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Candidate Name: Courtney Cechini

Date of Lesson: 10/09/14

Course Number: EDES 5252

LMU LESSON PLAN TEMPLATE


BACKGROUND
A. STUDENT DEMOGRAPHICS
1. Class
th
10 Grade
28 Total
Social Studies
Subject
Industrial
Revolution Topic

2. Proficiency Level
19 EO

3. Special Needs
3 IEP

ELS
0 Emerging
0 Expanding
3 Bridging
6 RFEP

0 504

4. Gender
15 Male
13 Female

0 GATE

5. Ethnicity
20Hispanic/Latino
3White
2Black/African American
1Asian
1Filipino
1Other

6. Key Modifications and Accommodations:


Based on the needs of your identified students (see A1-5), what do you need to consider when planning this lesson? Consider
the accommodations and modifications necessary based on the following factors:
Academic Behavioral Cultural Socioeconomic Religious Ethical - Other
Based on the demographics of my students, I need to be aware of several factors. The first being at least six of my students
may have difficulty throughout the lesson due to being an English language learner or having a specific learning disability
(requiring an IEP). I will need to consider making accommodations and/or modifications to the written text presented, the
allotted time to complete the activities, the vocabulary used or explained, and the overall pace of the lesson. Other
resources may be required, such as audio recordings of the reading, different colored paper or size font, digital text, etc.
and I should know to have them prepared ahead of time. In addition to the level of difficulty of the lesson, I will also need
to consider my economically disadvantaged students and the resources available to them. For example being aware that all
students may not have access to the internet outside of class and have reading material printed for them. Lastly I will need
to be aware of any social and/or cultural differences that may affect the way students approach the lesson. I may use this
knowledge as a tool for relevance as well as a reminder to be sensitive in approaching and presenting the content.

CONTEXT
B. LESSON VISION
Is this lesson linked to a larger unit of study. If so, how?
What is the purpose of this lesson?
Why is this content important for your students to learn, beyond the fact that it is meeting standards?
This lesson is a closing lesson within a unit on the Industrial Revolution. The purpose of this lesson is to assess what students
have learned on the Industrial Revolution. Specifically students will be assessed on the factors and inventions which drove the
Industrial Revolution, the changes it brought to society economically, politically, and culturally, as well as the positive and
negative social impacts it created such as child labor and labor reforms. Beyond meeting standards this lesson is designed to
culminate everything students have learned throughout the unit, which had a great focus on how history has impacted
society today. Throughout the unit students were encouraged to think how progress has helped or hurt society, focusing on
elements such as technological advancements, shifts in economic distribution and competing economic patterns, and labor
conditions. Students were challenged to think about these elements as they apply to our society today, making the unit
meaningful and relevant beyond meeting standards.
Social Justice:
How will students connect this to other subjects, their lives, and/or the real world?
This lesson will reiterate to students how industrialization dramatically changed society and how these changes affected the
world today in terms of politics, economics, technological advancement, science and medicine, culture and quality life.
Students will also be reminded of the challenges faced during the Industrial Revolution that still exist such as child labor, the
work and advancement of labor unions, competing economic patterns, and the owners and distribution of wealth. Through
this lesson, students may gain a new perspective of the world they live in today, the problems it faces, and how it may
continue to change.

