Вы находитесь на странице: 1из 20

Running Head: UNITED NATIONS UNIVERSITY COLLECTION: PART TWO

Developing a Strategic Plan for the United Nations University Collection


Part Two: Strategic Goals, Assessments, and Annotated Bibliography

Helen Ly
Snow Marlonsson
Loren Reese
Amanda Treat
Shibrie Wilson

San Jose State University School of Library and Information Science

Professor Robert Boyd


LIBR 204-11
November 14, 2014

United Nations University Collection


Abstract

In part two of the Organizational Analysis for the Collection and Library at the United
Nations University, strategic goals were planned with the environmental scan, SWOT and
literature review in mind from part one of this investigation. Four goals were planned to
improve access to the UNU Collection, separate the UNU from the United Nations, maintain its
reputation as a premier research organization and maximize the value of the Collection. For
each goal assessment metrics detail the action steps needed to turn these goals into successful
projects. In addition to the strategic plan, an annotated bibliography has been provided for the
literature review on improving access is included.

Keywords: United Nations University Collection, UNU, improved access, strategic plan,
marketing

United Nations University Collection

Developing a Strategic Plan for the United Nations University Collection


Part Two: Strategic Goals, Assessments, and Annotated Bibliography
Strategic goals describe the accomplishments needed to realize an overatching strategy
(Evans and Alire 2013 p. 95). The United Nations University Collection (UNUC) strategy is to
use technology to make resources accessible for agents of global change (Ly, Marlonsson,
Reese, Treat, Wilson, 2014). This approach to disseminating the UNU Collection to potential
users is based on the premise that any person with an internet-enabled device can use the
research. The alternative, printed research, is expensive, slow, and cannot travel freely to the
target market.
The strategic goals support this strategy by emphasizing increased accessibility. We
suggest increasing access to the physical location, the digital portal, and improving access for
the disabled. The digital and disabled access problems can be addressed with minimal design
and metadata adjustments. The remaining suggestions stem from the groups experience with
the United Nations University Collection and the teams 2014 SWOT analysis, which revealed
service, resource and administrative opportunities for improvement. The service, resource and
administrative goals are intimately linked to the overarching strategy of disseminating research
digitally. For example, the suggestion to broaden funding sources, increase visibility and add
participatory elements, are foundational requirements for the well being of the organization.
United Nations University Collection
Strategic Plan 2015 2019
The United Nations University Collection is the repository for the research created by
scholars at the United Nations University. The Collection is an online database of these

United Nations University Collection

materials and is made available to the public free of charge. Increased access and readily
available research studies will set us apart from other research institutions.
Goal 1: Increase access to the UNU Library, and subsequently the collection
Objective 1.1: Expand operating hours to increase traffic to the library
Action Plan: The library is currently only open from 10:00 to 17:30 Monday to Friday.
The library will increase operating hours to include five hours on Saturdays. This will increase
access for those in the academic community who have other obligations during regular business
hours. Signage will be posted in the library to update patrons to the new hours of business. If
after six months, patronage has not increased, then regular Monday to Friday business hours
will resume.
Assessment: As stated above, this plan will be reviewed and evaluated six months after
inception. To be able to report the statistics needed for this objective, the library will require all
patrons to sign in and out of the library. At the end of the six months, visit numbers from
Saturday will be compared against visit numbers throughout the week. If the number of patrons
utilizing the library on Saturday is less than 15% of total weekly patron visits, the Saturday
hours will be eliminated.
Objective 1.2: Allow the general public greater access to the library
Action Plan: The current plan allows only for members of the UNU community and
students with reference letters from their respective university to access the library. While the
UNU Collection is available online for use by the general public, the University needs to
increase access to the actual library in order to gather more support for both the research held
there and the researchers whose material is housed. In conjunction with additional Saturday
hours, the library will be open to the general public for four hours on both Tuesday and

