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Literacy Unit Overview

Na me: Sarah Miller


School: Elliott Elementary School
1.

Me ntor Teacher: Karen Schaefer

Ta rget Area
a.

2.

Gra de Level: Third Grade

Writing Instruction with focus on mini-lessons

Common Core State Standards


a.

CCSS.3.L.3.a: Choose words and phrases for effect.

b.

CCSS.3.W.3.a: Establish a situation and introduce a narrator and/or characters; organize


an event sequence that unfolds naturally.

c.

CCSS.3.W.3.d: Provide a sense of closure.

d.

CCSS.3.W.5: With guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen
writing as needed by planning, revising, and editing.

3.

Objectives
1.

After interacting with several examples of cinquain and diamante poems, students will be
able to identify the features of each form of poetry and apply the features appropriately
to their own writing as they compose a cinquain and a diamante poem.

2.

After participating in several mini-lessons on poetic devices such as figurative language,


rhythm, repetition, and vivid word choice, students will be able to compose writing pieces
using at least two devices or skills.

3.

After mini-lessons on the editing and revision process, students will be able to use
appropriate tools to self-monitor and self-evaluate their writing in order to share writing
with an audience.

4.

After interacting with multiple examples of fairy tales and mini-lessons on developing plot
and unique characters, students will be able to plan and compose a fairy tale with a
detailed beginning, middle and satisfying ending that follows a logical sequence.

4.

R a tionale
a.

This unit further prepares students to become organized and engaging writers. Choosing
words and phrases for effect gives students the power as writers to capture their
audiences, which is a useful skill as they grow older and continue to write for various
purposes. Using the different forms of diamante and cinquain poems causes students to
carefully pick and choose the words they use, as opposed to free verse poetry which is
less constrictive. Students success in the world is also tied to their ability to edit and
revise their writing in order to share it appropriately with an audience. Without these
skills, unfortunately students may not be perceived as educated individuals. Creating a
base for self-monitoring and self-evaluating gets students oriented to the process
needed throughout the rest of their lives as writers. And finally, exploring the structure of
stories through fairy tales helps students both expand their imagination and investigate
the underlying features of stories that are necessary for coherent writing: establishing
characters and more importantly, writing with a logical sequence. These skills can transfer
over to other types of writing that require the same organizational skills.

5.

Assessments
a.

b.

Pre-assessment: Collection of writing samples from previous units where students have
worked with these standards before. Students have worked with narrative poems and
cinquains already, which will be helpful to pre-assess for the poetry aspect. Other writing
that students have done, will be assessed with a rubric. This pre-assessment will help
inform what areas need the most focus.
Final writing products will be assessed with both a Holt School District writing rubric,
poetry form-specific rubrics, and fairy tale rubric.

c.

Multiple exit slips will be collected to gauge student understanding and inform instruction

d.

Student self-evaluation rubrics and checklists will be collected to gauge student selfmonitoring.

e.

Students will work together compile a class digital poetry book which will demonstrate
understanding of the poetry concepts and give students a meaningful audience.

f.
6.

Students will share final writing products and notice details within partners writing

Differentiating Instruction
a.

Process: During planning stage of writing fairy tales, students will be given story maps for
different levels, simpler to more complex. This still helps students organize their writing,
but requires less of students who may be confused by the structure of more complex
story maps.

b.

Process: I will allow verbal responses from some students who are slower writers on exit
tickets if time runs out. This is appropriate because I will be able to gather the same
information from students if they answer the question verbally. W riting the sentence (in
this case) is not essential to me but assessing their understanding is.

c.

Process: Allow students who do not finish writing assignments (except in the case of fairy
tales, which are supposed to be written as if they were a timed test prompt) extended or
extra time (i.e. after morning seatwork is done) to complete their writing.

7.

R esources
a.

Foresman, Scott. Reading Street Common Core Curriculum. (2013). Scott Foresman.

b.

Harvey, Stephanie & Goudvis, Anne. Strategies That Work: Teaching Comprehension for

c.

Understanding and Engagement. (2007) Stenhouse Publishers.


Isadora, Rachel. Rapunzel. (2008). Putnam Juvenile.

d.

Larsen, Eric. Emperor Penguins. (2012). https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9wzK-sEBoS8

e.

Loewen, Nancy. Words, Wit, and Wonder. (2010). Picture Window Books.

f.
g.

National Governors Association Center for Best Practices & Council of Chief State School
Officers. (2010). Common Core State Standards. Washington, DC: Authors.
Routman, Regie. Writing Essentials. (2004). Heineman.

h.

Ingham Intermediate School District. Reading Street Resources. http://readingstreet.wiki.inghamisd.org/Reading+Street+Resources

i.
j.

Mastgrave, Tobias. The Art of Writing. www.tobiasmastgrave.wordpress.com


Sanchez, Mariely. Mrs. Sanchezs Class. (2003). www.sanchezclass.com

k.

Schwartz, Corey. The Three Ninja Pigs. (2012). Putnam Juvenile.

l.

The Education Center. Writing Graphic Organizer: Planning a Fairy Tale. (2014).
http://www.theeducationcenter.com/editorial_content/my-fairy-tale

Lesson/ Focus,

Instructional Format

Ongoing
Asse ssment:

Te aching Notes:

Whole group discussion to overview


poetry.

