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THE

MILLENNIAL
A N E W G E N E R AT I O N O F I N F O R M AT I O N

EDITION: 1 | December 8, 2014

The Interdisciplinary Mind

IN THE ISSUE:
Learning
Space you may ne
Through,
About
ed lorem ipsum
in bold
and Around
Religion p. 6
A Scientific
Report of
Science p. 8
Philosophy and
students p. 12
Starbucks for the
Historian p. 14

SIMPLICITY

INDEX

History

Philosophy

12

10

Geography

4
Science

Starbucks for the Historian


The historical secrets of a Starbucks cup.

Table of Contents
MAPPING THE FUTURE / page 4

Philosophy: Useless?

Mapping the Future

Does it have any value to the modern day

UW Professor Victoria Lawson speaks to students about the need to move away from purely physical

college student?

geography...how does this translate to primary & secondary education?

Religion

RELIGION / page 6

ABOUT

A SCIENTIFIC REPORT / page 8


SOME THINGS TO CONSIDER/ page 10
PHILOSOPHY / page 12
STARBUCKS & THE HISTORIAN / page 14
ADVICE COLUMN & QUIZ RESULTS / page 16

A Scientific Study of Science

The Christian Chronicles

This is what happens when the researchers become the researched.

Movie reviews with a Christian flavor.

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From the editors:

The news industry is changing and millennials are the force behind the change.
No longer is news stuck in the past. Welcome to The Millennial.
Did you know that 67 percent of millennials prefer to be the last one to know
information, as long as it is accurate, rather
than be the first to know inaccurate information?
What we seek is accuracy in a concise delivery. While most of us receive information from social media outlets, recent
trends show that millennials are sick of
the shallow and want depth to writing, as
long as we arent staring at a mass of text.

Where do we find this balance?


In November 2014, a group of six
University of Washington Honors program
decided to create a newsmagazine that
combines both appealing visuals and short
writing bits with depth. It is a traditional
news platform with a twist.
We are excited to share our first edition, called The Interdiscplinary Mind. Its
hardly breaking news, but the information
we present allows any mind to expand. Enjoy.
-The Millennial Editors

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Source: Mike Keefe (intoon.com)

MAPPING
THE FUTURE
University of Washington Professor Victoria Lawson speaks to Honors students
about geography and the need to shift away from studying purely physical
geography in classrooms.

Karinne Sandstrom

Ethnocentrism: the judgment of cultures accor-

she studied.

ding to ones own cultural standards. The followers of

Professor Lawson spoke to the honors students

ethnocentrism place little value in different practices

and said that maps played an important role in how

and beliefs that do not align to their narrow and defi-

she perceived the world growing up. For example,

ned lifestyle.

one of the maps she studied in school was the Briti-

Ethnocentric individuals create boundaries and

sh Commonwealth map, which emphasized the va-

binaries in society that, in a hierarchical sort of way,

rious territories of British colonization, placing Great

assert dominance and influence on cultures that are

Britain at the center of focus for the world.

perceived as weaker. For example, British colonia-

Placing ones own country of origin in the cen-

lism affected indigenous tribes of the colonized te-

ter of the map is about power, according to Profes-

rritories, thus causing oppression and sometimes decline in


these native cultures.
But the example of British colonialism is quite a large
representation of ethnocentrism. Cultural narrow-minded-

About one-quarter of students perform at or above


the Proficient level [for
national geography standards] in 2010.

On Nov. 24, Victoria Law-

-U.S. Department of Education

son, a professor of geography,

more than lines and oceans,


but an entire commentary on
how our worldviews speak to a
wider interplay of masculinity
and a fight for power and terriProfessor Lawsons ideas
and beliefs are not bound to
the pink Commonwealth map

spoke to a small group of freshmen students in the

she learned from as a child. Ethnocentric learning

Interdisciplinary Honors Program about her study of

begins early in American classrooms.

geography and the influence of geography on an individuals perception of the world.

geographical mapping is much

tory.

ness happens in much smaller


degrees, even in everyday life.

sor Lawson. More specifically,

Growing up in California, I was taught according


to California state standards. World maps and the

Surprisingly, much of her interest in the field of

study of the modern world were hardly touched on

geography stems from her childhood in England and

until ninth grade, according to the California State

early ethnocentric tendencies regarding the maps

Board of Educations standards.

