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Works Cited

Primary Sources
Abramskii, L.P. "Lu. Ganf: Kulak Cunning." Seventeen Moments in Soviet History: Liquidation of the
Kulaks as a Class. N.p., n.d. Web. 30 Dec. 2014.
This document is propaganda, in the form of a comic strip that promotes "dekulakization." It encourages
the cheating, slaying, and smiting of kulaks in order to acquire and retain the Soviet regime.
A Picture of Tractors on a Collective Farm. 1930-1940. Russia. Web. 30 Dec. 2014. <wikispaces.com>.
This is an image demonstrating the collective farms that had overwhelmed the sceneries of the USSR, at
this time.
Central Committee [TsK] of the All-Union Communist Party (Bolsheviks). Memorandum on forced
collectivization of livestock. Resolution of the Central Committee [TsK] of the All-Union
Communist Party (Bolsheviks). 26 Mar. 1932. Raw data. N.p.
This document condemns the practice of forced collectivization in regards to livestock, claiming that it is
a "violation" of Stalin's directives, itself.
Duranty, Walter. British Embassy Report. Rep. N.p.: n.p., 1932. Spartacus-educational.com. Spartacus
Educational Publishers. Web.
It documents the devastation caused by Stalins inept Five Year Plans within Ukraine, especially
centralizing on the rapid rate of depopulation.
Russia. Former Head of Government of the Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic and of the
Soviet Union. Hanging Order P.1 and P.2. By Vladimir Lenin. Penza: n.p., 1918. Print.
This document is an order from Lenin to communists, in which he demands the public hanging of at least
100 kulaks and the confiscation of their grain, to set an example.
SETTING UP A NEWSPAPER ON A SOVIET COLLECTIVE. 1930-1940. Kiev. Eon Images. Web. 30
Dec. 2014.
This is an image that serves as a representation of the process and appearance of Stalin's collectivization.
Stalin, Joseph V. "On Soviet Industrialization. Speech to Industrial Managers." Feb. 1931. Web.
<"http://academic.shu.edu/russianhistory/index.php/Stalin_on_Rapid_Industrialization">.
Stalins speech demonstrates his motives for pursuing the Five Year Plansa desire to quickly
industrialize Russia and transform it into one of Europes greatest powers.
The Bolsheviks. "Smite the Kulak." The First Five Year Plan and Stalins Move to Collectivise. N.p., n.d.
Web. 30 Dec. 2014. <http://blogs.lt.vt.edu/wilkins/2013/10/07/12/>.

This document is a propaganda, in the form of an illustration, that promotes Stalin's practice of
dekulakization".

Secondary Sources
"Collectivization and Industrialization." Collectivization and Industrialization. N.p., n.d. Web. 30 Dec.
2014. <http://www.loc.gov/exhibits/archives/coll.html>.
This focuses on Stalin's attempt to industrialize Russia through the procurement of grains; it also
elaborates upon the introduction of collectivization as well as the harassment of the Kulaks.
Colley, Nigel. "Political Propaganda Posters." Enemies of the 5-Year Plan, by Victor Deni and Demyan
Bedny 1931 from the Gareth Jones Collection. N.p., n.d. Web. 05 Jan. 2015.
This document is propaganda, in the form of an image that promotes "dekulakization." It categorizes
kulaks, clergy men, and drunkards to be enemies of the Five Year Plans.
Crowl, James William. Angels in Stalin's Paradise: Western Reporters in Soviet Russia, 1917 to 1937, a
Case Study of Louis Fischer and Walter Duranty. Washington, D.C.: U of America, 1982. Print.
Angels in Stalins Paradise examines the oppressive and tyrannical rule of Stalin, especially in
application to the peasantry and farmers. It discusses both the catalysts as well as the impact of the
Ukrainian Genocide.
Deutscher, Issac. Stalin: A Political Biography. New York: Vintage ., 1949. Print.
This provides a general overview on the life and legacy of Joseph Stalin, emphasizing most dominantly
on his leadership of the USSR.
Finn, Peter. "Aftermath of a Soviet Famine." Washington Post. The Washington Post, 27 Apr. 2008. Web.
02 Jan. 2015.
This discusses the importance of the Ukrainian Genocide, in terms of understanding present day tensions
between Russia and Ukraine.
Gregorovich, Andrew. "BLACK FAMINE IN UKRAINE 1932-33." InfoUkes: Ukrainian History. N.p.,
n.d. Web. 31 Dec. 2014.
This discusses, at great length, the catalysts and the impacts of the Ukrainian Genocide, classifying it as
the "strangest form of war"; it includes a confession made by Stalin to Winston Churchill, in which he
discusses the mass depopulation that occurred due to his forced famine.
Gregorovich, Andrew. "Genocide in Ukraine 1933." Ontario, Hamilton. 14 Nov. 1998. Genocide in
Ukraine 1933. Web. 02 Jan. 2015.
This, primarily, discusses the devastation caused by the Ukrainian Genocide and emphasizes that its
effects were long-lasting, especially in matters of the destruction of climate/soil and depopulation.

