Citation: Character Sketch. (n.d.). . Retrieved August 2, 2014, from http://www.scps.k12.fl.us/curriculum/AcademicCore/LanguageArtsandReading/SecondaryReadi ng/DuringReading.aspx Name:

During-Reading Strategies

APA Citation:

Rogers, K. (n.d.). The Highlighting

Strategy. .

Retrieved July 31, 2014, from

Name: Highlighting Strategy

Steps:

  • 1. The teacher will hand out different colored highlighters to each student and/or table.

  • 2. The teacher will use his/her notes and show the students how to highlight important parts of their notes.

  • 3. Once the students have finished highlighting, the teacher will go over the notes with the entire class and compare their highlighted sections with the students.

Strengths and Weaknesses:

This strategy is great for working on study skills. It shows the students how to find the main ideas of the passage or chapter that stand out. This will be especially helpful for students when

studying for a test over a big chapter. It’ll help them in reviewing the chapter as well as having

them actively read throughout the passage.

Example:

During-Reading Strategies APA Citation: Rogers, K. (n.d.). The Highlighting Strategy. . Retrieved July 31, 2014, fromhttp://gse.buffalo.edu/org/writingstrategies/3-6highlighting.htm Name: Highlighting Strategy Steps: 1. The teacher will hand out different colored highlighters to each student and/or table. 2. The teacher will use his/her notes and show the students how to highlight important parts of their notes. 3. Once the students have finished highlighting, the teacher will go over the notes with the entire class and compare their highlighted sections with the students. Strengths and Weaknesses: This strategy is great for working on study skills. It shows the students how to find the main ideas of the passage or chapter that stand out. This will be especially helpful for students when studying for a test over a big chapter. It’ll help them in reviewing the chapter as well as having them actively read throughout the passage. Example: " id="pdf-obj-5-35" src="pdf-obj-5-35.jpg">

During-Reading Strategies

APA Citation:

David, M. (n.d.). Question

Wheel. .

Retrieved August 2, 2014, from

Name: Question Wheel

Steps:

  • 1. The teacher will make a copy of the ‘Question Creation Chart (Q-Chart)’ and have it with her while reading a passage.

  • 2. Then the teacher will make a wheel with every student’s name on it, with a spinner.

  • 3. The teacher will then use the wheel and spin it to determine which student will be answering the question.

  • 4. Every so often (after a page or a paragraph) the teacher will stop and ask a question over the material that has already been read.

Strengths and Weaknesses:

This is a great strategy to ensure that each student is actively reading. The students never know

when the spinner is going to land on their name. It’s also good for the students since the

questions are very simple thanks to the chart mainly being composed of simple one-worded

columns.

It also helps them with being more comfortable with being called on in class, they feel

more confident and if they’re actively reading then they will surely know the correct response.

Example:

During-Reading Strategies APA Citation: David, M. (n.d.). Question Wheel. . Retrieved August 2, 2014, from <ahttp://www.smoran.ednet.ns.ca/Reader'sworkshop/question_wheel.htm Name: Question Wheel Steps: 1. The teacher will make a copy of the ‘Question Creation Chart (Q - Chart)’ and have it with her while reading a passage. 2. Then the teacher will make a wheel with every student’s name on it, with a spinner. 3. The teacher will then use the wheel and spin it to determine which student will be answering the question. 4. Every so often (after a page or a paragraph) the teacher will stop and ask a question over the material that has already been read. Strengths and Weaknesses: This is a great strategy to ensure that each student is actively reading. The students never know when the spinner is going to land on their name. It’s also good for the students since the questions are very simple thanks to the chart mainly being composed of simple one-worded columns. It also helps them with being more comfortable with being called on in class, they feel more confident and if they’re actively reading then they will surely know the correct response. Example: " id="pdf-obj-6-52" src="pdf-obj-6-52.jpg">
During-Reading Strategies APA Citation: David, M. (n.d.). Question Wheel. . Retrieved August 2, 2014, from <ahttp://www.smoran.ednet.ns.ca/Reader'sworkshop/question_wheel.htm Name: Question Wheel Steps: 1. The teacher will make a copy of the ‘Question Creation Chart (Q - Chart)’ and have it with her while reading a passage. 2. Then the teacher will make a wheel with every student’s name on it, with a spinner. 3. The teacher will then use the wheel and spin it to determine which student will be answering the question. 4. Every so often (after a page or a paragraph) the teacher will stop and ask a question over the material that has already been read. Strengths and Weaknesses: This is a great strategy to ensure that each student is actively reading. The students never know when the spinner is going to land on their name. It’s also good for the students since the questions are very simple thanks to the chart mainly being composed of simple one-worded columns. It also helps them with being more comfortable with being called on in class, they feel more confident and if they’re actively reading then they will surely know the correct response. Example: " id="pdf-obj-6-54" src="pdf-obj-6-54.jpg">

During-Reading Strategies

APA Citation:

Sticky Notes.

