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Bonnie Palmer

Collaborated with Jessica Humphries


Mrs. Malloy 4th Grade
November 11 and 13, 2014 10:15-11:30

ELED 533 LESSON PLAN FORMAT


JMU Elementary Education Program
A. TITLE/TYPE OF LESSON
Geometry: Polygons
B. CONTEXT OF LESSON
I talked with my cooperating teacher and she decided that a geometry lesson on polygons
covering math SOL 4.12 would be appropriate. I will plan a pre-assessment to determine
the students readiness.
In third grade, students identified, described, compared, and contrasted the
characteristics of plane geometric figures (triangle, square, rectangle, and circle) by
identifying relevant characteristics, including the number of angles, vertices, and edges
(Math SOL 3.14). In fifth grade, the students will classify triangles as right, acute, obtuse,
equilateral, scale or isosceles. Additionally, they will develop definitions of plane figures
(square, rectangle, triangle, parallelogram, rhombus, and trapezoid) and investigate and
describe the results of combining and subdividing plane figures. This lesson will be an
important expansion of what the students learned in third grade and will prepare them to
further explore geometric plane figures in fifth grade.
This lesson will be the first geometry lesson the students have in fourth grade, so it will be
important to review related geometry information from previous years. This lesson will
set the stage for future geometry math lessons. After polygons are addressed, the
students will learn about geometric patterns (4.15); points, lines, line segments, rays, and
angles (4.10a); intersections, parallelism, and perpendicularity (4.10b) congruent figures
(4.11a); and geometric transformations (4.11).
This lesson focuses on the shapes and properties aspect of geometry. I would expect
students to be at level one (analysis) of the van Heile model. According to the textbook,
the greatest proportion of grades 3 through 5 content in the CCSS curriculum falls.
C. STANDARDS - VA SOLs and/or CCSS
Mathematics SOL
4.12 The student will
a) define polygon; and
b) identify polygons with 10 or fewer sides
All students should
-Identify polygons with 10 or fewer sides in everyday situations
-Identify polygons with 10 or fewer sides in multiple orientations (rotations,
reflections, and translations of the polygons)
The student will use problem solving, mathematical communication, mathematical reasoning,,
connections, and representation to
-Define and identify properties of polygons with 10 or fewer sides
-Identify polygons by name with 10 or fewer sides in multiple orientations
(rotations, reflections, translations of the polygons)

Bonnie Palmer
Collaborated with Jessica Humphries
Mrs. Malloy 4th Grade
November 11 and 13, 2014 10:15-11:30

Cross-curricular standards
Science SOL
4.1The student will demonstrate an understanding of scientific reasoning, logic, and the
nature of science by planning and conducting investigations in which
b) objects or events are classified and arranged according to characteristics or properties
D. LEARNING OBJECTIVES
Understand what are the
broad generalizations/concepts
the students should begin to
develop? (These are typically
difficult to assess in one lesson.)
U1 The students will understand
that polygons are identified by
their properties.
U2 The students will understand
that some polygons share some
of the same properties.
U3 The students will understand
that polygons are present in
everyday life.

Know what are the tools,


vocabulary, symbols, etc. the
students will gain through this
lesson? (These knows must
be assessed in your lesson.)
K1 The students will know the
definition of polygon.
K2 The students will know the
names of polygons with 10 or
fewer sides (triangle,
quadrilateral, rectangle,
square, trapezoid,
parallelogram, rhombus,
pentagon, hexagon, heptagon,
octagon, nonagon, and
decagon)
K3 The students will know the
properties of polygons with
10 or fewer sides.

Do what are the specific


thinking behaviors/procedures
students will be able to do
through this lesson? (These will
also be assessed in your
lesson.)
D1 The student will be able to
identify polygons with 10 or
fewer sides.
D2 The student will be able to
explain what makes a polygon
with 10 or fewer sides unique.
D3 The student will be able to
create polygons with 10 or
fewer sides.
D4 The student will be able to
classify polygons by their
properties.

