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STUDENT

Exhibition
JOURNAL

Name: ________________________________

BCIS Philosophy
BCIS Philosophy

We learn through. . .
Wn
curiosity, seeking understanding and enjoyment of ongoing learning
knowledge developed from world perspectives
academic achievement, physical well being, and personal success
awareness and understanding of global issues
Xng
inquiry and risk-taking in a safe and caring learning environment
creative thought, critical reasoning, and inspired action
exploration of the world
open and respectful communication among students, parents, and staff
Zhng
service to local and global communities
commitment to environmental sustainability
shared responsibility for learning among students, parents, and staff
Xn
respect, cultural understanding and linguistic diversity
appreciation of the unique features of our host country, China
We live by. . .

A spirit of inspiring others, achieving ones goals and creating a better world.

Shared Happiness

IB Learner Profile
The aim of all IB programmes is to develop internationally minded people who,
recognizing their common humanity and shared guardianship of the planet, help to
create a better and more peaceful world.
IB learners strive to be:

Inquirers

They develop their natural curiosity. They acquire the skills necessary to
conduct inquiry and research and show independence in learning. They
actively enjoy learning and this love of learning will be sustained throughout
their lives.

Knowledgeable

They explore concepts, ideas and issues that have local and global
significance. In so doing, they acquire in-depth knowledge and develop
understanding across a broad and balanced range of disciplines.

Thinkers

They exercise initiative in applying thinking skills critically and creatively to


recognize and approach complex problems, and make reasoned, ethical
decisions.

Communicators

Principled

Open-minded

They understand and express ideas and information confidently and


creatively in more than one language and in a variety of modes of
communication. They work effectively and willingly in collaboration with
others.
They act with integrity and honesty, with a strong sense of fairness, justice
and respect for the dignity of the individual, groups and communities. They
take responsibility for their own actions and the consequences that
accompany them.
They understand and appreciate their own cultures and personal histories,
and are open to the perspectives, values and traditions of other individuals
and communities. They are accustomed to seeking and evaluating a range
of points of view, and are willing to grow from the experience.

Caring

They show empathy, compassion and respect towards the needs and
feelings of others. They have a personal commitment to service, and act to
make a positive difference to the lives of others and to the environment.

Risk-takers

They approach unfamiliar situations and uncertainty with courage and


forethought, and have the independence of spirit to explore new roles, ideas
and strategies. They are brave and articulate in defending their beliefs.

Balanced

They understand the importance of intellectual, physical and emotional


balance to achieve personal well-being for themselves and others.

Reflective

They give thoughtful consideration to their own learning and experience.


They are able to assess and understand their strengths and limitations in
order to support their learning and personal development.

page 3

PYP Attitudes
Appreciation

Appreciating the wonder and beauty of the world and its people.

Commitment

Being committed to their own learning, persevering and showing selfdiscipline and responsibility.

Confidence

Feeling confident in their ability as learners, having the courage to take


risks, applying what they have learned and making appropriate decisions
and choices.

Cooperation

Cooperating, collaborating, and leading or following as the situation


demands.

Creativity

Being creative and imaginative in their thinking and in their approach to


problems and dilemmas.

Curiosity

Being curious about the nature of learning, about the world, its people and
cultures.

Empathy

Imagining themselves in anothers situation in order to understand his or her


reasoning and emotions, so as to be open-minded and reflective about the
perspectives of others.

Enthusiasm

Enjoying learning and willingly putting the effort into the process.

Independence

Thinking and acting independently, making their own judgments based on


reasoned argument, and being able to defend their judgments.

Integrity

Being honest and demonstrating a considered sense of fairness.

Respect

Respecting themselves, others and the world around them.

Tolerance

Being sensitive about differences and diversity in the world and being
responsive to the needs of others.

page 4

PYP Exhibition:
Student Guidelines
The exhibition holds a place of special importance in the PYP, and you will be working on it
for some time. Participating in the exhibition will demonstrate your learning in the PYP. The
exhibition will involve others (for example, you may work in a small group or become involved
with an organisation outside the school), and your participation and your work work will be
assessed. Your teacher will assess your planning and learning, including your reflections, the
methods you use, the way you link your exhibition to the transdisciplinary themes and any
forms of action that you engage in as a result. Your teacher or mentor will share with you the
criteria for this assessment.
The development of the exhibition in your school may include the following stages:
1.

Discussing possible real-life issues or problems to be investigated


Issues could be directly connected to your school or local area, and they may also be relevant
to children in other parts of the world. In your group, consider everyone's ideas carefully before
making a final decision.

2.

Who?

First individually and then maybe in small groups, brainstorm issues that
could be investigated and think about what issues you might be passionate
about taking on.

What?

Identifying issues affect children around the world.

When?

Beginning now

Where?

Looking at your personal life, in the community, the city, the country and in
the world.

Why?

By discussing possible issues and finding significant ones to tackle

How?