September 18, 2014

Page 1 of 13

Candidate Name: Courtney Cechini


Date of Lesson: 10/09/14

Course Number: EDES 5252

LMU LESSON PLAN TEMPLATE


C. STANDARDS
Key Content Standard (List individual grade-specific standards. Be sure to include Common Core and Subject-specific
California standards when appropriate)
CA.SS.9-10.3.1
Analyze why England was the first country to industrialize.
CA.SS.9-10.3.2
Examine how scientific and technological changes and new forms of energy brought about massive social,
economic, and cultural change (e.g., the inventions and discoveries of James Watt, Eli Whitney, Henry
Bessemer, Louis Pasteur, Thomas Edison).
CA.SS.9-10.3.3
Describe the growth of population, rural to urban migration, and growth of cities associated with the
Industrial Revolution.
CA.SS.9-10.3.4
Trace the evolution of work and labor, including the demise of the slave trade and the effects of
immigration, mining and manufacturing, division of labor, and the union movement.
CA.SS.9-10.3.5
Understand the connections among natural resources, entrepreneurship, labor, and capital in an industrial
economy.
CA.SS.9-10.3.6
Analyze the emergence of capitalism as a dominant economic pattern and the re-sponses to it, including
Utopianism, Social Democracy, Socialism, and Communism.
CA.SS.9-10.3.7
Describe the emergence of Romanticism in art and literature (e.g., the poetry of William Blake and William
Wordsworth), social criticism (e.g., the novels of Charles Dickens), and the move away from Classicism in
Europe.
Common Core:
Reading Standards for Literature in History/Social Science 6-12:
1. Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources, attending to such features as
the date and origin of the information.
2. Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary of
how key events or ideas develop over the course of the text.
3. Analyze in detail a series of events described in a text; determine whether earlier events caused later ones or
simply preceded them.
4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including vocabulary describing political,
social, or economic aspects of history/social science.
5. Analyze how a text uses structure to emphasize key points or advance an explanation or analysis.
6. Compare the point of view of two or more authors for how they treat the same or similar topics, including which
details they include and emphasize in their respective accounts.
7. Integrate quantitative or technical analysis with qualitative analysis in print or digital text.
9. Compare and contrast treatments of the same topic in several primary and secondary sources.
Writing Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies 6-12:
1. Write arguments focused on discipline-specific content.
2. Write informative/explanatory texts, including the narration of historical events, scientific
procedures/experiments, or technical processes.
4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task,
purpose, and audience.
5. Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach,
focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience.
8. Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources/.
9. Draw evidence from informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and resources.
10. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for reflection and revision) and shorter time frames (a single
sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.

ELD Content Standard by Proficiency Level


This lesson will be occurring within a general education classroom.
September 18, 2014

Page 2 of 13

Candidate Name: Courtney Cechini


Date of Lesson: 10/09/14

Course Number: EDES 5252

LMU LESSON PLAN TEMPLATE


Based on the California English Language Development Standards, the following standards by proficiency level are addressed
in this lesson:
Expanding
Students use English to learn and communicate about a range of topics and academic content areas.
Express more complex feelings, needs, ideas, and opinions using oral and written production.
Participate actively in collaborative conversations.
Comprehend detailed information and read complex grade-level text
Produce, initiate, and sustain spontaneous interactions.
Bridging:
Students communicate effectively with various audiences on a wide range of familiar and new topics to meet
academic demands.
Students participate fully in all collaborative conversations in all content areas at grade level with occasional
support.
Comprehend and read with limited difficulty.
Write and express ideas to meet a variety of academic demands for specific purposes and audiences.

D. OBJECTIVES
Content Objective
Students will review their knowledge gained on
the Industrial Revolution. Student will identify and
analyze the factors responsible for the Industrial
Revolution, the politics and economics, science
and medicine, society and culture, and overall
quality of life of Great Britain from 1750-1850, the
conditions of child laborers, and the reforms born
of the Industrial Revolution.

Academic Language Objective (By proficiency level where


applicable)
Students will articulate their knowledge gained on the
Industrial Revolution, using oral and written
expression. Students will respond to prompts on
various topics through class discussion, a trivia game
and a paper assignment. Responses shall contain
vocabulary and content associated with the historical
th
context of the 18 century Industrial Revolution.

Modified Content Objective

Key Vocabulary

Based on the modifications and accommodations in A6,


how will you modify the content objective for the identified
students?
Students will review their knowledge gained on
the Industrial Revolution. Student will identify and
analyze at least three factors responsible for the
Industrial Revolution, recognize the shift in
politics and economics, science and medicine,
society and culture, and overall quality of life of
Great Britain from 1750-1850, the conditions of
child laborers, and the reforms born from the
Industrial Revolution.

Mill
Infirmary
Machinery
Apprentice
Water-wheel
Oatcake
Textile
Machinery
Agriculture

Resources
Capitalism
Laissez-faire
Communism
Utopianism
Socialism
Democracy
Criticism
Squalor

Steam engine
Power loom
Locomotive
Hierarchy
Romanticism
Reform
Labor Union
Suffrage
Propaganda

E. RESPECT, EDUCATE, ADVOCATE & LEAD (REAL) DISPOSITIONS with EMBEDDED TEACHER PERFORMANCE
EXPECTATIONS
Identify the REAL Dispositions with embedded Teacher Performance Expectations
The REAL dispositions are reflected throughout the lesson.
First and foremost all students are treated equally, regardless of ethnicity, gender, or capability, relying heavily on the
principle that all students shall be valued and respected. This is greatly demonstrated in the accommodations and
modifications considered for students with disabilities, English-language learners, and economically disadvantaged students
which allows them to be equal learners in the classroom (TPE 4, 5, 6, 9, 10, 11, 12). As an advocate for equal education for all
my students, I am able to create an environment of social justice and cultural responsiveness in the classroom.
Social justice is also present in the content. This lesson concludes a unit which highlights a time in history where society
underwent dramatic changes that had both positive and negative impacts, many of which are present in todays society.
Students will be reviewing these changes, what caused them, and both the positive and negative impacts, determining how
September 18, 2014