Students can
identify features
of cinquain
poems, evidenced
by participation in
whole group

Create anchor chart of


cinquain features. Have
features written out
ahead of time to make
sure everything
important is included.

Objective #
Da y 1:
Monday, 10/20
Objective #1

Read like Writers: View examples of


cinquain poems.
Highlight excellent word choices and
identify key features of cinquains as
whole group.
View short video about emperor
penguins.
Independent writing prompt: Write a
cinquain poem about penguins.

discussion.
Collect
brainstorming
sheets with coded
words (Adj, N, V)
to assess

View video clip on


emperor penguins.
Display p. 115 of Reader
and Writers Notebook
on Powerpoint to

students word
choices and
knowledge of
parts of speech.
This will be
essential for
writing cinquains

analyze, so students do
not have to open books.

and diamantes.

Exit slip with Muddiest


Point what is still
unclear, if anything,
about cinquain poems
after the lesson.

Students will also


complete an exit
slip detailing the
Muddiest Point
from the lesson,
or one thing they

Hand out cinquain form


during video to
students.

do not
understand after
the lesson.
Da y 2:
Tuesday, 10/21
Objective #2

Whole group discussion: Review key


features of cinquains
*Whole group Mini-Lesson: Rhythm
using punctuation and words
Short work time to review poems for
rhythm with a peer using poetry
checklist

Collect student
sentences which
use either
imagery or
personification.
Look at student
checklists to
assess their
relation of rhythm

Review key features of


cinquains by displaying
anchor chart from
previous lesson
Use Words, Wit and
Wonder by Nancy
Loewen to exemplify
rhythm.

*Mini-lesson:
Choosing figurative language
(Personification, imagery)

to the feeling
expressed by the
poem.

Keep mini-lesson on
rhythm to 10 minutes.
Students may refer back
to Penguin Chick for
more information about
penguins if needed.

If time remains, students review


cinquains for personification and
imagery
Closure: students write a sentence
using either personification or
imagery.

Read The Penguin in


Student Edition
Keep mini-lesson on
figurative language to 5
minutes.
Give students a checklist
to review their poem
Review the sentences
from Penguin Chick
which use good word
choice and imagery
Display visuals for
imagery and
personification

Da y 3:
Thursday, 10/23
Objective #1, 2

Read personal model of diamante


poems Weather
Read Plants and Animals diamante
poem on p.115 of RWN.
Whole group discussion: Key
features of diamantes. Create anchor
chart.
*Mini-lesson: Choosing words to
create repetition of sounds and word
patterns
Writing prompt: write a diamante
poem about penguins.

Exit slip: Circle


which poem is a
diamante and
write one reason

Create anchor chart with


form and key features of
diamante poems

why. Then, circle


the words in the
poem that show
repetition.

Review Plants and


Animals diamante
poem (p.114 of Readers
and Writers Notebook.)
Pass out diamante
forms for students to
begin writing.
Pass out Muddiest Point
exit slip
Keep mini-lesson on
repetition to 3 minutes

Da y 4:
Friday, 10/24
Objective #2, 3

Whole group discussion: Review the


key features of both cinquain and
diamante poems, as well as
reminding students about rhythm,
imagery, personification, and
repetition.
*Mini-lesson as whole group: Editing.
Choose one of the poems to edit for
grammar and punctuation, revise
using vibrant words with figurative
language, and publish
Complete self-evaluation of poem

Think-WriteShare: Discuss
what students
learned about
poetry this week.
Collect the slip of
paper.

Students illustrate their


poem and record it on a
chromebook or iPod
after they have revised
their poem.

Collect student
poems, both the
one they choose
for editing and
the unedited
poem.

with rubric
Students have time to finish writing
and copy to final draft paper.

Display anchor charts


from Day 1 and 3.

Collect student
rubrics for poems.

Keep mini-lesson on
editing to 7 minutes
Pass out poetry rubric
Have iPod and
Chromebooks set up
and available for
recording at end of
lesson

Whole group discussion about what


was learned about poetry.
Da y 5:
Monday, 10/27

Whole group: Ask students what


their favorite fairy tales are. List

Students track
features of fairy

Produce anchor chart


together of key features

Objective #4

these. What makes a fairy tale a


fairy tale?

tales they notice


during read aloud
and share out.
Include Muddiest
Point on paper.
Collect slips of
paper.

of fairy tales.

Whole group: Read aloud of Fairy


Tale: Rapunzel by Rachel Isadora.
Students track fairy tale features.

Give students piece of


paper to track fairy tale
features during read
aloud.

Whole group: Introduce fairy tales

Introduce key features

and their key features, RWN p.122.


Read The Skunk and the Mice and
further investigate features of fairy
tales using this story and Rapunzel.

of fairy tales using RWN


p.122

Complete a Muddiest Point exit slip.


Da y 6:
Tuesday, 10/28
Objective #4, 3

Review key features of fairy tales.


*Mini-Lesson: Developing plot. Using
a story map to plan for writing.
Demonstrate how to complete a
story map using Rapunzel from
previous day.

Student story
maps should align
with stories and
follow the same
sequence.
Collect student
checklists.