By being open-minded to listen to others suggestions, by being observant


and by reflecting on your thoughts

Posing questions that help to define the central idea and to decide upon the lines
of inquiry
When the issue has been selected, you will need to have a basic understanding of the issue
and be able to explain why it is important in order to investigate it in more depth. You could
explore the issue further by:
discussing your ideas with different people, both inside and outside school
visiting a local site
identifying and looking at available resources
considering how the issue connects to the transdisciplinary themes
Once you have a better understanding of the issue, develop a central idea to explain the
significance of your inquiry. Thinking about PYP concepts (form, function, causation, change,
connection, perspective, responsibility and reflection) that are related to this issue could help
you construct questions to guide your inquiries.
page 5

It is useful to identify the lines of inquiry you will follow in order to explore your questions and
develop your understanding of the central idea. The central idea, lines of inquiry and questions
will help you to stay focused during this investigation and help you find out about your exhibition
issue.

3.

Who?

You, your group, speaking with your parents, visiting outside organisations

What?

Asking question, investigating

When?

After you picked an issue you are interested in ..

Where?

Inside school - books, magazines, newspapers, people; outside school library, places

Why?

To know more about your issue, to understand it so that you can present it to
teach your audience about your issue, you need to be prepared for it and try
to make a difference

How?

Asking questions and then find answers

Planning the exhibition


Write down ideas for how you will explore and develop your understanding of your central idea
and questions within the defined lines of inquiry.
In your group, ask questions such as:
Where do we find the materials and resources we need?
Who might have useful information?
What kind of experiences might inform our inquiries?
Do we need to carry out any experiments?
Do we need to prepare a questionnaire or survey?
What kind of technology will we need to have access to?
Choose sources and resource materials carefully; by looking at a variety of different sources,
you can improve the quality of your exhibition. When you have found a source of information, it
is important to consider the possible bias of this information and how useful it is going to be.
Who?

Students, teachers, mentors and parents

What?

To think about the tasks that need to be done, plan a timeline so that you
know what needs to be done by a certain date

When?

Starting now, more at the beginning and revisiting plans and make changes
along the way

Where?

At home, with your group at school, and by yourself

Why?

So that you know what you have to do to prepare for your exhibition and so
that the whole task becomes more manageable

How?

Continue to revisit issues and to ask questions

page 6

4.

Gathering the necessary material


Always write down the sources of your material. This information will vary according to the type
of source consulted.
A printed text: record the author(s), title, publisher and date of publication
A website: record the website address
(e.g. http://www.un.org/Pubs/CyberSchoolBus/index.html)
An interview: record the name, address, role of the person and date of the interview
An experiment: record the equipment and method used, the results and conclusions
A work of art: record the title, artist and reference (museum, recording) if appropriate

5.

Who?

All students

What?

Create a bibliography of primary and secondary resources

When?

On a daily basis and whenever you have collected information from different
sources

Where?

Keep everything in one spot, create a bibliography

Why?

Important to reference and acknowledge other peoples ideas

How?

See guidelines on how to create a bibliography

Recording and reflecting


Making regular entries in a journal of all your ideas, decisions and actions to record your
progress as you work on the exhibition can clearly show the work you have been engaged in as
well as how your understanding of the issue is developing. It should be filled in regularly to
show you how your exhibition is progressing. A journal can also be used to show your mentor
the progress being made. These reflections should be supported by recorded evidence of the
process. This evidence could include photographic and video evidence, interview notes,
feedback and comments from your peers, teachers and/or mentors and parents.
Who?

Individual students

What?

Record ideas and thoughts, and reflect on your own thinking

When?

Regularly, throughout the whole process

Where?

In class, in school, at home, whenever you work on every part of the


exhibition

Why?

To have a record of your work, show your thinking and progress, and to
reflect on your feelings

How?

Written, typed or video reflection

page 7

6.

Presenting the exhibition


Towards the end of the exhibition, you will need to think carefully about how you wish to present
the results of your inquiries. You must always consider your presentation from other people's
perspectives.

Be informed about the material you choose to present. You will need to be able to
answer any questions about it confidently.
Discuss the presentation with your teacher and/or your mentor before you start working
on it.
Use diagrams, drawings and/or photographs to add to the clarity of your presentation
Look at the examples of exhibitions that other students have done in your school in the
past. In particular, the formats they have used to present their ideas.
Make sure your presentation is clear, informative and appropriate for a range of
audiences.
And finally, you should celebrate your learning.

Who?

Presenting to students, teachers, parents, and visitors from elsewhere

What?

Presenting and showcasing everything you have done

When?

24th to 26th May (2 days and 1 evening)

Where?

At school: theatre, library, black-box, atrium ....

Why?

To help others learn and to show others what the PYP is about and to
celebrate the end of your PYP education

How?

Using posters, powerpoint presentations, speech, movements, etc.

page 8

Assessment
For the PYP Exhibition, you will be assessed on both the process as well as the product(s).
Specifically, you will be assessed on

whether the issue was appropriately defined.

how and where you collected your information and whether it was
adequate.

the process by which you prepare and complete the Exhibition.

whether the attributes of the Learner Profile, PYP Attitudes and


Transdisciplinary Skills were evident.

the action(s) you have decided to undertake

Assessment Criteria
Information/resources used
You collected and used relevant information from a variety of primary and secondary sources.
Resources for the exhibition are complied in a bibliography.
Achievement Level descriptors:

I did not collect, use or document information from a variety of resources.