United Nations University Collection

Thursday and during open hours on Saturday. To oversee patrons who are not affiliated with the
University, patrons will be required to register for access in person and check in and out during
public visiting times. No material belonging to the library will leave with patrons who are
visiting members of the public. Library staff will evaluate this increase at three, six and nine
months following implementation. If at three months the public is not making use of the library,
a marketing plan will be launched to ensure that the additional hours and availability are public
knowledge. If, after nine months the library is still not being utilized, the library will instead
offer open access to the public by appointment only (reference letter not required).
Assessment: Each member of the public will be issued a library card and required to
check in and out of the library. This data will be pulled and examined after a period of nine
months. If the total number of public patrons visiting the library does not make up at least 20%
of total library patron usage for the time periods they are allowed, then the plan will be disabled
and library access will only be granted to the public by appointment.
Objective 1.3: Increase website traffic
Action Plan: Lack of website traffic not only hurts the library, but also the researchers who are
published there. A committee will be appointed to begin marketing efforts for the library and the
Collection specifically. Marketing efforts will include placing print advertisements in premier
research journals and on premier research institution websites. The target users for this
campaign are researchers who do not already know of the holdings in the UNU Collection.
Assessment: An Alexa test will be used to determine if website traffic and ranking
numbers have increased. It is assumed that climbing in the ranks will take significant time. An
Alexa test will be performed once per quarter to evaluate progress. If website traffic is not

United Nations University Collection

growing by 10% at each evaluation an outside specialist in the field of website analytics and
marketing will be sought.
Objective 1.4: Offer language options on the UNU Collection website
Action Plan: The website currently operates in English only. Given the nature of the
research housed on the Collection website, this language barrier severely limits the use of the
Collection. An advisory committee shall be formed to begin the process of offering translation
software for those requiring it. The timeline for the addition of translation software is one year.
In the meantime, a welcome banner that displays a tagline for the Collection in a variety of
languages shall be added to the website within the month. In addition to this welcome banner, a
news brief describing the implementation of translation software will be added to the homepage
to inform patrons of the new additions coming to the website.
Assessment: Work on this objective will begin immediately, target completion of the
entire project is slated for Fall 2015. Statistics will be pulled to evaluate usage increases from
this advancement to the Collection and its technology. Library and Collection staff members
will report on additional inquiries to either location regarding the language increases. Use a user
survey and annual Alexa test results to estimate how much traffic came from disabled and
disadvantaged users.
Objective 1.5: Adjust the websites design, content and metadata for disabled and
disadvantaged users
Action Plan: Fifty-four million non-institutionalized Americans are disabled (United
States Department of Labor, 2014). The World Health Organization estimates that globally, over
a billion people are disabled, which leads to poorer health, fewer opportunities and increased
obstacles (W.H.O., 2014). A website whose goal is to reach a global audience must take

United Nations University Collection

measures to acknowledge this cohort. Information must be convenient, easy to see, hear and
comprehend. First, test the website using EvalAccess; an HTML mark-up analyzer that locates
errors (Bakar, 2013). Use this reading-level analyzer from East End Literacy:
www.eastendliteracy.on.ca/clearlanguageanddesign/readingeffectivenesstool (Links to external
site), and test the accessibility of images at: http://colororacle.org (Links to external site).
Use the results to adjust the websites design. Second, encourage the researchers to
provide a ninth grade reading level summary of their articles. Then, control the search
vocabulary to provide results for a wider range of users: Include colloquial terms in the retrieval
process. Last, place a multi-lingual text-reading application next to the easy-reader summary to
address low-vision and cognitively impaired users. Cognitively disadvantaged and disabled
users will be able to understand content previously hidden by elitism, industry jargon and social
exclusion.
Assessment: Improved EvalAccess, literacy level and vision scores will signal success
for design and metadata factors. A focus group of disabled and disadvantaged users will be
employed before and after changes to assess this action items efficacy. The focus group should
consist of people with a variety of disabilities and a wide range of cognitive impairment as well
as an economically disadvantaged sample set. The focus groups will evaluate the websites ease
of use with a survey based on the 1973 Rehabilitation Act, Section 508.
Goal 2: Build a stronger reputation for the United Nations University, as a separate entity
from the United Nations
Objective 2.1: Secure additional funding sources
Action Plan: Currently the UNU is privately funded by two major donors, were there
unforeseen changes in the existing situation, funding would be severely disabled. Increasing