Display the key features


of fairy tales (anchor
chart)
Keep mini-lesson on
building plot to 10
minutes.

Intro writing prompt: Write a fairy


tale with an iguana as the main
character.

Pass out story maps to


students (varied based
on level) and display
writing prompt.

Begin independent writing. Give each


student a writers checklist adapted
from pg. 258-259 of Student Edition.

Pass out a writing


checklist as students

Da y 7:

Read student model on p. 259 of

Collect scoring

begin writing.
Display anchor chart

Wednesday, 10/29
Objective #3, 4

Student Edition. Point out the key


features of a fairy tale.

rubric from
students

with key features of fairy


tales.

*Whole group mini-lesson evaluation


of word choice in own writing
sample from yesterday.

Collect the writing


samples at the
end of the time.

Pass out writers


checklist and scoring
rubrics to students.

Independent self-evaluation: Use


scoring rubric adapted from p. 126 of
RWN to evaluate writing from the
previous day focusing on word
choice. Model how to evaluate word
choice using the student model on
p.259.

Collect the slip of


paper where
students wrote at
least one word
choice change
they made within
their fairy tale.

Keep mini-lesson on
evaluation of word
choice to 10 minutes.

Read: The Three Ninja

Read aloud: The Three Ninja Pigs by


Corey Rosen Schwartz

Assess
understanding of
students during
whole group
discussion.

Refer to book for examples for how

Look for evidence

Display fairy tales

the author created unique


characters.

in student stories
that they have
created unique
characters.

anchor chart as students


write.

Collect checklist
and writing
samples.

Display proofreading
tips as students revise.

Independent writing time for revision


and evaluation
Da y 8:
Thursday, 10/30
Objective #4

*Whole group mini-lesson: Creating


unique characters.

Independent writing prompt: Write a


fairy tale about a boy or girl who
solves a problem.
Da y 9:
Thursday, 10/30
Objective #3

*Self-evaluation mini-lesson

Pigs
Keep mini-lesson on
characters to 8 minutes

Provide notebook paper


for writing prompt.

Refer to writers checklist to make


sure they include the necessary
elements in their writing.

Keep mini-lesson on
self-evaluation to 5
minutes.

Continue to edit and revise writing.


Da y 10:
Friday, 10/31
Objective #3

Whole group celebration of unit and


noticing of word choice use within
poems and fairy tales.

Students will
complete an exit
slip with favorite

Play digital poetry book.

their fairy tales with


Peanut butter/Jelly
partners.

Students write at least three word


choices that stood out to them from
classmates writing. Share as a whole

word choices they


noticed in other
students writing
and at least one
feature of fairy
tales that they
noticed in their

group.

partners fairy tale.

Students share their favorite fairy


tales they wrote with a partner.
Everyone shares out a feature of fairy
tales that they noticed in their
partners writing.

Collect all
unfinished writing.

Students will view the digital poetry


book that the class has completed.

Group students to share

Sample Detailed Lesson Plans

Da te: Monday, 10/20/14, 9:50-10:20am


Objectives for todays lesson:
After interacting with several examples of cinquain and diamante poems, students will be able to identify the
features of each form of poetry and apply the features appropriately to their own writing as they compose a
cinquain and a diamante poem.
R a tionale:
As students work within the strict boundaries of cinquain poems, they will learn to choose words wisely. This
helps young writers learn the power of carefully selecting words, which can make their writing more
appealing for readers.
Ma terials & supplies needed:

Personal model of Cinquain Poetry The Flying Mouse

Pg. 111 of Readers and Writers Notebook (RWN)

Exit slip for each student

Chart paper

Markers

Video clip: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9wzK-sE BoS8

Cinquain form for students (pictured below lesson plan, cut paper in half and save lower half for
lesson on diamantes).

Procedures and approximate time allocated for each e vent


Introduction to the lesson

Aca demic, Social and/or Linguistic


S upport during each e vent

This week we will be learning about and writing poetry. Poetry


expresses a writers imagination. When we finish this week, we will be
creating a digital classroom poetry book with all of our best poems. This
means you will have to work hard all week so you can share your best
work.
Activate prior knowledge: We already have experience with poems. We
wrote narrative poems, focusing on including characters, setting, plot,
and rhyming words. Then we did fall cinquains to display in the hallway.
We learned that these poems follow a very specific form. Does anyone
remember an important feature of a cinquain poem? (3 minutes)

Motivate students to finish their


work.

Relate new content to shared


experience of fall cinquains

Outline of key events during the lesson


Ask students if they know any words that look or sound like cinquain
from another language (Students in Spanish club may say cinco). Point
out that the root of cinquain means five. Explain that cinquains are
poems with five lines.
Read personal example of cinquain poem
The Flying Mouse

A cue for students to connect with


the word cinquain

Bats
Brown, tiny
Flying, swooping, squeaking
Mice in the sky
Acrobats
Read Play on p.111 of RWN
Play
Puppy
Silly, happy
Running, jumping, playing
Now its time for
Sleep
Create anchor chart with the key features of cinquain poems.