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The state educators adopted this idea that geography was

for geography includes a quote from The Road Map for 21st

all about a progression of knowledge that began locally and

Century Geography that reads, One thing is abundantly clear.

moved outward to a global worldview.

If American children hope to participate in our democracy and

For example, elementary geography standards in my home

play a strong leadership role in our world, they must possess

state begin with California history and geography, then move

geographic knowledge, understandings, and skills. Simply put,

to the United States in middle school (sixth-eighth grade), with

if our children are not taught to think geographically, their suc-

some study of ancient civilizations around the world. World

cess and the success of our nation and world in the 21st cen-

History, Culture, and Geography: The Modern World begins in

tury are in jeopardy.

grade ten, and lasts only for a single grade-level, until there is a
return to American democracy studies.
The problem with this type of progression in classrooms
is the structure in how a student gains his or her knowledge

The sentiments of this organization mirror a change in


the education system: a fear that American childrens perceptions of the physical and human geographical world have been
skewed or incorrectly approached.

about the world. By placing California at the forefront of geogra-

Thus, beginning early, standards for Common Core read,

phy at the elementary level, there is an implication that where

Describe how an individuals views and understandings of pla-

one lives is the most important territory to study, instead of

ces and regions differ, as expressed by his or her mental map.

beginning broad and narrowing those worldviews down to ones


home place. The student ends up taking the geography and history of California and building on it with the United States and
the world, which can be a scary position to learn from.

In laymans words, have a child compare how he or she


thinks the world looks versus how it really is.
Its a conceptual improvement, and while the applications
are an entirely different story, the fact that deficiencies in an

Fortunately, despite all of the negative controversy regar-

Americans understanding of the world are being addressed in

ding the new education standards known as Common Core,

the classroom marks a huge step, hopefully followed by a grea-

there are improvements regarding the standards of geography.

ter push to truly take down ethnocentrism.

The introduction to the Common Core Grade 4 standards

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MOVIE REVIEW: THE CHRISTIAN CHRONICLES


Reviewing movies for the integrity of todays Christian

RELIGION
LEARNING THROUGH, ABOUT, AND AROUND RELIGION

ist
he Chr

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irituali
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SIMPLICITY

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Hailee Herbst

Religion can be looked at through a series of lenses


as well as analyzed and discussed through multiple facets
of learning. Though many see religion as being purely personal and spiritual for an individual, there is much to be
learned from the various religions of the world. Religion is
a driving force behind so much of what has happened up
until today; this allows us to learn about the past, present,
and future if we view the world though a religious scope.
Take, for example, the gospels of the Bible. We can
view these stories two different ways: historical accounts
of what happened long ago or spiritual references meant
to guide people today. Religion molds past and present
societies; America was founded on both religious and economic principles, while to this day Israel lives in religious
turmoil. Some may say that religious works are meant to
be fact-based accounts of what happened thousands of
years ago. Others, on the contrary, believe religious texts
are meant to guide people through their journey of life.
However such texts are interpreted, it is true that such
works help people make sense of what has happened,
whether that be historically or spiritually. These texts guide people through the ways of the past, much like the
bible explains what happened during the time of Jesus.
Some could say religion is history in spiritual form; one
can read a history book or a religious text to learn about
the distant past.
Religious documents also provide todays society
with new ways to view a hot topic of contention. Feminism, for example, pulls from the Quran. In this foundational Muslim text, women are often times highlighted
as strong characters, and in early Muslim days, women
were the first supporters of Muhammad. This, in effect,
turns the Quran into a feminist document that shapes
todays society. We, as women today, use the Quran to
show the significance of women in movements such as
Muhammads, pushing women to be the forefront of todays revivals. Such documents provide the backbone for
feminist movements. Religious accounts provide a sense
of structure for what is argued in todays world and allow
scholarly debate to continue in circles.

Can you be a devout believer


in a specific religion and
still be a good comparative
religion scholar?
Can you be a good
comparative religion scholar
without having any sense of
religion?