Page 3 of 13

Candidate Name: Courtney Cechini


Date of Lesson: 10/09/14

Course Number: EDES 5252

LMU LESSON PLAN TEMPLATE


they have influenced not only Britain, but the world today. Students will also be encourage to determine if society has
worsened, improved, or stayed the same, connecting content to the real world and creating caring leaders. This is achieved
through group discussion, a trivia game, and final paper; (TPE 1, 2, 3).
CA-TPE.1
TPE 1: Specific Pedagogical Skills for Subject Matter Instruction
CA-TPE.1B
TPE 1B: Area B: Subject-Specific Pedagogical Skills for Single Subject Teaching Assignments
CA-TPE.1B.4
> Teaching History-Social Science in a Single subject Assignment
CA-TPE.2
TPE 2: Monitoring Student Learning During Instruction
CA-TPE.2.1
> Use progress monitoring at key points during instruction to determine whether students are progressing adequately toward
achieving the state-adopted academic content standards for students.
CA-TPE.2.3
> Anticipate, check for, and address common student misconceptions and misunderstandings.
CA-TPE.3
TPE 3: Interpretation and Use of Assessments
CA-TPE.3.1
> Understand and use a variety of informal and formal, as well as formative and summative assessments, to determine students
progress and plan instruction. They know about and can appropriately implement the state-adopted student assessment
program.
CA-TPE.3.4
> Know about and can appropriately use informal classroom assessments and analyze student work.
CA-TPE.3.7
> Know how to accurately interpret assessment results of individuals and groups in order to develop and modify instruction.
Candidates interpret assessment data to identify the level of proficiency of English language learners in English as well as in the
students primary language.
CA-TPE.3.8
> Give students specific, timely feedback on their learning, and maintain accurate records summarizing student achievement.
CA-TPE.4
TPE 4: Making Content Accessible
CA-TPE.5
TPE 5: Student Engagement
CA-TPE.6
TPE 6: Developmentally Appropriate Teaching Practices
CA-TPE.6C
TPE 6C: Developmentally Appropriate Practices in Grades 9-12
CA-TPE.9
TPE 9: Instructional Planning
CA-TPE.10
TPE 10: Instructional Time
CA-TPE.11
TPE 11: Social Environment
CA-TPE.12
TPE 12: Professional, Legal, and Ethical Obligations

F. EVIDENCE OF LEARNING

ASSESSMENT
DIFFERENTIATION

Identify the type of assessment will you use during the lesson
How do you know your students have mastered the
prerequisite knowledge?
What evidence do you have that students have
mastered the prerequisite knowledge?
How will you know the students have met the objective?
What evidence will you accept to demonstrate mastery of the
objective?
How will the data collected inform your instruction?
To know students have mastered the prerequisite
September 18, 2014

How will you differentiate


the assessment?
For students with specific
learning disabilities or are
English Language Learners
(ELL), I will speak slowly and
clearly and repeat questions
if necessary during group
discussion. Additionally I will
allow for extra thinking time

FEEDBACK
How will you share evidence
of learning with the
students?
Evidence of learning will be
shared with students as a
class throughout the group
discussion. Student
responses will guide the
discussion and demonstrate
learning.
Page 4 of 13