Retrieved July 30, 2014, from

___

Name: Sticky Notes

Steps:

  • 1. The teacher will hand out packets of sticky notes to each table/student.

  • 2. The teacher will the demonstrate how to put sticky note thoughts/questions on the text while reading the passage.

  • 3. At the end of class, the students will keep the sticky notes in the passage to review when finished reading.

Strengths and Weaknesses:

Sticky Notes is a great way to help students actively read. It’s especially great for ELL students because they can write down any question they may have about that part of the passage and even possibly over the grammar. The sticky notes will be a great way for them to keep track of their thoughts while reading.

Example:

During-Reading Strategies APA Citation: Sticky Notes. Retrieved July 30, 2014, from <a href=http://www.education.state.pa.us/portal/server.pt/community/before-during- after_reading_strategies/7540/d_-_during_%28reading rereading%29/508381 ___ Name: Sticky Notes Steps: 1. The teacher will hand out packets of sticky notes to each table/student. 2. The teacher will the demonstrate how to put sticky note thoughts/questions on the text while reading the passage. 3. At the end of class, the students will keep the sticky notes in the passage to review when finished reading. Strengths and Weaknesses: Sticky Notes is a great way to help students actively read. It’s especi ally great for ELL students because they can write down any question they may have about that part of the passage and even possibly over the grammar. The sticky notes will be a great way for them to keep track of their thoughts while reading. Example: " id="pdf-obj-7-40" src="pdf-obj-7-40.jpg">

After-Reading Strategies

APA Citation:

Engelbrecht, T. (2012, October 5). Magnet Summarizing

. .

Retrieved August 1, 2014, from

Name: Magnet Summaries

Steps:

  • 1. The teacher will have the students choose 3-4 key terms from the reading selection.

  • 2. Hand out 3 X 5 index cards to the students and assign each table a different key term.

  • 3. Each table will then write down important words that describe the key term.

  • 4. On the other side of the index card, have the students form a couple of sentences using their magnet word.

  • 5. Have one student from each table read off their sentences that they made for their key word.

Strengths and Weaknesses:

This strategy is a great way to help students remember vocabulary from the selection that you may be reading. It makes them recall what they had read and helps them better understand the key terms in the reading selection which will better help them understand the material. If the

students don’t understand the vocabulary, then they won’t be able to fully comprehend the

material of the subject that is being presented in the reading selection.

Example:

After-Reading Strategies APA Citation: Engelbrecht, T. (2012, October 5). Magnet Summarizing . . Retrieved August 1,http://www.crazyteacherlady.com/uploads/5/1/4/8/5148626/magnet_summaries.pdf Name: Magnet Summaries Steps: 1. The teacher will have the students choose 3-4 key terms from the reading selection. 2. Hand out 3 X 5 index cards to the students and assign each table a different key term. 3. Each table will then write down important words that describe the key term. 4. On the other side of the index card, have the students form a couple of sentences using their magnet word. 5. Have one student from each table read off their sentences that they made for their key word. Strengths and Weaknesses: This strategy is a great way to help students remember vocabulary from the selection that you may be reading. It makes them recall what they had read and helps them better understand the key terms in the reading selection which will better help them understand the material. If the students don’t understand the vocabulary, then they won’t be able to fully comprehend the material of the subject that is being presented in the reading selection. Example: " id="pdf-obj-8-40" src="pdf-obj-8-40.jpg">
After-Reading Strategies APA Citation: Engelbrecht, T. (2012, October 5). Magnet Summarizing . . Retrieved August 1,http://www.crazyteacherlady.com/uploads/5/1/4/8/5148626/magnet_summaries.pdf Name: Magnet Summaries Steps: 1. The teacher will have the students choose 3-4 key terms from the reading selection. 2. Hand out 3 X 5 index cards to the students and assign each table a different key term. 3. Each table will then write down important words that describe the key term. 4. On the other side of the index card, have the students form a couple of sentences using their magnet word. 5. Have one student from each table read off their sentences that they made for their key word. Strengths and Weaknesses: This strategy is a great way to help students remember vocabulary from the selection that you may be reading. It makes them recall what they had read and helps them better understand the key terms in the reading selection which will better help them understand the material. If the students don’t understand the vocabulary, then they won’t be able to fully comprehend the material of the subject that is being presented in the reading selection. Example: " id="pdf-obj-8-42" src="pdf-obj-8-42.jpg">
After-Reading Strategies APA Citation: Engelbrecht, T. (2012, October 5). Magnet Summarizing . . Retrieved August 1,http://www.crazyteacherlady.com/uploads/5/1/4/8/5148626/magnet_summaries.pdf Name: Magnet Summaries Steps: 1. The teacher will have the students choose 3-4 key terms from the reading selection. 2. Hand out 3 X 5 index cards to the students and assign each table a different key term. 3. Each table will then write down important words that describe the key term. 4. On the other side of the index card, have the students form a couple of sentences using their magnet word. 5. Have one student from each table read off their sentences that they made for their key word. Strengths and Weaknesses: This strategy is a great way to help students remember vocabulary from the selection that you may be reading. It makes them recall what they had read and helps them better understand the key terms in the reading selection which will better help them understand the material. If the students don’t understand the vocabulary, then they won’t be able to fully comprehend the material of the subject that is being presented in the reading selection. Example: " id="pdf-obj-8-44" src="pdf-obj-8-44.jpg">
After-Reading Strategies APA Citation: Engelbrecht, T. (2012, October 5). Magnet Summarizing . . Retrieved August 1,http://www.crazyteacherlady.com/uploads/5/1/4/8/5148626/magnet_summaries.pdf Name: Magnet Summaries Steps: 1. The teacher will have the students choose 3-4 key terms from the reading selection. 2. Hand out 3 X 5 index cards to the students and assign each table a different key term. 3. Each table will then write down important words that describe the key term. 4. On the other side of the index card, have the students form a couple of sentences using their magnet word. 5. Have one student from each table read off their sentences that they made for their key word. Strengths and Weaknesses: This strategy is a great way to help students remember vocabulary from the selection that you may be reading. It makes them recall what they had read and helps them better understand the key terms in the reading selection which will better help them understand the material. If the students don’t understand the vocabulary, then they won’t be able to fully comprehend the material of the subject that is being presented in the reading selection. Example: " id="pdf-obj-8-47" src="pdf-obj-8-47.jpg">