Five-line poems in which the first line and the fifth line are each a
single word (Related to each other)
The second line contains two words (Describing)
The third line contains three words (Actions)
The fourth line contains four words (A statement)

Have students provide examples of adjectives or verbs so they can


distinguish between the types of words required for each line. Refer to
the poems for examples. (Students count the words in each poem to
see if they fit the pattern). Which words in the model poems created
images or were excellent word choices? Explain that this is an important
part of poetry we will be working on this week.
Usually there is a comma between the words in the second line as well
as between the words in the third line. Have students interact with the
poems Play and The Flying Mouse noting the commas and the slight
pause they need to make while reading those particular lines. (12
minutes)
Tell students that this week we will be reading a story about emperor
penguins. We are going to be writing poems with penguins as the

Give several examples of


adjectives, verbs, and nouns so
students know what type of word
to put on each line.
Video clip gives students a shared
experience about emperor
penguins and provides a visual for
students
Provide a pre-made cinquain
format for students to fill in
Give one direction at a time. Be
explicit about what students
should be doing.

subject. They have not read the story yet, so to give them some ideas
about emperor penguins before writing, I will ask them to take notes on
a half sheet of paper of exciting descriptive words and images that
come to their mind while we watch a short video clip about emperor
penguins (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9wzK-sE BoS8). Briefly
review each of the word types (N- person place or thing; Adj- describes;
V action word). Students will then work with a partner to code their

Encourage students who did not


finish their cinquain to keep
working during snack time.

words as nouns (N), adjectives (A) or verbs (V). This will help them use
words in the appropriate lines as they write. (3 minutes)
After students have watched the video clip and coded their words, read
the writing prompt (Write a cinquain poem about penguins) to students
and give them time to write their cinquain poem about penguins,
encouraging them to use the notes they took during the video clip. (10

minutes)
Closing summary for the lesson
Tell students to put their cinquain in their unfinished work folder. Pass
out an exit slip to each student. Tell them that we have covered a lot of
information about cinquain poems today, so I want to figure out if
everything made sense. Review the anchor chart. Students will now
complete an exit slip called Muddiest Point which means they will
write a sentence or two stating something they did not understand in
the lesson. Tell students we will continue with our poems the next day.

(3 minutes)
Tra nsition to next activity
It is almost recess time. Before you get your snack, turn in your exit slip.
Assessment
I will use what I learn from the exit slips to inform my review of the
features of cinquain poems the next day, hitting any concepts that
students were unsure about. I will also collect students brainstorming
sheets to look at whether they have correctly categorized the words and
to analyze whether students are thinking of descriptive, vibrant words. I
will pass these back the next day so students still have these to refer back
to.
R eflection:
One challenge that I knew I would be facing going into this lesson was
the amount of content to cover in the short length of 30 minutes. I tried
to extend this time by integrating snack into the lesson (while they
watched the video clip), but there was still a rushed feeling as I tried to
get to everything.

Aca demic, Social, and/or Linguistic


S upport during a ssessment
Students with slower writing
abilities may use a few words
instead of a sentence or two to
successfully complete muddiest
point, or if time runs out, give a
verbal response.

Looking at students graphic organizers where they brainstormed words


for description and action words, they were able to pick out many
describing words such as fuzzy cuddly fluffy and action words like
sliding, shaking, flapping. Some students wrote complete sentences in
their graphic organizer or wrote in more words than there were spaces
for, which showed me they did observe a lot in the video and were
excited about looking for words that described the penguins. I learned
that having an extra experience like this video clip can be very powerful
for stimulating students thoughts and sparking ideas. I would like to
continue using writing activators like this.
If I were going to do this lesson again, I would have given students a
graphic organizer which had the columns action words and
describing words. I originally thought this would be too much for
students to deal with as they were watching the video, but one of the
students actually asked if she could write action or description next to
each word that she wrote. I think this would have been very helpful for
students so they could see which line each word would potentially fit in
with and then easily transfer these words into their poems, but the lack
of time was a huge factor.
Instead of having students write the muddiest point, which was my
original plan, I asked for students to verbally raise any questions. I know
this is not as safe as writing a question down, but I made the choice not
to pass out the slip. There were several questions about how to do the
fourth line (a statement, four words) and the fifth line (synonym or
reference to first line, one word), which was helpful to cover again.
Another issue with this lesson was absences and intervention pullouts.
Since writing is not considered part of the core instruction, it is fair
game for interventionists to do their pull out time. I had 2 students who
were pulled out of this lesson, as well as 2 other students who were
absent. My plan to quickly catch these students up to date is to give
them a printout of the anchor chart that we created together, since I
know for some students it is hard to keep looking up at the front of the
room and then back to their paper.

Da te: Tuesday, 10/21/14, 9:50-10:20am


Objective for todays lesson:
After participating in several mini-lessons on poetic devices such as figurative language, rhythm, repetition,
and vivid word choice, students will be able to compose writing pieces using at least two devices or skills.
R a tionale:
As students work on implementing the figurative language and rhythm in this lesson, they practice improving
their writing to make it more engaging. To capture a readers attention, writers need to draw them in with
such techniques as figurative language and rhythm.
Ma terials & supplies needed:

Student Edition, to refer to Penguin Chick if needed

Student Edition, to read The Penguin

Words, Wit, and Wonder by Nancy Loewen


Pg. 111 of Readers and Writers Notebook

PowerPoint with visuals

Poetry checklist for each student

Poem Play and The Flying Mouse

Slip of paper for students to record imagery or personfication example.