United Nations University Collection

relationships between the research and actual product material would provide revenue for the
UNU and credibility for the research. This goal will expand funding by partnering with
entrepreneurs who can create products or services to address the research findings.
Assessment: At least one additional financial backer is expected in the two year period
following the implementation of these goals. Additional financial support is to be gained from
the services or production of goods manufactured to support the research. Funding and budgets
will be evaluated quarterly. Monetary increases will be used for the next year to fund the
additional marketing needed to make this Strategic Plan successful.
Objective 2.2: Increase support from the Tokyo academic community
Action Plan: Previous reports have made claims that the Tokyo academic community
feels segregated from the UNU academic community. To remedy this and gain future
researchers for the UNU Library and Collection, the UNU will host a series of scholarly talks
and receptions to which the Tokyo academic community will be invited. In an effort to draw
attention to the research available in the Library and the Collection, at least two of the speakers
each year will be scholars who have research held in the Library and/or Collection. These events
will happen quarterly.
Assessment: The academic community will be surveyed quarterly to determine if efforts
are being received well. Survey participants will be entered into a lottery that awards funding or
materials to further their research. In addition, all survey participants will receive open access to
the library and Collection (within normal operating hours).
Objective 2.3: Promote the idea of Global Guardianship
Action Plan: The UNU Library and Collection will continue to harness information
from researchers, books, journals, and conference briefs and house it digitally in the United

United Nations University Collection

Nations University Collection. The research will be free to any who wish to access it. To further
promote the idea of Global Guardianship the Library and Collection will select one piece of
research from each of the five areas of study of the United Nations University and promote this
work on the website homepage for one month. In addition to being promoted, a discussion
forum will be included for each article for those interested in the research to share thoughts and
feedback on the piece. Each month the five articles will change.
Assessment: Discussion forums will be monitored and discussions will be expanded
and/or initiated by staff of the library and/or Collection. Social media campaigns will assist in
the marketing of these discussions. The end goal would be further research produced for the
library and Collection, in addition to new research ideas produced from the discussions.
Objective 2.4: Gain a perceptible degree of autonomy from the parent institution
Action Plan: The United Nations University as the research wing of the United Nations
frequently falls under the same scrutiny as the United Nations (the parent institution); any
misuse of funding or perceived injustices committed by the United Nations directly reflects the
reputation of the University. To increase autonomy from the UN, the UNU will issue a series of
press releases detailing the globally beneficial works of the UNU and the research it supports. In
addition, the UNU will make their budget reports available to the public.
Assessment: At the end of one calendar year a survey will be conducted to determine
the general publics opinion of the United Nations, the United Nations University and the
Library/Collection. This data will be used to continue the work on this objective. Any critical
problems reported will be addressed immediately.
Goal 3: Maintain and expand the United Nation Universitys (including the Library and
Collection) reputation as a premier research organization.

United Nations University Collection

10

Objective 3.1: Direct more researchers to the UNU Collection


Action Plan: Following the plan to implement a social media campaign to bring new
users to the UNU Library and Collection, the UNU Library and Collection will begin to
promote the research available through social media. In addition to social media marketing, the
research will be promoted through conventional methods such as research journals articles,
press releases and print advertisements and at conferences for organizations related to the field
of research mentioned and/or relating to the field of librarianship through the means of
conference sponsoring, advertisements and promotional materials as the budget allows.
Assessment: The social media campaign and marketing plan will be addressed monthly
during regularly held staff meetings. Questions, concerns and problems will be addressed at that
time. Any special events that require marketing will be discussed and placed on the calendar for
inclusion on social media. The budget for promotional materials will be evaluated quarterly, or
more often if it is deemed necessary.
Objective 3.2: Form new relationships with universities to develop future scholars
Action Plan: There are currently thirteen associated institutions affiliated with the
UNU. This goal aims at expanding that number to include other organizations in regions where
they are not currently present including the United States and Canada. A committee chaired by
the Vector shall be appointed to research institutions suitable for affiliation with the UNU, they
will select five institutions that will be given the opportunity to present materials to the
committee. From those the committee will choose two to add to the UNU list of associated
institutions bringing the number to fifteen.
Assessment: The committee will meet monthly to discuss progress on this objective.
The first meeting will include a planning session in which a checklist will be created to evaluate

