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Running head: USING STAGES OF CONCERN TO CREATE AN ACTION PLAN

Using Stages of Concern to Create and Action Plan


Jennifer McCoy
OTL-505-1 Educational Systems and Change
Colorado State University Global Campus
Dr. Jim Brown
December 12, 2014

USING STAGES OF CONCERN TO CREATE AN ACTION PLAN

Using Stages of Concern to Create an Action Plan


In this assignment we were asked to create an effective Stages of Concern questionnaire
based on our reading from the text, Implementing Change Through Learning by Shirley Hord
and James Roussin. We were to use this survey to summarize how we would score the results
and synthesize the information to create a Stages of Concern profile. From this profile, a plan of
action including possible interventions as well as concerns mitigation would result.
Stages of Concern Questionnaire
The Stages of Concern Questionnaire focuses on a current change at our school site. Our
teaching model is shifting from a traditional teacher focused instruction model to a student
centered one using the methods outlined by the International Baccalaureate Organization
Primary Years Program. Teachers will be asked to fill out the survey found at the below URL,
reflecting their stages of concern regarding the use of the IB PYP pedagogy.
Access to survey found on Google Form:
https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1o1w1naOPfsd35NfDH8BdPyk8e4ahg9FeoJKDvvZELWQ/vie
wform?usp=send_form
Scoring Survey Summary
The survey is designed to measure both the degree of the concern as well as to categorize
the concerns in order to create interventions allowing for a successful progression of the student
focused initiative. Hord and Roussin state, When individuals feel that their reaction and
feelings are seen and heard, and that the individual is valued, their enthusiasm and energy
committed to implementation escalates (Hord & Roussin, 2013). Results of this survey are
organized into effectiveness categories and personalized by using an individualized survey

USING STAGES OF CONCERN TO CREATE AN ACTION PLAN

technique. The Southeast Educational Development Laboratory states, The results of the data
collection indicate where staff members fall within the seven stages and provide a snapshot of
their concerns so that leaders can address them. Follow-up actions may include providing
additional information about the research behind a new program or offering how-to supports and
coaching (SEDL, 2014).
Create Individual Innovator Profile
With the results of the survey, organized by the seven Stages of Concern, leadership can
identify innovators need for support and create a profile of each participant in order to move
everyone toward successful change implementation. This profile will identify [p]eople who are
in the earlier stages of a change process will likely have more self-focused concerns, such as
worries about whether they can learn a new program or how it will affect their job performance.
As individuals become more comfortable with and skilled in using an innovation, their concerns
shift to focus on broader impacts, such as how the initiative will affect their students or their
working relationships with colleagues (SEDL, 2014).
Action Plan for Inventions
Based on the results of the survey action can be taken to address concerns starting first
with those innovators who are categorized as unconcerned, or unrelated and self-concerned.
Individual interviews conducted by leadership coupled with direct answers to specific questions
these teachers have would be an effective mitigation to those who profile in these categories.
This action invites implementers into a conversation about their teams SoC data so that they
generate ideas for the groups support, thus increasing the pool of collegial facilators (Hord &
Roussin, 2013).

USING STAGES OF CONCERN TO CREATE AN ACTION PLAN

Mitigation for teachers who profile in the self or task categories could be recommended
further professional development opportunities or perhaps use paid time to observe the IB
program in classroom where teachers are profiled in the impact stage of innovation. Using the
questionnaire results can accurately determine the degree to which this particular method of
professional development prepares teachers to utilize the IB teaching model or inquirybased
instruction. The notion that professional development can improve teaching methods is not
unconventional; the majority of efforts to reform schools utilize professional development as a
means to implement change (Shoulders & Myers, 2011).
Conclusion
Using the Stages of Concern outlined by Hord and Roussin is an efficient way to address
issues impeding or advancing change. This method takes into account that change is
implemented by a diverse collection facilitators with wide ranging emotion and concern. If
getting all players across the innovation bridge is our goal, then using data to pinpoint concerns
among individuals seems the most efficient way to accomplish it.

USING STAGES OF CONCERN TO CREATE AN ACTION PLAN


References
Hord, S. & Roussin, J. (2013). Implementing change through learning. Corwin & Learning
Forward
Shoulders. C & Myers, B. (2011). An analysis of national agriscience teacher ambassadors
stages of concern regarding inquiry based instruction. University of Florida
Southeast Educational Development Laboratory, SEDL. (2014). Stages of concern. Retrieved
from http://www.sedl.org/cbam/stages_of_concern.html
George, A. A., Hall, G. E., & Stiegelbauer, S. M. (2006). Measuring implementation in schools:
The Stages of Concern Questionnaire. Austin, TX: SEDL. Retrieved from
http://www.sedl.org/pubs/catalog/items/cbam17.html