I collected few sources of information and resources. I did not use any primary source data, or
most of the resources do not support my exhibition issue. I have a bibliography but many
parts are missing.

I collected a limited amount of useful information from primary and secondary resources. I
have a bibliography but some parts are missing.

I collected and used a good amount of relevant information from primary and secondary
resources. I have a bibliography with most parts included.

My exhibition contains excellent and relevant information and resources from a wide variety
of appropriate primary and secondary sources. I have a bibliography with all parts included.

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Organisation of work
My work throughout the exhibition is organised and presented in a clear manner.
Achievement Level descriptors:

My work throughout the exhibition is not organised or presented in a clear manner.

My exhibition work is poorly organised and doesn't make sense. My work is missing several
required parts.

My exhibition work is somewhat organised and clear. I have missed some of the required
parts. The presentation and neatness of my work are okay but improvements could be made.

My exhibition work is mostly organised and clear. I have most of the required parts. The
presentation and neatness of my work are good.

My exhibition work is completely organised and clear. I have all the required parts. The
presentation and neatness of my work are excellent.

Understanding the issue


I now know more about my issue than at the start of the exhibition. I can support my findings with
newly found evidence from answering key questions.
Achievement Level descriptors:

I know the same about my issue as I did when I started my research but and cannot support
my answers with evidence from my research.

I know and understand only a little bit more about my issue. My answers to key questions
are largely based on what I already know.

I know and understand some more about my issue. Most of my answers to key questions are
supported with newly collected evidence. However, I missed opportunities to analysis my
issue further.

I know and understand a considerable amount more about my issue. My answers to key
questions mostly all came from newly collected information. Most opportunities to analysis
my issue further were taken.

I clearly now know and understand a significant amount more about my issue. My answers
to key questions all came from newly collected information. Any opportunity to analysis my
issue further was taken.

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Learner Profile
I modelled the attributes of the Learner Profile during the exhibition. I applied the PYP attitudes and
transdisciplinary skills to my work.
Achievement Level descriptors:

I did not model the attributes of the Learner Profile during the exhibition.

I showed little evidence of the attributes of the Learner Profile, skills and/or attitudes
throughout the exhibition process.

I showed satisfactory evidence of the attributes of the Learner Profile, skills and/or attitudes
throughout the exhibition process.

I showed good evidence of the attributes of the Learner Profile, skills and/or attitudes
throughout the exhibition process.

I showed outstanding evidence of the attributes of the Learner Profile, skills and/or attitudes
throughout the exhibition process.

Skills
Transdisciplinary Skills

Throughout the exhibition, I demonstrated the following


transdisciplinary skills.
Consistently

Usually

Sometimes

Seldom

Social
Accepted responsibility
Respected others
Cooperated
Adopted a variety of group
roles
Self-Management
Managed time
Was organised
Behaved appropriately
Showed independent
Communicated clearly

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Reflection of the exhibition


I reflected throughout the stages of development of the exhibition.
Achievement Level descriptors:

I did not reflect throughout the stages of the exhibition.

My process journal entries are simply a recall/recount of the development of the exhibition.
Many of the required process journal entries are incomplete.

My process journal entries show some reflection on the different stages of the exhibition
including some sort of an analysis of the quality of my work. The majority of the required
process journal entries are complete.

My process journal entries show significant reflection on the different stages of the
exhibition. My reflections include a good analysis of the quality of the my work and some
evidence of my decision making process. The required process journal entries are complete.

My process journal entries show excellent reflection on the different stages of the exhibition.
My reflections include an excellent analysis of the quality of my work and clear evidence of
my decision making process. The required process journal entries completed fully.

Taking action
The solution I chose to take action on addressed my issue, was a result of my research, was both
realistic and achievable and is sustainable.
Achievement Level descriptors:

I did not choose to take action on any solutions to the problem(s).

There was only ever one solution to the problem. It was not put into action.

One realistic solution was chosen from several possible ones but has not been put into
action.

The chosen solution was either realistic or sustainable and has been put into action.

The chosen solution was both realistic and sustainable and has been put into action.

page 12

Modes of expression
I produced and refined my mode of expression thinking about the message I wanted to convey, the
audience and my strengths as a learner.

Production of expression piece


Achievement Level descriptors:

I did not put much thought into the production of my mode of expression.

I produced an expression piece that shows little exploration of ideas or slightly reflects issue
awareness or artistic qualities.

I produced expression pieces that show some exploration of ideas reflecting issue awareness
and artistic qualities.

I produced personally relevant expression pieces that show a good exploration of ideas
reflecting both issue awareness and artistic qualities.

I produced personally relevant expression pieces that show excellent exploration of ideas
reflecting both issue awareness and artistic qualities.

Review, modification and refinement of expression piece


Achievement Level descriptors:

I did not reflect on or think critically about my expression piece and made little or no
changes to it.

I began to reflect on and learn from my expression piece but did not apply what I learned to
any revisions or improvements.

I reflected on how well my expression piece communicates my ideas, feelings or experiences


and made minor revisions or improvements.