United Nations University Collection

11

potential associated institutions. Evaluation will be performed following the addition of the
fourteenth institution. Any improvements needed for the program will be included at this point.
A final evaluation will be conducted at the completion of the project.
Objective 3.3: Increase visibility by connecting to the research targets and potential
contributors
Action Plan: One major benefit of the UNU is the ability to publish research papers
without having to use a publishing company. To keep the research and the UNU Collection
current, a steady stream of new research needs to be received each year. A report on the benefits
of publishing with the UNU shall be prepared and sent to all past and current contributors.This
report will include information on how to submit research and also include information for
referring new researchers.
Assessment: Research evaluation methods already in place will be used for this process.
An increase in research is targeted for 4% per year. Numbers of research added will be tallied
and divided into the five areas of research. If any field of research falls below the 4% mark
individually, a marketing plan will be implemented to increase research for that field.
Goal 4: Maximize the value of the United Nations University Collection
Objective 4.1: Expand marketing efforts
Action Plan: The marketing plan of the United Nations University needs to be expanded
to include a social media campaign aimed at increasing awareness of the UNU and the
Collection. A committee will be formed and a part-time staff member in charge solely of social
media accounts including a blog, a Facebook page and a Twitter account will be hired. This
person will specifically market the Library and Collection to increase interest and draw patrons
to use the UNU resources.

United Nations University Collection

12

Assessment: The additional staff member will be evaluated monthly to determine


progress. An average growth of 10% across the spectrum of social media is expected each
quarter. At the end of the first year, progress will be evaluated and if need and budget allows the
position on staff will move from part-time to full-time.
Objective 4.2: Partner with other institutions of higher learning to promote cross
sharing of references.
Action Plan: A committee shall be formed to create a proposal for institutions of higher
learning to promote the research available in the library and Collection and to promote the cross
sharing of information. Cross sharing references will pull more researchers to the work, thus
creating more traffic to both the UNU Library and increase the citing of UNU works by
scholars.
Assessment: Data will be maintained on the traffic to the UNU Collection website.
Additional data will be pulled from the number of research citations that include reference to
UNU researchers/research held in the UNU Collection. Reference citation increases will benefit
the scholar responsible for the writing, and the Library/Collection housing the material.
Objective 4.3: Increase the collection by incorporating research from similar
institutions
Action Plan: The Library and Collection will implement a campaign to crowdsource
research information from the online community who are active with the UNU Library and
Collection. Given the nature of this strategic plan, the crowdsourcing will begin six months after
the initiation of the marketing program. The goal will be to include those that have begun to
reach out to the UNU Library and Collection through social media.

13

United Nations University Collection

Assessment: Library staff will evaluate the amount of requests received for the new
research. The research added will undergo the same scrutiny as the research produced under the
watchful eye of the UNU. New research will be coded to distinguish it from research produced
at the UNU.
Conclusion
Give that the UNU Collections holdings have increased every give years by an average of
132% and factoring in the expansion of digital content, along with the implementation of our
teams goals and strategies, we project that by 2019 the library holdings will reach 2,700 items,
and by 2014; more than 4,000. The most pressing threat to this projection is the limited number
of funding sources. If any single benefactor decided to withdraw support, the result could be
catastrophic. This analysis found that access, visibility and consortia are not comparable to other
organizations of its size; all of which plays a role in threatening the healthy growth, continuation
and wide spread utilization of the collection.
Our strategic goals seek to fortify the UNU Collection by diversifying funding,
improving public relations, increasing consortia, and generally improving access to the
collection. If our suggestions yielded modest results, the UNU Collection could expand the
value of its holdings to the public, which would safeguard it against an unforeseeable financial
and political future that could end the mission.

14

United Nations University Collection


Annotated Bibliography
Argetsinger, W. (2014). Behind the Scenes: Improving online access to UNU
research. Retrieved from

http://unu.edu/publications/articles/improving-online-access-to-unu-research.html
Though perhaps only intended for a select group of United Nations University students and
faculty, the article documents an internal project carried out by UNU staff to assess the
collection from the users perspective. It goes on to describe the current process of unifying and
broadening access to the collection via centralization and digitization. This was the first, and
one of the most significant, articles our team found pertaining to UNUs
library collection. It provided a look into the recent history and current goings on of the library.
Published on the UNU website in early 2014, it is timely and authoritative.Having worked at
UNU from 2009 to 2013 as program associate and project manager,the author would seem quite
qualified to offer critique and recommendation on the subject. What may be lacking in the
article is failure to recognize or address the relative obscurity of the library itself.
Bakar, A. (2012). Myths and realities of digital reference services: Perspectives of
libraries from developing countries. Library Management, 33(3), 136-141.
doi:10.1108/01435121211217018
From a paper originally presented at the Qualitative and Quantitative Methods in Libraries
conference, this article details an accessibility study of public and private university websites by
using freely available software to check HTML mark-up on a site for errors and also for
measuring website traffic. The study looked at 20 universities, 10 public and 10 private, all
located in Malaysia. The results indicate that large public universities have better accessibility
and visibility than do private universities. The author(a professor at the International Islamic
University Malaysia) hypothesizes that increasing access helps communicate the institutions
merits to a wider audience. From this example, our team recognized that the success of an
organizations metadata model and flow structure could be measured. We then used Bakars
method to understand how the UNU Collection could increase its accessibility.
Barrett, B. F.D., Grover, V. I., Janowski, T., Van Lavieren, H., Ojo, A., &
Schmidt, P. (2009). Challenges in adoption and use of OpenCourseWare: Experience of
the United Nations University. Open Learning: The Journal of Open, Distance and elearning, 24(1), 31-38. doi:10.1080/02680510802627803
This was one of three articles we used to look at libraries decisions to digitize their collections
and move towards greater emphasis in online services. Barrett joined the UNU in 1996 and is

