Вы находитесь на странице: 1из 4

Research Proposal

To:
Dr. Heidi Harris, University of Arkansas at Little Rock
From:
Gabe Richard, University of Arkansas at Little Rock
Date:
September 12th, 2014
Subject: Research Proposal on Solutions to Common Problems in the Bee Industry
Proposed Study
Year after year we lose thousands of bees seemingly overnight to tiny pests known as
beetles and mites. I propose to study these pests and figure out a fast and easy way to
engage the problem they bring using in-hive traps or possibly chemicals if safe enough.
These traps wont necessarily kill the mites and beetles altogether, but it will weaken them
which will give a beehive a better chance of survival.
Statement of Problem
Hive Beetles and Mites main focus is to find food. They do this by getting in the beehive and
eating the bees brood and honey. That, obviously, isnt helpful to the hive. The pests
reproduce and eventually grow so much that the hive cant handle it any more and they die.
Both pests have a different method of getting what they want. The mite will get in the hive
and try to plant itself inside the brood before it is capped off and eat the brood while it is
being formed. Once the bee hatches it will be deformed in some way, usually by a messed
up wing. They also latch on to the back of a bee and suck the blood while its walking
around doing its business in the hive. A beetle will get in the hive and eat the honey, pollen,
and brood while it lays eggs in the brood. Once it hatches the larvae crawls out the hive into
the ground until it becomes an adult hive beetle. Then the process starts all over again. The
pests are a huge nuisance and can bring a hive down in no time at all. Luckily, strong hives
can handle the pests if they dont get too out of control. Since Ive grown up around bees
and have seen these problems first hand, I believe I can create a good plan to help with the
problem.
Intended Audience
This proposal is intended for beekeepers around the country who spend countless hours
building up beehives only for them to be destroyed by Hive beetles and Mites. Hopefully I
can give them some ideas to combat these pests.
Scope of Proposed Study
My study will explore the following issues:
1. The life cycle and description of Hive Beetles and Mites, as well as preferences and
tendencies, to best explain and create a plan to trap them.
2. Different methods and ideas to calculate the fastest, easiest, and cheapest way to build
traps that engage the insects and give a hive the best chance to survive when Hive beetles
and Mites enter a hive.

3. The effects and possibility of using chemicals in the hive as an easier alternative to
physically building traps for each colony. This would save an abundance of time but the risk
of chemicals or pesticides coming in contact with the honey might not make it the best
choice.
Data Sources
Source 1:
Cuthbertson, Andrew G. S., et al. "The Small Hive Beetle Aethina Tumida: A Review Of Its
Biology And Control Measures." Current Zoology 59.5 (2013): 644-653. Academic Search
Complete. Web. 7 Sept. 2014
Description: This article talks about the origin of the Small Hive Beetle and how it has
originated from Africa. The beetle has recently invaded North America and Australia and
could affect the Bee Industry in a big way. The article describes how beetles re-produce as
well as what the beetle looks like at different stages of growth. The article also talks about
ways to control it using chemicals and actual in-hive traps like I suggested.
Why this source is useful: This source is useful because it gives vital information about
beetles and how they act and how they are produced. It gives readers more insight on what
it would take to control the beetles and how my ideas would work against them.
Why this source is reliable: This source is reliable because it has several well-known
authors and up-to-date and accurate information regarding the bee industry. It lists its
references and affiliations in the detailed record of the article.
Source 2:
Cuthbertson, Andrew G. S., et al. "Small Hive Beetle: The Next Threat To British Honey
Bees?." Biologist 57.1 (2010): 35-39. Academic Search Complete. Web. 7 Sept. 2014.
Description: This article goes into detail of how the small hive beetle has infested Great
Britain and North American colonies. It talks about its reproduction rate in different climates
and temperatures. The article also talks about what Small Hive Beetles feed on and the
types of colonies affected by the beetles.
Why this source is useful: This source is useful because it also goes into detail about the
production of bees but also talks about what they like to eat and different climates they were
re-produced in. These ideas could help in creating ideas of what to use against them.
Why this source is reliable: This source is reliable because it has some of the same authors
in the first article. They also give accurate information about Small Hive Beetles as well as
sources and affiliations.
Source 3:

Briscoe, Jenni. "'Bee-Killing' Pesticides Debate Has Industry Buzzing." DIY Week (2013): 2.
Business Source Complete. Web. 7 Sept. 2014.
Description: This article talks about the proposed ban of any pesticide with neonicotinoid
chemicals because the fear of it harming bees. Studies were shown that the chemical was
linked to decline in bees. Users of the chemical argued that they are over-looking all the
other problems causing bees to decrease including the varroa mite.
Why this source is useful: This source is useful because it talks about the different debates
on pesticides and other harmful things to bees. It also says that people who use this product
blame mites as the problem while non-users are looking at pesticides, which both might
have a hand in harming bees.
Why this source is reliable: This source is reliable because it has a legitimate author from
an actual newsource. The article provides information that is relatable to the current events
and controversy that the Bee Industry is facing or has faced in the recent past.
Source 4:
"Related Topics." ARS : Honey Bees and Colony Collapse Disorder. N.p., n.d. Web. 07
Sept. 2014.
Description: This article talks about the Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD) and how it has
affected the honey bee industry over the last couple of years. The article doesnt have any
one reason for why the colonies are disappearing, it only gives directions in which scientist
are looking. These reasons are Pathogens, Parasites, Management Stressors, and
Environmental Stressors. It also goes into detail about why the public should care and what
they can do to help.
Why this source is useful: This source is useful because it gives a general idea of the Bee
Industry and how its being affected. The article doesnt narrow the problem down to just
one idea but it gives several directions in which the problems could be, one of them being
parasites and specifically Varroa mites, which are a problem in our hives. It also gives tips
to how someone could help the bee industry.
Why this source is reliable: This source is reliable because its coming straight from the
United States Department of Agriculture and the Agriculture Research Service. It gives
Honey Bee research information and staff to contact for more information.
Source 5:
Ellis, James D., and C.M. Zettel Nalen. "Varroa Mite - Varroa Destructor Anderson and
Trueman." Varroa Mite - Varroa Destructor Anderson and Trueman. N.p., June 2010. Web.
07 Sept. 2014.

Description: This article gives detailed information about the Varroa mite which is a huge
problem in the bee industry, including our bee hives. It talks about their life cycle, what they
like to eat, how they migrate, and their effect on the economy. The article also provides
pictures and how to spot them, where they are distributed, and ideas on traps to catch
them.
Why this article is useful: This source is useful because it gives every bit of detail readers
would need to know about mites from their life cycle and what they prefer to eat, to how to
catch them. This article alone gives enough information about mites there is no need to do
any other research from another article.
Why this article is reliable: This source is reliable because it gives accurate information as
well as references to the information. The article gives the authors names, publication
number and dates as well as information on the authors from the University of Florida.

Похожие интересы