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WRTG

1150: First-Year Writing and Rhetoric



Spring 2014

It is absurd to hold that a man should be ashamed of an inability to defend himself with his limbs,
but not ashamed of an inability to defend himself with speech and reason; for the use of rational speech
is more distinctive of a human being than the use of his limbs.





- Aristotle, Rhetoric


Instructor: Marisa McNatt












Office: ENVD 1B50-C
Sections: 076 & 081
Office Hours: Tues., 2:30 4:30 p.m. (or by appt)
Time: Tues/Thurs; 076: 11:00 - 12:15 p.m.; 081: 12:30 - 1:45

Office Phone: 303.735.4671
Location: ECCR 1B08








Email: marisa.mcnatt@colorado.edu

Course Website: www.wrtg1150mcnatt.weebly.com (Before emailing me with questions, please visit the course website for assignments, updates, and other general info.)


Course Overview


As part of the Program for Writing and Rhetoric (PWR), the center for writing instruction at the University of Colorado-Boulder, WRTG 1150 teaches you to write and
engage in rhetoric, or the art of persuasion, in a variety of contexts from academic, to civic, to professional, to personal. The above quote from Aristotle suggests that your
ability to rationally use speech to defend yourself is, in part, what distinguishes you from other animals. This course is designed to teach you how to ethically take
advantage of this unique feature of yourself as a human being, whether writing an academic paper, cover letter, tweet, or delivering a speech. Well also cover the writing
process, a process you can apply to any of your writing assignments during your time at CU and beyond.

Further, learning and studying the art of writing and rhetoric goes beyond academic and professional success. The more you understand the writing process, how
successful texts and compositions are constructed, the power of language and words and the art of persuasion, the more you understand and perceive the world around
you, and in turn, understand yourself. This is in-and-of-itself is enriching. More specifically, in this course, you will learn various writing tools and the art of rhetoric
through class discussions, lectures, peer reviews, as well as multiple drafts and revision. You will read and reflect on texts and the use of rhetoric in a variety of genres.
You will use the writing and rhetorical tools that you learn from other writers and rhetoricians, including your peers, in your own narrative, rhetorical analysis, persuasive
and research pieces. The outcome will be a personal and substantial WRTG 1150 writing portfolio. Moreover, this course will enable you to become a more reflective,
active, and effective student and citizen during your time at CU and beyond. You will not only learn how to be a stronger writer and rhetorician, but you will also learn,
more importantly, how to make a stronger contribution to culture and society.

Course Materials


Knowing Words: A Guide to First-Year Writing and Rhetoric, Fall 2014- Spring 2015 Eleventh Edition, University of Colorado-Boulder

- This is the Program for Writing and Rhetorics custom text. It introduces you to the course goals/objectives, key rhetorical concepts and provides

student-writing samples.

Notepad or journal (please bring to each class)

Printer access (either a personal printer and/or access to the Universitys printers)

Access to your colorado.edu account (course updates will be sent via email as needed). If you have any questions that cant be answered on the course website,
or you need to schedule a time to meet, please contact me via email. However, I will not answer emails on the same day sent after 5:30 p.m. (unless an
emergency). If an email is sent after 5:30 p.m., you can expect to hear back from me the following day.

Course website: www.wrtg1150mcnatt.weebly.com

Major Assignments



1) Autoethnography/Personal Narrative (3 4 pages)

- You will explore a significant moment in your life that created a shift, or turning point in your thinking, beliefs, and/or sense of self

2) Rhetorical Analysis (3 4 pages)

- You will analyze the strategies the author(s) uses to persuade his or her audience of something

3) Persuasive Essay & Annotated Bibliography (5-6 pages, not including the annotated bibliography)

- Using the rhetorical devices weve learned throughout the semester, as well as thorough research, you will write your own persuasive piece

4) Research Proposal & Annotated Bibliography (45 pages)

- Based on preliminary research / your annotated bibliography, you will write a research proposal (not a research paper) on a topic of your choice

5) Final Project & Presentation (10 - 12 pages, not including sources)
rd

- You will write a final paper that builds on one of your previous major assignments & prepare a 10 minute presentation; Final Paper DUE: April 23

* On-time assignments will be graded. However, I reserve the right not to accept late assignments that have no documented reason for being late. If I do accept your late
assignment, your grade will drop a set number of points for each day it is overdue. You will receive a grade only on the final draft of each assignment, but you will be earning points
as we work on each stage of the assignment. * I will ask you to print the major assignments, including the rough, second, and final drafts. In addition to ensuring that your
assignment is completed on time, make sure that you are able to print AND staple it before class on the day its due, or points will be subtracted.