E. ASSESSING LEARNING
How will you assess student learning of the objectives? What type of assessment will
you use and why?
Remember every objective must be assessed for every student!
Objective

U1 The students will understand


that polygons are identified by
their properties.

Assessment Tool
What documentation will you have for
each student?

Student work from menu


activity- Appetizer (Soup and
Salad)
$10,000 pyramid observation
notes

Data Collected
What will your students do and say,
specifically, that indicate each student
has achieved your objectives?

Menu: Part 1-Students should ask


questions about the number of
sides the shape and vertices the
shape has. Advanced students
may ask about how many interior
angles the shape has.
Part 2- The students should ask if

Bonnie Palmer
Collaborated with Jessica Humphries
Mrs. Malloy 4th Grade
November 11 and 13, 2014 10:15-11:30

the shape has right angles and if


the sides are the same length.
$10,000 pyramid- To get the
other students to guess the
polygon, they will describe the
polygon by its properties (such as
number of sides, number of
vertices, number or measure of
interior angles, or length of sides)
U2 The students will understand
that some polygons share some
of the same properties.

Student work from menu


activity- Entre

U3 The students will understand


that polygons are present in
everyday life.

Student work from menu

K1 The students will know the


definition of polygon.

Student work from exit ticket


$10,000 pyramid observation
notes

activity- Desserts

Menu ActivityQ1: The student should


recognize and explain that the
definition of a rectangle is having
4 sides and 4 interior right
angles. A square shares these
properties so a square is a
rectangle.
Q2: The students should
recognize and explain that the
definition of a rhombus is having
4 sides of equal length. A square
shares these properties so a
square is a rhombus.
Menu: Desserts- The students
should successfully make two of
the polygons into objects that
they see in their everyday lives.
This shows that the students
recognize the presence of
polygons in the world around
them.
Exit ticket- For the written
definition, the students will say
something along the lines that a
polygon is a closed figure
composed of at least three line
segments (has three sides) that
do not cross and none of the
sides are curved. For the example
of a polygon, they will draw a
shape that fits that definition. For
a non-example, the student will
draw a figure that is not closed,

Bonnie Palmer
Collaborated with Jessica Humphries
Mrs. Malloy 4th Grade
November 11 and 13, 2014 10:15-11:30

has curved edges, or has lines


that cross.

K2 The students will know the


names of polygons with 10 or
fewer sides (triangle,
quadrilateral, rectangle, square,
trapezoid, parallelogram,
rhombus, pentagon, hexagon,
heptagon, octagon, nonagon, and
decagon)

Student work from menu


activity- Sides
Student work from menu
activity- Dessert
$10,000 pyramid observation
notes

$10,000 pyramid- The student


might list off examples of
polygons or say the definition
written above.
Menu Activity: Sides- The
students are answering questions
where they are required to know
the names of polygons. The
names could be a part of the
question or could be a part of the
answer.
Menu Activity- Dessert- If the
student is able to draw the shape
that is named, it shows that they
know the name of the polygon.

K3 The students will know the


properties of polygons with 10 or
fewer sides.

Student work from menu


activity- Sides

D1 The student will be able to


identify polygons with 10 or
fewer sides.

Student work from menu


activity- Appetizers

D2 The student will be able to


explain what makes a polygon

Student work from menu


activity- Entrees

$10,000 pyramid- If the student


is able to give the name of the
polygon that their classmate is
describing, they are showing that
they know the name of the
polygon.
Menu Activity- The students will
be answering questions in which
they need to know about the
number of sides and vertices of
polygons. They either need to
recognize what polygon is
associated with the given
properties or what properties
describe the given polygon.
Menu Activity- Appetizers
The students will be identifying
the shapes based off of pictures
of the shapes. The students
should be able to accurately
name the shapes. One shape, the
decagon, is shaped like a star.
The students should use the
proper name for the polygon.
Entree- The students are asked to
differentiate between the

Bonnie Palmer
Collaborated with Jessica Humphries
Mrs. Malloy 4th Grade
November 11 and 13, 2014 10:15-11:30

with 10 or fewer sides unique.

D3 The student will be able to


create polygons with 10 or fewer
sides.