Procedures and approximate time allocated for each e vent


Introduction to the lesson
Review key features of cinquain from yesterday. Be sure to address any
issues that arose in exit slips yesterday. Display anchor chart from
previous lesson. Tell students that we are going to be learning ways to
improve their writing today for the final product, the digital classroom
poetry book. Today they will be learning how to choose words and
patterns to create rhythm. They will also be learning how to make their

Aca demic, Social and/or Linguistic


S upport during each e vent

Visually display anchor chart.

writing more exciting and descriptive using personification and imagery.

(2 minutes)
OU TLINE of key events during the lesson
Mini-lesson: Using rhythm in poetry:
Use Words, Wit and Wonder by Nancy Loewen page 6-7 to exemplify
rhythm. Read side box and example poem to demonstrate rhythm using
word patterns. Tell students to read along chorally, reading the words in
red louder to emphasize the rhythm. Reread the poem to students,
modeling how to read with expression.

Display p. 7 of Words, Wit, and


Wonder on the Elmo so all
students can see and read along

Tell students that poems are ways to creatively express feelings about a
topic. One way to create a different feeling within a poem is to use a
certain rhythm, or beat. The beat can be regular or varied, which means
the beat would be different throughout the poem. Poems can have
different speeds of rhythm. A fast-moving rhythm can create a happy
effect, as in Play. Reread the poem to listen for the rhythm. If a poem
has a slow-moving rhythm, it might show sadness or seriousness. Ask

chorally. Read through twice for


fluency for struggling readers.

students what feeling the poem from Words, Wit and Wonder gave
them and have them write this on the back of their poetry checklist that
you pass out. Instruct students not to flip over the checklist yet.
Explain that punctuation can give us clues how to read poetry. When we
read a poem aloud, we dont always have to stop at the end of a line.
We can stop where punctuation tells us to. If it is a period, we stop. If it
is a comma, we pause. (10 minutes)
Read The Penguin in Student Edition.
The Penguin
Penguin
Black, white
Waddling, swimming, leaping
A tuxedo in Antarctica
Emperor

Model explicitly with this poem


how to pause or stop at
punctuation.

Ask students to point out word choices the author used and use of
rhythm in the model. (2 minutes)
Pair students up to go through the checklist reread their poems with a
partner to check for rhythm and check for each of the features of poetry
using a checklist. Students can refer to Penguin Chick if they want more
information on penguins while revising their poems. Give each student
a poetry checklist to assess their writing with. Students can refer to the
anchor chart to make sure they are using the correct form for a
cinquain poem. Circulate while students work to identify a student who
has good rhythm within their poem and one who has a completed
checklist to share out with the group to show what successful usage of
both look like. (8 minutes)
Mini-lesson on figurative language: After students have worked on their
poem, explain that authors of poetry use figurative language in their
writing. Figurative language involves using language that gives words a
meaning beyond their usual and everyday definitions. Two forms of
figurative language are imagery and personification.
Imagery is also called sensory language. Refer to prior experience with
sensory language when working on their descriptions of a store.

Give students a checklist so they


have a visual for monitoring their
writing.

Imagery is the use of words that help the reader experience the way
things look, sound, smell, taste, or feel. An image is any detail that
stimulates any of the senses or the imagination.
Ask students for an example of imagery. (The popcorn popped while
the fire crackled). Display the chart below for students.

(tobiasmastgrave.wordpre ss.com)
Personification is the use of language to give human characteristics to
animals or inanimate objects. The animal or object may be given a
personality, intelligence, or emotions that humans have. Authors who
use personification can make things or animals seem like people. Ask
students for an example of personification. (The car groaned).

Provide a visual and multiple


examples for students.

Write and read following sentences to students:

The wind shouted and whistled outside my window.


The fog slowly floated across the silent green waves.

Ask students to identify the sentence that uses imagery and the one
that uses personification.
Ask students to help create a sentence using imagery and a sentence
using personification. Write these on the board so they have multiple
visuals when they try to write their own sentences. (5 minutes)
Then, students write a sentence using either imagery or personification.
Partners read each others sentences and identify them as imagery or
personification. (2 minutes)

Show picture to help students


understand the concept. Give
examples to help them transfer
from the picture to writing.

