Вы находитесь на странице: 1из 6

Gudrun Salt

English 1010
Annotated Bibliography
Choi, Charles. "DNA Extractable from Fingerprints." UPI. 31 Jul. 2003: n.p. SIRS Issues
Researcher. Web. 11 Nov. 2014.
Summary: Even if the only evidence forensic analysts can pull from a crime scene is a
fingerprint smudged beyond recognition, a new technique developed by Canadian scientists soon
could harvest enough DNA from the print to produce a genetic identity." (UPI) This article
reveals a new extraction technique that can yield DNA from a fingerprint and is expected "to
help crime-fighters solve mysteries.
Assessment: "If you wanted to use blood as a source of DNA, you have fear of
contamination, people who don't want to give it, storage issues, and you have to sign a lot of
paperwork to get it," research scientist Maria Viaznikova of the Ottawa University Heart
Institute in Canada told United Press International. "We can now have DNA reliably and simply
with our method." (Choi, Charles)
Heath, David. "Bungled Fingerprints in Spain Bombing Expose Problems at FBI."
The Seattle Times (Seattle, WA). 08 Jun. 2004: n.p. SIRS Issues Researcher. Web.
11 Nov. 2014.
Summary: "Only a single piece of evidence linked Portland, Ore., lawyer Brandon
Mayfield to terrorist train bombings in Spain. Yet it was powerful evidence. Not just one but
three FBI examiners concluded that a fingerprint left on a bag of detonators linked to the March
11 [2004] attack that left 191 dead came from Mayfield....But the FBI's steadfast claim of a 'zero

error rate' in its fingerprint identifications would be shattered days later when Spanish police
announced that the fingerprint came from an Algerian suspect. In a stunning reversal, the FBI
admitted it was wrong and apologized to Mayfield." (The Seattle Times) This article discusses
how "some legal and forensic experts say the blunder comes as no surprise because the bureau
fails to rigorously train, test and oversee its examiners."
Assessment: SEATTLE--Only a single piece of evidence linked Portland, Ore., lawyer
Brandon Mayfield to terrorist train bombings in Spain. Yet it was powerful evidence. Not just
one but three FBI examiners concluded that a fingerprint left on a bag of detonators linked to the
March 11 attack that left 191 dead came from Mayfield. As always, they were so sure of their
finding that they called it a "100 percent identification." But the FBI's steadfast claim of a "zero
error rate" in its fingerprint identifications would be shattered days later when Spanish police
announced that the fingerprint came from an Algerian suspect. In a stunning reversal, the FBI
admitted it was wrong and apologized to Mayfield. The mistake has tainted the FBI's oncevaunted reputation for fingerprint work. Yet some legal and forensic experts say the blunder
comes as no surprise because the bureau fails to rigorously train, test and oversee its examiners
(Heath, David )
Humes, Edward. "Fingerprint Evidence Not Good Science, Scholar Says." Orange County
Register (Santa Ana, CA). Oct. 27 2004: n.p. SIRS Issues Researcher. Web. 11 Nov. 2014.
Summary: "The 25-year history of DNA matching and the century-long saga of
fingerprint evidence are remarkably similar: Both were introduced as triumphs of science, both
were received as magic bullets for police and prosecutors to solve previously unsolvable crimes.
But something happened with DNA evidence that has never occurred with fingerprints:
successful legal challenges, which fueled reform and improvements." (Orange County Register)