Candidate Name: Courtney Cechini


Date of Lesson: 10/09/14

Course Number: EDES 5252

LMU LESSON PLAN TEMPLATE


knowledge, I will lead a classroom discussion (informal, preformative assessment) on Day 1 of the lesson (Table 1). My
goal of the class discussion is to review material and check
that students have learned the factors and inventions which
drove the Industrial Revolution, the changes it brought to
society economically, politically, and culturally, as well as the
positive and negative social impacts it created such as child
labor and labor reforms. If less than 50% of my students are
able to participate in the discussion, then content will need
to be revisited.
To demonstrate students have properly mastered the
information learned throughout the unit on the Industrial
Revolution, they will also be lead through a game of Jeopardy
(informal, formative assessment) and complete a paper
assignment (formal, summative assessment).
I will assess level of learning through the Jeopardy game by
monitoring responses. If students are able to answer 50% or
more of the questions (Table 2), I may consider the content
mastered. If students are unable to answer 50% or more of
the questions, I will need to revisit the content.
A rubric will be used to score the paper assignment (Table 3).
If 70% of students score a C or higher, I may consider the
content mastered. If 70% of students score a C or lower, I will
need to revisit the content.
Ultimately, through the group discussion, Jeopardy game,
and paper assignment I will assess whether or not the factors
and inventions which drove the Industrial Revolution, the
changes it brought to society economically, politically, and
culturally, as well as the positive and negative social impacts
it created such as child labor and labor reforms has been
learned and if I may consider the unit successful.

before calling on students to


answer, use leading
questions to assist students
that are struggling to
respond, and write the
questions on the board for
visual representation. I will
curb my questions to the
abilities of my students.
I will provide directions on
how to play Jeopardy in
written form, as well as
explain it individually to
students who may struggle
with the concept. Paper
copies of the Jeopardy
template may be provided to
students with visual
impairments. Copies may be
on different colored paper or
in large text. Teacher will be
able to provide immediate
support using the overhead.
If a student struggles with
motor skills, they may
choose to hand-write or type
their paper assignment. If a
student is unable to write or
type, they may present their
assignment orally. Bi-lingual
dictionaries, grammar
resource books, sentence
starters and graphic
organizers will also be
provided to help students
organize their thoughts. If
deemed necessary, I will
allow more time to complete
the paper assignment, or
allow students to re-submit
the paper for more points.

Responses to Jeopardy will


also provide me feedback on
what students know. If
neither team is able to
answer a question, I may
determine this information
lacking. I will provide the
answer and explain how I
came to it to ensure students
understand. This feedback
will be immediate.
I will provide written
feedback on the paper
assignment, highlighting
good points and making
notes where improvements
are needed. The papers will
also be graded based on a
rubric (Table 3). A rubric will
be provided to students so
they may understand their
grade. After I grade the
papers and provide written
feedback, they will be
returned to the students for
review.

G. MATERIALS AND RESOURCES


What materials or resources will you need to conduct this lesson? Is technology needed to enhance this lesson? If so list how.
The materials needed for this lesson are:
pen or pencil
college-ruled notebook paper
dictionary/bi-lingual dictionary
Jeopardy Key
Jeopardy Template
Written directions for final paper
Rubric for final paper
No technology or outside research is required, though encouraged.
September 18, 2014

Page 5 of 13

Candidate Name: Courtney Cechini


Date of Lesson: 10/09/14

Course Number: EDES 5252

LMU LESSON PLAN TEMPLATE


What Depth of Knowledge level/s is addressed in the lesson?
Throughout this lesson students must use:
Comprehension of content.
Identification and evaluation of content (factors, changes, negative and positive impacts of the Industrial
Revolution).
Analysis and organization of information provided in secondary source (paper assignment).
Synthesis and summarization of knowledge (through paper assignment).
Recall and articulation of knowledge (class discussion, trivia game, paper assignment).
Application of knowledge (class discussion, trivia game, paper assignment).
Evaluating, comparing, and assessing knowledge (how it affects the world today).

H. PLAN
LESSON INTRODUCTION ( 15 mins)
Pre-Requisite Knowledge
Background Knowledge
Hook
How will you link pre-requisite knowledge?
How will you activate and build background knowledge?
How will you engage students?
State the objective in student friendly language
State the purpose
1. Teacher will begin lesson by informing students they will
be reviewing topics covered in the previous lessons on
the Industrial Revolution to assist with their final paper
assignment on the Industrial Revolution. The paper
assignment is a formal/summative assessment. Paper
assignments will have been given to students in the
beginning of the Unit (See Table 3).
o Teacher will review topics in the form of a class
discussion (See Table 1) to check for prerequisite knowledge (see Lesson Body). This
class discussion will be a pre-formative,
informal assessment.
2. Teacher will Hook students by informing them half the
class will have the chance to earn extra credit that will
increase their final paper score by half a grade (i.e. Bwill become B or B will become B+). Teacher informs
students they will get a hint how they may receive extra
credit at the end of class.
o At the end of class on Day 1, teacher will leave
students with a hint on how the extra credit
points might be earned the following class
period.
Teacher will display the Jeopardy
Template (Table 2) on the overhead.
Jeopardy will be an informal/formative
assessment.
LESSON BODY (90 mins)
Direct Instruction ( 10mins)
1. Day 1:
o At the end of the class discussion, teacher will
display the Jeopardy Template to class as their
extra-credit hint for the next day.
2. Day 2:
September 18, 2014

DIFFERENTIATION

FEEDBACK

How will you differentiate


the instruction?