The most obvious way that we can learn from religion


is to look back and see how religion has played a role
in history. Almost all wars, past and present, are centered about some religious beliefs held true to the soldiers
fighting. Without religion, where would countries stand
today? We learn about countries in a historical context
by analyzing their religious stances of the day. Thus, religion is undoubtedly one of the largest players in shaping
history.
While all of this is true, one may wrongly assume that
religion cannot be a tool for learning unless one is religious. Religion is both emotional and fact based. There is
a spirituality that is associated with religion that allows a
person to learn about him or herself by following various
practices associated with the religious sects. Beyond
the emotional ties of religion, however, is the concept of
religion tying into all facets of life. Societies were once
shaped around the God or gods they worshiped. Although
societies arent as religiously centered today, religion still
plays into modern aspects of learning. While we may no
longer directly learn about religion, we still learn through
religion. For example, religion plays a major backdrop for
debates today. Almost all hot topics of contention are
argued on religious lines. Abortion, gay rights, the use of
God in the pledge, and other political topics are fought
by those strongly associated with religious views.
Religion is no longer the focal point of a society, nor is
it universally accepted as the truth. Regardless of those
points, however, is the fact that religion ties into the past
and current societies of the world. We learn about the
past by examining the religion of a particular country or
culture, just as we center political and personal debates
on religious ties.

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A SCIENTIFIC REPORT
OF SCIENCE:

>>Figure 1.1
The relation between fun experienced
and work put into science.

Peeking into the world of science through


the lens of UW Professor Paul Johnson and
undergraduates Una Miller and Marie Salmi.

John Feltrup

Abstract
This report contains information pertaining to the field

Figure 1.2>>
The division of work for an oceanography professor.
*Note graph adds up to 110% because scientists always give 110%

of Oceanography as a category of the sciences. It seeks


to ascertain the reason behind pursuing a career in the
sciences. The answer was to be found by interviewing
some professionals in this field. Specific questions and
light conversation were used to gather the necessary
data. It was found that most of the desire to study Oceanography came from the joys of discovery. The scientists
loved their field, and found it fun to study each new day.
Introduction
The sciences are a complex field which require large
amounts of quantitative knowledge and years of studying
to get into. There are many very different fields one could
specialize in. That being the case, why does one pursue
a career in the field? It seems to be difficult and complex
and results in a huge commitment of ones life. There
is likely some overarching reason that can be used to
explain the phenomenon. This can best be uncovered by
reaching out to members in the field and obtaining their
input. The objectives of the study are to find out what
work is like in a scientific field and piece together why
that work is appealing. The field of Oceanography will be
studied as a representation of these effects.
Procedure
1. Send a well-worded email to arrange a meeting with
a scientist and his students. (UW Professor Paul Johnson, Graduate Student Marie Salmi, and Undergrad Una
Miller)
2. Navigate through the maze that is the southern scientific part of campus.
3. Collect photographic evidence of the kind of environments oceanographers work in.

Pictured above: The UW Oceanogrpahy research vessel theThomas G. Thompson. Photo taken Nov. 20.

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4. Locate the aforementioned scientist.


5. Inquire about how they became involved in the field of

Oceanography.

world we are on. We still dont really know the sea floor.

6. Construct a graphical representation of time is divided working over

Una Miller: Una is a senior undergrad who was hooked on science

the course of a year.

when she realized that she could be a part of the field, hands on,

7. Observe a range of the highs and lows of being in the scientific com-

here at UW. All the interesting things to discover and exciting people to

munity.

work with make the field worthwhile. Specialists from many disciplines

8. Ask about embarrassing or humorous stories to observe the fun that

come together with this kind of research. The grunt work of data proces-

could be had.

sing and feeling of inexperience can be rough for an undergrad, howe-

9. Thank the scientist for his or her time.

ver it is something that all scientists have to go through. In her words,

10. Repeat steps 4-9 with an undergrad and a graduate student.

Oceanography is one of the most fun fields you could choose to be in. It

Results
The gathered data can be divided into 3 categories according to the
experience in Oceanography of each interviewee.

combines so many different disciplines in one.