Student work from menu

D4 The student will be able to


classify polygons by their
properties.

Classification worksheet

activity- dessert

properties of a square, rhombus,


and rectangle. By explaining
their answer, they should identify
the similarities and differences
between the shapes.
Menu Activity: Dessert- The
students will draw the polygons
(that are listed in the procedure
section) correctly. They may
draw the polygon as regular and
irregular. Right angles, congruent
sides, and parallel lines do not
need to be perfect but they need
to be close indicating that the
students understand which
quadrilaterals have right angles,
congruent sides, and parallel
sides.
-the students will put the
polygons with the same number
of sides in the same group
-the students will put the
polygons with the same number
of vertices in the same group
-students in the sorting by
properties group will classify
quadrilaterals by the size of the
angles and/or presence of
parallel and/or congruent lines.

F. MATERIALS NEEDED
Access to SmartBoard that is in the classroom
The Greedy Triangle (me)
Polygon chart (me)
How many sides and vertices worksheet (me)
Shape cutouts (me)
Sorted polygons sheet (me)
Classification worksheet (me)
Menu worksheet (me)
Exit slip (me)
$10,000 pyramid game (me)
Drawing paper (me)

Bonnie Palmer
Collaborated with Jessica Humphries
Mrs. Malloy 4th Grade
November 11 and 13, 2014 10:15-11:30

Colored pencils, markers, highlighters, pencils, crayons, colored pens (the students have it in
their desks, I will provide extra)
G1 ANTICIPATION OF STUDENTS MATHEMATICAL RESPONSES TO THE TASK(S) POSED IN
THE PROCEDURE PORTION OF THE LESSON

Tasks:
Classification Activity- After students practice identifying the number of sides and vertices a
polygon has and classifying polygons with a small group, they will classify shapes on a
worksheet by color coding the shapes that are in the same group and naming/describing the
groups. The worksheet will be slightly different for each of the groups.
Menu- The students will individually complete a worksheet that is designed as a menu (allows
for choice) in order to assess the students on the majority of the objectives. The dessert portion
will be an integrated arts activity.
$10,000 Pyramid- Students will practice describing and identifying the polygons.
Anticipation of Student Strategies
Classification Activity
Students will not need to count the sides of the triangle and quadrilaterals; they will just
see that they have 3 or 4 sides.
The students will be able to count the sides of the polygons quicker than they can count
the vertices.
Students might miss vertices of irregular polygons where the polygon is concave.
After realizing the number of sides and vertices is the same on each polygon, the students
who missed vertices where they polygon is concave may go back and recount the
vertices.
Some students may classify the polygons by something other than their properties (such
as how the shape generally looks).
Menu
Students may have trouble remembering that the trapezoid and rhombus are
quadrilaterals like the square and rectangle. They may need to refer back to the concept
map we created as a class to remember the names of the other two quadrilaterals.
Students may remember shapes like the pentagon based upon real life places that they
have seen the shape. This will help them remember the names of the shapes when
identifying them
Students will notice the number of sides a shape has when attempting to identify
polygons.
The students will look at the interior angles in addition to the number of sides of the
rhombus when trying to identify the shape.
Dessert portion of the menu:
o Students will try to create regular polygons instead of the irregular polygons.

Bonnie Palmer
Collaborated with Jessica Humphries
Mrs. Malloy 4th Grade
November 11 and 13, 2014 10:15-11:30

o Students will use more common shapes like triangle, square, and rectangle to
make into something they see in everyday life.
o Students may mix up the polygons with 6+ sides.
Exit Slip
For a non-example of a polygon, more students will draw a shape with curved edges than
a shape that is not closed.
$10,000 Pyramid
Students will describe the polygons by the number of sides it has.
Students might tell where you can see the polygon, especially for the quadrilaterals that
they might have a harder time describing.