How will you check for


understanding?

I will make sure to speak


slowly and clearly and repeat
questions if necessary.
Additionally I will allow for
extra thinking time before
calling on students to
answer, use leading
questions to assist students
that are struggling to
respond, and write the
questions on the board for
visual representation.

I will check for understanding


based on the responses of
the students. If students are
struggling to respond (less
than 50% participating), I will
follow up with leading
questions or ask students to
clarify. I will also give
examples to help support
students statements or
recover the material.

I will provide directions on


how to play Jeopardy in
written form, as well as
explain it individually to
students who may struggle
with the concept. Paper
copies of the Jeopardy
template may be provided to
students with visual
impairments. Copies may be
on different colored paper or
in large text.

How will you differentiate


the instruction?

How will you check for


understanding?

For the class discussion, I will


make sure to speak slowly
and clearly and repeat
information if necessary.

For the class discussion, I will


check for understanding by
based on the responses and
participation of students. If
Page 6 of 13

Candidate Name: Courtney Cechini


Date of Lesson: 10/09/14

Course Number: EDES 5252

LMU LESSON PLAN TEMPLATE


o

Teacher will begin class by displaying the


Jeopardy Template on the overhead and
explaining the game to the class.
Class will be pre-split into two teams of
equal ability students (including ELLs
and learning disabilities).
Double Jeopardy questions will be preselected by teacher.
Directions (also written on the board):
Teams will flip a coin to go
first.
Teams may pick any topic and
point range.
Teams have 10 seconds to
answer.
If one team is unable to
answer a question, the other
team has the option to
answer it and receive the
points.
o Teacher asks if students have any questions
before they begin game.
Guided Practice ( 20 mins)
3. Day 1:
o Teacher will lead class through a pre-formative,
informal assessment in the form of a class
discussion to check for pre-requisite knowledge.
The pre-requisite knowledge encompasses all
topics previously covered on the Industrial
Revolution Including:
Causes for the Industrial Revolution
Life in Great Britain 1750-1850
Negative Impacts (child labor)
Positive Impact (reforms)
o Teacher will provide clarification and answer
questions as needed.
4. Day 2:
o Teacher leads students through Jeopardy game
(informal/formative assessment).
o Teach will keep time, score, settle
disagreements on answers, and accurately
determine the winners of the extra credit.
Independent Practice ( 0 mins completed outside of class)
5. Students will complete the paper assignment due the
following week in class.
What higher order thinking skills are addressed in this lesson?
Students will be asked to think critically about the factors
and inventions which drove the Industrial Revolution, the
changes it brought to society economically, politically, and
culturally, as well as the positive and negative social impacts
it created such as child labor and labor reforms. Student will
also demonstrate their understanding and ability to analyze
and organize information through class discussion, a trivia
game, and paper assignment.
September 18, 2014

Additionally I will allow for


extra note response or notetaking time and provide
visual representation of my
questions if necessary. If
visual representation of
questions is needed, it may
be displayed on different
colored paper or in large text
as well.
I will make sure to curb my
questions to the capability
level of my students.
For the Jeopardy game, I will
display the directions on the
board as well as provide
written copies for visual
representation. Questions
may be displayed on
different colored background
or with larger font if required
by students in the classroom.
Teacher will be able to
provide immediate support
using the overhead.

students are struggling to


respond (less than 50%
participating), I will follow up
with leading questions or
examples.
Responses to Jeopardy will
also provide me feedback on
what students know. If
neither team is able to
answer a question, I may
determine this information
lacking. I will provide the
answer and explain how I
came to it to ensure students
understand. This feedback
will be immediate.
Paper assignments will be
read and checked for quality,
completion, and evidence or
learning based on the
directions and rubric
provided (Table 1). Scores
will be provided on each
individual students rubric,
along with personal
feedback.

For the paper assignment, I


will reduce page limit from 5
pages to 3 pages as
necessary. Graphic
organizers, sentence starters,
bi-lingual dictionaries,
thesauruses, and grammar
work books will also be given
to help students organize
their thoughts and complete
the assignment. Students
may hand-write the paper
assignment if they lack the
resources or mobility to type
it. If a student is unable to
write or type, they may
present their assignment
orally
If deemed necessary, I will
allow more time to complete
the paper assignment, or
allow students to re-submit
the paper for more points.