This article presents the efforts of Simon Cole, a social sciences professor at the University of
California, Irvine, who is waging a campaign "to prove that the science of fingerprint analysis is
missing a crucial element--namely, the science part."
Assessment: According to Cole--and a growing number of scientists, scholars and legal
experts horrified at some recent, high-profile fingerprint blunders--the courts have gotten it
wrong for the last 94 years. They have been wrong, Cole says, not because Jennings was
innocent, but because he really was guilty--lending a lasting aura of invincibility to fingerprint
analysis that it has neither earned nor deserved. (Humes, Edward)
Richey, Warren. "US Creates Terrorist Fingerprint Database." Christian Science Monitor. Dec.
27 2006: n.p. SIRS Issues Researcher. Web. 11 Nov. 2014.
Summary: "The US government is building a massive database designed to identify
individual terror suspects from fingerprints on objects such as a tea glass in an Iraqi apartment or
a shell casing in an abandoned Al Qaeda training camp....Now [Dec. 2006], Homeland Security
is upgrading from a two-finger to a 10-finger system. In effect, it requires foreign visitors to
submit to the kind of extensive fingerprinting usually reserved for criminals." (Christian Science
Monitor) This article reports on the new fingerprint database designed to more accurately
identify terrorists.
Assessment: The US government is building a massive database designed to identify
individual terror suspects from fingerprints on objects such as a tea glass in an Iraqi apartment or
a shell casing in an abandoned Al Qaeda training camp. The database is being created in part by
forensic specialists searching for and preserving evidence overseas. They are collecting
unidentified latent fingerprints in places once occupied by Al Qaeda and other suspected

terrorists. The information is feeding into a computerized system designed to match a name with
an unidentified fingerprint. (Richey, Warren)
Turner, Allan. "Biometrics in Corrections: Current and Future Deployment." Corrections Today.
July 2003: 62-64. SIRS Issues Researcher. Web. 11 Nov. 2014.
Summary: Simply stated, biometrics is the automated identification or verification of
human identity through measurable physiological and behavioral traits. Major biometrics
technologies include fingerprint and iris scanning, facial recognition, hand geometry and voice
recognition." (Corrections Today) This article explains how biometrics is used to monitor
inmates, prison personnel and visitors inside an institution.
Assessment: As the deployment of biometrics technology has grown steadily in
corrections during recent years, two developments have become apparent. First, the application
of biometrics in prisons and jails is primarily in the verification mode and focuses on entrance
and egress. In other words, biometric technology has been used mostly to monitor staff and
inmates entering and exiting an institution. Identifying people entering and leaving a facility is a
major security concern. A warden or jail administrator must ensure that only authorized people
enter and exit an institution. Especially important is the need to ensure that they accurately
identify inmates and do not release the wrong person. Also, the warden or jail administrator must
be able to quickly account for all staff and visitors inside an institution in the event of an
emergency. Second, it appears there is an emerging consensus that fingerprint, hand geometry,
iris recognition and, to a lesser extent, facial recognition are the biometric technologies most
readily applied in corrections. (Turner, Allan)

Verrengia, Joseph B. "Forensic Evidence." Rocky Mountain News (Denver, CO). Feb. 2 1997:
16A-17A. SIRS Issues Researcher. Web. 11 Nov. 2014.
Summary: To solve the slaying of JonBenet Ramsey, Boulder police must rely to a great
extent on the results of forensic tests being conducted in crime laboratories. The question is
whether there is a sufficient amount of physical evidence--including body fluids, fingerprints,
hair, fibers and handwriting--to conclusively determine who sexually assaulted and strangled the
6-year-old beauty queen and youngest child of John and Patsy Ramsey. And the looming
problem for police and prosecutors, according to forensics experts, is whether the evidence is in
good condition. Or whether lax procedures--including John Ramsey's search of the house eight
hours after police were called, his discovery of his slain daughter and his handling of the body as
he carried it upstairs--resulted in key evidence being hopelessly contaminated." (ROCKY
MOUNTAIN NEWS) The challenges facing forensics experts in the JonBenet Ramsey murder
case are presented.
Assessment: The question is whether there is a sufficient amount of physical evidence-including body fluids, fingerprints, hair, fibers and handwriting--to conclusively determine who
sexually assaulted and strangled the 6-year-old beauty queen and youngest child of John and
Patsy Ramsey. And the looming problem for police and prosecutors, according to forensics
experts, is whether the evidence is in good condition. Or whether lax procedures--including John
Ramsey's search of the house eight hours after police were called, his discovery of his slain
daughter and his handling of the body as he carried it upstairs--resulted in key evidence being
hopelessly contaminated. (Verrengia, Joseph B)