"Joseph Stalin." History.com. A&E Television Networks, n.d. Web. 27 Dec. 2014.
<http://www.history.com/topics/joseph-stalin>.
This provides a general overview of Stalin's life, discussing upon his early years, rise to power, and the
legacy he has left behind.
Lyons, Eugene. Assignment in Utopia. New York: Harcourt, Brace, 1937. Print.
This is from the perspective of Lyons, a communist, who records and observes the USSR and its' policies-most notably, the Five Year Plans. Lyons concludes, reluctantly, that the Soviet experiment was
misfired, and proved to be more destructive than "idealistic."
Makuch, Andrij, and Vasyl Markus. "Famine-Genocide of 19323." Famine-Genocide of 19323. N.p.,
2009. Web. 02 Jan. 2015.
This article is from the perspective of Barchuk, a native Ukrainian, who discusses the Ukrainian Genocide
at great length, while implementing the memories of his ancestors who were present throughout it.
"Memories of Ukraine's Silent Massacre." BBC News. N.p., n.d. Web. 16 Oct. 2014.
This discusses the devastation of the Ukrainian Genocide through statistics and factual statements as well
as the personal account of Nina Karpenko--a firsthand witness of the Holodomor.
Moss, Walter G. Since 1855. Vol. 11. Boston, Mass.: McGraw Hill, 1997. Print.
This book provides an insight into the history of Russia, ranging from 1855 to the "modern era." Moss'
account explores aspects of culture as well as politics, and thus discusses Stalin's regime and Five Year
Plans.
Piggott, Mark. "Ukraine Commemorates Millions Who Died in Stalin's Holodomor Reign of
Terror." International Business Times RSS. N.p., n.d. Web. 02 Jan. 2015.
This article elaborates upon Ukraines remembrance of the Holodomor, by discussing the
commemoration ceremony that was held in honor of the victims as well as the establishment of an official
Holodomor Memorial Day.
Porloff, James. "Holodomor: The Secret Holocaust in Ukraine." Holodomor: The Secret Holocaust in
Ukraine. N.p., 05 Feb. 2009. Web. 01 Jan. 2015.
This provides an overview of the Ukrainian Genocide, emphasizing on its secretive nature, in the sense
that the majority of the public were left unaware of the genocide, as a whole.
Rewa, Kyrylo Daniel. "Famine Genocide In Ukraine, 1932-1933 - Kyrylo Daniel Rewa." Famine
Genocide In Ukraine, 1932-1933 - Kyrylo Daniel Rewa. N.p., 2003. Web. 02 Jan. 2015.
This discusses the tragic history behind the Ukrainian Genocide and serves as a "portal" to information
about its' relevance to current events.
"Spartacus Educational." Spartacus Educational. N.p., n.d. Web. 16 Oct. 2014.

Spartacus Education provides a general over-view of Stalin's regime, glossing over his Five Year Plans
and the subsequent Ukrainian Genocide, while implementing a variety of primary sources throughout.
"The History Place - Genocide in the 20th Century: Stalin's Forced Famine 1932-33." The History Place Genocide in the 20th Century: Stalin's Forced Famine 1932-33. N.p., n.d. Web. 14 Oct. 2014.
This focuses fundamentally on the Ukrainian Silent Genocide, mentioning the catalysts but focusing,
fundamentally, on its' destructive and degenerating impacts.
"The History Place - Genocide in the 20th Century: Stalin's Forced Famine 1932-33." The History Place Genocide in the 20th Century: Stalin's Forced Famine 1932-33. The History Place, 2000. Web.
31 Dec. 2014.
This discusses the Ukrainian Genocide at great length, especially emphasizing on the destruction of the
kulaks clan, the mass depopulation, and the lack of response by Western nations, who had become fully
aware of the circumstances.
"The New York Times--Walter Duranty----Denial of the Holodomor--Ukraine Famine Genocide-Videos." Pronk Palisades. N.p., 22 Apr. 2012. Web. 02 Jan. 2015.
This discusses how Walter Duranty, in a feat similar to numerous journalists and newspapers of this time,
undermined and understated the Holodomor, claiming that it was not a genocide or by nature,
destructive.
, . "Mapping the Holodomor/Great Famine in Ukraine."Scribd. Scribd Inc., n.d. Web. 02
Jan. 2015.
This account provides a "reconstruction" of the history behind the Great Famine, with an emphasis placed
on examining the accounts of survivors and first-hand witnesses.
"Ukraine Profile - Timeline." BBC News. N.p., n.d. Web. 30 Dec. 2014. <http://m.bbc.com/news/worldeurope-18010123>.
"Ukraine Profile" provides an outlook in Ukrainian history, discussing crucial events as well as listing
factual statements.
Waldon, Steve. "Www.theage.com.au." Ukraine's Harvest of Sorrow. N.p., 8 Mar. 2008. Web. 02 Jan.
2015.
This discusses former Ukrainian president Yushchenko's successful attempts to commemorate the
Ukrainian Genocide, and then delves into the historical background of soviet collectivization and the
subsequent Great Famine.
"Welcome to Ukraine." Welcome to Ukraine. Http://www.htd.kiev.ua/, n.d. Web. 05 Jan. 2015.
This provides an outlook on Ukraine as a whole, describing its political background, climate patterns,
cultural traditions, and geographical location.
Yushchenko, Victor. "Holodomor." Official Web-site of President of Ukraine. N.p., 27 Nov. 2007. Web.
02 Jan. 2015.

This demonstrates another commemoration of the Holodomor, as Yushchenko focalized on its'


importance in both history and current-day affairs, at a great length.
Zaretsky, Victor. Great Famine in Ukraine. 1932-33. Kyiv, Ukraine. Welcome to Ukraine.
Http://www.htd.kiev.ua/. Web.
This demonstrates a number of works composed by artists that are either dedicated to/draw inspiration
from the Ukrainian Genocide. A common element among many of these pieces, are their shared themes of
death, depression, and starvation.