Grading Scale

Your grade for the course will be determined according to the following scale:

Autoethnography/Personal Narrative
Rhetorical Analysis
Annotated Bibliography & Persuasive Essay
Annotated Bibliography & Research Proposal
Final Project & Presentation
Library Tutorials (RIOT)
Homework
Rough Drafts for Major Assignments
Attendance, In-Class Discussions, & Presentations
Peer Reviews

TOTAL

A = 920 1000 A- = 900 919
B+ = 870 899 B = 820 869 B- = 800 - 819
C+ = 770 799 C = 720 769 C- = 700 719
D = 600 699

Additional Support

The Writing Center Highly Recommended!


This is a fantastic resource to get additional help with your writing. The Writing Center
provides excellent one-on-one advice to consultants at all stages of the writing
process. Services are free to all CU-Boulder students.
Location: Norlin Commons (Norlin E111)
You need to make an appointment before you go. In other words, you cant
just show up. They get booked early, so sign up for your appointment well
ahead of time.
Contact: P: (303) 735-6906; E: wrtghelp@colorado.edu
For more info., visit: http://www.colorado.edu/pwr/writingcenter.html


100
100
100
100
230
60
110
60
100
40

Total Points: 1000

Course Policies

Attendance Policy

Attending class is critical for strengthening and improving your writing and rhetorical skills. Essential components of this course include lectures, writing
workshops, and classroom discussions where youll have the opportunity to work with other writers your peers. Each person contributes his or her own unique
perspectives and experiences, enriching peer reviews and class discussions. Attendance not only shows that youve made the effort to be here, but its also
important for the singular contribution you can make to this class. In short, your presence is valued.

That being said, if you miss more than three classes, your final grade will drop by half a letter grade, i.e., if your grade is a B and you miss more than three classes,
you will receive a B-. This may seem harsh, but the reasoning is simple if you are absent more than three times, you have missed a significant amount of the
course material and it will be difficult for you to achieve the goals of this course. Of course, there are always exceptions. If you have a valid reason for being
absent for more than three class periods, you must contact me and we can discuss the situation during my office hours or by appointment; however, if you are
absent, you cannot make up in-class work for the class period you missed. Finally, if you know you will be absent (for a valid reason, of course), please email me
ahead of time. If you know you will be absent several weeks in advance, for example, for a wedding, a family reunion, etc., please email me immediately. In
general, for any professional notification or request, the usual protocol is to send a notification or inquiry at least two weeks in advance.


Technology In-Class Policy


There will be no cell phone or smartphone, laptop or other technology use during the class period unless I give you permission, generally, for the purposes of
completing an in-class assignment. Studies have shown that student performance is correlated with cell phone use, where regular cell phone use in class is shown
to negatively affect students grades. Also, other students are distracted when youre texting, on Facebook, etc.
* The first time I observe you using your cell phone, laptop, etc. when class permission has not been given, Ill give you a warning.
* The second time I observe you using your cell phone, laptop, etc. when class permission has not been given during that same class period, Ill ask you to leave
class. This will count toward one of your permissible three class absences.


Plagiarism Policy

Its important that you develop and strengthen your own writing skills for this course to do that, you need to do your own work.
* If I discover that you have plagiarized any part of a paper, you will receive an F for that paper.
* If 50 percent or more of a paper is plagiarized, for example, an essay downloaded from the Web or if somebody else writes half or more of your paper for you,
you will flunk the course.
* I will report anyone who has plagiarized, or participated in any of the above violations, whether he or she flunks the course or not, to CUs Honor Code Council.

First Year Writing and Rhetoric: Goals & Objectives


develop rhetorical knowledge, making informed choices as you adapt your writing to the needs of your audience, to a specific context, and for a
particular purpose.
refine and reflect on your writing process, using multiple strategies to generate ideas, draft, revise, and edit your writing across a variety of genres.
develop your information literacy, making critical choices as you identify a specific research need, locate and evaluate information and sources, and draw
connections among your own and others' ideas in their writing.
analyze texts in a variety of genres, understanding and evaluating them through study of the writers choices and the texts meaning and effects.
construct effective and ethical arguments, using appropriate reasons and evidence to support your positions while responding to multiple points of view.
understand and apply language conventions rhetorically, including proper grammar, spelling, punctuation and format.


Meeting Colorado Commission on Higher Education Standards

These six goals mentioned above express the PWRs commitment to preparing you for the kinds of reading and writing you will perform in this class and others.
They also fulfill the course criteria given to all state institutions by the Colorado Commission on Higher Education, the governmental body that contributes to the
policies for college education in Colorado. In other words, this writing class is not just about what your writing teacher here at CU thinks is important. Its about
deepening your skills in rhetorical knowledge, writing processes, and language conventions so that you can write effectively for a variety of audiences in a variety
of situations both inside and outside the classroom.