I thought critically about my expression piece. I understand that my personal interests,


beliefs and values influence my creative work. I analysed my own expression piece and
revised and improved its quality.

I thought critically about my expression piece. I am able to identify how my personal


interests, beliefs and values influenced my creative work. I understand that my own creative
work can be interpreted and appreciated in different ways so I actively considered the
feedback from others when improving my expression piece.

page 13

Individual declaration of
Academic Honesty
By signing this declaration I am confirming that I understand the meaning of
plagiarism.
Plagiarism is the presentation by a student of an assignment which has in fact
been copied in whole or in part from another students work, or from any other
source (eg. published books, periodicals, or the web) without due
acknowledgement in the text.

I, _________________________________ declare that for this submitted work:

I did not cut-and paste information from others without appropriate use

of quotation marks and direct reference to their work;


I did not re-word the ideas of others without proper and clear

acknowledgement;
I did not write ideas or suggestions that originated from others and claim

these as my own;
I did not include words from other students work without permission.

Signed:#

______________________________# Date:!______________

page 14

Stage 1:
Discussing possible real-life issues or
problems to be investigated

page 15

The Inquiry Cycle


What does it look like ?

exploring, wondering and questioning


experimenting and playing with possibilities
researching and seeking information
collecting data and reporting findings
clarifying existing ideas and reappraising events
deepening understanding through the application of a
concept or rule
making and testing theories
making predictions and acting purposefully to see
what happens
elaborating on solutions to problems.

page 16

Stages

What happens.......

Tuning In

This is the stage where you define the key issue. You identify things you already know
and identify the questions you need to find out about. You will hypothesis and predict
what you are going to find out about.
Here is a good place to set goals and timelines for yourself.
What do you already know? What questions do you have?

Finding Out

Identify the primary and secondary resources you are going to need to help you find out
about your issue. Your data gathering can be done in many different ways. E.g.
engaging with experts, surveys, interviews, film, experiments, observations, field work.
What would you like to learn more about and where can you find it out?

Sorting Out
& Making
Connections

You will now combine all the different things you have learned and start to make
connections. You will organise, analyse and communicate the information you have
gathered using a range of different learning areas.
What meaning can you make from this?

Going
Further

Revisit your original questions where you investigated areas of personal interest and
present another perspective on the issue.
What would you like to learn more about and why?
How is this linked to your issue?

Reflection

Thinking about the unit! Here you can make connections and draw conclusions about
what you have learned. (You should be reflecting all the way through!)
What, how and why your learning has come about? What did you learn about this
unit? What did you learn about yourself self? What should I do now?

Taking
Action

Here is where you say SO WHAT? Now you have all this new knowledge how can you
apply this the real world.
What do you want to do as a result of your learning?

Tuning in
Finding
Out

Taking
Action

Sorting Out & Making


Connections

Reflection
Going
Further

page 17

BRAINSTORM
Begin recording all of your possible issues you would like to explore

page 18

Inquiry Cycle
Tuning in
Tuning In to my thinking

Hints:

What is this inquiry all about?


Why is it worth investigating?
What do I already think feel and know about this?
What might this inquiry be working towards?
Where is it headed?

Write some questions about your issue that


you are interested in finding out about. It
should be open ended. It should not be a
question you already know the answer to.
Think about what you might be able to do
once you answer your question.

What I would like to find out?

Teacher Comments:

Check with teacher

Date:__/__/__

Finding out
How will I find out?

Tick Boxes

Hints:

Talk to people (inside & outside school)


Read a variety of print (books, pamphlets,maps, charts) to gather
information.
Go on an excursion
Websearches
Watch TV/DVDs
Listen to CDs (muscial and informative)
Create & conduct suveys
Define terms
Learn from an expert in the community

Think about the best


place to get the
information to
answer your
questions.

Teacher Comments:

Check with teacher

Date:__/__/__
page 19

Sorting out & making connections


How will I show what I have learnt?

Tick Boxes

You have to evaluating information and ideas and consider


different perspectives.
Visual Organisers
Digital texts (web page, keynote, numbers)
Writing statements of generalisation
6 Thinking Hats
Data Charts and graphic organisers to represent thinking
Different text types
Compare and contrast
Photos for visual and written responses

Hints:
Think about the main ideas
and what is important to share
with others.
*Make sure the information is
in your own words and you
understand what you are
presenting*

Teacher Comments:

Check with teacher

Date:__/__/__

Going further
Extending your thinking
examples
Focused Research task around unanswered
questions
Individual or small group work
New finding out experiences: Look at new
texts.
Contact an expert group
Individualised inquiry

Hints:
How is this linked to your issue?
Now, what do we want and need to know
more about?

Teacher Comments:

Check with teacher

Date:__/__/__

page 20

Reflection
Thinking about the unit.
Weekly record
Reflecting on your inquiry
Thinking Hats on
Peer Feedback Sheet
Thinking backwards and forwards
Thinking outside the square
Tic tac toe
4 steps

Hints:
Take the opportunity to identify what you have
learnt and the implications for your personal
action.