After-Reading Strategies

APA Citation:

Reutzel, D., & Block, C. (n.d.). Story

Map. .

Retrieved August 1, 2014, from

http://www.adlit.org/strategies/22736/

Name: Story Map

Steps:

  • 1. The teacher will give the students a reading assignment.

  • 2. The teacher will give them a worksheet and demonstrate how to properly fill out the chart that contains questions about the passage.(Can be given as individual or group work)

  • 3. After the students are done with the assignment, they will turn it in.

Strengths and Weaknesses:

This strategy is a great way for the students to review the material they have just read. It’s great for ELL’s because it helps them analyze the story and better understand what they have read.

Story Maps are a great way for students to recall what they have just read and better help them actively read.

Example:

After-Reading Strategies APA Citation: Reutzel, D., & Block, C. (n.d.). Story Map. . Retrieved August 1,

After-Reading Strategies

APA Citation:

David, M. (n.d.). Venn

Diagram. .

Retrieved July 31, 2014 , from

Name: Venn Diagram

Steps:

  • 1. The teacher will draw an example of the Venn Diagram on the board.

  • 2. The students will then copy the same diagram onto their piece of paper after reading the selected passage.

  • 3. They will then find the differences between two of the selected areas and find the similarities as well.

  • 4. After the class is done, the teacher will have them share their results with their fellow peers and then maybe with the class as well.

Strengths and Weaknesses:

This is a great strategy for students to do after they have read a passage over two or more different areas. They get to see how the two things are similar and also how they differ from one another. Many teachers use this strategy every year in their classroom and gives them a new way to look at how they overlap.

Example:

Differences Differences
Differences
Differences

Similarities

After-Reading Strategies

APA Citation:

321 Strategy.

Retrieved August 3, 2014, from

Name: 321 Strategy

Steps:

  • 1. The teacher will teach a lesson during the class.

  • 2. About fifteen minutes before class is over, the teacher will hand out the 321 Worksheet.

  • 3. The teacher will demonstrate how to fill out the worksheet.

  • 4. The students will turn in their worksheet as they leave the class.

Strengths and Weaknesses:

This strategy is an easy way to get students to reflect on what was went over in class. It could be used for any subject and you can find plenty of worksheets online or you could even make your own. It lets you know how students are taking to your teaching and allows you to see how their brain processes the information they received through the lesson/story.

Examples:

Similarities After-Reading Strategies APA Citation: 321 Strategy. Retrieved August 3, 2014, from <a href=http://www.scps.k12.fl.us/curriculum/AcademicCore/LanguageArtsandReading/SecondaryReadi ng/AfterReading.aspx Name: 321 Strategy Steps: 1. The teacher will teach a lesson during the class. 2. About fifteen minutes before class is over, the teacher will hand out the 321 Worksheet. 3. The teacher will demonstrate how to fill out the worksheet. 4. The students will turn in their worksheet as they leave the class. Strengths and Weaknesses: This strategy is an easy way to get students to reflect on what was went over in class. It could be used for any subject and you can find plenty of worksheets online or you could even make your own. It lets you know how students are taking to your teaching and allows you to see how their brain processes the information they received through the lesson/story. Examples: " id="pdf-obj-11-38" src="pdf-obj-11-38.jpg">