United Nations University Collection

15

now an academic program officer and head of communications. The article reports on the
UNUs establishment of programs to increase capacity using OpenCourseWare (OCW) to
support broader research, training and institutional capacity development goals. It was
particularly useful given that the article was published almost six ago, so that we can compare
the original goals and attempts to meet them, with the current status.
Berkeley Electronic Press (2014). The Bepress Mission: The story of bepress.
Retrieved from http://www.bepress.com/aboutbepress.html
Of the three case studies we looked at of libraries digitizing their collections, one was
Eastern Illinois Universitys success in using Berkley Digital Publishing (now called
bepress). Founded in 1999 by UC Berkeley Professors Robert Cooter, Aaron Edlin, and Ben
Hermalin, Bepress provides academia with platforms to showcase their work. In 2004 bepress
launched its Digital Commons institutional repository software, which is now used by more than
300 public and academic libraries, including San Jose State University.
Brull,S., (1992, August 5). UN University in Tokyo is Accused of Studying Mainly Itself. The
New York Times, pp.
This article appeared in the New York Times: The audience was its readership. Brull gathered
strategic planning information from the UNU financial reports, Japanese government reports,
articles and first-person accounts. He combined his research into an explanation of the
conditions that led to the UN Universitys funding crisis. Brulls tone was explanatory. He was
neither defending nor condemning the UNU. His argument was that some of the allegations of
financial mismanagement have a basis in truth, but the funding situation is complex because of
the history of the organization. Our team used the information to understand the distant past and
maturing (1992) funding structure that led to allegations of mismanagement. We used it to
support our assertion that the funding structure was both a strength and weakness. The value of
the article was not in its authority, but its first-person perspectives on the funding structure and
how that has affected opinions on financial management. The quotes from educators, scholars
and government officials helped form our understanding of the issues surrounding our target
organization in a way that our scholarly sources did not.
Bruns, T., Knight-Davis, S., Corrigan, E., & Brantley, S. (2014). It Takes a Library: Growing a
Robust Institutional Repository in Two Years. College & Undergraduate Libraries,
21(3/4), 244-262.
The authors published this peer-reviewed article in College and Undergraduate Libraries. The
article appeared in a special issue on scholarly communication. The educational tone was
intended for academic librarians. Bruns, Knight-Davis, Corrigan and Brantley researched
Eastern Illinois Universities process for moving a collection from a physical to digital format
and updating/ consolidating disparate collections by interviewing key actors and reviewing
documents. They found that careful planning and interdisciplinary participation fostered