Teacher Comments:

Check with teacher

Date:__/__/__

Taking action
How will I act or use what I have learnt?
Participate in community activity or
voluntary work
Create an information booklet
Organise a fundraiser
Raise awareness
Newspaper
Multimedia
Present at the Exhibition

Hints:
How can we do something with what
we have learned?

Teacher Comments:

Check with teacher

Date:__/__/__

page 21

What is an issue ?
An issue should be:
a challenge or risk
complex in nature
creating an emotional response
involving different perspectives
controversial
something significant
An issue can be:

An issue is NOT a frustration.


A frustration is short term and has a simple solution

Some examples of some global and personal issues are:

GLOBAL

PERSONAL
Mum and dad are never at home

Pollution

Cannot speak Chinese

Lack of fresh drinking water


ISSUE
Childhood obesity

Loss of a family member

page 22

What is an issue quadrant

Global

Mum and dad are divorced

*Tip*
Your issue
should fall on
the right hand
side of the
quadrant.

Underage purchasing of beer

Frustration

Issue
perspective
more than
one solution
complex
emotion

simple
usual
short term

A cat jumping on my bed


and waking me up

Test anxiety and academic


pressures

Personal

page 23

Stage 2:
Posing questions that help to define
the central idea and to decide upon
the lines of inquiry

page 24

Essential Agreements:
Create a list of Essential Agreements for your group/yourself for this Exhibition.

page 25

Transdisciplinary Themes
All of our Units of Inquiry this year have been under one of these 6 Transdisciplinary
Themes. Read through them and familiarise yourself with these themes and what we
can inquire into under each theme.

Who we are
An inquiry into the nature of the self; beliefs and values; personal, physical, mental,
social and spiritual health; human relationships including families, friends, communities,
and cultures; rights and responsibilities; what it means to be human.

How the world works


An inquiry into the natural world and its laws; the interaction between the natural world
(physical and biological) and human societies; how humans use their understanding of
scientific principles; the impact of scientific and technological advances on society and
on the environment.

Where we are in time and place


An inquiry into orientation in place and time; personal histories; homes and journeys; the
discoveries, explorations and migrations of humankind; the relationships between and
the interconnectedness of individuals and civilizations, from local and global
perspectives.

How we organise ourselves


An inquiry into the interconnectedness of human-made systems and communities;
the structure and function of organizations; societal decision-making; economic
activities and their impact on humankind and the environment.

Sharing the planet


An inquiry into rights and responsibilities in the struggle to share finite resources with
other people and with other living things; communities and the relationships within and
between them; access to equal opportunities; peace and conflict resolution.

How we express ourselves


PYP Exhibition
An inquiry into the ways in which we discover and express ideas, feelings, nature,
culture, beliefs and values; the ways in which we reflect on, extend and enjoy our
creativity; our appreciation of the aesthetic.

page 26

8 PYP Key Concepts


Form: What is it like?

? ?
The understanding that everything has a form with recognizable features
that can be observed, identified, described and categorized.
(related concepts: properties, structure, similarities, differences, pattern)

Function: How does it work?

: ?
The understanding that everything has a purpose, a role or
a way of behaving that can be investigated.
(related concepts: behavior, communication, pattern, role, systems)

Causation: Why is it like it is?

: ?
The understanding that things do not just happen,
that there are casual relationships at work, and that actions have consequences.
(related concepts: consequences, sequences, pattern, impact)

Change: How is it changing?

: ?
The understanding that change is the process of movement from one state to another.
It is universal and inevitable.
(related concepts: adaptation, growth, cycles, sequences, transformation)

Connection: How is it connected to other things?

: ?
The understanding that we live in a world of interacting systems
in which the actions of any individual element affects others.
(related concepts: systems, relationships, networks, interdependence)

page 27

Perspective: What are the points of view?



: ?
The understanding that knowledge is moderated by perspectives;
different perspectives lead to different interpretations, understandings and findings;
perspectives may be individual, group, cultural or disciplinary.
(related concepts: subjectivity, truth, beliefs, opinion, prejudice)

Reflection: How do we know?

: ?
The understanding that there are different ways of knowing,
and that it is important to reflect on our conclusions, to consider our methods of reasoning,
and the quality and the reliability of the evidence we have considered.
(related concepts: review, interpretation, evidence, responsibility, behaviour)

Responsibility: What is our responsibility?

: ?
The understanding that people make choices based on their understandings,
and the actions they take as a result do make a difference.
(related concepts: rights, citizenship, values, justice, initiative)

page 28

Central Idea
A central idea is not a title, not a question, not a phrase.
It is a rich sentence that clearly indicates what the unit of inquiry is about.
Anyone reading it would understand it.
It focuses on conceptual understanding and states the big idea.

A good Central Idea

is significant
is relevant; linked to prior knowledge
is engaging; being of interest to many students
is challenging and extends knowledge
is written as a broad statement
is clear and concise
is value-free
is globally transferable
is complex to some degree
promotes discovery
determines the understanding of the unit
is factual

page 29

Central Idea
Initial Draft:

Feedback on Central Idea:


is significant
is relevant; linked to prior knowledge
is engaging; being of interest to many students
is challenging and extends knowledge
is written as a broad statement
is clear and concise
is value-free
is globally transferable
is complex to some degree
promotes discovery
determines the understanding of the unit
is factual

page 30

Second Draft:

Central Idea: (Final)

page 31

How

Why

When

Where

What

Did

Can

Would

Question Creation Chart


Will

Might

@2006 Education Oasis!

http://www.educationoasis.com!