CU Policies
Disability Accommodations
If you qualify for accommodations because of a disability, please submit to me a letter from Disability Services in a timely manner so that your needs can be
addressed. Disability Services determines accommodations based on documented disabilities. Contact: 303-492-8671, Center for Community N200, and
www.colorado.edu/disabilityservices/. If you have a temporary medical condition or injury, see guidelines on the Disability Services website and discuss your
needs with me.

Religious Observances
Campus policy regarding religious observances requires that faculty make every effort to reasonably and fairly deal with all students who, because of religious
obligations, have conflicts with scheduled exams, assignments or required attendance. Please e-mail me or visit me in office hours to notify me of such a situation
at least 2 weeks before the event. For more information about CU religious observance policies: www.colorado.edu/policies/fac_relig.html.

Classroom Behavior
Students and faculty each have responsibility for maintaining an appropriate learning environment. Students who fail to adhere to such behavioral standards may
be subject to discipline. Faculty have the professional responsibility to treat all students with understanding, dignity and respect, to guide classroom discussion
and to set reasonable limits on the manner in which they and their students express opinions. Professional courtesy and sensitivity are especially important with

respect to individuals and topics dealing with differences of race, culture, religion, politics, sexual orientation, gender variance, and nationalities. Class rosters are
provided to the instructor with the student's legal name. I will gladly honor your request to address you by an alternate name or gender pronoun. Please advise
me of this preference early in the semester so that I may make appropriate changes to my records. See polices at www.colorado.edu/policies/classbehavior.html
and www.colorado.edu/studentaffairs/judicialaffairs/code.html#student_code.

Discrimination and Harassment
The University of Colorado Boulder (CU-Boulder) is committed to maintaining a positive learning, working, and living environment. The University of Colorado does
not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age, disability, creed, religion, sexual orientation, or veteran status in admission and access to, and
treatment and employment in, its educational programs and activities. Individuals who believe they have been discriminated against should contact the Office of
Discrimination and Harassment (ODH) at 303-492-2127 or the Office of Student Conduct (OSC) at 303-492-5550. For more information:
http://www.colorado.edu/odh

Honor Code
All students of the University of Colorado at Boulder are responsible for knowing and adhering to the academic integrity policy of this institution. Violations of this
policy may include: cheating, plagiarism, aid of academic dishonesty, fabrication, lying, bribery, and threatening behavior. All incidents of academic misconduct
shall be reported to the Honor Code Council. Students who are found to be in violation of the academic integrity policy will be subject to both academic sanctions
from the faculty member and non-academic sanctions (including but not limited to university probation, suspension, or expulsion). More information on the
Honor Code: www.colorado.edu/policies/honor.html & www.colorado.edu/academics/honorcode.












Daily Schedule & Assignments For January 13 April 30


The following schedule is an overview of what we will cover in class. It may be subject to change. I will inform you of any changes in class. Further instructions and
details on the assignments are provided in class and posted on the course website: www.wrtg1150mcnatt.weebly.com

WEEK 1

Jan. 13
In Class: Introduction to WRTG 1150 and each other

Due: (no assignment due)

Assignment: (1) Personal letter (2) Gather course materials

Jan. 15
In Class: (1) Writing to Discover (2) The writing process: habits of mind for effective writing (3) Introduction to rhetoric & rhetorical writing situations

Due: (1) Personal letter (2) Course materials

Assignment: (1) Read Knowing Words, Chap. 1, determine four main points from the chapter, and summarize each point in three to four paragraphs

WEEK 2

Jan. 20
In Class: (1) Review rhetorical situations & the writing process (2) Introduce analyzing texts (3) Introduce Personal Narrative, Autoethnography, and the Personal
Narrative / Autoethnography Assignment

Due: Four main points from Knowing Words, Chap. 1

Assignment: Read and answer assigned reading questions for: Buckeye (by Scott Russell Sanders); Telling a Story: The Incidental Revelation (by Ross Talarico);
student essays in Knowing Words, Cultural Chameleon and Finding Pretty (2) Complete at least two freewrites for your Personal Narrative (see further
guidelines on the course website for both assignments)

Jan. 22
In Class: (1) Class discussion on assigned readings (2) Introduce writing techniques for the Personal Narrative / Autoethnography

Due: (1) Answers to assigned reading questions (2) Personal Narrative / Autoethnography freewrites