DAY 1

G2

PROCEDURE
Include a DETAILED description of each step, including how you will get the students attention,
your introduction of the activity, the directions you will give students, the questions you will
ask, and appropriate closure. Write exactly what you will SAY and DO. Think of this as a script.
BEFORE:
1. I will give each of the students a polygon chart and explain that we will use it to record
what they learn about each of the polygons. They will fill out whatever they know now on
the polygon chart for two minutes.
2. I will point out the word polygon at the top of the paper and ask if anyone knows what it
means.
3. I will then show examples and non-examples of polygons on the SmartBoard. I will ask the
students what makes some figures polygons and some figures not polygons.
4. I will define a polygon-A closed plane geometric figure composed of at least three line
segments that do not cross. None of the sides are curved. Each line segment is a side. The
point where two sides meet is called a vertex. I will have that definition on the
SmartBoard and then breakdown that definition:
A plane geometric figure means that it is a two-dimensional shape
Closed means that all of the sides touch (show an example and a non-example)
I will highlight the line segments and vertices of a polygon.
I will tell the students that the prefix poly- means many and the suffix gon means
angle, so polygon means many angles. I will highlight the angles of some polygons.
5. I will ask the students where they have seen polygons in their lives.
6. I will read the students The Greedy Triangle and ask the following questions while reading
the book.
What are different types of quadrilaterals?
What shape do you think will be next?
What were some examples of polygons in real life that you learned from this book
that you had not thought about before?
7. I will go over the following polygons on the SmartBoard: triangle, quadrilateral, pentagon,
hexagon, heptagon, octagon, nonagon, and decagon. The students may add to their
polygon chart ask I go over the polygons.
8. I will ask the students how you know that this shape is a triangle (pointing at a triangle).

Bonnie Palmer
Collaborated with Jessica Humphries
Mrs. Malloy 4th Grade
November 11 and 13, 2014 10:15-11:30

This should bring up a conversation about the number of sides/edges and corner/points
a triangle has. I will discuss the definition of vertex and side/edge as it relates to being a
property of polygons and guide the class in counting edges and vertices. Then I will talk
with the class about how polygons are identified by their properties, number of edges
and vertices being just a few of those properties.
DURING
1. The students will be split into four groups (these groups have been decided by their
answers to the formative assessment) and complete the following activities. I will be
monitoring as the students work. I will have a sheet with all of the students names on it to
write down observations. I will be monitoring for which shape properties the students
notice first, how the students group shapes, and what properties the students looked at
when the number of sides were equal (quadrilaterals).

Classifying by properties group (Jamie, Kevin, Talen, Ariana, Christopher, Hailea,


Timothy M.)
First the students will be given a variety of shapes (particularly irregular concave
polygons) and will be asked the number of sides and vertices of each polygon.
Students will be prompted to ensure that the number of sides and the number of
vertices are equal. The students will be given groupings of shapes and will need to
identify why the shapes are grouped the way that they are. The students will then be
given the properties of quadrilaterals. As a group, the students will match the
properties to the specific quadrilaterals. I will make sure the students have the
properties correct. Independently, the students will sort quadrilaterals. If there is
time, the students (as a group) will work to make a concept map to make
connections among the quadrilaterals.
Describes properties group (Charlie, Rachel, Timothy L., Dalton)
First the students will be given a variety of shapes (particularly irregular concave
polygons) and will be asked the number of sides and vertices of each polygon.
Students will be prompted to ensure that the number of sides and the number of
vertices are equal. The students will be given groupings of shapes and will need to
identify why the shapes are grouped the way that they are. Independently, the
students will sort polygons by their properties. Last the students will look at sets of
two or more quadrilaterals and identify what is in common and what is different
between the two quadrilaterals.
Beginning to describe properties group (Heaven, Hannah, Kayla, Annabelle, and
Isaiah)
First the students will be given a variety of polygons and will be asked the number
of sides and vertices of each polygon. Students will be prompted to ensure that the
number of sides and the number of vertices are equal. The students will be given
groupings of shapes and will need to identify why the shapes are grouped the way
that they are. As a group, the students will sort some polygons by their properties.
Then independently, the students will sort a different set of polygons by their
properties. Last the students will look at sets of two or more quadrilaterals and