Page 7 of 13

Candidate Name: Courtney Cechini


Date of Lesson: 10/09/14

Course Number: EDES 5252

LMU LESSON PLAN TEMPLATE


LESSON CLOSING (15 mins)
Restate the objective
Ask students to express what they have learned

1. Teacher wraps up the Jeopardy game by asking if


students have any questions about any topic they have
covered over the past two weeks or on the paper
assignment.
2. Allow for questions and provide answers as needed.
3. Teacher ends class by asking students their opinion on
the problems faced during the Industrial Revolution and
how they affect present day. Sample question include:
o How do you feel about child labor and its
existence today? Do you think its wrong? How
do you feel about current labor practices? Do all
countries have the same labor laws we have?
How do you feel about the various economic
practices today? Do you think democracy is
universal? Do you think the rich get richer? Do
you think technology is good or bad? Why?

How will you differentiate


the instruction?

How will you check for


understanding?

For discussions, as
mentioned above, I will make
sure to speak slowly and
clearly and repeat questions
if necessary. Additionally I
will allow for extra thinking
time before calling on
students to answer, use
leading questions to assist
students that are struggling
to respond, and write the
questions on the board for
visual representation.

For discussions, as
mentioned above, I will
check for understanding
based on the responses of
the students. If students are
struggling to respond(less
than 50% participating), I will
follow up with leading
questions or examples.
When discussing current
problems, I will ask students
to refer to the reading,
charts, and activities of
previous lessons to ensure
they are connecting to the
content.

What Students will be doing during the lesson


(SWBAT)
1. Students will be able to demonstrate acquisition of the pre-requisite knowledge by responding to teachers prompts and
participating in the class discussion.
2. Students will be able to identify the lesson objectives and topics to be reviewed.
3. Students will be able to comprehend they will be playing Jeopardy as their extra credit opportunity.
4. Students will be able to demonstrate comprehension and synthesis of knowledge through the class discussion, jeopardy
game, and paper assignment.
5. Students will be able to access content knowledge and use critical thinking to play the jeopardy game and complete the
paper assignment.
6. Students will be able to articulate their opinions on challenged faced during the Industrial Revolution that exist today
through a group discussion.

What the Teacher will be doing during the lesson


1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

Teacher will outline lesson objectives to students.


Teacher will check for pre-requisite knowledge (i.e. information learned throughout the unit) through class discussion.
Teacher will hint at extra credit Jeopardy game to Hook students.
Teacher will introduce and explain the Jeopardy game to the class.
Teacher will place students into their pre-determined teams.
Teacher will guide the Jeopardy game, providing assistance as necessary.
Teacher will answer questions and give clarification on the paper assignment.
Teacher will lead class through closing discussion on current challenges of advancement.
Teacher will provide graded score on paper presentation.
Teacher will provide written feedback on both the homework and partner presentation.

REFLECTION
I. GUIDING QUESTIONS
Using the data collected for this lesson, how will you use the data to inform your future lessons?
This lesson has not been implemented yet, but I plan on assessing the class discussions, jeopardy game, and paper
assignment to determine the quality of comprehension. If the class discussion and paper assignment submissions show a lack
of understanding (based on 50% or less participating 70% or more of students scoring a C or below respectively), and students
struggle with Jeopardy game (based on students being unable to answer 50% or more of the questions), then I will use this
information to better prepare for future lessons. This may be achieved by increased time of guided instruction, adjusted
questions on the Jeopardy game or replacement of the game with another activity, and modifications to the paper
assignment questions or time to complete it. Questions asked during group discussion may be modified to better promote
student comprehension. Additionally modifications may be made to previous lessons. For instance I may provide more
primary sources, additional images or video, graphs and data, change or modify activities, or adjust pacing of lesson to
September 18, 2014