Conclusion
I have come to the conclusion that the fun of making new discove-

Paul Johnson: Professor Johnson displayed a huge fondness of the

ries, working with exciting people, and pursuing ones desires is what

field, knowing from a young age that he planned to pursue science.

makes Oceanography so appealing. The gathered data was with the

His time is divided between the field and research (see Figure 1.2)

expected range while also including values that were not expected wi-

and his desire stems from how fun he finds the field to be. The most

thin the initial assessment of the subject. Looking at Figure 1.1 (ave-

enjoyment comes from making a new discovery, no matter how small.

raged from the conversations with all three subjects), there is a direct

The worst part of this field is having a proposal you have worked on for

relationship between fun and work within the field of Oceanography.

months get rejected. In his words about the field, We have a lot of fun.

There is a dip midway through the graph, coming from the probabili-

There arent many endeavors where you can do anything than you can

ty (85%) of getting a research proposal rejected. This deviation could

convince the board to fund.

also be caused by the grunt work researchers have to get used to with
data processing, or possibly the pain of having to write and publish

Marie Salmi: Marie is in the first year of her PhD program. She pursued

papers. I realize that this study is limited in the scope of fields resear-

science as she enjoyed it much more than the humanities. Working

ched, however it is within the realm of reason to assume that many

with a group of like-minded people, making discoveries, and taking

of these feelings are shared throughout all specializations of science.

those discoveries public are all appealing parts of science. Having


to write up papers can be one of the less entertaining parts of the

-A special thanks for Professor Paul Johnson, Marie Salmi, and Una

field. In her words, What surprises me is how little we know about the

Miller for their help in my research.


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-SOME THINGS TO CONSIDER-

>>Quiz:
WHICH POSTMODERN IRONIST
ARE YOU?

>>Comics

Sure, we all know truth is socially constructed, but what do you do about it?
If you could meet any famous historical figure, who would it be?
a. Martin Luther King, Jr. or Gandhi
b. John Lennon or Marilyn Monroe
c. Buddha or Machiavelli
You would consider your life most
successful if you had
a. Started an orphanage in rural
Brazil
b. Set foot on every continent and
collected every Jimi Hendrix vinyl
c. Written a bestselling book on epistemology
When you travel, you
a. Build a school or give vaccinations
b. Hit all the best tourist attractions
and work on your tan
c. Make sure you go everywhere BUT
the places your Lonely Planet recommends

by Maya Norton

>>From the funny files: Science Struggles

You love to talk about


a. Your plans for research and controversial topics
b. Your favorite music and edible pot
recipes
c. The corruption of the government
and conspiracy theories

-Sometimes you just want to have a nice, relaxing research cruise to do some
mapping off of Oregon. Thats what professor Johnson wanted, until he got skunked
by the weather. What started as a calming studying became three weeks of getting
tossed around a boat with no useful data at the end. Sometimes you cant avoid it,
whether you like it or not!
-The best laid plans of mice and men..have a lot to do with science. How would
you feel when you get out on the sea, ready to research some new and exciting
thing, only to find out you are dead wrong? It happens more than you think, and
scientists need to keep on their toes. You never know when youll need to come up
with a plan B on the fly, or even a plan C!

10

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by John Feltrup

Think science is nothing but test tubes and roses? Well think again, even
Oceanographers get seasick!

In your spare time, youd most like


to
a. Help your favorite professor with
his/her research
b. Party and teach yourself guitar
c. Attend Iron Maiden concerts and
put studs on your black clothing
You love to read
a. The New York Times and Malcolm X
b. Harry Potter and John Green
c. George Orwell and Edgar Allen Poe
FOR AN EXPLANATION
OF RESULTS, SEE P. 16.