Closing summary for the lesson


Remind students that they can use imagery and personification in their
writing. Tell them that we will be writing another poem tomorrow, so
they can keep thinking of a way to describe penguins using imagery or
personification, and express different feelings in their poem by using
rhythm. (1 minute)
Transition to next learning activity
As you finish writing your sentence using either imagery or
personification, bring it to me and you may go get ready for recess.
Assessment
Collect student sentences which use either imagery or personification.
Identify whether students are able to use the devices effectively or not.
Check the back of students checklists to see if they were able to relate
the feeling the poem gave them appropriately to the rhythm.
R eflection:
Although we had talked about some of the students questions to
conclude the last lesson, they had many questions as they actually
began to write regarding what words they could put on each line. This
is where it would have been helpful to have their words coded or
divided into groups of nouns, adjectives and verbs so they could easily
see where each one fit within the cinquain format.
Facing a lack of time, to assess their understanding of imagery and
personification, instead of writing their own sentence using imagery or
personification I asked students to quickly label the sentences we
shared on the board on the brainstorming sheet they had out. After the
lesson, I quickly marked my assessment checklist with a (+) or (-) who
had correctly identified the sentences. Of the sixteen students present,
only 50% understood the concept, which signals that the whole class
would benefit from re-teaching.
At the end of the lesson, I had students continue working on their
poems if they were not finished and other students work with a partner
to use the poetry checklist to review their poem if they were finished. I
did display the poetry checklist on the Elmo and read through it with
students, but I think I could have been more explicit. Many of the
checklists I got back were simply marked with a check in every box and
no suggestions. I had not modeled what it would look like to give
feedback to each other as they went through the checklist, so this is not
surprising. The next time I use a form like this, I will need to choose a
student to help model what it looks like to go through the steps.

Aca demic, Social, and/or Linguistic


S upport during a ssessment
For students unable to finish
writing a sentence using
personification or imagery, accept
verbal response.

Unit Assessment Plan


Formative assessment:
I will keep notes of any outstanding issues or thoughts from children that come up in whole group discussions and
continue to take anecdotal records of student writing. Multiple lessons will have an exit slip that will be used to
inform instruction, on the following day, such as identifying the Muddiest point from the day (one thing that is still
unclear), or a list of features that they identified within a read aloud. During week 2, students will also be writing
diamantes or cinquains independently, which can be used as an extra measure to see whether the concepts from the
week before stuck or not. I will collect all story maps, writing checklists, self-evaluation rubrics to gauge student
progress.
S ummative a ssessment:
Using the Holt School District writing rubric and a rubric specific to fairy tales adapted from sanchezclass.com, I will
assess the students final product fairy tales. I will use an adapted poetry rubric from Routmans Writing Essentials,
page 252 to assess students chosen poems. I will not formally assess the poems that students did not choose as their
best work. I will also create a checklist to keep track of which assignments, checklists, rubrics, and exit slips I have
received from students.

Interpreting Evidence and Making Claims:


Students can look at their writing to find word choices to improve when prompted (especially to replace the
word said) and given time to revise. Most students can now use a planning tool to help organize thinking and
improve the organization of their writing. At the beginning of the year, most students were able to write a cinquain
poem following the correct format, but were able to choose from a word bank with the correct word types for each
line for that activity. Most students are able to follow the format of a cinquain or diamante poem without a model to
follow or sample words provided for each line. Many students met expectations or exceeded them for creating fairy
tales through creating a plan, developing characters, and a logical sequence of events. This was not all evident in
writing samples taken from the beginning of the year. However, for each standard and objective, there were students
who did not meet the expectations.
The percentages of students who were exceeding expectations for third grade prior to the unit has remained
consistent, although it is interesting to look at each CCSS individually. Some students may excel at organizing their
writing, but not use words and phrases as effectively as other students. There were different mixes of students
exceeding certain objectives. During my pre-assessments, I had concluded that four students were beyond grade
level in terms of the CCSS and that five would need additional support to be on track with the CCSS by the end of the
year. For CCSS.3.L.3.a, for instance, these numbers held completely accurate, but for CCSS.3.W.3.d I had only one
student exceed expectations and eight students who need additional support.
There is a wide range of abilities within my classroom; within our class we have both the highest and the
lowest students in the third grade in literacy according to multiple assessments. I experienced success with
differentiating the process for some of the learners in my classroom, with one example being the different story maps
(simple and more complex). Students responded well to this and were able to accomplish the same goals with it.
Continuing to look for ways to accomplish the same goals while meeting all of the different needs of students will be
something to work on as I continue planning for literacy instruction.

Assessment Analysis
Na me: Sarah Miller

Gra de Le ve l: 3rd grade

Common Core State Standards:

CCSS.3.W.5: With guidance and support from


peers and adults, develop and strengthen
writing as needed by planning, revising, and
editing.
CCSS.3.W.3.a: Establish a situation and introduce
a narrator and/or characters; organize an event
sequence that unfolds naturally.
CCSS.3.W.3.d: Provide a sense of closure.
CCSS.3.L.3.a: Choose words and phrases for
effect.

S chool: Elliott Elementary

Knowledge gained from Pre-assessments:


There were 4 students performing beyond grade
level whose writing included a good amount of
detail, organization, varied sentence structure and
vocabulary use, original ideas, and the key features
for the genre of text which they are writing in for
this time of the year. There were 5 students who will
need additional support to get on track to meet the
CCSS by the end of the year. In terms of writing
according to my pre-assessments, they included
very little detail, may or may not have included the
key features of the genre they are writing in, may or
may not produce original ideas, and present
repetitive or unorganized writing. Very often their
spelling interferes with understanding of the writing.