Page 8 of 13

Candidate Name: Courtney Cechini


Date of Lesson: 10/09/14

Course Number: EDES 5252

LMU LESSON PLAN TEMPLATE


increase overall understanding throughout the unit.
How are you going to provide feedback for students?
I will provide feedback for students through guided group discussions and Jeopardy game as well as written feedback and a
numerical score on the paper assignment. During group discussion, feedback will be immediate and flexible based on the
students responses. Feedback on the paper assignment will be hand written and individualized per student.
Based on evidence of learning, what goals will you set with students?
Based on evidence of learning, I will expect my students to understand the factors and inventions which drove the Industrial
Revolution, the changes it brought to society economically, politically, and culturally, as well as the positive and negative
social impacts it created such as child labor and labor reforms. Students should also be capable of analyzing and summarizing
primary and secondary source material, organizing, synthesizing and articulating information learned through written and
oral expression, and formulate opinions.
Were your students engaged? How do you know?
This lesson has not been implemented as I am not currently teaching in a classroom. My prediction is that my lesson will be
engaging based on participation in group discussion and Jeopardy game, as well as on the quality of paper submissions
(calculated by the scoring outlined above).
Did you meet your lesson objective? How do you know?
This lesson has not been implemented as I am not currently teaching in a classroom. My prediction is that my lesson will
meet the objectives stated based on the quality of work and overall classroom participation and scores on the class
discussions, Jeopardy game, and paper assignment.

September 18, 2014

Page 9 of 13

Candidate Name: Courtney Cechini


Date of Lesson: 10/09/14

Course Number: EDES 5252

LMU LESSON PLAN TEMPLATE


Tables
Table 1: Class Discussion Question Samples

Discussion Questions
1.

What are some inventions that spurred the Industrial Revolution?

2.

Explain how these inventions advanced society.

3.

What factors not related to technological inventions allowed for the Industrial
th
Revolution in 18 Century Britain?

4.

How did Britains colonial power aid the IR?

5.

What resources did Britain have in abundance?

6.

Which portion of the population enjoyed the benefits of the Industrial Revolution? Why?

7.

Who owned the wealth during the Industrial Revolution? Is this true now?

8.

What were the problems with urbanization?

9.

What were the hours children worked during the Industrial Revolution?

10. How did family structure change during the Industrial Revolution?
11. How did social structure change during the Industrial Revolution?
12. What is Capitalism?
13. What were the competing economic patterns?
14. What is Romanticism? Why did it exist? What was its purpose?
15. Why do you think children were so valuable in mills in factories?
16. How did conditions of labor changes?
17. Who led reforms? How?
18. How did reforms succeed? How did they fail?
19. What problems exist today because of the Industrial Revolution?
20. Do you think advancement is good or bad? Why?

September 18, 2014

Page 10 of 13

Candidate Name: Courtney Cechini


Date of Lesson: 10/09/14

Course Number: EDES 5252

LMU LESSON PLAN TEMPLATE


Table 2: Jeopardy Template and Key
2a. Jeopardy Template

Isms

Causes of IR

Inventions

Impact

Reform

100

100

100

100

100

200

200

200

200

300

300

300

300

300

400

400

400

400

400

500

500

500

500

500

200

2b. Jeopardy Key


-Isms

Causes of IR

Inventions

Impact

Reforms

Q: This economic pattern


was claimed by Adam Smith,
in the Wealth of Nations, to
increase the wealth for all.

Q: Which form of
transportation greatly
altered the moving of
goods and resources?

Q: James Watts
invention of this
powered locomotives,
ships, and machinery.

Q: The move from


rural farms to big
cities was called
what.

A:Capitalism

A: The railroad

A: Steam engine.

A: Urbanization

Q: Cotton Factories
Regulation Act 1819
forbade the
employment of
children in mills under
what age?
A: 9

Q: The system in which all


property and wealth is
owned in a classless society.

Q: Technological
advancements first
affected this industry.

A:Communism

A: Textile Industry.

Q: James Hargreaves
invention of this
machine enabled one to
produce multiple spools
of thread at once.

Q: The spread of
filth and disease in
cities was mainly
due to a lack of
what?

Q: The Mines and


Collieries Act 1842
forbade which group of
people to work in the
mines?

A: Sewage

A: Women, children
under 10

Q: Samuel Comptons
invention of this
allowed cotton fibers to
be turned into yarn.

Q: Which
population greatly
supplied the work in
factories?

Q: The Reform Act of


1832 allowed men who
owned 10 pounds
worth of property to do
what?

A: Spinning mule

A:Women and
children

A: Spinning jenny
Q: A term used to describe
egalitarian or perfect
societies that arose in
response to Marxist
thinking.

Q: What natural
resources did Britain
have in great supply that
helped supply the
Industrial Revolution?