Class Survey<<
Howard Gardners Theory of

Multiple Intelligences
The Intelligences of Honors 205

Intrapersonal (19%)

Interpersonal (17%)

Spatial (11%)

Logical/mathematical (22%)

Kinesthetic (7%)

Linguistic (14%)

Musical (10%)

And here are the self-proclaimed intelligences of the 22 honors


students of What We Know and How We Know It, averaged and summed up in a neat little pie chart. While crunching the numbers, it was
interesting to see just how widely varied the results were per person;
I had expected the sections of the pie chart to be more evenly sized.
Some students reported to possess all seven intelligences to varying
degrees; others identified only with three or four. Nobody reported
more than 50 percent of their overall intelligence to be one particular
intelligence; some people did report to be comprised of 1 percent of
one intelligence or other.
It is interesting that the largest slice turned out to be Logical/
Mathematical. It seems very feasible that this would be a dominant
intelligence in a group of Honors students; this intelligence seems
conducive to test-taking (such as the SAT and AP tests) and quantitative classes (math and science) which tend to trip up the majority of
students, but generally not those who excel enough to get into the UW
Honors Program. I was surprised, however, that linguistic intelligence
was not as strongly represented. Writing for many disciplineslab
reports in science, language classes, English composition classes, as
well as for test takingsuch as aforementioned standardized tests
would seem to be a strength for UW Honors students, especially those
taking an Honors composition course.
However, its comforting to remember that no two-dimensional pie
chart could sum up the potential of the minds of the universitys most
promising; the skills and inclinations of this class are still forming.

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11

Philosophy

Professional schools want to know they have


well-rounded, collaborative students capable
of critical thought.

Useless to the modern college student?


Adrienne Chen
that deal with similar subject matter

12

If youre reading the title, and

jobs in our flagging economy, I pose

monstrate those skills. With the ex-

youre nodding thoughtfully to your-

that degrees in fields like Philosophy

pected qualifications for entry-level

self, I suggest you take a moment

actually make for a more competitive

jobs at big corporations rising every

and reconsider. It is true that many

candidate in STEM fields, in terms of

year, Philosophy and its associated

people, especially in this age of ra-

applying for graduate schools or jobs

skills are useful tools when on the

pidly developing technology, scoff at

alike.

job hunt.

the social sciences and the huma-

To clarify, Im not saying that you

While you may be disbelieving

nities in higher education. Though

should expect to be a competitive

now, Philosophy does not just con-

required by most high school curri-

candidate for a software engineer

sist of people questioning the me-

culums, higher education in these

job at one of the dot com giants with

aning of life, listlessly staring at the

fields is usually regarded with muted

just a Philosophy degree in hand at

ceiling in hope of some kind of errant

dismissal, a barely-there smirk and

your interview. I am, however, saying

epiphany to come waltzing through

sardonic good luck finding a job

that double majoring in Computer

their mind. Just as Psychology is not

almost certain to follow. To be fair,

Science and Philosophy, for exam-

limited to and how do you feel about

the modern worlds preoccupation

ple, could aid your hypothetical claim

that? so too is Philosophy more

with STEM (science, technology, en-

to a beanbag chair at Googles offi-

than its stereotype.

gineering, and mathematics) fields

ces. UW Honors author-in-residence,

What do I really mean by Phi-

and their practical applications are

Frances McCue contends that candi-

losophy and its associated skills?

founded in the human desire for

dates for jobs and for limited spaces

Well, initially, we can understand

progress, and it can only be expec-

in graduate schools are expected to

Philosophy as the area of study that

ted that there be a rush to fill the de-

have the content knowledge and

deals with general, big-picture ques-

mand for people with skills in such

necessary skills to succeed, with

tions like reality, knowledge, exis-

fields. But while there is a huge influx

the parity or binary of contrasting

tence, etc. Furthermore, what sets

of people aiming for those coveted

degrees only serving to further de-

Philosophy apart from other fields

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of a STEM-focused workforce.

portant, some kind of collaboration

is the analytical and logical nature

Imagine for a moment two peo-

or group involvement requiring the

of its approach to these issues, its

ple show up for the same job inter-

need to articulate ones ideas clearly

basis in rational argument. Clarify,

view. Both have the same degrees in

will inevitably arise. Whether it be a

justify, give your arguments, then

a STEM field, but the second person

cross-department project or just se-

consider and respond to objections.

has a second degree in Philosophy.