May be reproduced for classroom use only

Directions: Create questions by using one word from the left hand column and one word from the top row. The farther down and to the right you go, the more complex and highlevel the questions.

Is

Q-Chart

Who

page 32

TEACHER QUESTIONS
Form: What is the issue?

Connection: How does your Causation: What is/are the


issue link to "Sharing the
cause(s) of the issue?
Planet"? or the UN
Childrens Rights? Why?

Perspective: What are the


different points of view or
sides about the issue?

Responsibility1 : Why is it
important that this issue be
addressed?

Responsibility2 :What is
our responsibility to the
issue?

Change: What needs to


change in order to reduce
the challenge or risk from
taking place?

Function: How will you


address the issue?

Reflection: How do you


know if you truly understand
your issue?

page 33

Lines of Inquiry
Write 3-4 Lines of Inquiry to guide your inquiry during the Exhibition process.
Indicate the Key Concept that each represent.

page 34

Stage 3:
Planning the exhibition

page 35

Action
What action is ...

What action is not ...

page 36

Action Cycle

Choose

Reflect

Act

Think about your responsible Action ...


What type of action have you decided to take and why?
(Form/Causation)
What are the different ways you could carry out this action?
(Perspective)
How are you planning on carrying out your action
and why is this an effective way of doing it?
(Function/Connection)
How would you know if your action is successful?
(Reflection/Change)

page 37

Thinking about
my responsible action
An example:
What type of action have you decided to take and why?
(Form/Causation)
I want to raise parents awareness that it is important to let their children get sufficient sleep(form) ... because
through my survey, I found out that 65% of the elementary school kids have less than the recommended amount
of sleep for their age groups (causation)
I want to ensure that I get the recommended amount of sleep each night (form) ... because from my lifestyle
record, I realised I was under the recommended amount of sleep for my age group (causation)

What are the different ways you could cary out this action?
(Perspective)
I could raise parents awareness by including weekly tips about sleep in the Principals weekly email to parents;
set up a wikispace page about healthy lifestyles; make posters and display them around the school; organise
workshops for parents.
I could go to bed earlier; My family could move closer to my school; I could get transferred to a school closer to
home; I could try to make up for sleep on the weekends; I could cut down on after-school activities so that I can
complete homework on time and go to bed early.

How are you planning on carrying out your action and why is this an effective way of
doing it?
(Function/Connection)
I will make a recommendation to the Principal to have the Parent Resource Center run a series of talks for
parents (function). The current PRC workshops by Dr Rhodes have been well-attended and this would be a
good way to raise parents awareness about the issue (connection).
I will establish a new bedtime of 8.30 p.m. with a 30-minute quiet period (no TV, electronic media) to help me
calm myself down before bedtime (function). I found out that video games often stimulate the brain and make
falling asleep difficult. (connection)

How would you know if your action is successful?


(Reflection/Change)
I know my action is successful if a PRC workshop about sleep hours is scheduled on next years school
calendar and if the workshop is well-attended by parents (reflection). After the workshop, I could conduct
another survey to see if the percentage of children getting enough sleep has increased (change).
I know my action is successful if I am able to sustain my new bedtime habit (reflection). I should also be able to
begin to see or experience results or benefits as suggested by research, e.g. positive mood, more energy,
higher level of concentration at school, etc. (change)

page 38

Brainstorm possible action


1st Thinking:

Does my Action aim to:


create others awareness and interest about an issue
bring about a change in others attitude/behaviour
improve a situation or solve a problem
Does my Action involve:
myself or a small group of people
members of the BCIS community
people outside the BCIS community

page 39

Brainstorm possible action


2nd Thinking:

Does my Action aim to:


create others awareness and interest about an issue
bring about a change in others attitude/behaviour
improve a situation or solve a problem
Does my Action involve:
myself or a small group of people
members of the BCIS community
people outside the BCIS community

page 40

Brainstorm possible action


3rd Thinking:

Does my Action aim to:


create others awareness and interest about an issue
bring about a change in others attitude/behaviour
improve a situation or solve a problem
Does my Action involve:
myself or a small group of people
members of the BCIS community
people outside the BCIS community

page 41

My Action Plan
These are the important things I need to do to work towards my exhibition:
Things to do:

Action by:

Due date:

page 42

Things to do:

Action by:

Due date:

page 43

page 44

page 45

page 46

Mentor Meetings

Date: ________________

Agenda

Action by:

What targets have been set for the next meeting?

Date/Time/Venue for the next meeting?

Mentors comments:
(Kindly comment on progress, difficulties, issues raised, as well as profiles/attitudes/skills displayed by the
students during your meeting.)

Mentors Signature: _____________________


page 47

Mentor Meetings

Date: ________________

Agenda

Action by:

What targets have been set for the next meeting?

Date/Time/Venue for the next meeting?