Bonnie Palmer
Collaborated with Jessica Humphries
Mrs. Malloy 4th Grade
November 11 and 13, 2014 10:15-11:30

identify what is in common and what is different between the two quadrilaterals.
Shape recognition group (Brent, Erica, Joseph, Carter)
First the students will be given a variety of polygons and will be asked the number
of sides and vertices of each polygon. The students will start off with regular shapes
and convex irregular shapes and then, if ready, move on to irregular concave
polygons. Students will be prompted to ensure that the number of sides and the
number of vertices are equal. The students will be given sets of two shapes and will
be asked what the shapes in each set have in common (will be number of edges or
vertices). As a group, the students will sort some polygons by their properties. Then
independently, the students will sort a different set of polygons by their properties.
Last the students will look at two quadrilaterals and identify what is different
between the two quadrilaterals.
During this time, I will be monitoring to see if the students have a grasp on counting
the sides and vertices of a polygon. I will notice how the students classify polygons
(by sides, vertices, angles, other properties). I will ask questions such as, How else
can we sort these polygons? What else do these polygons have in common? What
is different about these polygons? When the students are exploring quadrilaterals, I
will ask questions such as What makes (some quadrilateral) different than (some
other quadrilateral)? What is the same? Can polygons share properties? Can a
(some quadrilateral) be considered a (some other quadrilateral)? I will write
observations and student answers on a sheet with all of their names on it.
The students will return to their seats.
2. I will select students to share what properties they classified the polygons by. I will also
select students to talk about some of the properties of specific quadrilaterals. Lastly, I
will select students to share what properties some quadrilaterals have that are the same
and which ones are different.
3. I will go over rectangle, square, trapezoid, parallelogram, and rhombus on the
SmartBoard.
4. I will explain how the menu works (where they have choice) and establish the expectation
that the students will work independently. I will tell the students that from the menu we
are trying to understand that we identify polygons by their properties and that some
polygons share some of the same properties.
5. I will monitor the questions the students would ask in the soup and salad part of the
menu and which shapes students have difficulty identifying in the appetizer part. I will
take note of what the common questions put for the soup and salad part. For students who
struggle with the soup part, I will encourage them to think about the properties of shapes
that we looked at in the previous activities. For students who struggle with the salad part,
I will have them look at the different quadrilaterals and notice what properties makes
each one different. During the appetizer part, I will see if students are touching each side
or vertex to count them. If I see a student call the decagon a star, I will ask them if it has
another name. I will ask the students how they knew what the shape was.
AFTER:
1. I will have the students stop working and partake in a group discussion focusing on the
questions, How do we identify polygons? How do we distinguish shapes that have at least

Bonnie Palmer
Collaborated with Jessica Humphries
Mrs. Malloy 4th Grade
November 11 and 13, 2014 10:15-11:30

DAY 2

one of the same properties? How do we classify polygons?


Select students who used the following strategies: identified polygons based on
recognition, counted the number of sides or vertices to identify the polygons, and
noticed and classified by properties other than number of sides and vertices (such as
size of angles, parallel lines, and congruent lines)
I will have the selected students share their thinking in the order of the strategies
listed above.
I will conclude that polygons are identified by their properties and that some
polygons share some of the same properties (like we found that many shapes had four
sides.
2. The students will take a minute to add to their polygon chart.
3. The students will complete and exit slip that asks them to define what a polygon is and
draw an example and a non-example of a polygon. On the back of the exit slip, the students
may write either a question they have related to the lesson or something that they have
learned from the lesson.
4. For homework the students will complete pages 137-138 in their workbooks.
Students will continue to work on their menu for their morning work.
BEFORE:
1. I will answer any common questions that were on the back of the students exit slips.
2. Students will take a minute to add anything new to their polygon chart.
3. The students will play $10,000 pyramid with a partner with activate their learning from
Day 1. I will observe the students as they play to look for how they get their partner to
guess the correct word (Do they describe the number of sides or vertices? Do they talk
about where they have seen the shape before?). If a student is only describing number of
sides, I might ask them How else can you describe the shape besides number of sides?
4. I will have some selected students share with the class what connections they made with
the shape (like where they have seen it before) if any students did that and then how they
described the shape to get their partner to know the answer.
5. I will refresh the students on how we identify polygons by their properties.
DURING:
1. During the students computer lab time, they will work on activities P9 (Number of sides
in polygons), P6 (which 2D shape is being described), and P8 (classify quadrilateral) on
IXL.
2. After the computer lab, I will remind the students that from the menu we are trying to
understand that we identify polygons by their properties and that some polygons share
some of the same properties. Also, polygons are present in their everyday lives.
3. Students will resume work on their menu.
I will observe the properties that students bring up in the entre part. I will take note
of what shapes the students seem to know or dont know based on the sides and
dessert part of the menu.
For students who are struggling with the entre part, I will guide them through
looking at the different properties of rectangles or rhombuses and squares and
comparing the properties. For the students who just draw the regular polygons, I will
encourage them to draw a few as irregular polygons.
While the students work I will ask questions such as What properties make a square