curing information that is not at your

Such is the basic process of approa-

The first person interviews, is found

own disposal, I think it is fair to say

ching something from a philosophi-

to be knowledgeable in their field, de-

that a generally accepted reality of

cal standpoint, according to Profes-

monstrating a proficiency that meets

working in todays world is having to

sor Ann Baker, herself a prominent

the expectations for the skillset the

talk to other people. And while deve-

lecturer in the field. I would postulate

job is asking for. The second person,

loping the skills needed for a Philoso-

that the associated skills of such an

on the other hand, though demons-

phy degree do not give you the kind

area of study would involve the abili-

trating a proficiency that does not

of hard science knowledge that is

ty to articulate an argument or idea

match up to the first candidate, does

required for a STEM field, this does

intelligibly, reason through steps,

go on to impress the interviewer with

not render them useless.

participate in civil discourse, and ge-

their precise manner of speaking

Professional schools, like law,

nerally think things through in a clear

and communication skills. This dis-

medicine, business, and compa-

and concise manner. And while it is

tinguishing quality leads the inter-

nies, as well, want to know they

true that these do not, at all, sudden-

viewer to choose the second person.

have well-rounded, collaborative stu-

ly make you knowledgeable in how

As contrived as this may sound,

dents capable of critical thought,

to write working code, or qualify you

existing, and more importantly suc-

says McCue. And Philosophy, as un-

to start designing structurally sound

ceeding, in any kind of work environ-

related as it may seem, can help you

buildings, these skills do lend them-

ment requires interacting with other

get there.

selves to other aspects of being part

people. While individual work is im-

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13

By JaJanelle Lee
Here is a Starbucks cup, decorated with festive color and designs to celebrate the holiday season. As an
American in the 21st century, you probably see dozens
of these cups every day, casually placed on a table or
tossed into a trashcan. And, frankly speaking, the regular person would not think much of this 12-ounce (bet-

STARBUCKS

FOR THE HISTORIAN

as one of the most popular stocks among investors.


Considering these facts, it would not be exaggerating
to say that it plays a significant role in the modern
economy. Moreover, Starbucks has become deeply
engrained in contemporary culture, especially that of
the United States. It is a common practice to start off

ter known as tall-sized) Starbucks cup or the histori-

ones morning with a cup of Starbucks coffee; there

cal and contemporary significance it holds. However, it

are more than 16 million posts on Instagram tagged

is a different story with historians. Most people are not

#starbucks; and the arrival of Christmas season is offi-

accustomed to viewing the world through a historical

cially announced by the red Starbucks cups.

lens; however, being historically aware can reveal va-

As a result of such cultural permeation, Starbuc-

rious interesting facts and lead to valuable inferences

ks cups have also come to illustrate certain social ste-

about a seemingly mundane occurrence or object.

reotypes in modern America. One of the things that

A good example is this Starbucks cup. Yes, we see

define the basic white girl is her love for Starbucks;

it so many times everyday that we have grown apathetic

the stereotypical American white girl during fall would

to it. But where did it come from? When, why and how

be found wearing a pair of yoga pants and a pair of

was the first Starbucks coffee shop established? Have

Uggs, accompanied by a cup of Starbucks Pumpkin

the ambitions of its founders been realized today? How

Spice Latte in her hand. The 26th century historian

has the perceived role and significance of Starbucks

could delve into the effects of these often inaccurate

changed over the years?

perceptions on the Caucasian female in 21st century

The history of the Starbucks cup traces all the way

America.

back to March 30, 1971, when the original Starbucks

As illustrated, studying an object as simple as a

coffee shop was established in Seattles notorious Pike

Starbucks cup can enable an enriching learning ex-

Place Market by its three founders, Gordon Bowker, Je-

perience for the historically minded individual. This

rry Baldwin, and Zev Siegl. Starbucks started out with

emphasizes the importance of respecting the value

a mission to inspire and nurture the human spirit

of even the seemingly insignificant subjects in history,

one person, one cup and one neighborhood at a time.

often deemed dead history or historical losers.