Progress made toward CCSS (Examples of each category in PowerPoint):


CCSS.3.W.5:
Exceeding: 2, 15, 16, 20
On track: 1, 3, 5, 6, 7, 8, 11, 12, 13, 18, 21
Need support: 4, 9, 10, 14, 17, 19
CCSS.3.W.3.a:
Exceeding: 1, 2, 5, 16
On track: 3, 6, 8, 9, 10, 12, 13, 15, 20, 21
Need support: 4, 7, 11, 14, 17, 18, 19
CCSS.3.W.3.d:
Exceeding: 16
On track:1, 2, 5, 7, 8, 10, 12, 13, 15, 19, 20, 21
Need support: 3, 4, 6, 9, 11, 14, 17, 18
CCSS.3.L.3.a:
Exceeding: 2, 5, 16, 20
On track: 1, 3, 6, 7, 8, 9, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 21
Need support: 4, 10, 17, 18, 19
Examples of word choices by students who are e xceeding expectations: feathered, creatures, graceful,
huddle, turquoise, golden, fierce, silver, shuffle, downy
Examples of word choices by students who are on tra ck: waddling, sliding, shaking, shiny, noticed, cuddly

Examples of word choices by students who ne ed support: cute, nice, walk, swim,
Progress made toward unit objectives:
1.

After interacting with several examples of cinquain and diamante poems, students will be able to
identify the features of each form of poetry and apply the features appropriately to their own writing as
they compose a cinquain and a diamante poem.

Exceeding: 2, 15, 16, 20

On track: 1, 3, 5, 6, 7, 8, 11, 12, 13, 18, 21

Need support: 4, 9, 10, 14, 17, 19

Those exceeding expectations did not have any word types in the wrong place and had the correct
number of words in line in their drafts. Those who are on track may have made 1-2 mistakes in the form
of the poetry, whether it was including a word type in the wrong line, or including too many words in a
certain line in their drafts. Those who need support made more than 2 mistakes in the poetry form of
cinquains and diamantes, whether it was word type or number of words per line in their drafts.
2.

After participating in several mini-lessons on poetic devices such as figurative language, rhythm,
repetition, and vivid word choice, students will be able to compose writing pieces using at least two
devices or skills.

Exceeding: 5, 13, 16, 20

On track: 1, 2, 3, 6, 11, 15, 21

Need support: 4, 7, 8, 9, 10, 12, 17, 18, 19

Half of students were able to identify sentences as including personification and imagery; half were not
directly after the mini-lesson on the two features.
Students in the exceeding expectations category included two or more poetic devices in both their
cinquain and diamante poems. Students who are considered on track included two poetic devices in
either their cinquain and diamante poems. Students who need additional support included less than
two poetic devices in both their cinquain and diamante poems.
3.

After mini-lessons on the editing and revision process, students will be able to use appropriate tools to
self-monitor and self-evaluate their writing in order to share writing with an audience.

Exceeding: 4, 8, 13, 21

On track: 1, 4, 5, 6, 7, 12, 16, 19

Need support: 3, 9, 10, 11, 14, 15, 17, 18, 20

The students needing support did not appropriately monitor, self-evaluate or use the writing process to
produce a finished product. The students who are on track were able to monitor their writing and
incorporate some revisions and edits to create a finished product. The students exceeding objectives

were able to monitor and self-evaluate, incorporate many edits and revisions and create a finished
product.
4.

After interacting with multiple examples of fairy tales and mini-lessons on developing plot and unique
characters, students will be able to plan and compose a fairy tale with a detailed beginning, middle and
satisfying ending that follows a logical sequence.

Exceeding: 1, 2, 5, 16

On track: 3, 6, 8, 9, 10, 12, 13, 15, 20, 21

Need support: 4, 7, 11, 14, 17, 18, 19

Students needing support did not meet expectations with either fairy tale prompt. They lacked
elements of organization such as introduction to characters, logical sequence, satisfactory endings, etc.
Students who are on track met the expectations with at least one of the fairy tale prompts. They may
have had unclear endings, beginnings, or character introductions in one of their pieces. The students
exceeding expectations met expectations with both of their fairy tale prompts. They had clea r
introductions, logical sequence, created a plan, and had satisfying endings with both pieces.
R ecommendations & Next Steps:
I would continue differentiating the process for some of my students. The differentiated story maps worked
very successfully. I told students up front that they would be working with different story maps, and they
seemed unfazed when I explained that they included the same information, but just looked a little bit
different. They looked very similar, and although students did question for a little bit why theirs was
different, they were able to use the story charts successfully (for the most part). Other students did not
seem to care about the difference in story charts. I will continue looking for ways to adapt the process like
this to make it easier for certain students to organize their thinking and get started writing is something I
will continue looking for opportunities to practice.
Students need continued practice with planning writing and developing logical sequence. Students need
more experience evaluating their own work so they can revise and edit. My mentor teacher and I have
discussed giving them a rubric each time they write (or often) so they can see the expectations, and then
going through the feedback with them so they can see what they need to work on.

Unit Materials

Writing Survey

1. How do you feel about spending your free time writing?

2. How do you feel about writing poetry for fun?

3. How do you feel about becoming an even better writer than you already are?

4. How do you feel if your teacher asks you to go back and change some of your writing?

5. How do you feel writing about things that could not happen in real life?

6. How do you feel if your classmates read something you wrote?

What is your favorite thing about writing?


_________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________
Is there anything you do not like about writing?
_________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________

______________

______________, _____________
______________, _____________, _____________
______________ _____________ _____________ ______________

______________

_________________________

______________
______________, _____________
______________, _____________, _____________
______________, _____________, _____________, ______________
______________, _____________, _____________
______________, _____________
______________

Name _____________________________
What features of fairy tales did you notice during Rapunzel?