Assignment: (1) Complete the Rough Draft of Personal Narrative / Autoethnography (2) Read Knowing Words, Chap. 7: answer question 2, found at the end of
the chapter (write a paragraph answer to turn in) (3) Take notes on common myths about workshops & revision for class discussion (notes will not be collected)

WEEK 3

Jan. 27
In Class: (1) Review the peer review process (2) In-class peer reviews of the rough draft of the Personal narrative / Autoethnography

Due: (1) Rough Draft of Personal Narrative / Autoethnography (2) Answer to question 2, found at the end of Chap. 7, Knowing Words (3) Notes on common
myths about workshops and revision (for class discussion)

Assignment: (1) Complete Second Draft of the Personal Narrative / Autoethnography (2) Read Knowing Words, Chap. 2: In your own words, explain and describe
critical inquiry (write a paragraph answer to turn in)

Jan. 29
In Class: (1) Introduce the paper grading process (2) Review critical inquiry (3) Watch a segment of the documentary Soul Food (incorporates autoethnography
elements)

Due: (1) Second Draft of Personal Narrative / Autoethnography (2) Explanation and description of critical inquiry, based on reading Chap. 2, Knowing Words

Assignment: Read Knowing Words, Chap. 4 and answer question 1, found at the end of the chapter (write a paragraph answer to turn in)

WEEK 4

Feb. 3
In Class: (1) Review Chap. 4 in Knowing Words and answers to question 1 (2) Introduction to the history of rhetoric and rhetorical appeals

Due: Answers to question 1, found at the end of Chap. 4, Knowing Words

Assignment: (1) Find a text to rhetorically analyze & answer accompanying questions (see guidelines on course website) (2) Complete the Final Draft of your
Personal Narrative/Autoethnography





Feb. 5
In Class: (1) Introduce Rhetorical Analysis Essay (2) Review Rhetorical Analysis examples (3) Rhetorical Analysis Group Presentation

Due: (1) Text to rhetorically analyze & accompanying questions (2) Final Draft of your Personal Narrative / Autoethnography

Assignment: (1) Read Martin Luther King Jr.s Letter from Birmingham Jail and answer the following questions: Is Kings letter persuasive? Why, or why not?
(provide four reasons) (2) Read The Public Letter as Rhetorical Form: Structure, Logic and Style in Kings Letter from Birmingham Jail and in a paragraph, determine
and describe four main points from this piece (3) In your notebook, or journal, complete at least two freewrites for the Rhetorical Analysis Essay

WEEK 5

Feb. 10
In Class: Rhetorical analysis of a text: Martin Luther King Jr.s Letter from Birmingham Jail

Due: (1) Answers to Letter from Birmingham Jail questions (2) Four main points from The Public Letter as Rhetorical Form: Structure, Logic and Style in Kings Letter
from Birmingham Jail (3) Two freewrites for the Rhetorical Analysis Essay

Assignment: Complete the Rough Draft of the Rhetorical Analysis Essay

Feb. 12
In Class: (1) Review paraphrasing, summarizing, plagiarism, and incorporating quotes (2) In-class peer reviews of the rough draft of the Rhetorical Analysis Assay

Due: Rough Draft of the Rhetorical Analysis Essay

Assignment: Complete the Second Draft of the Rhetorical Analysis Essay

WEEK 6

Feb. 17
In Class: Documentary viewing: Food Inc. & answer accompanying questions to turn in that class period

Due: Second Draft of the Rhetorical Analysis Essay

Assignment: No assignment


Feb. 19
In Class: (1) Introduction to argument (2) Analyze the argument made in Food Inc. and other readings

Due: No assignment due

Assignment: Create a list of three issues you and others you know care about. For each, state precisely what the issue is and your stance on the issue.

WEEK 7

Feb. 24
In Class: (1) Review argument and additional considerations (2) Introduce constructing & researching counterclaims, or other perspectives (3) Introduce the
Annotated Bibliography (4) In-class activity on constructing an argument

Due: Three issues you and other you know care about and your stance on each issue

Assignment: (1) Find five sources for the Persuasive Essay annotated bibliography (see details on the course website) (2) Begin working on Final Draft of Rhetorical
Analysis Assignment

Feb. 26
In Class: (1) Introduce the Persuasive Essay assignment (2) Introduce how to write a Persuasive Essay introduction (3) Sign up for conferences (4) Introduce the
RIOT tutorials