A:Utopianism

A: Coal and iron ore

September 18, 2014

A: Vote

Page 11 of 13

Candidate Name: Courtney Cechini


Date of Lesson: 10/09/14

Course Number: EDES 5252

LMU LESSON PLAN TEMPLATE


Q: This movement is
characterized by its artistic
and intellectual hostility
towards industrialization.

Q: What did Britains


financial institutions and
central bank allow them
to finance?

Q: Edmund cartwrights
invention used water
instead of human
power for weaving.

A:Romanticism

A: Construction of
Factories

A: power loom

Q: This economic pattern,


based on co-operative
management of the
economy, occurred as a
critique of capitalism.

Q: What gave Britain


access to raw materials
and a market for
manufactured goods?

Q: Henry Bessemer
discovered a way to
mass produce what?

Q: As a result of the
IR, mass production
replaced what?

Q: Which Act limited


working hours to 10
per day for women and
children?

A: Domestic System

Q: Poor working
conditions and low
wages led to the
formation of what?

A: steel
A: Leading colonial
power

A: Socialism

A: Ten Hours Bill

Q: Which act forbade


factory masters to
dictate working hours?
A: Factories Act of 1856

A: Labor union

Double Jeopardy (500 pts each):


Q: This term is used by Marxists to describe wage-earners.
A: Proletariat
Q: The term is used by Marxists to describe the owners of wealth and production.
A: bourgeoisie

Table 3: Paper Assignment and Rubric


3a. Paper Assignment

Final Paper: Industrial Revolution


Answering the prompt below, you will complete a paper on the Industrial Revolution.
Prompt:
1.

The Industrial Revolution benefited society. Respond to this statement whether you
agree or disagree and why.

Please use the following format:


o Minimum of 5 pages, maximum of 6 pages
o Typed
o Double-Spaced
o Resources you may use: Textbook, primary sources, class lectures and activities. No
outside research is required.
Topics to consider when writing your essay:
o New technology
o Domestic vs. Factory System
o Urbanization
o Labor Conditions
o Unions
o Distribution of wealth
o Owners of wealth
o Social response
o Cultural changes

September 18, 2014

Page 12 of 13

Candidate Name: Courtney Cechini


Date of Lesson: 10/09/14

Course Number: EDES 5252

LMU LESSON PLAN TEMPLATE


3b. Paper Rubric
CATEGORY

3
The thesis statement
names the topic of the
essay.

2
The thesis statement
outlines some or all of
the main points to be
discussed but does not
name the topic.

Focus or Thesis
Statement

The thesis statement


names the topic of the
essay and outlines the
main points to be
discussed.

The thesis statement


does not name the topic
AND does not preview
what will be discussed.

Support for Position

Includes 3 or more pieces Includes 3 or more pieces Includes 2 pieces of


of evidence that support of evidence that support evidence that support
the position statement. the position statement. the position statement.
The writer provides a
counter-argument.

Includes 1 or fewer
pieces of evidence.

Accuracy

All supportive evidence is Almost all supportive


reported accurately.
evidence is reported
accurately.

Most supportive
evidence is reported
accurately.

Most supportive
evidence is inaccurately
reported.

Transitions

A variety of thoughtful
Transitions show how
transitions are used. They ideas are connected, but
clearly show how ideas
there is little variety
are connected

Some transitions work


well, but some
connections between
ideas are fuzzy.

The transitions between


ideas are unclear OR
nonexistent.

Closing paragraph

The conclusion is strong


and leaves the reader
solidly understanding the
writer's position.
Effective restatement of
the position statement.

The conclusion is
The conclusion is
recognizable. The writer's somewhat recognizable.
position is restated
within the closing
paragraph.

There closing paragraph


does not accurately restate the thesis or there
is no closing paragraph.

Sources

All sources used for


quotes, statistics and
facts are credible and
cited correctly.

All sources used for


quotes, statistics and
facts are credible and
most are cited correctly.

Most sources used for


quotes, statistics and
facts are credible and
cited correctly.

Many sources are suspect


(not credible) AND/OR
are not cited correctly.

Grammar & Spelling

Author makes no errors


in grammar or spelling
that distracts the reader
from the content.

Author makes 1-2 errors


in grammar or spelling
that distract the reader
from the content.

Author makes 3-4 errors


in grammar or spelling
that distract the reader
from the content.

Author makes more than


4 errors in grammar or
spelling that distracts the
reader from the content.

Grade: /28= _______% , Letter Grade: __________


Extra Credit: Yes/No, If yes, Letter Grade: __________
Teacher Comments:

September 18, 2014

Page 13 of 13