United Nations University Collection

16

success. Creative budgeting, like reallocating human resources, allowed for the flexibility
necessary to staff and fund the project. The authors concluded that the projects goal of
increasing accessibility was exceeded. An interesting flaw in the paper is that it claims that it
took two years to create the digital archive, but simultaneously describes the ten-year process.
Our team over looked this time-frame issue because it was not relevant to our purpose. We used
the article to learn about how organizations expand access. Various combinations of search
terms related to improving collection access yielded this article.
Cervone, H. (2013). Selected practices and tools for better accessibility in digital library
projects. OCLC Systems & Services, 29(3), 130-133.
This article appeared in the academic journal: Systems and Services. It explains to an audience
of information professionals, why accessibility should be addressed. Cervone vigorously
advocated for accessibility improvements. He posits that disabilities are wide-spread and
provides a list of common disabilities with corresponding solutions. Most of the solutions are
inexpensive web-design changes that make information easier to see, hear and process. He
suggests materials and training for librarians. The team used this information to improve our
knowledge of accessibility issues.
Chowdhury, G.G. (2010). Introduction to modern information retrieval. New York. NealSchuman Publishers. 3rd ed.
Chowdhury seeks to educate information professionals about underlying principles of
organizing information. The tone in his book is urgently educational, as he imparts decades of
research to his readers. Our team used Chowdhurys chapter on metadata to inform our section
on improving browser access. Small changes in metadata can affect whether a browser can find
information or not. Although our team only referenced metadata and controlled vocabulary, this
text was used to improve our frame of reference about the underlying mechanics of organizing
information for universal retrieval. It put the other accessibility issues into context by providing
a base structure for understanding the mechanics of sharing information.
Federal Communications Commission. (2014). Guide: Childrens internet protection act.
Retrieved from http://www.fcc.gov/guides/childrens-internet-protection-act
The Childrens Internet Protection Act is provided on the Federal Communications Commission
webpage, the audience is intended for schools and libraries. The Childrens Internet Protection
Act is an article we used to exhibit the forms of protection used in the libraries digitization.
According the FCC library is required to abide by the requirements of the Federal
Communications Commission. This article explains the purpose of the Childrens Internet
Protection and requirements. Congress enacted CIPA in 2000 in order to protect children from
inappropriate contents available on the Internet. In 2011 CIPA rules were updated to
accommodate the change in Internet usage. For our group the importance of this article serves as
foundational literature as to what is limited and prohibited in libraries that abide by CIPA.

United Nations University Collection

17

Gilbert, A., Cox, J. (Editors). (1975). Exploring the Potential of the United Nations University.
Academy of World Studies, S. A., & Association for World Education, H. Y. Retrieved
from http://eric.ed.gov.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/?id=ED114336 (Links to an external site.)
Editors Alfred Gilbert and Jim Cox presented this speech/ paper at the World Citizens
Assembly. Our team used this paper in order to understand the original goals of the UNU. The
audience is intended for all people and specifically identifies United Nations International
University. This paper examines the United Nation International University in its early stages of
development. Gilbert and Cox explained in their speech the purpose of the UNU and how the
University can expand globally in the realm of education, and individuals becoming involved in
the United Nations University. The speech was published in 1975 two years after the
establishment of the United Nations University. Using this paper was beneficial for our team
because we were able to understand the significance of the University and the original ideals,
goals, and purpose of the UNU. The speech places emphasis on the path of the University and
how it will approach issues on a global scale. Gilbert and Cox present a point of view that is
centrally based on the perception of the potential of the UNU. The editors suggest that the UN
needs to expand its members, as quoted from the speech think in terms of being members of an
interdependent world instead on independent nations (Gilbert, Cox, p. 19).
Hudson, L. (2002). A new age of accessibility. Library Journal, 19-21
Author Laura Hudson journal article explains how libraries can make websites available to all
individuals. Hudsons article is directed to information professionals who are responsible for
making websites. Hudsons text was vital in our team reference to digitalization and
accessibility for the disabled. The tone of the article exhibits the passion Hudson displays for
designing websites that are efficient for individuals with disabilities and creating websites,
which abide by Section 508. There are different forms of disabilities addressed such as
blindness or low vision, hearing, mobility, cognitive, and seizure disorders. Section 508 is
pivotal in the creation of websites, which are capable of accommodating all users. In order to
modify the currently non-user friendly sites, Hudson indicates webmasters need to create
adjustments to their sites in small increments over a period of time. We used this article in order
to grasp an understanding as to how organizations can improve digital access to websites.
Hudson proposes a time frame that implements change in the web page in less than a year. The
article is valuable for information professionals redesigning their webpage. Our team discovered
that Hudsons conclusion contradicts the initial arguments. Originally Hudson discussed Section
508 guidelines and federal standards, yet concludes that Section 508 may not apply to the states
and is conflicting in interpretation.
Laursen, D., Christiansen, K., & Olsen, L. (2012). Management of Metadata for Digital
Heritage Collections. Microform & Digitization Review, 41(3/4), 151-158.
This article is available in the periodical Microform & Digitization Review. The tone of the
article is intended for librarians learning how to manage the flow of metadata for digital
collections. Author Laursen serves as a senior researcher at a University, and Christiansen is an