What was the Muddiest Point (something you did not


understand) from todays lesson?

Name __________________________
What was the Muddiest Point (something you did not
understand) from todays lesson?

Name ____________________________
Write at least 3 words or phrases one of your classmates used
in their poem that you like:
1.
2.
3.

Write one feature of fairy tales that you were able to find in
your classmates fairy tale.

Name ________________________________
Circle the poem below that is a diamante.
Cat
Clever, cuddly

Dogs
Furry, friendly

Prowling, pouncing, purring

Barking, fetching, playing

Meow, feline, canine, bark

Friends that you need

Running, sniffing, yelping

Pets

Loveable, smart
Dog

Name one thing that makes this poem a diamante:

Now, circle the words in the poem that show repetition.


Name ________________________________
What was one word choice change you made in your writing
today?

Name ________________________________
What was at least one thing you learned about poetry this
week?

Writing Checklist for Poems


Remember, you should
Use the correct pattern for the form of poetry
you are writing
Include sensory details
Give your poem a title
Use words correctly
Use punctuation correctly
Use exciting words
Use rhythm

Writing Checklist for Fairy Tales


Remember, you should
Write an imaginative or made up story
Have a clear beginning, middle, and end
Include details about the characters
Build the plot to a climax (exciting point!)
Use exciting action words

Poetry Rubric

(Adapted from Routman Writing Essentials)


YES

Title
Follows pattern of poetry form
Uses punctuation correctly
Creative word choice
Revises final product for publishing
Ending pulls poem together
Includes at least 2 poetic devices (rhythm,
repetition, personification, rhyme,
imagery)

NO

Name ______________________________

Write a sentence using either personification or imagery.

Name _______________________________

Penguins

Assessment Checklist
S tudent

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21

C inquain

M uddiest
Point #1

Word web

I magery/
Pe rsonification
e xample

Poetry
checklist

D iamante

D iamante
E x it slip

M uddiest
Point #3

S t ory
M aps

I guana
Fa iry
t a le

Pr oblem
Fa iry tale

Fa iry Tale
C hecklist

S e lfE val
Rubric

C e lebration
E x it slip

Fairy Tale Rubric


Category
Title

4
Title is creative, sparks interest and is
related to the story and topic.

3
Title is related to the story and
topic.

Writing Process

Student devotes a lot of time and


effort to the writing process
(prewriting, drafting, reviewing, and
editing). Works hard to make the
story wonderful.
The main characters are named and
clearly described in text. Most
readers could describe the characters
accurately.
It is very easy for the reader to
understand the problem the main
characters face and why it is a
problem.
Many vivid, descriptive words are
used to tell when and where the
story took place.

Student devotes sufficient time


and effort to the writing
process (prewriting, drafting,
reviewing, and editing). Works
and gets the job done.
The main characters are named
and described. Most readers
would have some idea of what
the characters looked like.
It is fairly easy for the reader to
understand the problem the
main characters face and why it
is a problem.
Some vivid, descriptive words
are used to tell the audience
when and where the story took
place.
The solution to the character's
problem is easy to understand,
and is somewhat logical.
There is one spelling or
punctuation error in the final
draft.

Characters

Problem

Setting

Solution

Spelling &
Punctuation

Organization

Creativity

The solution to the character's


problem is easy to understand, and is
logical. There are no loose ends.
There are no spelling or punctuation
errors in the final draft. Character and
place names that the author invented
are spelled consistently throughout.
The story is very well organized. One
idea or scene follows another in a
logical sequence with clear
transitions.
The story contains many creative
details and/or descriptions that
contribute to the reader's enjoyment.
The author has really used their
imagination.

The story is pretty well


organized. One idea or scene
may seem out of place. Clear
transitions are used.
The story contains a few
creative details and/or
descriptions that contribute to
the reader's enjoyment. The
author has used their
imagination.

(Adapted from Mariely Sanchez rubric,

2
Title is present, but does not
appear to be related to the
story and topic.
Student devotes some time and
effort to the writing process
but was not very thorough.
Does enough to get by.

1
No title.

Student devotes little time and effort to


the writing process. Doesn't seem to
care.

The main characters are named.


The reader knows very little
about the characters.

It is hard to tell who the main


characters are.

It is fairly easy for the reader to


understand the problem the
main characters face but it is
not clear why it is a problem.
The reader can figure out when
and where the story took place,
but the author didn't supply
much detail.
The solution to the character's
problem is a little hard to
understand.
There are 2-3 spelling and
punctuation errors in the final
draft.

It is not clear what problem the main


characters face.

The story is a little hard to


follow. The transitions are
sometimes not clear.

Ideas and scenes seem to be randomly


arranged.

The story contains a few


creative details and/or
descriptions, but they distract
from the story. The author has
tried to use their imagination.

There is little evidence of creativity in


the story. The author does not seem to
have used much imagination.

The reader has trouble figuring out


when and where the story took place.

No solution is attempted or it is
impossible to understand.
The final draft has more than 3 spelling
and punctuation errors.

sanchezclass.com)