Mentors comments:
(Kindly comment on progress, difficulties, issues raised, as well as profiles/attitudes/skills displayed by the
students during your meeting.)

Mentors Signature: _____________________


page 48

Mentor Meetings

Date: ________________

Agenda

Action by:

What targets have been set for the next meeting?

Date/Time/Venue for the next meeting?

Mentors comments:
(Kindly comment on progress, difficulties, issues raised, as well as profiles/attitudes/skills displayed by the
students during your meeting.)

Mentors Signature: _____________________


page 49

Mentor Meetings

Date: ________________

Agenda

Action by:

What targets have been set for the next meeting?

Date/Time/Venue for the next meeting?

Mentors comments:
(Kindly comment on progress, difficulties, issues raised, as well as profiles/attitudes/skills displayed by the
students during your meeting.)

Mentors Signature: _____________________


page 50

Mentor Meetings

Date: ________________

Agenda

Action by:

What targets have been set for the next meeting?

Date/Time/Venue for the next meeting?

Mentors comments:
(Kindly comment on progress, difficulties, issues raised, as well as profiles/attitudes/skills displayed by the
students during your meeting.)

Mentors Signature: _____________________


page 51

Mentor Meetings

Date: ________________

Agenda

Action by:

What targets have been set for the next meeting?

Date/Time/Venue for the next meeting?

Mentors comments:
(Kindly comment on progress, difficulties, issues raised, as well as profiles/attitudes/skills displayed by the
students during your meeting.)

Mentors Signature: _____________________


page 52

Mentor Meetings

Date: ________________

Agenda

Action by:

What targets have been set for the next meeting?

Date/Time/Venue for the next meeting?

Mentors comments:
(Kindly comment on progress, difficulties, issues raised, as well as profiles/attitudes/skills displayed by the
students during your meeting.)

Mentors Signature: _____________________


page 53

Mentor Meetings

Date: ________________

Agenda

Action by:

What targets have been set for the next meeting?

Date/Time/Venue for the next meeting?

Mentors comments:
(Kindly comment on progress, difficulties, issues raised, as well as profiles/attitudes/skills displayed by the
students during your meeting.)

Mentors Signature: _____________________


page 54

Stage 4:
Gather the necessary materials

page 55

Bibliography
Steps to Preparing Your Bibliography
When doing research and writing a report, it is always necessary to name the
source of your information. This list of sources is called a bibliography.
1. As you use each source, write down its bibliographic information (don't
wait and do it later!).
2. When you are ready to write your bibliography, gather all the bibliographic
entries together and write them down in alphabetical order. See examples
on the next page.
3. Each entry ends with a period, just like a sentence.
4. Skip a line after each entry.
5. If you are not sure how to cite a source, ask a teacher or librarian.
6. Think of all the primary and secondary resources you could use to help
you to research into your topic. List them below.
REMINDER:
Make sure to keep copies of all your research (emails, letters, printed papers,
etc.).
Work as you go, dont leave it all until the end!

Examples of Primary and Secondary Resources:


Primary Resources
(e.g. interviews, field trips, photos, letters, speeches, emails)
Secondary Resources
(e.g. articles, TV programme, internet, books, magazines)

page 56

How to cite sources of information:


BOOKS:
Authors last name, first name. Title of book. City of publication: Publisher, copyright year.
e.g." Fogle, Bruce. Training Your Dog. New York: DK Publishing, 2001.
PRINT ENCYCLOPEDIA ARTICLE (NOT an online encyclopedia):
"Title of article." Name of encyclopedia. Copyright year. Volume number, page(s).
e.g." "Golden Retriever." World Book Encyclopedia. 1999. Volume 8, p.255.
MAGAZINE OR NEWSPAPER ARTICLE:
Article authors last name, first name. "Title or headline of article." Name of magazine or
newspaper. Date of magazine or newspaper, page(s).
e.g. " McGill, Kristy. "A Baltic Scramble." Faces. May, 2003, p. 27.
WEBSITE/INTERNET ADDRESS:
Authors last name, first name. "Title of article." http://address/filename, date accessed.
e.g. " DiStefano, Vince. "Guidelines for Better Writing."
"
http://www.usa.net/~vinced/home/better-writing.html, October 5, 2002.
(Many websites do not include author information. If you cant find it, begin with title of article.)

AUDIOVISUAL MATERIALS (DVDs, etc.):


Title of material. Type of material. Place of publication: Publisher, copyright date.
e.g." Bizets Dream. Videotape. New York: Sony Wonder, 1998.
INTERVIEWS:
Name of person interviewed (last name first). Kind of interview. Date.
e.g." Watson, Cosmo. Personal interview. July 29, 2003.
Your finished bibliography should be alphabetized by the first word of the entry, and
will look something like this:
BIBLIOGRAPHY
Bizets Dream. Videotape. New York: Sony Wonder, 1998.
Clark, William W. "Gothic Art." World Book Encyclopedia. 2002. Volume 8, pp. 284-286.
DiStefano, Vince. "Guidelines for Better Writing." http://www.usa.net/~vinced/home/betterwriting.html, October 5, 2002.
Fogle, Bruce. Training Your Dog. New York: DK Publishing, 2001, pp. 50-55.
"Golden Retriever." World Book Encyclopedia. 1999. Volume 8, p.255.
McGill, Kristy. "A Baltic Scramble." Faces. May, 2003, p. 27.
"Titanic Disaster." Encarta 99 Encyclopedia. CD-ROM. 1999.
Watson, Cosmo. Personal interview. July 29, 2003.