Bonnie Palmer
Collaborated with Jessica Humphries
Mrs. Malloy 4th Grade
November 11 and 13, 2014 10:15-11:30

a square, a rhombus a rhombus, or a rectangle a rectangle? Could you explain the


entre problem with a picture? What makes a square a special type of rectangle or
rhombus? How did you know that it is a (polygon from sides part of menu)?
4. If students finish early, I will encourage them to add more detail to the dessert part of
their menu.
AFTER:

1. Students will take 2 minutes to add to their polygon chart.


2. Selected students will share how they knew what a shape was when told the number of
sides. Selected students will also share the properties they thought about when looking
at rectangles, rhombuses, and squares. I will have a few students who had particularly
good responses, share what they said for the entre part.
3. The students (who volunteer) will share their works of art with their peers. They will
share something about their creation, the real life connection they made, or how they
decided to draw each shape (tried to make it like the regular polygon or made an
irregular polygon).
H. DIFFERENTIATION
Describe how you plan to meet the needs of all students in your classroom with varied interests
and readiness levels by completing ONE of the six boxes below for each day. You may choose
the same box for each day. Use the learning progressions to support your decisions. Include a
specific differentiation plan for each day.
This connects to your During Phase Actions: providing support and extensions.

Content

Process

Students may choose which


question they would like to
answer in the appetizer,
entre, sides, and part of
the menu.

Interest

Readiness

Product

The students are put into


four different groups based
on the results of the
formative assessment. All
groups will work towards
the D4 objective of
classifying polygons, but
they will all go through a
different process to reach
classifying the polygons.

For the classifying activity,


the four groups will have
slightly different
worksheets. The classifying
by properties group will
have solely quadrilaterals
on their sheet while the
other three groups will
have a variety of polygons.

Bonnie Palmer
Collaborated with Jessica Humphries
Mrs. Malloy 4th Grade
November 11 and 13, 2014 10:15-11:30

I.

WHAT COULD GO WRONG WITH THESE LESSONS AND WHAT WILL YOU DO ABOUT IT?
Think about this specifically for THESE lesson plans. This CANNOT include fire drills, interruptions
due to announcements, weather, or other emergencies.
The menu activity may take way longer or shorter than expected. Students may take drastically
different amounts of time to complete the menu.
o Because the menu activity spans over two days, I will collect the students papers at the
end of the first day and check to see where each student is at. If the students are mostly
done by the end of the first day, I will have the students spend more time on the dessert
part of their menu. For students who finish early, they may play $10,000 pyramid. For
the students who are taking longer than their classmates, I will see why that is the case
(Are they distracted and off task? Are they struggling?) and allow them to move where
they can focus better or encourage them to ask me questions and talk through the
problems with them.
The students may know more or less than the formative assessment indicated, so the students
may not fit well into the differentiated groups for the classification activity.
o If this a student is really not fitting well in the group because of their readiness, I will
have them move to a different group where they may fit better. I will determine this by
monitoring each group during the classification activity.
The SmartBoard or my PowerPoint may not work.
o I will draw the polygons on the white board and any necessary notes.