Due: (1) Five sources for the Persuasive Essay Annotated Bibliography

Assignment: (1) Complete Final Draft of the Rhetorical Analysis (2) Begin preparing a short presentation on your Persuasive Essay topic that includes your primary
claim and three supporting premises (3) Begin working on the Rough Draft of your Persuasive Essay (4) Begin working on RIOT tutorials #1 - #3 (RIOT tutorials #1 -
th
#3 are due by the beginning of class on Tuesday, March 10 )
WEEK 8

March 3 & 5
In Class: No Class conferences

rd
th
Due: Final Draft of the Rhetorical Analysis due the day of your conference (March 3 or March 5 )

Assignment: (1) Continue working on the Rough Draft of the Persuasive Essay (2) Complete short presentation on your Persuasive Essay topic that includes your
primary claim and three supporting premises (3) Complete RIOT tutorials #1 - #3

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WEEK 9

March 10
In Class: (1) In-class activity and presentation on constructing a claim, supported by reasons and evidence, and giving time to the counterclaims

Due: (1) Short presentation on your Persuasive Essay topic that includes your primary claim and three supporting claims (2) RIOT tutorials #1 - #3 (completed)

Assignment: (1) Complete Rough Draft of the Persuasive Essay

March 12
In Class: (1) In-class peer reviews of the Persuasive Essay

Due: (1) Rough draft of the Persuasive Essay

th
Assignment: (1) Determine and briefly describe three topics, or more that youre interested in researching for the Library seminar on Tues., March 17 (2) Begin
th
th
working on the Final Draft of the Persuasive Essay (due by class on Thursday, March 19 ) (3) Work on RIOT tutorials #4 & #5 (due by class on Thursday, March 19 )

WEEK 10

March 17
In Class: Library seminar (meet in the Norlin Library, details announced in class & posted on the course website)

Due: (1) Three topics youre interested in researching (please turn in a hard copy at the library seminar)

Assignment: (1) Complete Final Draft of Persuasive Essay (2) Complete RIOT tutorials #4 & #5

March 19
In Class: (1) Introduce the differences between a research report and research paper, finding & posing a researchable question & drafting a research proposal

Due: (1) Final Draft of the Persuasive Essay (2) RIOT tutorials #4 & #5

Assignment: Determine three potential topics for the Research Proposal & Annotated Bibliography assignment and draft two potential research questions for each

WEEK 11

March 24 & 26
rd
th
* No class, Spring Break, Campus Closed from Monday, March 23 Friday, March 27

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WEEK 12

March 31
In Class: (1) Review the Research Proposal & Annotated Bibliography assignment (2) Review MLA and APA through in-class research and presentation (4) Review
research & citation methods

Due: Three potential topics for the Research Proposal & Annotated Bibliography assignment and two potential research questions for each

Assignment: Complete Rough Draft of the Research Proposal & Annotated Bibliography assignment

April 2
In Class: (1) Introduce the Final Project (2) Peer review of Research Proposal & Annotated Bibliography

Due: Rough Draft of the Research Proposal & Annotated Bibliography

Assignment: (1) Complete Final Draft of the Research Proposal & Annotated Bibliography (2) Begin working on the Final Paper

WEEK 13

April 7
In Class: Guest lecture (to be announced)

Due: Final Draft of the Research Proposal & Annotated Bibliography

Assignment: (1) Research how to give successful presentations & three tips for delivering an effective/successful presentation (2) Write a 30-second elevator pitch
on your Final Paper to practice presenting in front of the class (3) Continue working on the Final Paper

April 9
In Class: (1) How to create an effective title (2) Introduce how to deliver an effective presentation (3) Elevator-pitch presentations

Due: (1) Three tips for delivering an effective/successful presentation (2) 30-second elevator pitch on your final paper to practice presenting in front of the class

Assignment: (1) Complete Rough Draft of the Final Paper (2) Work on the Final Presentation



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WEEK 14

April 14
In Class: (1) Peer review of the Final Paper

Due: Rough Draft of the Final Paper

Assignment: (1) Continue working on the Final Paper & Presentation

April 16
In Class: (to be announced)

Due: (no assignments due)

Assignment: (1) Continue working on the Final Paper & Presentation
WEEK 15

April 21
In Class: Student Presentations

Due: (no assignments due)

Assignment: (1) COMPLETE FINAL PAPER (2) Prepare for in-class presentation (if you haven't presented)

April 23
In Class: Student Presentations

Due: FINAL PAPER

Assignment: Prepare for in-class presentation (if you haven't presented)





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WEEK 16

April 28
In Class: Student Presentations

Due: (no assignment due)

Assignment: Prepare for in-class presentation (if you haven't presented)
April 30
In Class: Student Presentations

Due: (no assignment due)

Assignment: (no assignment last day of class)




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