page 57

Books:
Author/Editor(s)
Title
Edition
Page number
Place of publication
Publisher
Year

Newspaper Articles:
Author
Title of article
Name of newspaper
Date
Page number

Websites:
Author
Title
URL
Date

page 58

Audiovisual Materials (DVD, CD, etc.):


Title
Type
Place of publication
Publisher
Year of publication

Interviews:
Name of person
Type of Interview
Place
Date

Podcasts, Webcasts, Online Videos:


Title
Type
Place of Publication

eg. Podcast, Vodcast, video,


the site or application

URL (web address)


Publisher
Author
Release/Post Date
Date Viewed

the person/organisation who uploaded it


may be different from the publisher
the date it was uploaded
the date you viewed the resource

page 59

page 60

Bibliography

page 61

Bibliography

page 62

Stage 5:
Recording and reflecting

page 63

Thinking hats on

page 64

Thinking hats on

page 65

Thinking hats on

page 66

Thinking hats on

page 67

Thinking hats on

page 68

Thinking hats on

page 69

Reflect on your inquiry


Tuning In

I enjoyed...............

I learnt..................

Fill this in as you complete each stage of your investigation


Finding Out
I did.....................

I was surprised........

page 70

Reflect on your inquiry


Sorting Out & Making Connections
I did.....................

I was surprised........

Going Further
I found out more about..........

page 71

Reflect on your inquiry


Reflection
Now I know...............

I think....................

Taking Action
I will....................

page 72

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page 74

page 75

page 76

page 77

page 78

page 79

page 80

Stage 6:
Presenting the Exhibition

page 81

Reflecting on my Exhibition
Opening Ceremony :
Reflect any/some/all of these questions:
How did the opening of the Exhibition go?
What were some successes?
What were some challenges/difficulties?
What are some areas you could improve on for tomorrow?
What were some comments you received?
How did you feel?

page 82

Parents Reflection on
My Exhibition :
I learned that ...

I like ...

I suggest ...

page 83

Reflecting on my Exhibition
Day 1:
Reflect any/some/all of these questions:
How did Day 1 of the Exhibition go?
What were some successes?
What were some challenges/difficulties?
What are some areas you could improve on for tomorrow?
What were some comments you received?
How did you feel?

page 84

Final Reflection:
My Exhibition is a success for me because ...

3 Things I have learned are ...

What makes this experience unforgettable is ...

page 85

MY IB Learner Profile
Profiles

Communicator

Caring

Open-minded

Reflective

Thinker

Inquirer

Knowledgeable

Risk-taker

Principled

Balanced

I strive to be:

Evidence that I showed this

I can express my feelings and


thoughts and I can communicate
in different languages. I use
knowledge to solve problems.
I show sensitivity towards the
needs and feelings of others. I
also show empathy towards other
people and situations.
I listen to other peoples thoughts
and ideas and I can accept that
there is more than one way to look
at things.
I am aware of my strengths and
weaknesses. I also set goals for
myself. I am aware of the effects
of my actions and words on
others.
I can apply thinking skills critically
and creatively. I build on other
peoples ideas and I demonstrate
original thinking.
I ask variety of questions, look for
their answers and I seek out
knowledge independently.
I am curious to know about new
things and I explore ideas. I
construct meaning through active
research/ inquiry.
I am willing to make mistakes and
try new things. I use good
judgement and I act on my own
initiative.
I show honesty and I make good
decisions. I accept responsibility
for my actions and views. I stand
up for what I know is right.
I learn about the importance of
good health. I use time wisely and
I develop organizational skills. I
show awareness of my emotions
and learn how to control them.
page 86

Teachers Feedback
on Learner Profile
Name of Teacher: _________________________________

You are ...

Needs to
work on it

Some
evidence

Definitely!

a Communicator

Caring

Open-minded

Reflective

a Thinker

an Inquirer

Knowledgeable

a Risk-taker

Principled

Balanced

page 87

Teachers Feedback
on Transdisciplinary Skills
You show ...

Needs to
work on it

Some
evidence

Definitely!

Thinking Skills

Research Skills

Communication
Skills
Social Skills

Self-Management
Skills

Teachers Comments:

page 88

Notes:

page 89

Notes:

page 90

Notes:

page 91

Notes:

page 92

Notes:

page 93

Notes:

page 94

Learn from yesterday,


live for today,
hope for tomorrow.
The important thing is to not stop questioning.
- Albert Einstein By three methods we may learn wisdom:
First, by reflection, which is noblest;
Second, by imitation, which is easiest;
and third by experience, which is the bitterest.
- Confucius -

Congratulations!
Youve made it!

We live by a spirit of inspiring others, achieving ones goals and creating a better world.

Inspire.Achieve.Create
Beijing City International School
Grade 5 PYP Exhibition

page 95