United Nations University Collection

18

electrical engineer as well as studies information retrieval. Laursen, Christiansen, and Olsen
provide insight of the proper flow of metadata for digital heritage collections. This article was
important for our team in analyzing the correlation between well-organized metadata and its
contribution to the greater accessibility in the digital library. Authors Laursen, Christiansen, &
Olsen reassert the traditional metadata did not approach from just a digital collection, but card
cataloging and the Dewey decimal classification system are forms of managing information.
This information is effective is for our team understanding metadata, but for all information
professionals who need assistance in creating metadata that allows them to access more
information.
Newland, K. (1987). The United Nations University: A New Kind of University. The
Washington Quarterly, 10(3), 215-224.
This article provided The Washington Quarterly in 1987 audience was the general public.
Newland currently serves as member of the Migration Policy Institute. The article places
emphasis on how imperative was the creation of the UNU and its capabilities. Newlands article
was important for our group in understanding the exchange the University host amongst
member regardless of the headquarters being located in Tokyo. The usage of third-person in this
article relinquishes any type of bias or fallacies if it were written in first-person. Newland
articulates to the readers of how the UNU is different in comparison to other institution and
universities because the ideal of advancing knowledge through universal human programs.
Understanding how the UNU is able to network amongst its members in various geographical
locations was essential, so that our team was able to understand the organization.
United Nations University Collections. (n.d.). United Nations University Collections. Retrieved
from https://collections.unu.edu
The webpage for the United Nations University Collections is intended for those interested in
accessing UNU Collections for research on information pertaining to world crisis and
policy. The online repository for the university currently holds 1,811 records with plans to
continue adding materials. Searches can be made by year, author, institute, or UNU Themes
under topics titles including global change and sustainable development, peace security and
human rights, science technology innovation and society, human and socio-economic
development. There is also a section to search under tags of recently added and recently popular,
which documents how many times theyve been downloaded in the past week. The various
search options show different ways UNU Collections can be accessed, and interpreted for
further research.
United Nations University Press. (2013). UNU Press. Retrieved from
http://unu.edu/publications/unu-pres
The United Nations University Press closed January 2014 but is active through this website for
researchers interested in retrieving the volumes of an extensive collection of university
publications. While the webpage announced the closure of the publishing division and

United Nations University Collection

19

notification theyve ceased collecting future manuscripts and will no longer provide reprints
from past volumes, the site gives insight into the development of UNU Collections and past
volumes will be available online for free via UNU Collections, and covered under Creative
Commons License. The brief description informs that UNU will be working on making all
volumes accessible through UNU Collections through the year 2015.
United States Department of Labor. (2014). Disability Resources: Americans with disabilities
act. Retrieved from http://www.dol.gov/dol/topic/disability/ada.htm
The Disability Resources: Under the Americans with Disabilities act, this site was created and
helps give definition to the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), which bans discrimination
in employment, transportation, communications, and government activities. It is a site for
individuals or organizations serving the public to ensure that they practicing proper inclusivity
for those with disabilities. While the law does not specifically state what is disability, it does list
characteristics of how someone qualifies as disabled. The webpage is a reference on how UNU
Collections can be all-inclusive.
World Wide Web Consortium. (2014). Web content accessibility guidelines: Overview.
Retrieved from http://www.w3.org/WAI/intro/wcag
The Web Content Accessibility Guidelines: This overview from the Web Accessibility Initiative
addresses standards to make web content accessible to individuals, organizations, and
international governments for people with disabilities. The site also aims to attract
professionals, from web content developers to web tool developers, to help increase and
evaluate web accessibility and protocol. Through simple and lacking new graphic design
standards for mass readership, the site enables accessibility to web sources, including the UNU
Collections, as new resources for people with disabilities, policy makers, and on-site managers.

References
Bakar, A. (2012). Myths and realities of digital reference services: Perspectives of
libraries from developing countries. Library Management, 33(3), 136-141.
doi:10.1108/01435121211217018
Evans, G.E., & Alire, C.A. (2013). Management basics for information professionals (3rd ed.). New
York: Neal-Schuman.

Ly, H., Marlonsson, S., Reese, L., Treat, A., Wilson, S., (2014). Organizational Analysis of the

United Nations University Collection

20

United Nations University Collections Part One: Mission, Vision & Value Statements,
Environmental Scan, and SWOT Analysis. Retrieved from
http://www.weebly.com/weebly/main.php
World Health Organization, (2014). World report on disability. Retrieved from
http://www.who.int/disabilities/world_report/2011/en/