I would say this goal has been largely realized by this

look for, what they are drawn to. In fact, history itself is

likely be inclined to overlook the importance of this cup

History is living, with every detail actively involved

point, seeing that Starbucks has proliferated enough to

fluid, always changing with constantly developing inter-

and throw it in the trash. However, a historian would see

in the intricate web of connection across space and

reach almost every neighborhood in the United States,

pretations of the past.

it differently. He or she would wonder what this appa-

time. Every little part of it is bound to have some effect

and many people throughout the globe associate a cup

Another interesting point of view from which we can

rently ordinary cup might reveal about the time it is

that could easily reach us today in some form. When

of Starbucks with comfort and rejuvenation. Starbucks,

analyze a Starbucks cup is by assuming the eyes of, say,

from: the economic, cultural, and social patterns of the

we esteem the value of historical thinking and start

which started out as a small coffee shop no different

a 26th century historian discovering this cup 500 years

21st century. And, surely, the questions the historian

to consider the historical significance of the things

from any other of its kind, has come to assume a much

later (setting aside the fact that the paper cup would

asks would lead to some astounding discoveries.

around us, our experience of the world becomes that

larger and significant role in the daily lives of people to-

have long deteriorated by then; let your imaginations

Starbucks Corporation is without a doubt one of

day. This kind of change across time is what historians

run). A regular person of the 26th century would most

most influential businesses in the world today, as well

14

SIMPLICITY
MILLENNIAL

much more rewarding and meaningful.

SIMPLICITY
MILLENNIAL

15

Q:

Dear Dubs,
I am a student at the UW, and I
have a problem with the food here.
All I want is good food, but all I
can think of doing is whining and
that somehow hasnt helped at all.
What else could I possibly do?
Sincerely,
Hungry Student

Dubs enjoys
long walks on
the beach, large
pork bones,
barking at
cougars, and
giving advice
to his beloved
students.
QUIZ RESULTS:
Mostly As: Constructivist
Mostly Bs: Player
Mostly Cs: Nihilist

According to Walter Truett Anderson (Four Different Ways to Be Absolutely Right), heres what
your results mean.
Constructivists
are tend to be philosophers, sociologists, cognitive scientists, feminist scholars, and liberal theologians. They are concerned less with words and
more with action.
Players
are not as action-oriented as the constructivists.
They are curious, taking interest in many different
aspects of society and pop culture, and tend also to
be rather adventurous.
Nihilists
doubt the credibility of the commonly held
beliefs of the world. They tend to be defiant and shy
away from convention, emphasizing the importance of living in the moment.

16

SIMPLICITY
MILLENNIAL

THE EDITORS

DEAR DUBS
A:

An advice column from your


favorite mascot

Dear Hungry Student,


There are many approaches I could recommend you take. It
really depends on the kind of student you are, and perhaps your
field of study, too.
One way of changing your point of view could include contemplating the past. Did your parents have this good of food when they
were in college? If not, how did they somehow manage to survive?
Also you can take a moment to think about what dogs like me have
had to eat ever since the invention of kibble (you could also give
that a try and try to tell me your greasy hamburgers and potatoes
arent tolerable).
Another approach you could take would be to think it out. How
do you know that the food is really bad? What if there is an evil
genius controlling your tastebuds and simply misleading you as to
the taste of the food? It may actually be gourmet food; whos to say
that everything you perceive isnt just a lie anyway? Since you really
dont have any way to prove the answer to any of these questions,
you could try choosing the possible truth that the food actually is
good.
When youre thinking about the food, you could be taking too
traditional of an approach as well. Try not thinking about the hard
facts of the foodthe cost, taste, ingredients, and quantitybut
rather think about the intention behind the food. Think about what
it implicitly means. What steps went into the making of this food?
Maybe enough hard work went into the food at which you turn up
your nose make it more appealing than you originally thought.
You could also come up with your own theory about why the
food is how it is. Of course, youd need to start with an observation
to form this theory, then test it through several trial runs, recording
your observations and collecting data. If this data were compelling
enough and all of your sources of error accounted for and determined to not be confounding, you could then draw conclusions.
Finally, depending on your religion, you could pray about this
issue or make a sacrifice in appropriate manner to your denomination asking for a change in your mindset or a change in the quality
of food on your campus. Many religious idols did, however, fast to
achieve enlightenment, so thats another perfectly valid approach
as well.
Of course, all of these approaches are valid, though different.
Choose one or two of them, and Im sure you wont have as rrrruff
of a time.

Adrienne Chen

John Feltrup

Hailee Herbst

Janelle Lee

Maya Norton

Karinne Sandstrom

--Dubs
SIMPLICITY

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